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CATALOGUE 



AND 



GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENT 



191 I-I9I2 









FORM OF BEQUEST 

To the Trustees of Columbia College in the City of New York I 
give and bequeath the sum of $ , to be used by said 

Trustees for the uses and purposes of said Corporation. 



CONTENTS 

Trustees 

Standing Committees 
University Council 
Officers of Administration 
Emeritus Officers . 

Administrative Board of the Summer Session . 
Administrative Board of Extension Teaching 
Board of Managers, Vanderbilt Clinic . 
Board of Managers, Sloane Maternity Hospital 
Advisory Committee on Art .... 
Members of Faculties and Teaching Staff 
General Statement 

Historical 

Organization . 

Schools and Faculties 

Divisional Organizatio 

Annotancements 
General Regulations 

Status of Students 

Registration 

Withdrawal 

Fees 

Laboratory Fees 

Summer Courses in Surveying, Mining, and Geodesy 
Deposits for Apparatus 
Students' Expenses . . . 

Committee on Employment for Students 
Appointment Committees .... 

Relations between the University and Other Institutions 
Public Lectures 
The Library . 
Book-Store 
University Commons 
Residence Halls 
Other Living Accommodations 
Public Worship and Religious Work 
Earl Hall ..... 
Medical Visitor .... 
Student Organizations . 



PAGE 
I 

2 

3 
5 
7 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 

lO 

37 
37 
38 
39 
41 
42 
42 
42 
42 
43 
43 
46 
46 
46 
47 
47 
48 
48 
51 
51 
53 
53 
54 
55 
55 
55 
56 
56 



iv CONTENTS 










PAGE 


Greek-Letter Fraternities 56 


Divisional and Departmental Statements 






57 


Introductory ....... 






57 


Anatomy 










58 


Anthropology . . • . 










60 


Architecture . 










61 


Astronomy 










65 


Bacteriology and Hygiene 










66 


Biological Chemistry 










67 


Botany .... 










70 


Chemistry 










73 


Civil Engineering 










79 


Classical Philology . 










83 


Clinical Instruction, Courses in Dermatology, Genito 




Urinary Diseases, Laryngology, Ophthalmology, Ortho 




pedic Surgery, and Otology .... 


87 


Clinical Pathology .... 








89 


Design ...... 








90 


Diseases of Children 








90 


Domestic Art and Domestic Science 








91 


Drafting 








91 


Economics and Social Science . 








92 


Education 








96 


Electrical Engineering 








lOI 


English and Comparative Literature 








104 


Fine Arts .... 








107 


Geography .... 








. 109 


Geology ..... 








no 


Germanic Languages and Literatures 








. 113 


Gynecology .... 








• "7 


History and Political Philosophy 








. 118 


Household Arts 








. 123 


Industrial Arts 








. 123 


Law 








. 123 


Municipal or Private Law . 








. 123 


Public Law and Comparative Jui 


isprudence 






. 125 


Manual Training 








. 127 


Mathematics .... 








. 127 


Mechanical Engineering . 








. 130 


Metallurgy .... 








. 132 


Mineralogy .... 








. 134 


Mining ..... 








. 135 


Music ..... 








. 137 


Nature Study . 


. 








. 140 



CONTENTS 



Departments of Instruction — Continued 
Neurology 
Obstetrics 
Oriental Languages . 

Chinese 

Indo- Iranian Languages 

Semitic Languages 
Pathology 

Pharmacology, Materia Medica, and Therapeutics 
Pharmacy 

Philosophy and Psychology 
Physical Education . 
Physics .... 

Mathematical Physics 
Physiology 
Practice of Medicine 
Religion . . 

Romance Languages and Literatures 
Shopwork .... 
Surgery ..... 
Zoology ..... 
Entrance Requirements . 
General Statement . 
Examinations . 

Application for Examination 

Examination Fee 

Restrictions Governing Credits for Examinations 

Examination Subjects 

Schedule of Examinations . 

Submission of Note-Books, Drawings, etc. 

Definitions of the Requirements in Each Subject 
Regulations for the University Degrees 

Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy 
Master of Laws 
Columbia College . 
The Faculty . 
Admission 

Advanced Standing 

To Special Courses 

Probation 
Program of Studies . 

Degree of A.B. or B.S. with Honors 

Degree of A.B. or B.S. 

Options in the Professional Schools 



140 
141 
142 
142 
142 
144 
146 

147 
148 

150 
155 
157 
159 
161 
162 
164 
165 
170 
171 
172 
176 
176 
176 
177 
177 
178 
179 
180 
182 

183 
188 
188 
193 
194 
194 

194 
104 

195 
195 
195 
196 
198 
198 



VI 



CONTENTS 



Columbia College — Continued 




Additional Credit for High Standing . 


199 


Examinations in Course ...... 


199 


Grades and Credit ....... 


200 


Advice to Students 


200 


Register of Students . 


201 


School of Law 


216 


The Faculty 


216 


Purposes of the School ....... 


216 


Requirements for Admission ...... 


216 


To the First-Year Class 


216 


To Advanced Standing ..... 


217 


Program of Studies 


217 


Curriculum ........ 


220 


Examinations 


220 


Law Library . . . . . 


221 


Register of Students 


222 


School of Medicine (College of Physicians and Surgeons) . 


230 


The Faculty 


230 


Historical Statement 


230 


Buildings, Grounds, and Equipment .... 


231 


Vanderbilt Clinic 


232 




233 


Clinics at Hospitals 


233 


Lectures 


234 


General Plan of Instruction 


234 


Clinical Clerkships 


236 


Requirements for Admission . . 


236 


Advanced Standing ...... 


237 


As Special Students ...... 


. 238 


Requirements for Graduation ..... 


. 238 


Degree of Master of Arts ...... 


. 238 


Equipment and Collections ..... 


. 238 


Course of Study ....... 


239 




. 240 


Register of Students 


. 241 


Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry 


• 249 


The Faculty 


• 249 




• 249 


Admission ........ 


. 250 


Collegiate Preparation ..... 


. 250 


Requirements without Collegiate Preparation 


. 250 


Advanced Standing 


. 250 


Special Courses 


. 251 



CONTENTS 


vii 


Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry — Continued 


PAGE 


Rules Governing Students ..... 


252 


Equipment and Collections ..... 


254 


Courses of Study ....... 


254 


Uniform Curriculiun for the First Year 


254 


Engineer of Mines 


256 


Metallurgical Engineer ..... 


257 


Civil Engineer ....... 


258 


Sanitary Engineering ..... 


259 


Electrical Engineer ...... 


260 


Mechanical Engineer ..... 


261 


Chemical Engineer 


262 


Chemist 


263 


Register of Students 


265 


Faculty of Political Science 


280 


The Faculty 


280 


General Statement . . . . . . 


280 


Courses of Instruction ...... 


281 


Yale-Columbia Courses ..... 


281 


Faculty of Philosophy . . . . . 


283 


The Faculty 


283 


General Statement ....... 


283 


Courses of Instruction ...... 


284 


Faculty of Pure Science . . . . . 


285 


The Faculty . . . . . 


285 


General Statement 


285 


Courses of Instruction 


286 


Register of Students under the FACin:-TiEs of Political Science 


1 


Philosophy, and Pure Science 


287 


Faculty of Fine Arts 


322 


Faculty 


322 




323 


Admission 


323 


Advanced Standing ....... 


323 


Non-matriculated Students . . . . . 


324 


Examinations 


324 


School of Architecture 


324 


General Statement 


. 324 


Equipment ....... 


. 324 


Admission 


32s 


Candidacy for the Degree 


325 


Students from Other Institutions 


325 


Program of Studies 


326 


Bachelor of Architecture 


326 



i^m 



CONTENTS 



Faculty of Fine Arts (School of Architecture)- 

Certificate in Architecture 

Architectural Engineering 

Landscape Architecture 

Graduate Courses 
School of Music 

General Statement 

Admission 

Degree of Bachelor of Music 

Program of Studies 
School of Design 

Admission 

Program of Studies 
Register of Students 

School of Architecture 

School of Music 
Barnard College . 
Trustees 

Standing Committees 
OflScers of Instruction 
General Statement . 
Admission 

On Probation 

Advanced Standing 

Special Students 
Matriculation, Registration, Fees 
Program of Studies 
Options in the Professional Schools 
Register of Students 
Teachers College . 
Trustees 

Faculty 

Other Officers of Instruction 
Officers of Teachers College Schools 
General Statement . 
Buildings and Equipment 
Register of Students 
College of Pharmacy 

Officers and Trustees 
Officers of Instruction 
General Statement . 
Admission 
Courses of Study 
Method of Instruction 



■Continued 



CONTENTS IX 

PACK 

College of Pharmacy — Continued 

Register of Students 392 

Summer Session 398 

Administrative Board 398 

Officers of Instruction 398 

Assistants 4<)i 

General Statement 402 

Fees 402 

Summary of Registration . 403 

Extension Teaching 403 

Administrative Board 398 

Officers of Instruction 403 

General Statement 404 

Courses of Instruction 404 

Fees 405 

Admission 4^5 

Degrees Conferred during J910-1 1 407 

Honorary Degrees 43© 

Commencement Calendar, 191 1 43 ' 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Other Provision for the 

Assistance and Reward of Students .... 432 

General Regulations 43^ 

University Fellowships 433 

Special Fellowships * . . . 433 

University Scholarships 439 

Aimual Scholarships 44^ 

Medals and Prizes 440 

Scholarships and Prizes in Columbia College . . . 443 

Award of Honors, Columbia College, 1911 . . . . 447 

Scholarships and Prizes in the School of Law . . . 447 
Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes in the College of 

Physicians and Surgeons 448 

Scholarships and Prizes in the Schools of Mines, Engineering, 

and Chemistry 45^ 

Scholarships and Fellowships in the School of Architecture 452 
Barnard College: Scholars, Honors, and Prizes . . -453 

Teachei-s College: Fellows and Scholars .... 466 

College of Pharmacy: Prizes • 4^^ 

Exchange Professors 469 

Alumni Council 47^ 

Alumni Organizations 47o 

University Publications 474 

Official Publications 474 

Columbia University Press 47^ 



CONTENTS 



University Publications — Continued 

Alumni and Student Publications 
Special Funds .... 
Academic Calendar 
Summary of Officers and Students 
Directory of Officers 
Directory of Students 
Index 



476 

479 
490 

494 
497 
518 
579 



TRUSTEES 
Chairman 

George L. Rives 69 East 79th Street 

Clerk 
John B. Pine 63 Wall Street 



Gerard Beekman 35 East 38th Street 

W. Bayard Cutting 32 Nassau Street 

Seth Low, LL.D 30 East 64th Street 

George L. Rives, LL.D 69 East 79th Street 

Lenox Smith 25 Broad Street 

Rev, Marvin R. Vincent, S.T.D 20 East 92d Street 

John B. Pine 63 WaU Street 

Hermann H. Cammann 84 William Street 

Rev. Edward B, Coe, D.D., LL.D 42 West 52d Street 

William Barclay Parsons, LL.D 60 Wall Street 

George G. DeWitt 39 West sist Street 

Francis Sedgwick Bangs 44 Wall Street 

Benjamin Aymar Sands 31 Nassau Street 

Nicholas Murray Butler, Ph.D., LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), 

Columbia University 

J. Pierpont Morgan, LL.D 3 Broad Street 

T. Matlack Chessman, M.D Garrison-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Horace W. Carpentier 108 East 37tli Street 

Marcellus Hartley Dodge 691 Fifth Avenue 

Rev. William T. Manning, S.T.D 27 West 25th Street 

Rt. Rev. David H. Greer, D.D., S.T.D 7 Gramercy Park 

Benjamin B. Lawrence, M.Sc 60 Wall Street 

WiLLARD V. King 13S Broadway 

William Fellowes Morgan Arch 5, Brooklyn Bridge 

Stephen Baker 4° Wall Street 

Treasurer 
John McLean Nash 63 Wall Street 

Office op the Trustees 63 Wall Street 



standing Committees 
1911 

[NoTK. — ^The date after each name indicates the expiration of term of ofiSce.] 
ON FINANCE 

Mr. Bangs (19 12), Chairman 
Mr. Dodge (1913) Mr. King (1915) 

Mr. Baker (1914) Mr. Sands (1916) 

on buildings and grounds 

Mk. Pine (1912), Chairman 
Mr. Sands (1913) Mr. King (1914) 

Dr. Cheesman (1915) 
The President (ex-officio) 

ON HONORS 

Mr. Parsons (1913), Chairman 
Mr. Rives (1912) Rev. Dr. Manning (1915) 

Bishop Greer (1914) Rev. Dr. Coe (1916) 

on education 

Dr. Cheesman (1916), Chairman 
Mr. Pine (1912) Mr. Parsons (1914) 

Mr. Lawrence (1913) Mr. Bangs (1915) 

Mr. Rives (ex-officio) 
The President (ex-officio) 

on the library 

The President (ex-officio), Chairman 
Mr. De Witt (1912) Mr. W. F. Morgan (19x5) 

Rev. Dr. Manning (1914) Rev. Dr. Coe (1916) 

Secretary, the Librarian 



UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

[Note.— The date after each name indicate3 the expiration of term of office.] 

The President of the University 
Faculty of Columbia College 
Dean Keppel 
Professor Thomas (1913) 
Professor Lord (1914) 

Faculty of Law 

Dean Stone 

Professor Burdick (1913) 

Professor Redfield (1914) 

Factdty of Medicine 

Dean Lambert 

Professor Huntington (1913) 

Professor Starr (1914) 

Faculty of Applied Science 

Dean Goetze 
Professor Munroe (1913) 
Professor Alexander Smith (1914) 

Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, and Pure Science 

Dean Burgess 

Associate Dean Carpenter 

Political Science 
Professor Seligman, Chairman of Committee on Instruction 
Professor Munroe Smith (19 13) 
Professor Goodnow (191 4) 

Philosophy 
Professor McCrea, Chairman of Committee on Instruction 
Professor A. H. Thorndike (1913) 
Professor WooDBRiDGE (1914) 

Pure Science 
Professor Fiske, Chairman of Committee on Instruction 
Professor Wilson (1913) 
Professor Kemp (1914) 

3 



UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Faculty of Fine Arts 
Dean Burgess 
Associate Dean Carpenter 
Professor Hamlin (1914) 

Faculty of Barnard College 

Dean Gildersleeve 
Acting Provost Trent 
Professor Robinson (191a) 

Faculty of Teachers College 
Dean Russell 
Professor Lodge (1913) 
Professor E. L. Thorndike (1914) 

College of Pharmacy 
Dean Rusby 



Summer Session and Extension Teaching 
Professor Egbert, Director 

Union Theological Seminary 
President Brown 

General Theological Seminary 
Dean Robbins 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Nicholas Murray Butler, Ph.D., J.U.D., LL.D. (Cantab.), D. Litt. 

(Oxon.) President of the University 
John W. Burgess, Ph.D., LL.D., Jur. D. 

Dean of the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, Pure 
Science, and Fine Arts 
Samuel W. Lambert, M.D. 

Dean of the Faculty of Medicine 
Frederick Arthur Goetzb, M.Sc. 

Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science, and Consulting 
Engineer 
William H. Carpenter, Ph.D. 

Associate Dean of the Faculties of Political Science, Philos- 
ophy, Pure Science, and Fine Arts 
Harlan F. Stone, A.M., LL.B. 

Dean of the Faculty of Law 
Frederick Paul Keppel, A.B. 

Dean of Columbia College 
Virginia C. Gildersleeve, Ph.D. 

Dean of Barnard College and Adviser of Women Graduate 
Students 
William T. Brewster, A.M. 

Provost of Barnard College 
Jambs Earl Russell, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Dean of Teachers College 
Henry H. Rusby, M.D. 

Dean of the College of Pharmacy 
James C. Egbert, Ph.D. 

Director of the Summer Session and of Extension Teaching 
William A. Hervey, A.M. 

Registrar of the University 
Frank Diehl Fackenthal, A.B. 

Secretary of the University 
Charles S. Daniblson 

Bursar 
Edward K. Hayt, A.M. 

Assistant Registrar and Assistant Bursar at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons 
Frank A. Dickey, A.B. 

Assistant Registrar of the University 
5 



6 OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Henry Lee Norris, M.E. 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 
Adam Leroy Jones, Ph.D. 

Chairman of Committee on Undergraduate Admissions 
Helen C. Wadelton 

Recorder 
Cornelia P. Macy 

Recorder 
Elizabeth H. Wheeler 

Recorder of the Medical Faculty 
Katharine S. Doty, A.M. 

Secretary of Barnard College 
Anna E. H. Meyer, A.B. 

Registrar of Barnard College 
Mrs. N. W. Liggett, A.B, 

Bursar of Barnard College 
Bertha L. Rockwell 

Librarian of Barnard College 
Clifford B. Upton, A.M. 

Secretary of Teachers College 
Frederick H. Sykes, Ph.D. 

Director of Technical Education 
Charles T. McFarlane, Pd.D. 

Controller of Teachers College 
Theodora George 

Registrar of Teachers College 
Cyrus Hurlburt Pomeroy 

Bursar of Teachers College 
Charles Prentice Benns, M.E. 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds in Teachers College 
Thomas D. Wood, A.M., M.D. 

College Physician, Teachers College 
IsABELLE L. Pratt 

Recorder of Teachers College 
Lucetta Daniell 

Social Director of Teachers College 
Benjamin R. Andrews 

Secretary of Schools of Industrial Arts and Household Arts in 
Teachers College 
Harriet Hawley 

Secretary to the Dean of Teachers College 
Jane Berger 

Assistant Secretary of Teachers College 
Thomas F. Main 

Secretary of the College of Pharmacy 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Edward W Run yon 

Assistant Secretary of the College of Pharmacy 
Walter B. Simpson 

Clerk of the College of Pharmacy 

Librarian of the University 

William Dawson Johnston, A.M. 

Assistant Librarians 

Frederick C. Hicks, A.M. 
J. David Thompson, A.M. 

Chaplain of the University 
Rev. Raymond C. Knox, B.D. 

Medical Director of the Gymnasium 
George Louis Meylan, A.M., M.D. 

Comptroller of Student Organizations 

Frederick Arthur Goetze, M.Sc. 

Secretary of Earl Hall 
James Myers, A.B. 

University Medical Visitor 
D. Stuart Dodge Jessup, M.D. 

Organist 

Frank E. Ward 

Director of Women's Religious Work 
Ethel Rather, Ph.D. 

Secretary for Women Graduate Students 

Emma P. Smith, A.M. 



Officers of Administration, 51 (16 
of whom are also teaching officers) 

Emeritus Officers 

Edward Curtis, M.D Emeritus Professor of Materia Medica 

and Therapeutics 

John D. Quackenbos, A.M., M.D Emeritus Professor of Rhetoric 

James W. McLane, M.D Emeritus Professor of Obstetrics 

1 For Library Staff, see page 51. 



8 OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Francis Delapield, M.D., LL.D Emeritus Professor of the 

Practice of Medicine 
Abraham Jacobi, M.D., LL.D. .Emeritus Professor of the Diseases of 

Children 

William R. Ware, LL.D Emeritus Professor of Architecture 

George M. Lefferts, M.D., M.Sc. .Emeritus Professor of Laryngology 
Arthur H. Elliott, Ph.D., F.C.S. . . Emeritus Professor of Chemistry, 

College of Pharmacy 
Frederick R. Hutton, E.M., Ph.D., Sc.D. .. .Emeritus Professor of 

Mechanical Engineering 

Charles McBurney, M.D Emeritus Professor of Surgery 

Robert F. Weir, M.D Emeritus Professor of Surgery 

John G. Curtis, M.D., LL.D Emeritus Professor of Physiology 

T. Mitchell Prudden, M.D., LL.D Emeritus Professor of 

Pathology 
John Howard Van Amringe, Ph.D., L.H.D., LL.D. . .Emeritus Professor 

of Mathematics 
Charles F. Chandler, M.D., LL.D., Sc.D. .Mitchill Professor Emeritus 

of Chemistry 
(15) 

Administrative Board of the Summer Session 

Professor James C. Egbert, Director Professor William A. Hervey 
Professor Paul Monroe Frederick P. Keppel 

Professor Frederick J. E. Woodb ridge 
(5) 

Administrative Board of Extension Teaching 

Professor James C. Egbert, Director Professor William A. Hervey 

Professor Paul Monroe Frederick P. Keppel 

Professor Frederick J. E. Woodbridge 
(5) 

Administrative Board on Instruction and Research in 
Agriculture 

Professor James C. Egbert Professor Henry R. Mussey 

Professor Earl B. Lovell Professor Robert A. Harper 

Professor Henry C. Sherman Professor O. S. Morgan, Chairman 

Professor Carlton C. Curtis Hon. Augustus S. Downing 

(8) 

Board of Managers of Vanderbilt Clinic 

Frederick W. Vanderbilt Samuel W. Lambert, M.D. 

T. Matlack Cheesman, M.D. Joseph A. Blake, M.D. 

Francis C. Wood. M.D. 
(5) 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 9 

Board of Managers of the Sloane Hospital for Women 

William D. Sloane Samuel W. Lambert, M.D. 

George L. Rives Edwin B. Cragin, M.D. 

Francis C. Wood, M.D. 
(5) 

Advisory Committee on Art 

Edwin H. Blashfield, N.A. Frank D. Millet, A.M., N.A. 
Daniel C. French, A.M., N.A. William Rutherford Mead, LL.D, 
(4) 



MEMBERS OF FACULTIES AND TEACHING STAFF 

Nicholas Murray Butler President of the University 

A.B., Columbia, 1882; A.M., 1883; Ph.D., 1884; LL.D., Syracuse, i898;Tulane, 
1901; Johns Hopkins, Princeton, Yale, and University of Pennsylvania, 1902; 
Chicago, 1903; Manchester and St. Andrews, 1905; Cambridge, 1907; Williams, 
1908; Harvard and Dartmouth, 1909; D. Litt., Oxford, 1905; J.U.D., Breslau, 
I9ii;0fficier de la Legion d'Honneur, 1906; Commander, Order of the Red Eagl» 
(Prussia), 1910; Member, American Academy of Arts and Letters, 1911. 

Professors 

John W. Burgess Ruggles Professor of Political Science and 

Constitutional Law 
A.B., Amherst, 1867; A.M., 1870: LL.D., 1884; Ph.D., Princeton, 1883; Ph.D. 
(Hon.), Leipsic, 1909; Jur. D. (Hon.), Berlin, 1910. 

Henry S. Munroe Professor of Mining 

E.M., Columbia, 1869; Ph.D., 1876; Sc.D., 1904. 

Munroe Smith Professor of Roman Law and Comparative 

Jurisprudence 
A.B., Amherst, 1874; A.M., 1880; LL.B., Columbia, 1877; LL.D, 1904: J.U.D., 
Gottingen, 1880; J.D., Louvain, 1909. 

* Frank J. Goodnow.. .Eaton Professor of Administrative Law and 

Municipal Science 
A.B., Amherst, 1879; A.M., 1S86; LL.D., 1898; LL.B.. Columbia, 1882, cum 
laude; LL.D., 1904; LL.D., Harvard, 1909. 

Richard J. H. Gottheil Professor of Rabbinical Literature and the 

Semitic Languages 

A.B., Columbia, 1881; Ph.D., Leipzig, 1886. 

Edwin R. A. Seligman. . . .McVickar Professor of Political Economy 
A.B., Columbia, 1879; A.M., 1883; LL.B., 1884; Ph.D., 1884; LL.D., 1904. 

William Henry Carpenter. . Villard Professor of Germanic Philology 

A.B., Hamilton, 1881; Ph.D., Freiburg, 1881. 

M. Allen Starr Professor of Neurology 

A.B., Princeton, 1876; A.M., 1879; Ph.D., 1884; LL.D., 1899; M.D., Columbia, 
1880; Sc.D., 1904. 

Alfred D. F. Hamlin Professor of the History of Architecture 

A.B., Amherst, 187s; A.M., 1885. 

Alfred J. Moses Professor of Mineralogy 

E.M., Columbia. 1882; Ph.D., 1890. 

3 George S. Huntington Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Trinity, 1881; A.M., 1884; M.D., Columbia, 1884; Sc.D., 1904; LL.D., 
Jefferson Medical College, 1907. 

Herbert L. Osgood Professor of History 

A.B., Amherst, 1877; A.M., 1880; LL.D., 1907; Ph.D., Columbia, 1889. 

J. McKeen Cattell Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette, 1880; A.M., 1883; LL.D., 1907; Ph.D., Leipzig, 1886; Member 
of National Academy of Sciences. 

' Absent on leave 1911-12. ' Absent on leave second half-year. 

10 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION II 

Francis M. Burdick Dwight Professor of Law 

A.B., Hamilton, 1869; LL.B., 1872; LL.D., 1895. 

George W. Kirchwey Kent Professor of Law 

A.B., Yale, 1877; LL.D., Yale, University of Cincinnati, New York University, 
1908. 

John B assett Moore . . . Hamilton Fish Professor of International Law 

and Diplomacy 

A.B., Virginia, 1880; LL.D., Yale, 1901. 
Henry Fairfield Osborn Research Professor of Zoology 

A.B., Princeton, 1877; Sc.D., 1880; LL.D., Trinity College (Hartford), 1901; 
Princeton, 1902; Columbia, 1907; Sc.D., Cambridge, 1904; Ph.D. (Hon.) Chris- 
tiania, 191 1, Member of National Academy of Sciences. 

Edward Delavan Perry Jay Professor of Greek 

A.B., Columbia, 1875; LL.D., 1904; A.M. and Ph.D., Tubingen, 1879. 

Frank Dempster Sherman Professor of Graphics 

Ph.B., Columbia, 1884. 

William A. Dunning Lieber Professor of History and Political 

Philosophy 

A.B., Columbia, 1881; A.M., 1883; Ph.D., 1885; LL.D., 1904. 

Abraham Valentine Williams Jackson Professor of Indo-Iranian 

Languages 
A.B., Columbia, 1883; A.M., 1884; L.H.D., 1885; Ph.D., 1886; LL.D., 1904. 

Adolphe Cohn . . . Professor of the Romance Languages and Literatures 
B 6s. L., Paris, 1868; LL.B., 1873; A.M., 1874; Chevalier do la Ldgion 
d'Honneur, 1900. Cavaliere della Corona d'ltalia. 

J Edmund B. Wilson Da Costa Professor of ZoSlogy 

Ph.B., Yale, 1S78; LL.D., 1901; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1881; LL.D., 1902; 
LL.D., Chicago, 1901; Sc.D., Cambridge, 1909; M.D. (Hon.), Leipsic, 1909; 

Member of National Academy of Sciences. 

James Furman Kemp Professor of Geology 

A.B., Amherst, 1881; Sc.D., 1906; E.M., Columbia, 1884; Member ofj National 

Academy of Sciences. 

Robert Peele Professor of Mining 

E.M., Columbia, 1883. 

William Hallock Professor of Physics 

A.B., Columbia, 1879; Ph.D., Wurzburg, 1881; Phar.D., National College of 
Pharmacy, 1892. 

Brander Matthews Professor of Dramatic Literature 

A. B., Columbia, 1871; LL.B., 1873; A.M.. 1874; LL.D., 1904; D.C.L., Univer- 
sity of the South, 1899; Litt. D., Yale, 1901; LL.D., Miami, 1909; Chevalier 
de la Legion d'Honneur, 1907; Member American Academy of Arts and Letters. 

Francis B. Crocker Professor of Electrical Engineering 

E.M., Columbia, 1882; Ph.D., 1895. 

Michael Idvorsky Pupin Professor of Electro-Mechanics 

and Director of Phoenix Research Laboratories 

A.B., Columbia, 1883; Sc.D., 1904; Ph.D., Berlin, 1889; Member of National 
Academy of Sciences. 

William H. Burr Professor of Civil Engineering 

C.E., Rensselaer Polytechnic, 1872. 

Henry Alfred Todd Professor of Romance Philology 

A.B., Princeton, 1876; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1885. 
3 Absent on leave second half-year. 



12 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Franklin Henry Giddings Professor of Sociology and the 

History of Civilization 

A.B., Union, 1877; A.M., 1889; Ph.D., 1897; LL.D., Oberlin, xpoo. 

George F. Canfield Professor of Law 

A.B., Harvard, 187s: LL.B., 1880. 

Thomas Scott Fiske Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Columbia, 1885; A.M., 1886; Ph.D., 1888, 

Harold Jacoby Rutherfvird Professor of Astronomy 

A.B., Columbia, 1885; Ph.D., 1895- 

'John B. Clark Professor of Political Economy 

A.B., Amherst, 1872; Ph.D., 1890; LL.D., 1897; LL.D., Princeton. 1896; 

Christiania, 191 1. 

» James Rignall Wheeler. .Professor of Greek Archseology and Art 

A.B., Vermont, 1880; LL.D., 1909; Ph.D., Harvard, 1885. 

Frank N. Cole Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Harvard, 1882; A.M. and Ph.D., 1886. 

» James Harvey Robinson Professor of History 

A.B., Harvard, 1887; A.M., 1888; Ph.D., Freiburg. 1890. 

Frederic S. Lee Dalton Professor of Physiology 

A.B., St. Lawrence, 1878; A.M., 1881; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1885. 

James Chidester Egbert Professor of Latin 

A.B., Columbia, 1881; A.M., 1882; Ph.D., 1884. 

Calvin Thomas, . .Gebhard Professor of the Germanic Languages and 

Literatures 

A.B., Michigan, 1874; A.M., 1877; LL.D., 1904. 

Edwin B. Cragin Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology 

A.B., Yale, 1882; A.M. (Hon.), 1907: M.D., Columbia, 1886. 

Bashford Dean Professor of Vertebrate Zoology 

A.B., College of the City of New York, 1886; A.M., Columbia, 1889; Ph.D., 1890. 
Chevalier de la L6gion d' Honneur, rgio. 

William Milligan Sloane Seth Low Professor of History 

A.B., Coliunbia, 1868; L.H.D., 1887; A.M. and Ph.D., Leipzig, 1876; LL.D,, 
Rutgers, 1898; Princeton, 1903; Chevalier de la Legion d'Honneur, 1910; Mem- 
ber American Academy of Arts and Letters, 

Henry Marion Howe Professor of Metallurgy 

B.S., Harvard, 1869; A.M., 1872; LL.D., 1905; B.S., Mass. Institute of 
Technology, 1871; LL.D., Lehigh, 1905. 

Earl B. Lovell Professor of Civil Engineering 

C.E., Cornell, 1891. 

' Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology 

Ph.D., Kiel, 1881; LL.D., Clark, 1909; Member of National Academy of Sciences. 

John Francis Woodhull Professor of Physical Science in Teachers 

College 
A.B., Yale, 1880; Ph,D„ Columbia, 1899. 

Franklin Thomas Baker Professor of the English Language and 

Literature in Teachers College 

A.B., Dickinson, 1885; A.M., 1889; Litt.D,. 1908; A.M., Columbia, 1900. 

Richard Elwood Dodge Professor of Geography 

in Teachers College 

A.B., Harvard, 1890; A.M., 1894. 
> Absent on leave 1911-12, • Absent on leave second half-year. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 1 3 

Virgil Prettyman Principal of Horace Mann High School with 

rank of Assistant Professor in Teachers College 

A.B.. Dickinson, 1893; A.M., 189s; Pd.D., 1905. 

James Earl Russell Barnard Professor of Education 

A.B., Cornell, 1887; Ph.D., Leipzig, 1894;' LL.D., Dickinson, 1903; LL.D., 
McGill, 1909. 

Helen Kinne Professor of Domestic Science in Teachers College 

Mrs. Mary Schenck Woolman Professor of Domestic Art in 

Teachers College 

i Frank M. McMurry Professor of Elementary Education in 

Teachers College 
Ph.D., Jena, 1889. 

Paul Monroe Professor of the History of Education in Teachers 

College 

B.S., Franklin, 1890: M.S., 1895; Ph.D., Chicago, 1897. 

Samuel Train Dutton Professor of School Administration in 

Teachers College 
A.B., Yale, 1873; A.M., 1900. 

William P. Trent Professor of English Literature 

M.A., Virginia, 1884; LL.D., Wake Forest, 1899; D.C.L,, University of the 
South, 1905. 

Herbert G. Lord Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Amherst, 1871; A.M., 1900. 

Nelson Glenn McCrea Anthon Professor of the Latin Language 

and Literature 
A.B., Columbia, 1885; A.M., 1886; Ph.D., 1888. 

Gonzalez Lodge . . . Professor of Latin and Greek in Teachers College 
A.B., Johns Hopkins, 1883; Ph.D., 1886; LL.D., Franklin and Marshall, 1901. 

Clarence H. Young Professor of Greek 

A.B., Columbia, 1888; A.M., 1889; Ph.D., 1891. 

Livingston Farrand Professor of Anthropology 

A.B., Princeton, 1888; A.M., 1891; M.D., Columbia, 1891. 

James Maclay Professor of Mathematics 

C.E., Columbia, 1888; Ph.D., 1899. 

Marston Taylor Bogert Professor of Organic Chemistry 

A.B., Columbia, 1890; Ph.B., 1894; LL.D., Clark, 1909. 

J. Livingston Rutgers Morgan Professor of Physical Chemistry 

B.S., Rutgers, 1893; A.M. and Ph.D., Leipzig, 1895. 

Henry E. Crampton Professor of Zoology 

A.B., Columbia. 1893; Ph.D., 1899- 
Edward Lee Thorndike. . . .Professor of Educational Psychology in 

Teachers College 
A.B., Wesleyan, 1895; A.B., Harvard, 1896; A.M., 1897; Ph.D., Columbia, 1898. 

Charles Hubert Farnsworth Associate Professor of School Music 

in Teachers College 

Henry S. Redfield Nash Professor of Law 

A.B., Amherst, 1877; A.M., 1887; LL.D., 1901. 

David Eugene Smith. .Professor of Mathematics in Teachers College 
Ph.B.. Syracuse, 1881; Ph.M., 1884; Ph.D., 1887: LL.D., 1905; M.Pd.. 
Michigan State Normal, 1898. 

* Absent on leave second half-year. 



14 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Thomas Denison Wood Professor of Physical Education 

A.B., Oberlin, 1888; A.M., 1891; M.D., Coltunbia, 1891. 

Charles Thaddeus Terry Professor of Law 

A.B., Williams, 1889; LL.B., Columbia, 1893. 

Walter B. James Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Yale, 1879; M.D., Columbia, 1883; LL.D., 1904; A.M. (Hon.), Yale, 1906. 

William J. Gies Professor of Biological Chemistry 

B.S., Pennsylvania College, 1893: M.S., 1896; Ph.B., Yale, 1894; Ph.D., 1897. 

'William T. Brewster Professor of English 

A.B., Harvard, 1892; A.M., 1893. 

George Clinton Densmore Odell Professor of English 

A.B., Columbia, 1889; A.M., 1890; Ph.D., 1893. 

Charles Knapp Professor of Classical Philology 

A.B., Columbia, 1887: A.M., 1888; Ph.D., 1890. 

3 L. Emmett Holt. . . . Carpentier Professor of the Diseases of Children 
A.B., Rochester, 1875; A.M., 1878; M.D., Columbia, 1880; Sc.D., 1904. 

Amadeus W. Grabau Professor of Palaeontology 

S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1896; S.M., Harvard, 1898; S.D., 
1900. 

Henry Rogers Seager Professor of Political Economy 

Ph.B., Michigan, 1890; Ph.D., Pennsylvania, 1894. 

Henry L. Moore Professor of Political Economy 

A.B., Randolph-Macon, 1892; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1896. 

John Dyneley Prince Professor of Semitic Languages 

A.B., Columbia, 1888; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1892. 

Frederick James Eugene Woodbridge Johnsonian Professor of 

Philosophy 
A.B., Amherst, 1889; A.M., 1898; LL.D., 1903. 

Friedrich Hirth Dean Lung Professor of Chinese 

A.M. and Ph.D., Rostock, 1869. 

Felix Adler Professor of Social and Political Ethics 

A.B., Columbia, 1870; Ph.D., Heidelberg, 1873. 

Julius Sachs Professor of Secondary Education in Teachers College 

A.B., Columbia, 1867; A.M., 1871; Ph.D., Rostock, 1871. 

The Very Reverend Wilford L. Robbins, D.D Dean of the General 

Theological Seminary 
A.B., Amherst, 1881; A.M., 1884; B.D., Episcopal Theol. School, 1887; D.D., 
St. Stephen's, 1891; Amherst, 1903; Princeton, 1908; LL.D., Hobart, 1905. 

Ralph Edward Mayer. .Associate Professor of Engineering Draughting 

C.E., Columbia, 1879. 

Herbert Maule Richards Professor of Botany 

B.S., Harvard, 1891; Sc.D., 1895. 

Gary N. Calkins Professor of Protozoology 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1890; Ph.D., Columbia, 1898. 

Philip Hanson Hiss, Jr Professor of Bacteriology 

A.B., Johns Hopkins, 1891; M.D., Columbia, 189s. 

Margaret E. Maltby Assistant Professor of Physics in Barnard 

College 

A.B., Oberlin, 1882; A.M., 1891; B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
1891; Ph.D., Gottingen, 1895. 

• Absent on leave ipn 12. 3 Absent on leave second half-year. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 15 

Cassius Jackson Keyser Adrain Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Missoiiri, 1892; A.M., Columbia, 1896; Ph.D., 1901. 
' Charles Augustus Strong Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Rochester, 1884; A.B., Harvard, 1885. 

Marshall H. Saville Loubat Professor of American Archaeology 

George L. Meylan Associate Professor of Physical Education and 

Medical Director of the Gymnasium 

M.D., New York University, 1896; B.S., Harvard, 1902; A.M., Columbia, 1904. 

Elijah Wu^liam B agster-Collins . . Associate Professor of German in 

Teachers College 

A.B., Brown, 1897; A.M., Columbia, 1898. 

Maurice A. Bigelow Professor of Biology in Teachers College 

B.S., Ohio Wesleyan, 1894; M.S., Northwestern, 1896; Ph.D., Harvard, 1901. 

Frederick H. Sykes Director of Technical Education and 

Professor in Teachers College 

A.B., Toronto, 1885; A.M., 1886; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1894. 

' Henry Carr Pearson Principal of Horace Mann Elementary 

School with rank of Assistant 
Professor in Teachers College 
A.6., Harvard, 1893. 

Joseph A. Blake Professor of Surgery 

A.B., Yale, 1885; Ph.B., 1886; M.A. (Hon.), 1909; M.D., Columbia, 1889. 

Samuel W. Lambert Professor of Apphed Therapeutics 

A.B., Yale, 1880; Ph.B., 1882; M.A. (Hon.), 1905; M.D., Columbia, 1885. 

George E. Brewer Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A.B., Hamilton, 1881; A.M., 1882; M.D., Buffalo, 1884; M.D., Harvard, 1885. 

Virgil P. Gibney Professor of Orthopasdic Surgery 

A.B., Kentucky, 1869; A.M., 1872; LL.D., 1899; M.D., Bellevue, 1871. 

William K. Simpson Professor of Larvngoloev 

M.D., Columbia, 1880. J >= sj 

Arnold H. Knapp Professor of Ophthalmology 

A.B.. Harvard, 1889; M.D., Coltmibia, 1892, 

GoRHAM Bacon Professor of Otology 

A.B.. Harvard, 187s; M.D., Bellevue, 1878. 

James R. Ha yden Professor of Genito-Urinary Diseases 

M.D., Columbia, 1884. 

"Hermann T. Vulte Assistant Professor of Domestic Science in 

Teachers College 

Ph.B., Columbia, 1881; Ph.D., 1885. 

Francis Carter Wood Professor of Clinical Pathology 

B.S., Ohio State, 1891; M.D., Columbia, 1894. 

Lea McIlvaine Luquer Assistant Professor of Mineralogy 

C.E., Columbia, 1887; Ph.D., 1894. 

Louis Auguste Loiseaux Assistant Professor of the Romance 

„ „ . Languages and Literatures 

B.S., Dijon, 1894. 

3 William Addison Hervey Associate Professor of the Germanic 

Languages and Literatures 
A.B„ Columbia, 1893; A.M., 1894. 

> Absent on leave 1911-12. 2 Absent on leave first half-year. 

^Absent on leave second half-year. 



l6 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Rudolf Tombo, Jr Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages 

and Literatures 
B.S., College of the City of New York. 189s; M.S., 1899; A.M.. Columbia. 1898; 
Ph.D., 1901. 

John Angus MacVannel . . Professor of the Philosophy of Education 

in Teachers College 
A.B.. Toronto, 1893; A.M., 1894; Ph.D., Columbia, 1898. 

Russell Burton-Opitz Associate Professor of Physiology 

M.D., Chicago, 189s; B.S., 1898; M.S., 1902; Ph.D., 1905. 

' George N. Olcott Associate Professor of Latin 

A.B.. Columbia, 1893; Ph.D., 1899. 
Thomas Hunt Morgan Professor of Experimental Zoology 

B.S., State College of Kentucky, 1886; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1891; Member 
of National Academy of Sciences. 

2 George Stuart Fullerton Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., jPennsylvania, 1879; M.A., 1883; B.D., Yale, 1883; Ph.D., Muhlenburg, 
1892; LL.D., 1900, 

Jefferson B. Fletcher Professor of Comparative Literature 

A.B., Harvard, 1887; A.M., 1889. 

Harry McMahon Painter Professor of Clinical Obstetrics 

A.B., Yale, 1884; Ph.B., 1885; M.D., Columbia. 1888. 

Charles Lane Poor Professor of Celestial Mechanics 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1886; M.S., 1890; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins. 
1892. 

Cornelius Rubner Professor of Music 

Mus. Doc, George Washington, 1907. 

2 Arthur Wesley Dow. . .Professor of Fine Arts in Teachers College 

3 John Dewey Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Vermont. 1879; LL.D., 1910; Ph.D.. Johns Hopkins, 1884; LL.D., 
Wisconsin, 1904; Member of National Academy of Sciences. 

Henry H. Rusby Professor of Materia Medica in the College 

of Pharmacy 
M.D., University Medical College of New York, 1884. 

George C. Diekman Professor of Pharmacy in the College of 

Pharmacy 
Ph.G., New York College of Pharmacy, 1888; M.D., Columbia. 1901. 

John Oehler Assistant Professor of Chemistry in the College 

of Pharmacy 
Ph.G., New York College of Pharmacy, 1879. 

Henry Clapp Sherman Professor of Food Chemistry 

B.S., Maryland Agricultural College, 1893; A.M., Columbia, 1896; Ph.D., 1897. 

William Robert Shepherd Professor of History 

A.B., Columbia, 1893; A.M., 1894; Ph.D., 1896. 

"James T. Shotwell Professor of History 

A.B., Toronto, 1898; Ph.D., Columbia, 1903. 

George W. Botsford Professor of History 

A.B., Nebraska, 1884; A.M., 1889; Ph.D., Cornell, 1891. 

Albert P. Wills Professor of Mathematical Physics 

B.E.E., Tufts, 1894; Ph.D., Clark, 1897; Sc.D,, Tufts, 1911. 

* Absent on leave 1911-12. ' Absent on leave first half-year. 

* Absent on leave second half-year. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 1 7 

3 Robert Sessions Woodworth Professor of Psychology 

A.B., Amherst, 1891; A.B., Harvard, 1896; A.M., 1897; Ph.D., Columbia, 1899. 

Bern B . Gallaudet Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Trinity, 1880; A.M., 1883; M.D., Columbia, 1884. 

Samuel A. Tucker Assistant Professor of Electro-Chemistry 

Ph.B., Columbia, 1895. 

Henry Bedinger Mitchell Professor of Mathematics 

E.E., Columbia, 1898; A.M., 1900. 

Vladimir G. Simkhovitch Associate Professor of Economic History 

Ph.D., Halle-Wittenberg, 1898. 

Edward Thomas Devine Professor of Social Economy 

B.A., Cornell College, Iowa, 1887; M.A., 1890; LL.D., 1904; Ph.D., Pennsyl- 
vania, 1895. 

Thomas Hastings Director of Atelier 

Member of American Academy of Arts and Letters. 

Frank W. Jackson Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Yale, 1876; M.D., Columbia, 1879. 

Adolph Black Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 

C.E., Columbia, 1894. 

John Henry Larkin Assistant Professor of Pathology 

A.B., Manhattan, 1891; M.D., Columbia, 1894. 

Charles Edward Lucke Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.. College of the City of New York, 1895; M.S., New York University, 1899; 
Ph.D., Columbia, 1902. 

Edward Kasner Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1896; A.M.. Columbia, 1897; Ph.D., 1899- 

Ashley Horace Thorndike Professor of English 

A.B., Wesleyan, 1893., L.H.D., 1909; A.M., Harvard, 1896; Ph.D., 1898. 

Walter Rautenstrauch Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Missouri, 1902; M.S., Maine, 1903. 

Henry Johnson Professor of History in Teachers College 

B.L., Minnesota, 1889; A.M., Columbia, looa. 

Mary Adelaide Nutting Professor of Nursing in Teachers College 

Edward R. Smith Reference Librarian, Avery Architectural 

Library 

A.B., Amherst, 1876. 

Edward Robinson •. Director of the Metropolitan 

Museum of Art 
A.B., Harvard, 1879; LL.D., Aberdeen, 1905; Litt.D., Columbia, 1911. 

Nathaniel Lord Britton Director of the New York Botanical 

Garden 

E.M., Columbia, 1879; Ph.D., 1881; Sc.D., 1904. 

Anton Vorisek Professor of Analytical Chemistry in the 

College of Pharmacy 
Phar.G., New York College of Pharmacy, 1898; Phar.D., 1902. 

Frederick Arthur Goetze Dean of the Faculty of Applied 

Science and Consulting Engineer 

M.Sc, Columbia, 1905. 

Frederick Peterson Professor of Psychiatry 

M.D., Buffalo, 1879; Ph.D., Niagara, 1893. 

3 Absent on leave second half-year. 



18 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

James D. Voorhees Assistant Professor of Obstetrics 

A.B., Princeton, 1890; A.M., 1893; M.D., Columbia, 1893. 

Royal Whitman Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery 

M.D.. Harvard, 1882. 

George R. Lockwood Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., College of the City of New York, 1881; M.D., Columbia, 1884. 
William K. Draper Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Harvard, 188s; M.D., Columbia, 1888. 

Van Horne Norrie Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Columbia, 1885; M.D., 1889. 

Daniel Jordan Assistant Professor of the Romance 

Languages and Literatures 
B.S., University of France, 1888; Pd.B., University of the State of New York, 
1893. 

Arthur F. J. Remy ..Assistant Professor of Germanic Philology 

, A.B., College of the City of New York, 1890; A.M., Columbia, 1897; Ph.D., 1901 . 

William Campbell Associate Professor of Metallurgy 

B.S., Durham College of Science, 1898; Sc.D., 1905; M.Sc, Royal School of 
Mines, 1903; Ph.D., Columbia, 1903; A.M., 1905. 

William Pepperrell Montague Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B.. Harvard, 1896; A.M., 1897; Ph.D., 1898. 

William W. Lawrence Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Bowdoin, 1898; A.M., Harvard, 1900; Ph.D., 1903. 

James Howard McGregor Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Ohio State, 1894; A.M., Columbia, 1896; Ph.D., 1899. 

Charles A. Beard Associate Professor of Politics 

Ph.B., De Pauw, 1898; A.M., Columbia, 1903; Ph.D., 1904. 

' Dickinson S. Miller .Professor of Philosophy 

A.B. and A.M., Harvard, 1892; Ph.D., Halle, 1893. 

Grace A. Hubbard Associate Professor of English in Barnard College 

A.B., Smith, 1887; A.M., Cornell, 1893. 

Nathan Abbott Professor of Law 

A.B., Yale, 1877; LL.B., Boston University, 1893. 

Simon Baruch Professor of Hydrotherapy 

M.D., Virginia, 1862. 

Samuel McCune Lindsay Professor of Social Legislation 

Ph.B., University of Pennsylvania, 1889; LL.D., 1909; Ph.D., Halle, 1892. 

William Mansfield, Phar.D Professor of Pharmacognosy in the 

College of Pharmacy 

George D. Strayer. .' Professor of Educational Administration 

in Teachers College 
A.B., Johns Hopkins, 1903; Ph.D., Columbia, 1905. 

Henry Suzzallo Professor of the Philosophy of Education 

in Teachers College 
A.B., Stanford, 1899; A.M., Columbia, 1902; Ph.D., 1905. 

Hermann von W. Schulte Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

A.B., Trinity, 1897: M.D., Columbia, 1902. 

George T. Jackson Professor of Dermatology 

M.D., Columbia, 1878. 

' Absent on leave 1911-12. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 1 9 

Kenyon Cox, N. A Professor of Painting 

Member, American Academy of Arts and Letters. 

Daniel Chester French, N.A Professor of Sculpture 

A.M., Dartmouth ; Member, American Academy of Arts and Letters. 

Rev. Francis Brown, D.D. . President of the Union Theological Seminary 

A.B., Dartmouth, 1870; A.M., 1873; Ph.D., Hamilton, 1884; D.D., Dartmouth, 
1884; Yale, 1894; Glasgow, 1901; Williams, 1908; Harvard, 1909; Litt.D., Ox- 
ford, igoi; LL. D. , Dartmouth, 1901, 

Edward Lawrence Kurtz Assistant Professor of Mining 

E.M.. Columbia, 1893. 

Carlton Clarence Curtis Associate Professor of Botany 

A.B., Syracuse, 1889; Ph.D., 1893; A.M., Columbia. 1892. 
S. Alfred Mitchell Assistant Professor of Astronomy 

A.M., Queen's, 1894; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1898. 

William R. Williams Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

and Therapeutics 
A.B., Williams, 1889; A.M., 1892; M.D., Columbia, 1895. 

Arthur L. Walker Professor of Metallurgy 

E.M., Columbia, 1883. 

Lucius W. Hotchkiss Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A.B., Columbia, 1881; M.D., 1884. 

John B. Walker Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A.B., Harvard, 1884; M.D., 1888. 

Charles North Dowd Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A.B., Williams, 1879; A.M., 1883; M.D., Columbia, 1886. 

Augustus B. Wadsworth Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1893; M.D., Columbia, 1896. 

Theodore C. Janeway. . . .Bard Professor of the Practice of Medicine 
Ph.B., Yale, 1892; M.D., Columbia, 1895. 

Evan M. Evans Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.S., Princeton, 1892; M.D., Columbia, 1895. 

Charles H. Peck Professor of Clinical Surgery 

M.D., Columbia, 1892. 

Marie Reimer. . . .Associate Professor of Chemistry in Barnard College 
Ph. D., Bryn Mawr, 1904. 

George B, Pegram. Assistant Professor of Physics 

A.B., Trinity (N.C.), 189s; Ph.D., Columbia, 1903. 

Charles P. Warren Assistant Professor of Architecture 

Ph.B., Columbia, 1890; A.M., 1892. 

Bergen Davis Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S., Rutgers, 1896; A.M., Columbia, 1900; Ph.D., 1901. 

Karl Max Vogel Assistant Professor of Clinical Pathology 

Ph.G., New York College of Pharmacy, 1896; M.D., Columbia, 1900. 

John Erskine Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Columbia, 1900; A.M., 1901; Ph.D., 1903. 

William D. Guthrie Professor of Law 

A.M. (Hon.), Yale, 1904. 

William Dawson Johnston Librarian of the University 

A.B., Brown, 1893; A.M., Harvard, 1898; Litt.D., Rutgers, 1911. 



20 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Adam Lbroy Jones Chairman of Committee on Undergraduate 

Admissions and Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., Williams, 1895: Ph.D., Columbia, 1898, 

William G. MacCallum Professor of Pathology 

A.B., Toronto, 1894; M.D., Johns Hopkins, 1897. 

Henry Raymond Mussey Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., Beloit, 1900; Ph.D., Columbia, 1905. 

Naomi Norsworthy Assistant Prof essor of Educational Psychology in 

Teachers College 

B.S. (in Education), Columbia, 1901; Ph.D., 1904. 

Hugh Angus Stewart .Assistant Professor of Pathology 

M.B., Ch. B., Edinburgh, 1904: M.R.C.P., 1906; M.D., 1907. 

John W. Alexander, N.A President of the National Academy of 

Design 

Member of American Academy of Arts and Letters. 

Raymond Weeks Professor of the Romance Languages 

and Literatures 
A.B., Harvard, 1890; A.M., 1891; Ph.D., 1897. 

Frederick P. Keppel Dean of Columbia College 

A.B., Columbia, 1898; Chevalier de la L6gion d'Honneur, 1911. 

David Bovaird, Jr Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Princeton, 1889; M.D., Columbia, 1893. 

Nathaniel B. Potter Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Harvard, 1890; M.D., 1896. 

Daniel Gregory Mason Assistant Professor of Music 

A.B., Harvard, 1895. 

Charles H. Burnside Assistant Professor of Mechanics 

B.S., Columbia, i8g8; A.M., 1899. 

James A. Miller Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Princeton, 1893; A.M., 1894; M.D., Columbia, 1899. 

Wilhelm a. Braun Associate Professor of the Germanic Languages 

and Literatures 
A.B„ Toronto, 189s; Ph.D., Columbia, 1903. 

Morton Arendt Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

E.E., Columbia, 1898. 

Tracy E. Hazen Assistant Professor of Botany 

A.B., Vermont, 1897; A.M., Columbia. 1899; Ph.D., 1900. 

Charles P. Berkey Assistant Professor of Geology 

B.S., Minnesota, 1892; M.S., 1893; Ph.D., 1897. 

Raymond C. Osburn Assistant Professor of Zoology 

B.S., Ohio State, 1898; M.S., 1900; Ph.D., Columbia, 1906. 

John L. Gerig Assistant Professor of Celtic 

A.B., Missouri, 1898; A.M., 1899; Ph.D., 1902. 

Harry M. Ayres Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Harvard, 1902; Ph.D., 1908. 

Camille Fontaine Assistant Professor of the Romance Languages 

and Literatures 

B. ha L., Univ. of Paris, 187s; B. en Dr., 1877; Lie. en Dr., 1878. 

Charles C. Grove Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

A.B., Pennsylvania State College, 1900: A.M., 1903; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 
1906. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 21 

John Harold Morecroft. .Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

E.E., Syracuse, 1904; B.S., 1907. 

Algernon De V. Tassin Assistant Professor of English 

A.B., Harvard, 1892; A.M., 1893. 

Carlton H, Hayes Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Columbia, 1904; A.M., 190s; Ph.D., 1909. 

Virginia C. Gildersleeve . . . Dean of Barnard College and Professor of 

English 

A.B., Columbia, 1899; A.M., 1900; Ph.D., 1908. 

William Benjamin Fixe Professor of Mathematics 

Ph.B., Cornell, 1892; Ph.D.. 1901. 

Herbert E. Hawkes Professor of Mathematics 

A.B,. Yale, 1896; Ph.D., 1900. 

George Philip Krapp Professor of English 

A.B., Wittenberg, 1894; A.M., 1897; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1899. 

Dean Putnam Lockwood Assistant Professor of Classical Philology 

A.B., Harvard, 1903; A.M., 1904; Ph.D., 1907. 

Frank Gardner Moore Professor of Classical Philology 

A.B.. Yale. 1886; Ph.D., 1890. , 

Walter Irvine Slighter Professor of Electrical Engineering 

E. E., Columbia. 1896, 

Harlan F. Stone Professor of Law 

B.S., Amherst. 1894; A.M., 1900; LL.B., Columbia, 1898. 

La Rue Van Hook Associate Professor of Classical Philology 

A.B., Michigan, 1899; Ph.D.. Chicago, 1904. 

George V. Wendell Professor of Physics 

B.S., Mass. Inst, of Tech., 1892; Ph.D., Leipzig, 1898. 

Milton C. Whitaker Professor of Engineering Chemistry 

B.S., University of Colorado, 1897; M.S., 1899. 

J. Paul Jones Williams Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S., Pennsylvania, 1898; M.S., 1899; C.E., 1908. 

Curt P. Wimmer Assistant Professor of Pharmacy in the College of 

Pharmacy 
Phar. G., New York College of Pharmacy, 1902; Phar. D., 1904; A.M., Colum- 
bia, 1909. 

Frederick G. Bonser Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts in 

Teachers College 

B.S., Illinois, 1901; M.S., 1902; Ph.D., Columbia, 1911. 

Anna M. Coolev. . . .Assistant Professor of Household Arts in Teachers 

College 
B.S., Columbia, 1903; Bachelor's Diploma. Teachers College, 1903; Diploma, 
New York Normal College, 1893; Hunter Kindergarten Training School, 1894. 

Jane T. Fales Assistant Professor of Household Arts in Teachers 

College 
Diploma, Teachers College. 1906; B.S.. Columbia. 1907. 

Frederic Ernest Farrington Associate Professor of Education in 

Teachers College 

A.B., Harvard. 1894; A.M., Columbia, 1902; Ph.D., 1904. 

Grace Fulmer Assistant Professor of Kindergarten Education in 

Teachers College 
Diploma, Chicago Kindergarten College, 1893. 



22 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Patty S. Hill Assistant Professor of Kindergarten Education in 

Teachers College 
Diploma, Louisville Free Kindergarten Association Training School, 1888. 

AzuBAH J. Latham. . . .Assistant Professor of Oral English in Teachers 

College 

B.A., Boston University, 1880; Diploma, Boston School of Expression, 1890. 

William H. McCastline.. .Assistant Professor of Physical Education in 

Teachers College 

M.D., Columbia, 1903. 

William Noyes Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts in Teachers 

College 

A.B., Amherst, 1884; A.M., 1905. 

Mrs. Mary D, Swartz Rose Assistant Professor of Household Arts 

in Teachers College 
B.L., Dennison, 1901; Diploma, Mechanics Institute, Rochester, 1902; B.S., 
Columbia, 1906; Ph.D., Yale, 1909; Diploma, Teachers College, 1906. 

Henry A. Ruger. . . .Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology in 

Teachers College 
A.B., Beloit, 1895; A.M., Chicago, 1905; Ph.D., Columbia, 1910. 

Clifford B. Upton Assistant Professor of Mathematics in Teachers 

College 
A.B., Michigan, 1902; A.M., Columbia, 1907; Master's Diploma, Teachers Col- 
lege, 1907. 

May B. Van Arsdale Assistant Professor of Household Arts in 

Teachers College 
B.S., Columbia, 1905; Diploma, Teachers College, 1893. 

LaMont a. Warner Assistant Professor of Household Arts in 

Teachers College 
Diploma, Pratt Institute, 1898. 

J. Ramsay Hunt.. ..Chief of Clinic and Associate Professor of Neurology 

M.D., Pennsylvania, 1893. 

Charles N. B. Camac Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine 

M.D., Pennsylvania, 1895. 

Charles A. Harriman Assistant Professor of Architecture 

Everett J. Hall Assistant Professor of Assaying 

Floyd J. Metzger Assistant Professor of Analytical Chemistry 

Ph.B., Buchtel, 1899; Ph.D., Columbia, 1902. 

Harry L. Parr Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

A.B,, Columbia, 1902; Mech.E., 1904. 

Samuel Osgood Miller Assistant Professor of Drawing 

C.E., Columbia, 1895. 

Edward F. Kern Assistant Professor of Metallurgy 

B.S., Tennessee, 1897; Ph.D., Columbia, 1901. .& 

Hal T. Beans Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Nebraska, 1899; A.M., 1900; Ph.D., Columbia, 1904. 

Alvan a. Tenney Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Columbia, 1898; A.M., 1899; Ph.D., 1907.. 

Charles W. Thomas Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 
Mech. E., Stevens Inst, of Technology, 1884. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 23 

Eugene E. Agger Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Cincinnati, 1901; A.M., 1902; Ph.D., Columbia, 1907. 

Robert L. Schuyler Assistant Professor of History 

A.B., Columbia, 1903; A.M., 1904; Ph.D., 1909. 

Henry V. Arney .... Professor of Chemistry in the College of Pharmacy 

Ph.M., Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, 1889; Ph.D., Gottingen, 1896. 

Charles Sears Baldwin Professor of Rhetoric and English 

Composition 
A.B., Columbia, 1888; A.M., 1889; Ph.D., 1894. 

Alon Bement Assistant Professor of Fine Arts in Teachers College 

A.B., Stanford, 1896; Ph.D., Chicago, 1911. 

Arthur H. Blanchard Professor of Highway Engineering 

C.E., Brown, 1890; A.M., Columbia, 1902. 

Robert E. Chaddock Assistant Professor of Statistics 

A.B., Wooster College, 1900; A.M., Columbia, 1906; Ph.D., 1908. 

Grace A. Cornell Assistant Professor of Fine Arts in 

Teachers College 

Thomas B. Freas Assistant Professor of Chemistry and 

Curator of the Chandler Museum 
A.B., Stanford, 1896; Ph.D., Chicago, 1911. 

Willystine Goodsell Assistant Professor of the History 

of Education in Teachers College 
B.S., Columbia, 1905; A.M., 1906; Ph.D., 1910. 

Robert A. Harper Torrey Professor of Botany 

A.B., Oberlin, 1886; A.M., 1891; Ph.D., Bonn, 1896. 

MiLO B. Hillegas Assistant Professor of Elementary 

Education in Teachers College 

Ph.B., Rochester, 1897- 

William H. Kilpatrick Assistant Professor of the History of 

Education in Teachers College 
A.B., Mercer, 1891; A.M., 1892. 

A. Arthur Livingston Assistant Professor of the Romance 

Languages and Literatures 
A.B., Amherst, 1904; Ph.D., Columbia, 1911. 

Warfield Theobald Longcope Assistant Professor of the Practice 

of Medicine 

M.D., Johns Hopkins, 1901. 

William G. Marquette Associate Professor of Botany 

Ph.G., Northwestern, 1899; B.S., Wisconsin, 1903; Ph.D., 1907. 

O. S. Morgan Professor of Agriculture 

A.B., Illinois, 1905; M.S.A., Cornell, 1907; Ph.D., 1909. 

Frank Henry Pike Assistant Professor of Physiology 

A.B., Indiana, 1903; Ph.D., Chicago, 1907- 

Alexander Smith Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Edinburgh, 1886; Ph.D., Munich, 1889. 

William H. Welker Assistant Professor of Biological Chemistry 

A.C., Lehigh, 1904; Ph.D.. Columbia, 1908. 

Gustave Lanson, Litt. D Visiting Professor of French Literature 

for the year 1911-12 
Professor of French Literature in the University of Paris. 



24 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Josef Schick, Ph.D Kaiser Wilhelm Prof essor of German History 

and Institutions for the year 1911-12 
Professor of English Philology in the University of Munich. 

Paul S. Reinsch, Ph.D Theodore Roosevelt Professor of American 

History and Institutions in the University 
of Berlin for the year 1911-12 
Professor of Political Science in the University of Wisconsin. 
(288) 

Special Lecturers for 1911-12 

Sir Frederick Pollock, LL.D., D.C.L Lecturer on the Carpentier 

Foundation 
Honorary Fellow of Corpus Christi College, Oxford; Bencher, Lincoln's Inn. 

Jacques Hadamard, Ph.D., Sc.D., LL.D Non-resident Lecturer 

Professor of Analytical and Higher Mechanics in the College of France, Paris. 

W. L. Johannsen, Ph.D Non-resident Lecturer 

Professor of Plant Physiology in the University of Copenhagen. 

(3) 

Clinical Professors 

Francis P. Kinnicutt Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Harvard, 1868; A.M., 1872; M.D., Columbia. 1871. 

Frank Hartley Professor of Clinical Surgery 

A.B., Princeton, 1877; LL.D., 1909; M.D., Columbia, 1880. 

John S. Thacher Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Yale, 1877; M.D., Columbia, 1880. 

Walter F. Chappell Professor of Clinical Laryngology 

M.D., University of Toronto. 1879. 

Porter F. Chambers Professor of Clinical Gynecology 

M.D., Bellevue Hospital Medical College, 1876. 

Francis Huber Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1873; M.D., College of Physicians and 
Surgeons, 1877. 

Alexander B. Johnson Professor of Clinical Surgery 

Ph.B., Yale. 1882; M.D., Columbia, 1885. 

Robert Lewis, Jr Professor of Clinical Otology 

M.D., Columbia, 1885. 

Otto G. T. Kiliani Professor of Clinical Surgery 

M.D., Halle, 1888. 

Jacob Kaufmann Professor of Clinical Medicine 

M.D., Strassburg, 1885. 

Rudolf C. Denig Professor of CHnical Ophthalmology 

M.D., Wfirzburg, 1891. 

Nathan E. Brill Professor of CHnical Medicine 

M.D., New York University, 1880. 

Arpad G. Gerster Professor of Clinical Surgery 

M.D., Vienna, 1872. 

Frederick Kammerer Professor of Clinical Surgery 

M.D., Freiburg, 1889. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 25 

Emanuel Libman Professor of Clinical Medicine 

A.B., College of the City of New York, 1891; M.D., Columbia, 1894. 

NoRBERT Stadtmuller Professor of Clinical Medicine 

M.D., Munich, 1889. 
(16) 

Associates 

Robert Abbb Associate in Clinical Surgery 

A.B., College of the City of New York, 1870; M.D., Columbia, 1874. 

Frank R. Oastler Chief of Clinic and Associate in Gynecology 

A.B., Yale, 1891; M.D., Columbia, 1894. 

Linnaeus Edford La Fetra Chief of Clinic and Associate in 

Diseases of Children 
A.B., Wesleyan, 1891; M.D., Columbia, 1894. 

Walter A. Bastedo .... Associate in Pharmacology and Therapeutics 
Ph.G., New York College of Pharmacy, 1894; M.D., Columbia, 1899. 

William C. Clarke Associate in Surgery 

M.D., Columbia, 1899. 

Henry S. Patterson Associate in Applied Therapeutics 

A.B., Williams, 1896; M.D., Columbia, 1900. 

Nellis B. Foster Associate in Biological Chemistry 

M.D., Johns Hopkins, 1902. 

Linsly Rudd Williams Associate in Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Princeton. 1895; M.D., A.M., Columbia, 1899. 

George J. Bayles Associate in Ecclesiology 

A. B., Columbia. 1891; A.M., 1892; LL.B., 1893; Ph.D., 1895. 

Fellowes Davis, Jr Associate in Clinical Obstetrics 

M.D., Columbia, 1899. 

George Montague Swift Associate in Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Amherst, 1876; A.M., 1879; M.D., Columbia, 1879. 

T. Stuart Hart Associate in Medicine 

A.B., Yale, 1891; A.M., 1893; M.D., Columbia, 1895. 

Lewis F. Frissell Associate in Medicine 

A.B., Yale, 1895; A.M., 1897; M.D., Columbia, 1900. 

Alwin M. Pappenheimer Associate in Pathology 

A.B., Harvard, 1898; M.D., Columbia, 1902. 

Frederick Tilney Associate in Anatomy 

A.B., Yale, 1897; M.D., Long Island College Hospital, 1903. 

John V. Van Pelt ,. . . .Associate in Architecture 

Architecte Dipl6m6 parle Gouvernement, Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris. 

Wendell T. Bush Associate in Philosophy 

A.B., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, 1889; A.M., Harvard, 1898; Ph.D., 
Columbia, 1905. 

Austin W. Hollis Associate in Clinical Medicine 

M.D., Columbia, 1890. 

Frank E. Ward Associate in Music 

Alfred Stillman Associate in Anatomy 

A.B., Harvard, 1903; M.D., Columbia, 1907. 

Isaac Levin Associate in Pathology 

M.D., St. Petersburg, 1890. 



26 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Edward W. Scripture Associate in Psychiatry 

Ph.D., Leipzig, 1891; M.D., Munich, 1906. 

Mabel F. Weeks Associate in English in Barnard College 

A.B., Radcliffe, 1894. 

Walton Martin Associate in Surgery 

Ph.E., Yale, 1889; M.D., Columbia, 1892. 

Albert E. Sumner Associate in Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Amherst, 1889; M.D., Columbia, 1894; A.M., 1903. 

Henry W. Berg Associate in Diseases of Children 

A.B., College of the City of New York, 1878; M.D., Columbia, 1881. 

Herbert S. Carter Associate in Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Princeton, 1892; A.M., 1895; M.D., Columbia, 189s. 

T. Leslie Shear Associate in Classical Philology 

A.B., New York University, 1900; A.M., 1903; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1904. 

Frederic Moir Hanes Associate in Pathology 

A.B., University of North Carolina, 1903; A.M., Harvard, 1904; M.D., Johns 
Hopkins, 1908. 

Charles Christian Lieb . . . Associate in Pharmacology and Therapeutics 

A.B., Columbia, 1902; M.D., 1906. 

GoLDTHWAiTE H. DoRR Associate in Law 

A.B., Harvard, 1897; LL.B., Columbia, 1904. 

Walter H. Eddy Associate in Biological Chemistry 

B.S., Amherst,;;i898; A.M., Columbia, 1908; Ph.D., 1909. 

Walter Bensel Associate in Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 

M.D., Columbia, 1890. 

Albert A. Berg Associate in Clinical Surgery 

A.B., College of the City of New York, 1891; M.D., Columbia, 1894. 

Jackson E. Reynolds Associate in Law 

A.B., Stanford University, 1896; LL.B., Columbia, 1899. 

Jacob Rosenbloom Associate in Biological Chemistry 

B.S., Western University of Pennsylvania, 190s; Ph.D. and M.D., Columbia, 
1909. 

Maurice Pr6v6t Associate in Architecture 

Dipl6m6 Ecole des Beaux-Arts, 1900. 

Wilbur Ward Associate in Gynecology 

A.B., Williams, 1900; M.D., Columbia, 1904. 

Haven Emerson Associate in Physiology and Instructor^ in 

Medicine 
A.B., Harvard, 1896; A.M. and M.D., Columbia, 1899." 

Francis A. Nelson ,, Associate in Architecture 

B.S., Columbia, 1900; *A.D.G., Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris. 

Walter B. Pitkin Associate in Philosophy 

A.B., Michigan, 1900. 

Frederick A. Halsey Associate in Mechanical Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell, 1878. 

Lincoln De Groot Moss Associate in Mechanical Engineering 

F. V. D. Longacre Associate in Mechanical Engineering 

David S. Muzzey Associate in History 

A.B., Harvard, 1893; B.D., New York:University,!i897; Ph.D., Columbia, 1907. 
* Architecte Dipl6m6 par le Gouvernement. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



27 



Charles G. Simpson Associate in Mechanics 

Ph.B., Cornell College, 1895; A.M., 1902. 

George A. Tuttle Associate in Clinical Medicine 

A.B., Amherst, 1883; M.D., Columbia, 1S86. 

Horatio B. Williams Associate in Physiology 

A.B., Syracuse, 1900; M.D., 1905. 
(48) 

Instructors 

Note — For the Instructors and other Officers not of Professorial Grade in Teachers 
College, in the College of Pharmacy, and those of the Summer Session and Extension 
Teaching, see the Table of Contents. 

Richard Frothingham, M.D Instructor in Laryngology 

Charles Conrad Sleffel. . . . Instructor in Industrial Arts in Teachers 

College 

Charles W. Weick, B.S Instructor in Mechanical Drawing in 

Teachers College 

Arthur M. Shrady, M.D Chief of Clinic and Instructor in 

Hydrotherapy 

Charles C. Trowbridge, Sc.D Instructor in Physics 

A, Emil Schmitt, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Ward A. Holden, M.D .Chief of Clinic and Instructor in 

Ophthalmology 

Henry H. Tyson, M.D Instructor in Ophthalmology 

Clarence A. McWilliams, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Adrian Van Sinderen Lambert, M.D. .Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Adam M. Miller, A.M Instructor in Anatomy 

Eugene Hillhouse Pool, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Oliver S. Strong, Ph.D Instructor in Anatomy 

Charles I. Proben, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

George H. Ryder, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

William Skarstrom, M.D Instructor in Physical Education 

Samuel W. Thurber, M.D Chief of Chnic and Instructor in 

Laryngology 

Percy R. Turnure, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Gertrude M. Hirst, Ph.D Instructor in Classical Philology 

in Barnard College 

Edward L. Hunt, M.D Instructor in Neurology 

Rowland Cox, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

James H. Kenyon, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Walter S. Reynolds, M.D Chief of Clinic and Instructor in 

Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Charles H. Jaeger, M.D Chief of Clinic and Instructor in 

Orthopaedic Surgery 
Howard D. Collins, M.D Instructor in CHnical Surgery 



28 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

T. Laurance Saunders, M.D Chief of Clinic and Instructor in 

Otology 

John H. P. Hodgson, M.D Chief of Clinic and Instructor in 

Dermatology 
D. Stuart Dodge Jessup, M.D. .. .Instructor in Clinical Pathology 

James I. Russell, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Edward Knight Judd, A.B., E.M Instructor in Mining 

Arthur S. Vosburgh, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Percy Herbert Williams, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

Karl A. Connell, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Hugh B. Blackwell, M.D Instructor in Clinical Otology 

William Darrach, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Thomas H. Harrington, C.E Instructor in Drawing 

Henri F. Muller, B. es L .. Instructor in the Romance Languages 

and Literatures 

Leighton B. Morse, Ph.D Instructor in Physics 

Alfred P. Lothrop, Ph.D Instructor in Biological Chemistry 

Herman O. Mosenthal, M.D. . . .Instructor in Biological Chemistry 

and in Medicine 

Hugh Auchincloss, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Frederick H. Bartlett, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Children 

Thomas McCheyne Gunn, A.M Instructor in Mechanical 

Engineering 

Henry H. Janeway, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Ralph W. Lobenstine, M.D Instructor in Clinical Gynecology 

Harold Worthington Webb, Ph.D Instructor in Physics 

Hermann Fischer, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

De Witt Stetten, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Otto M. Schwerdtfeger, M.D Instructor in Clinical Medicine 

J. Victor Haberman, M.D Instructor in Neurology and in Applied 

Therapeutics 
Cavalier Hargrave Jouet, Ph.D.. .Instructor in Analytical Chemistry 

Arthur Colon Neish, Ph.D Instructor in Chemistry 

Roscoe GuERNSEY.'^Ph.D. Instructor in Classical Philology 

Eleanor Keller, A.M Instructor in Chemistry in Barnard College 

Maurice A. Lamme, Ph.D Instructor in Mineralogy 

Frederick W. J. Heuser, A.M Instructor in the Germanic 

Languages and Literatures 

Ida Helen Ogilvie, Ph.D Instructor in Geology in Barnard College 

Lewis P. Siceloff, A.B Instructor in Mathematics 

Harold C. Brown, Ph.D Instructor in Philosophy 

Pauline Hamilton Dederer, A.M. .. Instructor in Zoology in Barnard 

College 
Alexander O. Bechert, A.M .... Instructor in the Germanic Languages 

and Literatures 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 29 

Marion E. Latham, A.M Instructor in Botany in Barnard College 

Otto Kress, Ph.D Instructor in Engineering Chemistry 

Allen W. Porterfeld, Ph.D Instructor in the Germanic Languages 

and Literatures 

Edgar H. Sturtevant, Ph.D Instructor in Classical Philology 

DiNO BiGONGiARi, A.B Instructor in the Romance Languages and 

Literatures 

Maude A. Huttmann, A.M Instructor in History in Barnard College 

Chester A. Darling, Ph.D Instructor in Botany 

Grace Langford, S.B Instructor in Physics in Barnard College 

William F. Cooley, Ph.D Instructor in Philosophy 

Harrison R. Steeves, A.M Instructor in English 

John Maurice Nelson, Ph.D Instructor in Organic Chemistry 

Hermon W. Farwell, A.M Instructor in Physics 

Harry L. Hollingworth, Ph.D Instructor in Psychology 

Harry Wilfred Reddick, Ph.D Instructor in Mathematics 

Edward D. Thurston, Jr., A.B., Mech.E Instructor in Mechanical 

Engineering 
Louise Hoyt Gregory, Ph.D . . Instructor in Zoology in Barnard College 

Frederick W. Hehre, E.E Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

William Cabler Moore, Ph.D Instructor in Chemistry 

Henry H. L. Schulze, A.M Instructor in the Germanic Languages 

and Literatures 

J. Enrique Zanetti, Ph.D Instructor in Chemistry 

Mrs. Juliana S. Haskell, Ph.D . . .Instructor in the Germanic Languages 

and Literatures in Barnard College 

Otto Hensel, M.D Instructor in Clinical Medicine 

Frederick T. Van Beuren, Jr., M.D Chief of Clinic and Instructor 

in Surgery 

Leander H. Shearer, M.D Instructor in Clinical Medicine and 

in Physiology 

Charles H. Smith, M.D Instructor in Anatomy 

James S. Macgregor, M.S Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Isaac O. Woodruff, M.D Instructor in Clinical Medicine 

Howard H. Mason, M.D. .,. .Chief of Clinic and Instructor in Medicine 
William W. Herrick, M.D. ..Chief of Clinic and Instructor in Medicine 

Max Schulman, M.D Chief of Clinic and Instructor in Applied 

Therapeutics 

Frederick B. Humphreys, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Henry E. Hale, Jr., M.D Chief of Clinic and Instructor in Applied 

Therapeutics 

F. Morris Class, M.D Instructor in Applied Therapeutics 

Harold B. Curtis, Ph.D Instructor in Mathematics 

Franklin C. Fette, Ph.B Instructor in Physical Education 

James Kip Finch, C.E., A.M Instructor in Civil Engineering 



30 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Edward J. Fortier, A.B Instructor in the Romance Languages and 

Literatures 

Arthur Lowell Herrick, B.S., C.E Instructor in Mechanical 

Engineering 

Nels J. Lennes, Ph.D Instructor in Mathematics 

Henry H, M. Lyle, M.D Instructor in Surgery 

Charles W. McMurtry, M.D Instructor in Dermatology 

Alfred Michaelis, M.D Instructor in Otology 

Ernest H. Wright, Ph.D Instructor in English 

Ernest D. Clark, Ph.D Inetructor in Biological Chemistry 

Robert A. Lambert, M.D Instructor in Pathology 

Dudley S. Conley, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Matthew L. Carr, M.D Instructor in Otology 

James G. Dwyer, M.D Instructor in Bacteriology 

Allen O. Whipple, M.D Instructor in Clinical Surgery 

Carl Van Doren, Ph.D Instructor in English 

Arthur W. Bingham, M.D Instructor in Physiology and Assistant in 

Diseases of Children 

Harry M. Keator, M.D Instructor in Physiology 

William K. Terriberry, M.D Instructor in Physiology 

Edward M. Sait, Ph.D Instructor in Public Law 

Willard L. Severinghaus, A.M Instructor in Physics 

William Haller, A.M Instructor in English 

Burton W. Kendall, S.B Instructor in Experimental Physics 

Frank L. Mason, E.E Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

Charles Herrman, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Children 

Jesse E. Beans Instructor in Drawing 

Edwards A. Park, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Children and 

Assistant in Medicine 

Benjamin M. Anderson, Jr., A.M Instructor in Economics 

Daniel Roe Ayres, M.D Instructor in Gynecology 

Russell L. Cecil, M.D Instructor in Clinical Medicine 

Gerhard H. Cocks, M.D Instructor in Clinical Laryngology 

Irving C. Demarest, A.M Instructor in Classical Philology 

Lloyd L. Dines, A.M Instructor in Mathematics 

Henry B. Drowne, C.E Instructor in Highway Engineering 

Donald Gordon, M.D Instructor in Physiology 

Gordon Harwood Graves, A.M Instructor in Mathematics 

Joseph C. Green, A.M Instructor in History 

Menas S. Gregory, M.D Instructor in Psychiatry 

Royal Storrs Haynes, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Children 

Edward F. Humphrey, A.M Instructor in History 

Louis Imbert, A.M Instructor in the Romance Languages and 

Literatures 
Edward Crane Lyon, Jr., M.D Instructor in Obstetrics 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 3I 

William S. Messer, A.M Instructor in Classical Philology 

Nathaniel R. Norton, M.D Instructor in Diseases of Children 

Frank H. Ristine, Ph.D Instructor in English 

J. Bethune Stein, M.D Instructor in Genito-Urinary Diseases 

Arthur W. Swann, M.D Instructor in Medicine 

Morris F. Weinrich, A.M Instructor in Physics 

(143) 

Demonstrators 

Alfred J. Brown, M.D Demonstrator of Anatomy 

Richard Derby, M.D Demonstrator of Anatomy 

John C. Vaughan, M.D. .Demonstrator of Anatomy and Assistant in 
(3) Surgery 

Lecturers and other Special Officers of Instruction 

Abraham Yohannan, Ph.D Lecturer in Oriental Languages 

Ernst D. Richard, Pd.D Lecturer on the History of German 

Civilization 

William S. Day, Ph.D Lecturer in Physics 

William K. Gregory, Ph.D Lecturer in Zoology 

Richard Franz Bach, A.B Lecturer in Architecture 

Nicholas A. Koenig, Ph.D Gustav Gottheil Lecturer in Semitic 

Languages 

Frederick A. Vanderburgh, Ph.D Lecturer in Semitic Languages 

Harold A. Caparn Lecturer in Landscape Architecture 

Ferruccio Vitale Lecturer in Landscape Architecture 

Frederic Lyman Wells, Ph.D Lecturer in Psychology 

Walter Henry Hall Conductor of University Chorus 

Alexander Goldenweiser, Ph.D Lecturer in Anthropology 

Mrs. Estelle H. Davis Lecturer in English in Barnard College 

Albert E. Flanagan, B.S Lecturer in Drawing 

Leo J. Frachtenberg, Ph.D Lecturer in Anthropology 

Fritz F. Hahn, Ph.D Curator in Palaeontology 

Henry G. Hartmann, A.B Lecturer in Philosophy 

Clare M. Howard, A.M Lecturer in EngUsh in Barnard College 

Charles W. Leavitt, Jr Lecturer in Landscape Architecture 

Thomas Reed Powell, A.B., LL.B Lecturer in Public Law 

Oscar H. Rogers, M.D Lecturer on Life Insurance 

LuciAN E. Smith, B.S Lecturer in Architecture 

Ethel Sturtevant, A.B Lecturer in English in Barnard College 

(23) 

Assistants 

Peter Irving, M.D Assistant in Clinical Pathology 

CuRTENius Gillette, M.D Assistant in Clinical Medicine 

Edward Cussler, M.D Assistant in Clinical Pathology 



32 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Sidney V. Haas, M.D Assistant in Diseases of Children 

Herbert B. Wilcox, M.D Assistant in Diseases of Children 

Frederick James Barrett, M.D Assistant in Clinical Medicine 

Lilian Brandt, M.A Assistant in Social Economy 

Lewis M. Silver, M.D Assistant in Diseases of Children 

William S. Nelms, A.M Assistant in Physics 

Ransom S. Hooker, M.D Assistant in Clinical Surgery 

James R. Whiting, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Bernard O. Dodge, Ph.B Research Assistant in Botany 

Frank Erdwurm, M.D Assistant in Clinical Medicine 

Elizabeth C. Cook, A.M Assistant in English in Barnard College 

Frederick P. Whitaker, LL.B Assistant in Law 

Andrew B. Yard, M.D Assistant in Diseases of Children 

Carlotta J. Maury, Ph.D Assistant in Geology in Barnard College 

John F. Dashiell, A.M Assistant in Philosophy 

KiRBY Dwight, M.D Assistant in Surgery 

Harriet Ruth Fox, A.M Assistant in English in Barnard College 

Grace Harriet Goodale, A.B Assistant in Classical Philology in 

Barnard College 

Abraham Gross, Ph.D Assistant in Food Chemistry 

Julian C. Hines, Jr., M.S Assistant in Physics 

J. Gardner Hopkins, M.D Assistant in Clinical Pathology 

Arthur Lefferts Hutton, M.D. .. .Assistant in Applied Therapeutics 

Henry James, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Edward Norris Milliken, A.M Assistant in Chemistry 

Charles Packard, M.S Assistant in Zoology 

Harold Perrine, A.M Assistant in Civil Engineering 

Albert T. Poffenberger, Jr., A.M Assistant in Psychology 

Anton R, Rose, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

Reuben Ottenberg, M.D Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

Clayton S. Smith, B.S Assistant in Biological Chemistry 

E. Stagg Whitin, Ph.D Assistant in Social Legislation 

George A. Scott, B.S Assistant in Physics 

Robert G. Snyder, M.D Assistant in Clinical Pathology and in 

Medicine 

Henry C. Thacher, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

John W. Todd, A. M Assistant in Psychology 

Rollin C. Dean, B.S Assistant in Zoology 

Edgar Altenburg, A.B Assistant in Botany 

Henry M. Bach, Chem.E Assistant in Analytical Chemistry 

John S. Bates, B.Sc Laboratory Assistant in Engineering Chemistry 

Helene M. Boas, A.M Assistant in Botany in Barnard College 

William B. Boyd, M.D Assistant in Applied Therapeutics 

Clement S. Brainin, A.B Assistant in Physics 

Edward C. Brenner, M.D .Assistant in Clinical Medicine 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 33 

Robert W. Briggs, C.E Assistant in Civil Engineering 

EvEREND L. Bruce, B.S Assistant in Mineralogy 

John J. Coss, A.M Assistant in Philosophy 

Frank R. Elder, B.S Assistant in Organic Chemistry 

Charles R. Fettke, A.M Assistant in Geology 

John C. Frazee, A.B Assistant in Physics 

Fred D. Fromme, B.S Assistant in Botany 

Paul C. Haeseler, S.B Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry 

Ferdinand F. Hintze, A.M Assistant in PaLi?ontology 

Emilie J. Hutchinson, A.M Assistant in History in Barnard College 

Frederick R. Keller, E.E Assistant in Electrical Engineering 

Albert R. Lamb, M.D 1 Assistant in Pathology 

William W. McKirahan, A.B . .Laboratory Assistant in Physical Chemistry 

Harris Moak, M.D Assistant in Bacteriology 

Frederick S. Nowlan, A.M Assistant in Mathematics 

George A. Pfeiffer, A.M Assistant in Mathematics 

Annabella E. Richards, A.B Assistant in Chemistry in Barnard 

College 
Albert J. Salathe, A.B . . . Laboratory Assistant in Inorganic Chemistry 

Georgiana Sandford, A.B Assistant in Physics in Barnard College 

Carl A. Schwarze, A.M Assistant in Botany 

Montgomery H. Sicard, M.D Assistant in Clinical Obstetrics 

Willard B. Soper, M.D Assistant in Pathology 

William W. Stifler, Ph.D Assistant in Physics 

Archibald McI. Strong, M.D Assistant in Medicine 

Wilbur D. Tupper, C.E Assistant in Drawing 

(71) 

CLINICAL ASSISTANTS AT THE VANDERBILT CLINIC 

Officers of instruction holding appointments in addition to that 
of Clinical Assistant are not included in this list. A complete list 
of the Clinical Assistants in each subject will be found at the head of 
the appropriate Departmental Statement. 

In Medicine 

Julius W. Weinstein, M.D. M. Heminway Merriman, M.D. 

Morris D. Keller, M.D. Henry C. Fleming. M.D. 

J. W. DouNCE, M.D. Bernard Fraenkel, M.D. 

D. Clifford Martin, M.D. Albert K. Detwiller, M.D. 
Arthur Middleton Jacobus, M.D. Herman Fried, M.D. 

H. Austin Cossitt, M.D. Marks S. Shaine, M.D. 

John McCabe, M.D. Clement C. Young, M.D. 

David S. Likely, M.D. W. J. Vogeler, M.D. 

E. Garnsey Brownell, M.D. Otto H. Leber, M.D. 

G. A. Friedman, M.D. 



34 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

In Surgery 

Noel B. Leggett, M.D. Rolfe Kingsley, M.D. 

GouvERNEUR M. Phelps, M.D. 

In Orthopaedic Surgery 

SiGMUND Epstein, M.D. William Frieder, M D. 

S. Kleinberg, M.D. 

In Neixrology 

Charles E. Atwood, M.D. William V. P. Garretson, M.D. 

H. R. Humphries, M.D. Smith Ely Jelliffe, M.D. 

E. J. McEntee, M.D. Abraham A. Brill, M.D. 
J. E. Clark, M.D. Robert E. Pou, M.D. 

J. L. Macumber, M.D. J. C. Fisk, M.D. 

Christopher C. Beling, M.D. Richard H. Macrae, M.D. 

In Gynecology 

William L. Bradley, M.D. Augustine W. Ropf, M.D. 

Henry K. W. Kellogg, M.D. Walter M. Silleck, M.D. 

Clinton B. Knapp, M.D. 

In Ophthalmology 

Nathan Goodfriend, M.D. J. O'Connell, M.D. 

Gerald H. Grout, M.D. A. W. Thompson, M.D. 

In Laryngology 

(Including Diseases of the Larynx, Pharynx, and Nasal Passages) 

A. P. Coll, M.D. C. D. Van Wagenen, M.D. 

John Leshure, M.D. Charles Osgood, M.D. 

F. Conger Smith, M.D. Charles A. Whiting, M.D. 
Irving W. Voorhees, M.D. E. Willis Kobler, M.D. 

Edward E. Myers, M.D. 

In Dermatology 

John Aldrich, M.D. Charles T. Dade, M.D. 

J. D. Gold, M.D. S. Dana Hubbard, M.D. 

George Howard Fox, M.D. Selden Irwin Rainforth, M.D. 

William H. Morrison, M.D. 

In Diseases of Children 

Ira S. Wile, M.D. B. Wallace Hamilton, M.D. 

George Augustus Schnepel, M.D. Theodore J. Abbott, M.D. 

Lesser B. Groeschel, M.D. 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 35 

In Geni to -Urinary Diseases 

Walter B. Brouner, M.D. Maynard S. Owen, M.D. 

Bernard Kohn, M.D. Sidney R. Titsworth, M.D. 

James Albert Cowan, M.D. George M. Feldstein, M.D, 

In Applied Therapeutics 

Morris Fink, M.D. Benjamin J. Beck, M.D. 

Paul Bartholow, M.D. Solomon Beck, M.D. 

Athel C. Burnham, M.D. Edmund M. Devol, M.D. 

In Hydrotherapy 

Albert J. Wittson, M.D. 

In Psychiatry 

Abraham A. Brill, M.D. C. F. Haviland, M.D. 

Robert Edward Pou, M.D. 

In Otology 

Max Nisselson, M.D. Charles Osgood, M.D. 

(82) 



in tUt ®it$5 jof ^txo ^oxU 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

On October 31, 1754, Letters Patent were issued incorporating The 
Governors of the College of the Province of New York in the 
City of New York in America, and providing for the es- rr- * ■ 1 1 
tablishment of a College to be known as King's College 
"for the Instruction and Education of Youth in the Learned Lan- 
guages and in the Liberal Arts and Sciences." The conclusion of the 
announcement issued in the same year reads: "A serious, virtuous, 
and industrious Course of Life being first provided for, it is further the 
Design of this College, to instruct and perfect the Youth in the learned 
Languages, and in the Arts of Reasoning exactly, of Writing correctly, 
and Speaking eloquently : And in the Arts of Numbering and Measur- 
ing, of Surveying and Navigation, of Geography and History, of Hus- 
bandry, Commerce, and Government; and in the Knowledge of all 
Nature in the Heavens above us, and in the Air, Water, and Earth 
around us, and the various Kinds of Meteors, Stones, Mines and 
Minerals, Plants and Animals, and of every Thing useful for the Com- 
fort, the Convenience, and Elegance of Life, in the chief Manufactures 
relating to any of these things: And finally, to lead them from the 
Study of Nature, to the Knowledge of themselves, and of the God of 
Nature, and their Duty to Him, themselves, and one another; and 
every Thing that can contribute to their true Happiness both here and 
hereafter. " The Revolutionary War interrupted the active work of 
the College, which numbers John Jay, of the Class of 1764, Robert R. 
Livingston, of the Class of 1765, and Alexander Hamilton, of the Class of 
1774, among its graduates. 

In 1784, the Legislature of the State of New York passed an act 
incorporating the "Regents of the University of the State of 
New York," vesting the property of King's College in the Regents, 
and changing the name of the College to Columbia College. In 1787, 
this act was repealed, and an act was passed confirming the Royal Charter 

» The attention of those interested in the historical development of the University 
is called to The History of Columbia University, 1754-1904 (pp. xiii + 493). published in 
Commemoration of the One Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary of the Founding of 
King's College, by the Columbia University Press, Lemcke and Beuchner, New York, 
agents, and to various articles in the Columbia University Quarterly. 

37 



38 GENERAL STATEMENT 

of 1754 and vesting the property and franchises of King's College in " The 
Trustees of Columbia College in the City of New York." 

In 1 810, the charter was again amended in certain particulars at the 
request of the Trustees, and re-enacted, but the corporate title re- 
mained and still continues unchanged. The title to all corporate prop- 
erty is vested in a board of twenty-four Trustees, whose term of office 
is for life, and who form a self-perpetuating body, exer- 
cising the power of appointment as to all officers of in- 
struction and administration and general oversight and control of 
the affairs of the University. In 1909 provision was made for the 
nomination by the Alumni of six of the twenty-four Trustees (see p. 468) . 

In 1896 the title "Columbia University" was adopted for general use, 
and in 1897 the University removed from its former site to Morningside 
Heights. 

The President has charge of the educational administration of the 
University and is Chairman of the University Council and of every 
faculty established by the Trustees. The Treasurer of the corporation 
elected by the Trustees has charge of the financial administration of 
the University. The other principal administrative officers are the 
Deans, and the Director of the Summer Session and of Extension 
Teaching, who under the general supervision of the President have 
immediate charge of the Educational work of the University; the 
Librarian, the Chaplain, the Constdting Engineer, the Secretary of 
the University, the Registrar, the Bursar, and the Superintendent of 
Buildings and Grounds. 

The University Council (see p. 3) is a representative body consist- 
ing of the President, the Deans, certain other executive officers, and two 
members elected from each of the several factdties. Subject to the 
reserved power of control by the Trustees, it is the function of the 
Council (a) to control the award of the higher degrees, to secure 
the correlation of courses with a view to increasing the efficiency 
and enlarging the range of University work, to encourage original 
research, and to adjust all questions involving more than one faculty ; 
(6) to make recommendations, both to the Trustees and to the several 
faculties, concerning the educational administration of the University, 
and advise the President upon such matters as he may bring before 
it; (c) to appoint all Fellows and University Scholars and, within the 
limits of the Statutes, make rtdes for their government (see page 435) . 

The University includes the following: 

Columbia College (see p. 194) offers a program of studies leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. 

Emphasis is placed upon the quality of the student's work rather 
than upon the time spent in residence, and this combined with the close 
co-ordination of the work of the Summer Session and Extension Teaching 
with that of the College makes it possible for a well prepared candidate to 



GENERAL STATEMENT 39 

complete the requirements for the bachelor's degree in three and one-half 

or three years. The program provides not only for those students who wish 

to devote their entire time to undergraduate work, but for „ ^ , 

■■ . -I . , . ,, . . , Schools and 

those who desire durmg their collegiate residence to prepare Faculties 

themselves for advanced standing in some professional 
course of study. As a preliminary to any professional courses the Uni- 
versity strongly recommends at least two years of collegiate work, and 
candidates for professional degrees who are not already college gradu- 
ates are advised to take advantage of the opportunities offered through 
Columbia College for a combination of general and professional studies 
which will lead to the bachelor's degree in arts or science, in addition 
to a professional degree in law, medicine, mining, engineering, and 
chemistry, teaching, or fine arts, in six years. 

Barnard College (see p. 336), founded in 1889, is a separate cor- 
poration. As an undergraduate college for women, however, it bears 
the same relation to the educational system of Columbia University 
as does Columbia College for men. The requirements for admission 
and the standard of scholarship are of the same grade. The students 
receive their instruction in the Barnard College buildings. The degree 
of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science is conferred upon its grad- 
uates by the University on the recommendation of the Faculty of 
Barnard College. (For the regulations governing candidates for an 
academic degree and a diploma in teaching, see p. 342.) 

The Graduate Faculties of the University offer advanced courses 
of study and investigation leading to appropriate degrees and cer- 
tificates in (o) law, (6) medicine, (c) philosophy, education, philology, 
and letters, {d) history, economics and social science, and public law, 
ie) mathematics and natural science, (f) mines, engineering, and chemis- 
try, (g) fine arts, and Qi) pharmacy. Women students are admitted to 
all graduate courses except in law, medicine, and engineering. 

The division of the University into faculties and schools neither 
controls nor limits the student in his freedom of electing, under one or 
several of the faculties, courses that lead to the degrees of Master of 
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy (see p. 188). Advanced courses and 
opportunities for original research leading primarily to these degrees 
are offered by: 

The Faculty of Philosophy (see p. 283), in philosophy and ed- 
ucation, psychology and anthropology, classical philology, English, 
comparative literature, and the Germanic, the Romance, and the 
Oriental languages; 

The Faculty of Political Science (see p. 280), in history and 
political philosophy, economics and social science, and public law and 
comparative jurisprudence; 

The Faculty of Pure Science (see p. 285), in mathematics, astron- 
omy, physics (mathematical and experimental), chemistry, mineral- 



40 GENERAL STATEMENT 

ogy, geology, zoology, botany, psychology, physiology, anatomy, 
bacteriology, embryology, biological chemistry, pathology, and 
engineering in its various branches; 

The School of Law (see p. 216), established in 1858, offers a course 
of three years in the principles and practice of private and public law, 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Laws; 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons (see p. 230), founded 
in 1807, offers a course of four years in the principles and prac- 
tice of medicine and surgery, leading to the degree of Doctor of 
Medicine; 

The School of Mines (see p. 249), founded in 1863, offers four-year 
courses of study in mining and metallurgical engineering, leading to a 
professional degree ; 

The Schools op Engineering and Chemistry (see p. 249), set off 
from the School of Mines in 1896, offer four-year courses, leading to 
appropriate professional degrees in chemistry and chemical engineer- 
ing and in civil, sanitary, electrical, and mechanical engineering; 
similar courses in forest and agricultural engineering are in process of 
organization ; 

The Faculty of Fine Arts (see p. 322), was organized in 1906 and 
given jurisdiction over the following Schools : Architecture (foxinded as 
a department in 1880), Music (founded as a department in 1896), 
Design (1906); and offers courses of study of indeterminate length, 
leading to appropriate degrees and certificates in Architecture and 
Music, and, in co-operation with the National Academy of Design 
(see p. 330), to a certificate in Design; 

Teachers College (see p. 336), founded in 1888 and chartered in 
1889, was included in the University in 1898. It is a separate cor- 
poration, but takes academic rank in the University system as a pro- 
fessional school for teachers. It offers the following courses of study: 
(o) graduate courses leading to the doctor's or master's diploma; and 
simtdtaneously to the doctor's and master's degrees under the faculty 
of Philosophy; {h) professional courses, each of two years, based upon two 
years of collegiate study, leading to the bachelor's diploma for teachers 
and supervisors in kindergartens or elementary schools, or for specialists 
in fine arts, household arts, industrial arts, music, and physical education, 
and to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education; 

The College of Pharmacy (see p. 388), is, similarly, a separate 
corporation. It offers University courses leading to the degrees of 
Pharmaceutical Chemist and Doctor of Pharmacy. 

By agreement with the late Joseph Pulitzer of New York, executed 
July 20, 1903, Columbia University will establish in the future a School 
OP Journalism, for which purpose Mr. Pulitzer has given to the Uni- 
versity the sum of one million dollars. 

In co-operation with Yale University, courses are oflEered designed 



GENERAL STATEMENT 4I 

to prepare students for work in foreign countries, either in the service 
of the United States Government or otherwise (see p. 281). 

A provisional course of study in Preventive Medicine has been 
approved and the courses will be put into operation when the necessary 
funds have been made available. 

The University maintains a Summer Session (see p. 398), of six 
weeks' duration, in which are offered courses that are accepted in 
partial fulfilment of the requirements of certain academic degrees 
and of the diplomas in teaching. The same academic standards are 
maintained as in the courses offered from September to June. 

Through its system of Extension Teaching (see p. 398), the Uni- 
versity offers to men and women, especially to those engaged in teach- 
ing, who can give only a portion of their time to study, an opportunity 
to pursue subjects included in a liberal education and to make progress, 
if they so desire, toward a diploma in teaching or an academic degree. 

The several Departments of Study maintained by the University, 
including Barnard College, Teachers College, and the College of Phar- 
macy, grouped in divisions, are as follows : 

Ancient and Oriental Languages and Literatures: Departments 
Classical Philology, Chinese, Indo-Iranian, and Semitic and Division 
Languages. 

Biology: Anatomy, Bacteriology, Botany, Physiology, Pathology, 
Embryology, Biological Chemistry, and Zoology. 

Chemistry: Chemistry and Biological Chemistry. 

Education (Faculty of Teachers College). 

Engineering : Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical 
Engineering, and Engineering Drafting. 

Fine Arts (Faculty of Fine Arts): Architecture, EngHsh and Com- 
parative Literature, Fine Arts, and Music. 

Geology, Geography, and Mineralogy: Geology, Geography, 
and Mineralogy. 

History, Economics, and Public Law (Faculty of Political 
Science) : Economics, Social Economy, Sociology and Statistics, 
History, and Public Law and Jurisprudence. 

Mathematical and Physical Science: Astronomy, Mathematics 
and Physics. 

Medicine (College of Physicians and Surgeons). 

Mining and Metallurgy: Metallurgy and Mining. 

Modern Languages and Literatures: English and Comparative 
Literature, Celtic, Germanic, and Romance Languages. 

Pharmacy (College of Pharmacy). 

Philosophy, Psychology, and Anthropology: Anthropology, 
Philosophy, and Psychology. 

Physical Education: Physical Education. 



42 REGISTRATION 

Private Law ^Faculty of Law). 

The Announcements of each College or School, of the Slimmer 
Session, of Extension Teaching, and of the several Divi- 
ArmouEce- sions, are issued annually or biennially in the form of Bul- 
letins of Information, and may be obtained withoui charge 
from the Secretary of the University. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 
STATUS OF STUDEZ^TS 

A student may enter Columbia University as either: 

1. A matriculated student accepted by the University as having 
fulfilled the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a degree, 
certificate of proficiency, or diploma. A period of regular attendance 
upon all stated academic exercises * amounting to at least one aca- 
demic year must be completed by each candidate; or 

2. A non-matriculated student, permitted to attend such courses 
as he may be qtiahfied to take but not regarded as a candidate for a 
degree, certificate of proficiency, or diploma. Jvon-matriculated stu- 
dents may, however, receive a formal statement as to the satisfactory 
completion of any coarse or courses. 

In the announcement of each faculty t ill 'z~ iz-:s-Z. the conditions 
governing the admission of matriculated and non-matriculated stu- 
dents to courses tmder that faculty. 

Under the Statutes every student is admitted subject to the disci- 
plinary powers of the University authorities. The President is em- 
powered to administer discipline and to authorize the Deans of the 
several fa:'-lties to do so on his behalf. 

REGISTRATION 

Before attending any University exercises each student must regis- 
ter, i. e., must present him self in person to furnish the information necessary 
for the University records and to file a statement of the courses he is au- 
thorized to pursue (for the matriculation or registration fee, payable 
bu: :n:e £ee z- 43)- The central office of the Registrar, 201 East Hall, 
an I .r.e :ff :;= ;.: the CoUege of Physicians and Surgeons, 437 West 59th 
5:ret:, a: -.le C.^eve of Pharmacy, 115 West 68lii Street, and at Barnard 
Ccllege and lea.Jier: Collie, will be open for r^istration on February 
5 and 6, 1912, from September 18 to September 24, 1912, and on February 
4 and 5, 1913. New students may also register on the day following each 
of these periods. Those unable to complete their registration may file a 

» Students prevented by conscisrtiotis scruples from complying with academic 
recuirements witicb may be futSUed only ttpon days set apart by their chtirch for 
religions obs»vaace, shoold make applicatic-a to t-e appropriate Uni'^ersity authority 
for eqtdtafale veli^ 



FEES 43 

provisional statement within the statutory period. Students registering 
late are diaiged an additional fee of $5 and are held accountable for 
absences thtis incurred. 

Students holding fe!lowshii» or sdiolar^ps are required to register 
not later than the date spedfied in the TJmverdty cakaidar; failure to do so 
may be coaddered as vacating the fellowship or scSiolarship. 

The leqmreanents for graduation may be completed at any time during 
tiie year, but diplcnnas are issued only at commencement and at the be- 
ginniiig of each half-year. 

Withdrawal 

An honorable discharge is granted to any adult student in good stand- 
ing who may desire to withdraw from the University; a minor must sub- 
mit the written assent of his parent or guardian. 

Students withdrawing from the University are requested to notify the 
R^istrar. No application for a return of fe^ can be considered unless 
written notice be given at the time d withdrawaL 

The Dean of any faculty may for reasons of wright grant a leave of 
absence to a student in good standing. 

FEES 

(Exclusive of BamaLri College, Teachers College, and the Collie of 
Pharmacy.) 

The regulations as to fees adopted by the Trustees of Oslunabia College 
in the City of New York are at present as follows. They are subject 
to change by them at their discretion. The President is under instructions 
to withdraw the privil^es of students delinquent in payment after the 
second Wednesday <rf each half-year. 

(a) For MatricvlatioH or Registraium: Required of all studoits 

l^ore entrance, payable but once I 5 

For Late Registration (see above) 5 

For Change of Eegistratunt after tiie second Saturday (in the 
Schools of Political Sdence, Philosophy, and Pure Science 
after the fourth Saturday) of any half-3?ear, for any course 

or courses added or dropped at any one time i 

(6) For Tuition, payable at the b^inning of each half-year: 
For Matrictdaied Students: 

In the CbEegej per point (s^ page 195) 5 

To be paid for the total number of points- for ivhich the 
student is {lermitted to register; with extra charges for 
certain allowed professional courses, not to exceed ^50 
in any half-year. 
In the School of Law perhalf-year 75 

^ A "point" is the eqmvaleiit of attfiadaiice one hour a wsek for one half-year in 
class-ioam exesoses. or two hoois & veek for one half -year in laboratory exercises. 



44 FEES 

In the College of Physicians and Surgeons per half-year $ 125 

In the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry (exclusive 

of certain summer-course fees, see page 46) per half-year 125 

In the Schools of Fine Arts " " 75-100 

In Architecture the fees are at the rate of $100 per half- 
year, except that a student who lacks less than 14 points 
for the degree or certificate is charged at the rate of $7.50 
per point. In Music the fees are at the rate of $7.50 per 
half-year for each hour of attendance a week up to a 
maximum of $75. 
Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy, exclusive of laboratory fees (see page 46) and 
of charges, not to exceed I50, for certain professional 

courses per half-year 75 

With a minimum fee of $150 for courses taken to fulfil the 
requirements of the degree of Master of Arts, irrespective of 
the aggregate number of hours occupied by such courses, and 
irrespective of the regulations governing fees for Summer 
Session courses taken to fulfil the requirements for that degree, 
and irrespective of the fees for courses in Extension Teaching. 
With a minimum fee of $300 for courses taken to fulfil the 
requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, ir- 
respective of the aggregate number of hours occupied by 
such courses; unless, because of having passed at least one 
year in graduate study in an approved university, the candi- 
date may be excused from attending for a longer period than 
one year in Columbia University, in which case the minimum 
tuition fee is $150. 

Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor 
of Philosophy who have paid the minimum tuition fee may 
take additional courses at the rate of $5 per half-year hour 
until the expiration of three years and six years, respectively, 
from the beginning of their candidacy. 
For N on- Matriculated Students (and matriculated students tak- 
ing part time). 
For Tuition, at the rate of $7.50 per half-year for each hour of 
attendance per week on lectures, or recitations with a maxi- 
mum fee, exclusive of charges, not to exceed $50, for certain 

professional courses per half-year 75 

With the following exceptions: 

In the School of Medicine and in the Schools of Mines, En- 
gineering, and Chemistry, the maximum fee per half-year is 
$125, and in Columbia College and the School of Architecture 
$100. For other fees see page 46. 
For laboratory instruction, except in Columbia College, — 



FEES 



45 



where it is charged for by points, — $7.50 per half-year for 
each two hours weekly, with a maximum of $25 per half- 
year when the number of hours weekly of such instruction 
does not exceed nine, and $40 per half-year when the number 
of hours weekly exceeds nine. 
For all Students, matriculated or non-matriculated, in the Sum- 
mer Session, for any course or courses aggregating not more 

than six points $ 30 

For courses aggregating more than six points 35~40 

For Students in Extension Teaching, in courses that may be taken 
for credit toward a degree or diploma, per half-year hour (two 

laboratory hours counting as one) 5 

For special fees in courses not so credited see the separately 
printed Announcement of Extension Teaching. Fees for courses 
in Extension Teaching to be paid irrespective of the privileges 
otherwise secured by the payment of a maximum half-year fee. 

(c) For Examinations, payable in each case before examination is held: 

For entrance (see pp. 173 et seq.) 5 

For any deficiency examination or series of deficiency examina- 
tions held in the week preceding the opening of the first half- 
year, for each course 5 

with a maximum fee of 25 

For a deficiency examination at any other time than in the 
period designated above, whether taken at the conclusion 
of a course repeated by the student in addition to his normal 
schedule (except in Coltunbia College) or without such repe- 
tition, for each course 5 

For special examinations at unusual times: 

For admission, for the series 5 

For removal of deficiencies in course, for each subject 5 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 35 

(d) For Degrees, payable on or before the ultimate date fixed by the 

University calendar for the filing of applications for the respec- 
tive degrees: 

For the Bachelor's degree (not professional or technical) 15 

For any professional or technical degree or certificate 25 

For the Foreign Service Certificate 10 

For the Degree of Master of Arts 25 

(e) For Use of the Gymnasium and Baths, and the exclusive use of a 

locker 7 

Required of all students except the following, who are exempt: 
(i) Students in the Graduate Faculties, students in Medicine and 
Pharmacy, and those in other professional schools who hold an 
academic degree, and students in Extension Teaching, unless 
they shall elect to use the privileges of the Gymnasium ; 



46 FEES 

(2) Students who have paid this fee for four years, unless they 
shall elect to use the privileges of the Gymnasium; 

(3) Students presenting the certificate of the Director of the 

Gymnasium, showing actual physical ability. 

Simimer Session, optional $ 5 

For the fees prescribed by the Trustees of Barnard College, Teach- 
ers College, and the College of Pharmacy see the separately printed 
Announcements. 

Laboratory and Other Special Fees and Deposits 

The Statutes provide that students taking laboratory or field courses 
or making use of the laboratories may be charged a fee therefor in accord- 
ance with a schedule prepared by the department concerned and on 
file in the Office of the Registrar. A deposit for the use of the apparatus, 
material, and other like purpose shall also be charged. 

Summer Courses in Surveying, Mining, and Geodesy 

Laboratory fees, payable on or before the last Saturday in May, are 
required as follows: Civil Engineering course No. 15, I25, or $7 per 
survey; No. 25 and No. 27, $15, or ^5 per survey; No. 26, $5; No. 28 and 
No. 71, $10. 

Non-candidates, candidates for admission to, and students having 
entered with, advanced standing, who may be required to attend these 
courses, and students who fail to complete them in the summer to which 
they are assigned, are charged in addition tuition fees as follows: No. 15, 
I35; No. 25, No. 27, No. 28, and No. 71, $25; No. 26, $10. Students 
entering with credit for part of course 15 shall pay a tuition fee of $10 for 
each survey. A tuition fee of $6 is required for each survey of courses 
25 or 27 taken under similar conditions. In the case of a student registered 
in Columbia College who has paid an additional fee under the operation 
of this rule, an equitable credit will be made should he later complete the 
requirements for a professional degree. In the case of a student admitted 
to advanced standing the additional fee may be refunded in whole or in 
part, according to regulations which may be learned from the Registrar. 

Candidates for admission to advanced standing who attend the 
Summer Course in Practical Mining are required to pay therefor a fee 
of $50. All students attending the Summer Course in Geodesy must 
pay a fee of $20 for the course. 

Deposits for Apparatus Supplies and for Keys to Desks and Lockers 

A deposit for the use of lockers, keys, apparatus, material, and the 
like, ranging from $1 to $40, is required of students in Mines, En- 
gineering, Chemistry, and Architecture. At the end of the year each 
student will be credited with those articles which he returns in good 



COMMITTEE ON EMPLOYMENT FOR STUDENTS 47 



order, and the value of those he has injured or broken will be deducted 
from his deposit. Details may be obtained from the Bursar. 

Comparative Statement of Students* Probable Expenses for the 
Academic Year, October to June 

BASED ON students' STATEMENTS 



Matriculation Fee (First Year) 

Tuition Fee « 

Gymnasium Fee 

Books 

Incidentals 

Residence Hall (39 weeks) 

Commons (39 weeks) 

Clothes and Washing 

All other expenses 

Total 



Low Average Liberal 



$507 



$ s 


$ 5 


$ 5 


150 


150 


150 


7 


7 


7 


18 


30 


40 up 


7 


IS 


33 " 


100 


128 


180 " 


150 


191 


236 " 


46 


80 


125 " 


24 


57 


100 " 



$663 



$876 up 



Residence Halls and University Commons 
(See page 53) 



COMMITTEE ON EMPLOYMENT FOR STUDENTS 

Professor Kemp, Chairman; Professors Fiske, Huntington, Bur- 
dick, GiDDiNGS, and Todd, and the Secretary and Registrar of the 
University, the Alumni Secretary, and the Secretary of Earl Hall. 
The Secretary of the Committee is Malcolm M. Roy, A.B., 1909, to whom 
communications should be addressed. No fees are charged for the Com- 
mittee's services. 

The Employment Committee endeavors to give students who need it 
the opportunity to earn enough for partial or complete support and 
to extend assistance in other ways. Some of the openings available are : 
private tutoring, translating, addressing, sociological work, teaching 
in evening schools, stenography. During the year 1910-11 the stu- 
dent earnings reported to the Committee amounted to $75,709.45. 

Preference is naturally given, in case of a choice of applicants, to 
those who, as strangers in New York, are not likely to hear of positions 
through other channels. No prospective student should come to 

' For Medicine and Mines, Engineering and Chemistry, add $ioo, and for Architec- 
ture add $50. Students in Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry should also make 
provision for deposits for apparatus ranging from $10 to $40 and for Summer Courses. 



48 APPOINTMENT COMMITTEES 

Columbia expecting to depend entirely or even largely upon the assist- 
ance of the Committee, and every student should be prepared to meet 
at least the expenses of the first half-year — say $250. 

The chiefs of clinic in the Medical School give advice without charge 
to students on the lists of the Committee. 

APPOINTMENT COMMITTEES 

The duty of these committees is to assist competent graduates of 
the University to obtain suitable permanent employment. 

The committees keep classified lists of those who wish employment 
and will be glad to be informed promptly of present or prospective 
vacancies in positions for which college-trained men or women are 
eligible, 

1^0 fees are charged for any service rendered by either committee. 

For positions in Colleges and Universities except in the Department of Education 

Professor Tombo, Chairman; Professors Seligman, Cattell, Todd, 
KiRCHWEY, Wheeler, Thomas, and A. H. Thorndike. 

Communications in regard to vacancies and recommendations of 
suitable candidates for the same should be addressed to the Chairman. 

For college and university positions in Education, and for Administrative, Supervisory, 
and Teaching positions in Normal, Secondary, and Elementary Schools and Kinder- 
gartens 

Professor James E. Russell, Dean of Teachers College, Chairman; 
Professors Button, Kemp, McMurry, Smith (D. E.), sind Trent. 

Communications should be addressed to the Chairman of the Com- 
mittee, or to its Secretary, Miss I. L. Pratt. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND PRIZES 

(See page 432) 

RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNIVERSITY AND OTHER 
INSTITUTIONS 

The educational opportunities of students in Columbia University 
(including Barnard College, Teachers College, and the New York 
College of Pharmacy) are increased by the close relations of the 
University with other institutions of instruction and research. 

The Theodore Roosevelt and Kaiser Wilhelm Professorships 

The Theodore Roosevelt Professorship of American History and 
Institutions in the University of Berlin has been endowed by the gift 
of $50,000 to the Trustees of Columbia University. Appointments are 
made annually with the sanction of the German Emperor by the 
Prussian Ministry of Education upon the nomination of Columbia Uni- 
versity, but are not confined to members of this University. In succes- 



OTHER INSTITUTIONS 49 

sive years the fields of American history, American constitutional and 
administrative law, American economic and sociological problems and 
movements, American education, and American contributions to 
science, technology, the arts and literature, will be dealt with. The 
instruction will be given in German in the University of Berlin during 
each winter semester, and may be repeated in whole or in part 
elsewhere during the ensuing semester. 

The Prussian Ministry of Education has established in Columbia 
University a corresponding chair of German History and Institutions, 
to be filled each year by the Trustees of Columbia University upon the 
nomination of the Prussian Ministry of Education. To this chair 
the name of the Kaiser Wilhelm Professorship of German History and 
Institutions has been given, with the approval of the German Emperor. 

(See also page 467) 
The Visiting French Professorship 

By agreement with the Council of the University of Paris there has 
been established in Columbia University a new professorship to be known 
as the Visiting French Professorship. The appointment is made each 
year jointly by the Council of the University of Paris and the Trustees 
of the University. The Visiting French Professor is to be in residence at 
the University for three months dur".ng the first half-year and to conduct 
a seminar after the manner of the Conferences of the University of Paris. 

(See also page 467) 
American Museum of Natural History 

The American Museum of Natural History places its collection at the 
service of advanced students of Columbia University for the purposes 
of study and research, and provides them with the necessary facilities 
for work. The Director of the Museum is a member of the Faculty of 
Pure Science of the University. 

National Academy of Design 

The agreement of February 5, 1906, between the University and the 
Academy makes provision for the closest relations between the two 
institutions in the development of the study of design in New York City. 
(See page 330.) The President of the Academy is a member of 
the Faculty of Fine Arts, and the professors in the departments 
of painting, sculpture, and in the decorative arts are appointed upon 
the joint recommendation of the President of the University and the 
Council of the Academy. 

Metropolitan Museimi of Art 

The Metropolitan Museum of Art admits students of Columbia 
University on presentation of cards of introduction from the Univer- 



50 OTHER INSTITUTIONS 

sity, and gives them special facilities for the study of the objects in the 
Museum. The Director and Assistant Director are members of the 
Faculty of Fine Arts. 

The New York Botanical Garden 

Columbia University has the privilege of conducting university 
courses in botany at the New York Botanical Garden and of using its 
laboratories and floral material, and all courses of instruction given 
there are open to officers and students of the University without 
charge. The Director is a member of the Faculty of Pure Science. 
For a description of the equipment of the Botanical Garden, see the 
statement of the Department of Botany (page 72). 

Theological Seminaries 

The Union Theological Seminary and the General Theological 
Seminary, both of which are represented in the University Council, 
admit students of high standing in the University to certain lec- 
tures in their regular or special courses without tuition fee. 
Libraries of the Seminaries, for reference, are open to all qualified 
students of the University. Reciprocal advantages are offered by 
the University to students of the Seminaries who are qualified to 
register as candidates for the higher degrees. The General Theological 
Seminary offers a scholarship to graduates of Columbia College, 

The University also enjoys reciprocal arrangements with the other 
theological seminaries in the vicinity of New York — the Jewish Theo- 
logical Seminary (New York), Drew Theological Seminary (Madison, 
N. J.), St. Joseph's Theological Seminary (Yonkers, N. Y.), the New 
Brunswick (N. J.) Theological Seminary, and the German Theological 
Seminary (Bloomfield, N. J.). 

Hospitals 

Besides the Vanderbilt Clinic and the Sloane Maternity Hospital, 
the general and special hospitals of New York afford most important 
fields for clinical teaching. The College of Physicians and Surgeons 
is in close alliance with the Presbyterian Hospital (see page 232) and is 
strongly represented on the staff of many other institutions, and regular 
clinical instruction at hospitals is made a prominent feature of the program. 
In many of these hospitals the fourth-year students are admitted as clinical 
clerks to serve on the house staff. 

Other Institutions 

For the details of the work preparatory to public service offered by 
Yale University and Columbia University in co-operation, see page 281. 

The Director of the New York School of Philanthropy is a professor 
in the University, and the same reciprocal advantages for students 
exist as in the case of the Theological Seminaries. 



PUBLIC LECTURES 51 

There are close informal relations between the University and 
the Hispanic Society of America, the Rockefeller Institute of 
Medical Research, the New York Zo5logical Garden, the New York 
Aquarium, and the laboratories at Wood's Hole and Cold Spring 
Harbor. (For the Libraries of the city, see below.) 

PUBLIC LECTURES 

In addition to the regular program of studies, arrangements are made 
for lectures before the members of the University, and in some cases 
before the public also. (For the list of Lectures given in 19 10- 11, see 
the Annual Reports for that year,) 

THE LIBRARY 

W. Dawson Johnston, A.M., Litt.D., Librarian 
Frederick C. Hicks, A.M., LL.B., Assistant Librarian 
Readers' Department : 

Reference Division. . . . Isadore G. Mudge, Ph.B., B.L.S., Reference 

Librarian 

Loan Division Frederic W. Erb, Ph.B., Supervisor 

Accessions Departments : 

Shelf Division Frank C. Erb, Supervisor 

Order Department Ethel H. Budington, Supervisor 

Serial Department Anna K. Fossler, A.B., Supervisor 

Catalogue Department Harriet B, Prescott, Supervisor 

Binding Department Thomas P. Ayer, A.B., Supervisor 

Department Libraries 

Teachers College Elizabeth G. Baldwin, Librarian 

School of Law J. David Thompson, A.M., B.Sc, Librarian 

School of Medicine G. Summerfield Evans, Librarian 

Avery Library Edward R. Smith, A.B., Librarian 

Undergraduate Reading-Rooms 

Columbia College Ralph F. Miller, Librarian 

Barnard College Bertha L. Rockwell, Librarian 

Collections 

The Library contains about 473,000 volumes, exclusive of unbound 
pamphlets and duplicates, and some 30,000 German dissertations. 

Among the notable special collections may be mentioned the Colum- 
biana, 3500 titles; the Phoenix Library, consisting of 7000 volumes, the 



52 THE LIBRARY 

gift of Stephen Whitney Phoenix, of the Class of 1859; the Avery Archi- 
tectural Library, a collection of about 19,000 volumes relating to architec- 
ture and decorative art; the Mary Queen of Scots Library, containing 550 
volumes, collected and given by General J. Watts de Peyster; the collection 
of over 1200 volumes by and about Goethe; the Immanuel Kant collection 
of nearly 1000 volumes; the valuable Townsend Library of National, State, 
and Individual War Records; the Garden Library, deposited by the South- 
ern Society of New York; the valuable library of The Holland Society of 
New York, 600 volumes, including the remarkable collection of works of 
Grotius; the philological library of the late Professor Mortimer Lamson 
Earle, given by his students and friends — consisting of some 2500 volumes; 
the library of Henry Livingston Thomas, late Chief Translator of the 
Department of State, Washington, given by his son, Dr. William S. 
Thomas — some 9000 volumes; and the Library of the American Mathe- 
matical Society, 1500 volumes. The Library is also the depository for the 
Reform Club of the City of New York. 

Reading-Rooms 

About 5000 carefully selected reference books and many of the most im- 
portant works on all subjects, in standard editions, representing the leading 
authors in all literatures, are placed in the general reading-room, directly 
accessible to all authorized readers. On the same floor, in the north wing, 
is the periodical reading-room, where are shelved about 4000 bound vol- 
umes of periodicals, and where the current numbers of about 600 periodicals 
are displayed. 

For the convenience of undergraduates of Columbia College, there 
has been established in Hamilton Hall a College Study. Five thousand 
carefully selected volumes have been placed in this room, as a reference 
library. 

Connected with the stacks in which are stored the books relating es- 
pecially to Philosophy, Literature, the Languages, the Sociological and 
Economic Sciences, Public Law, and History, are twenty special study 
rooms, open only to authorized readers; thus affording advanced students 
and investigators in these fields the fullest opportunity to carry on their 
work in quiet rooms in the immediate vicLnity of the literature of the 
subjects under consideration. The various Science departments have 
special libraries in close connection with their laboratories and lecture 
rooms. 

The Law Library, the Bryson Library of Teachers College, which is the 
Educational Library of the University, and the carefully selected reference 
libraries of Barnard College, the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and 
the College of Pharmacy, are all available to officers and students of the 
University. Nearly all of the more private or restricted libraries of the 
city, such as those of the learned societies, are open to officers and to ad- 
vanced students introduced by the Librarian of the University. 



THE LIBRARY 



Catalogues 



53 



The general catalogue of the Ubraries of the University is a record of all 
books in the possession of the University. In addition to this there are 
catalogues of department libraries located in department reading-rooms, and 
a union catalogue which is a record, by authors only, of books not possessed 
by the University which may be found in the Library of Congress, John 
Crerar Library, and other libraries. The catalogue of the New York Public 
Library in the Library building, 42d St. and 5th Avenue, may also be 
consulted, especially for references to articles in magazines not indexed in 
the published indexes to periodicals. 

Use 

All ofiScers, students, and graduates of the University have free access 
to the Library and may draw books for home use. For further information, 
consult the Reader's Manual, 1911-12. 

Officers of the New York University, of the College of the City of New 
York, of the Normal College, of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and of 
the American Museum of Natural History are granted the same Library 
privileges as are extended to graduates of Columbia University. 

Persons of mature years desiring to engage in definite research which 
cannot be successfully conducted in the public or other libraries of this 
city will be given the privilege of using this Library in the building, upon 
filing a satisfactory application, responsibly endorsed. Blank applica- 
tions will be furnished by the Librarian on request. 

The Library is open each week-day (except Labor Day, Thanksgiving, 
Christmas, New Year's Day, Good Friday, and Independence Day) 
from 8.30 A.M. until 11 p. m., October- June; and until 10 p.m., July- 
September. 

UNIVERSITY PRESS BOOKSTORE 

A University bookstore is maintained under the auspices of the Columbia 
University Press, where officers and students may purchase books and 
stationery at stated discounts from list prices. 

THE GYMNASIUM 

(See page 156) 

UNIVERSITY COMMONS 

The University Commons, in University Hall, conducted under 
student management, has accommodations for 450 men, upon a 
system combining the table d'hdte and A la carte, the average weekly 
charge being $-{.50. There is also a large buffet lunch- room. 



54 RESIDENCE HALLS 

RESIDENCB HALLS 
For Men 

There are two University dormitories on South Field, with accommo- 
dations for 500 men, Hartley Hall, a memorial to the late Marcellus 
Hartley, and Livingston Hall, named in memory of Robert R. Living- 
ston, of the Class of 1765. Each building is 10 stories in height exclu- 
sive of basement, and 137 feet long by 60 feet wide. They are lighted 
by electricity and heated by steam, and have telephone and elevator 
service. 

The two Halls contain 600 rooms, both single and double, all being 
outside rooms; their arrangement permits of flexibility in renting 
the rooms in suites. The average size of the bedrooms is 8 feet by 
14.6, of the studies 10 by 14.6; all are nine feet high. Each bedroom 
has a clothes-closet and an enamelled basin with hot and cold water, 
and is provided with heavy oak furniture. There are four shower- 
baths on each floor. 

The only entrance to each building for students is on the side facing 
the campus, and leads directly into an assembly room 60 feet square. 
This room runs up through two stories and has a large open fireplace 
opposite the entrance. 

The Residence Halls are supervised and controlled by a Council 
composed of the Consulting Engineer, two University officers, and a 
representative from each Hall. The Council is assisted by two Com- 
mittees made up of residents in the Halls. 

While Hartley Hall and Livingston Hall are open to all male students 
of the University, students in Columbia College, in accordance with 
the desire of the donors, Mrs. Helen Hartley Jenkins and Marcellus 
Hartley Dodge, '03, are given the preference in the assignment 
of rooms in Hartley Hall. 

The average weekly charge for a single room is $3.30, or $129 for 
the academic year of thirty-nine weeks. A pamphlet containing 
floor-plans, charges, and the Hall Regulations may be had upon appli- 
cation to the Secretary of the University. Rooms will be assigned in 
the order of receipt of written applications to be made on a blank 
provided by the Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 

For Women 

Brooks Hall, the hall of residence for Barnard College students, is 
on the north side of 11 6th Street; it accommodates 90 students'. 
Full information in regard to the situation and cost of rooms, the 
advance deposit, the charge for electric light, and the residence 
scholarships is published in a separate pamphlet, to be had on ap- 
plication to the Secretary of Barnard College, or to the Mistress of 
Brooks Hall, Barnard College, New York City. 



PUBLIC WORSHIP AND RELIGIOUS WORK 55 

Whittier Hall, the dormitory btiilding of Teachers College, is situated 
on Amsterdam Avenue, between 120th and 121st Streets, and has 
accommodations for 350 women. Inquiries regarding rooms, board, 
and the like, should be addressed to the Secretary of Whittier Hall, 
1230 Amsterdam Avenue. 

Other Living Accommodations 

Besides these dormitories, there are many good boarding-houses and 
apartments near the University. The careful selection, inspection, 
and registration of such lodgings, have been undertaken, and a card- 
catalogue is kept at Earl Hall. Many of the Greek-letter fraternities, 
a list of which will be found on page 56, maintain chapter houses near 
the University. 

PUBLIC WORSHIP AND RELIGIOUS WORK 

St. Paul's Chapel, dedicated February 3, 1907, was the gift of Olivia 
Egleston Phelps Stokes and Caroline Phelps Stokes as a memorial to their 
parents. The Chapel is in the form of a cross, the greatest length being 122 
feet and the width at the transepts 77 feet, and has 1050 sittings. 

Service, at which attendance is voluntary, is held every week-day, 
except Saturday and Wednesday, at noon, the period from 12 to 12.20 
being set aside by the University Council for religious exercises. On 
Wednesday there is a Vesper service at 5.10. Service on Sunday is at 4 
o'clock. Organ recitals are also frequently given. 

EARL HALL 

Earl Hall, the home of the religious, philanthropic, and social or- 
ganizations and interests of the University, is open from 8.30 a.m. 
to 10 P.M. daily, to all students without expense, under the direct 
management of the Secretary of Earl Hall, who is also Secretary of 
the University Young Men's Christian Association. 

The building may not be used for distinctly dogmatic or denomina- 
tional religious teaching. All organizations the objects of which are 
to promote the religious and philanthropic life of their student mem- 
bers and of the student body at large have the privilege of holding their 
meetings in this building. While the social purposes of the Hall are 
necessarily subordinated to the other uses of the building, the Sec- 
retary desires to promote the same type of informal personal and social 
intercourse that prevails in a good club. 

Provision for the regular meetings of student organizations is made 
on a day-and-hour schedule, without exclusive use of any of the rooms 
in the following order: societies the purpose of which is (i) primarily 
religious; (2) primarily philanthropic; (3) primarily literary, and (4) 
miscellaneous student organizations. 



56 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

MEDICAL VISITOR 

For those who are without local family physicians there is a Medical 
Visitor (Dr. D. S. D. Jessup, 542 W. 112th St.) whose duties are to ren- 
der medical assistance to such officers and students as may desire it, 
either at their homes or elsewhere, at a remuneration to be arranged 
between himself and individual patients. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The various student organizations, while self-governing, are subject 
to the following regulations: The schedules of public contests and per- 
formances must be approved by a University Committee; budgets ior 
expenditure are approved and checked by the Comptroller of Student 
Organizations; the University Committee on Athletics, consisting of 
three graduates, two students, and two University officers, adopt and 
administer rules of eligibility not involving questions of scholarship 
and govern participation in inter- collegiate athletics. Provision is 
made for the election each year by the student body at large of a 
Board of Student Representatives. The constitution of this board 
will be found in the pamphlet on Student Organizations, which may 
be obtained from the Secretary of the University. The members for the 
current year are: 

Student Board 

W, C. Pyne, Chairman J. P. Wood, Secretary 

H. S. Babcock H. a. Calahan 

A, D. Alexander L. H. Robinson 

J. T. Kemp F. W, Culman 
C. G. Sinclair 

The members of the University Committee on Student Organizations are: 

Professor Lord, Chairman (term expires July i, 191 6) 
Professor S. A. Mitchell (term expires July i, 19 15) 
Professor Fletcher (term expires July i, 19 14) 
Prof essor Kemp (term expires July i, 19 13) 
Professor Hayes (term expires July i, 1912) 

Greek Letter Fraternities 

The following Greek-letter fraternities, given in the order of their 
establishment, maintain chapters at Columbia University: 

Alpha Delta Phi; Psi Upsilon; Delta Phi; Delta Psi; Phi Kappa 
Sigma; Phi Gamma Delta; Phi Kappa Psi; Delta Kappa Epsilon; 
Zeta Psi; BetaTheta Pi; Delta Tau Delta; Theta Delta Chi; Phi Delta 
Theta; Delta Upsilon; Sigma Chi; Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Phi Sigma 
Kappa; Theta Xi; Alpha Chi Rho; Phi Epsilon Pi; Sigma Nu; Alpha 
Sigma Phi ; Zeta Beta Tau. 



DIVISIONAL AND DEPARTMENTAL STATEMENTS 
INTRODUCTORY 

The courses of instruction are numbered in accordance with a plan 
uniform throughout the University, and attention is called to the 
following information which the number assigned to a course will in 
each case indicate : 

Odd numbers indicate the first, even numbers the second-half of 
the academic year. Courses designated 1-2, 21-22, etc., run through 
both half-years; courses designated 1-4, 5-8, etc., run through two 
complete academic years. Courses numbered between i and 100 
are, in general, elementary and may not be offered in fulfilment of 
the requirements for the higher degrees (A.M. and Ph.D.). Courses 
numbered from 101-200 are primarily for students who hold a first 
degree but are open to undergraduates who have completed 64 points 
(for courses in law 94 points), including all prescribed work. In gen- 
eral no such course may be taken without some elementary training in 
the same or in some allied subject. Courses from 201-300 are re- 
stricted to such graduate students as are qualified to pursue the work 
to advantage. Seminars are numbered from 301 up. Attention is 
called to the Announcement of the Faculties of Political Science, Phi- 
losophy, and Pure Science, and particularly to the fact that the re- 
quirements for the higher degrees are based upon subjects and not 
upon courses. Students who wish to offer a subject either as a major 
or minor should, before registration, consult the officers of instruction 
and administration concerned with regard to their selection of courses. 

Courses enclosed in brackets are not offered during 1911-12, and 
any other course not applied for by at least three candidates for a 
degree may be withdrawn by the instructor. 

Any subject of study not appearing in its alphabetical order may 
be found through the index. 

With the exception of the courses in mines, engineering, chemistry, 
medicine, and law, all courses numbered over loi are open to women 
upon the same terms as to men, unless specific statement is made to 
the contrary. 

Unless otherwise stated, the number of hours given indicates the 
hours of classroom work (lectures, conferences, and recitations) per 

57 



58 ANATOMY 

week. When a course involves both classroom work and laboratory 
or drafting-room work, the former will be indicated by C and the 
latter by L and D, respectively. In courses in medicine, D indicates 
demonstrations. An "afternoon " implies three hours a day, normally 
from I : oo to 4 : oo. 

Students should note the distinction between a department and 
a school. For instance, there is in the University both a Depart- 
ment of Architecture and a School of Architecture; Departments 
of Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering and a School of 
Engineering. The Departmental Statements which follow have to 
do only with the giving of the instruction and the opportunities 
for research in each special branch of study. The information as 
to the conditions of admission to the courses, and the academic 
credit to be received therefor, will be found under the information 
relating to Colleges and Schools, pages 194 et seg., and in the separately 
printed Announcements. 

For the courses to be offered in fulfilment of the requirements for 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science, see page 195; 
Bachelor of Laws, see page 217; Doctor of Medicine, see page 239; 
for the several degrees in mining, engineering, and chemistry, see 
pages 254-264; and for Fine Arts — architecture, music, and design — 
see pages 326, 329, and 330. 

It is not possible, within the limits of this volume, to give more 
than the briefest outline of the courses. In some one of the 
Bulletins of Information published by the University, and distributed 
without charge upon application to the Secretary, a detailed state- 
ment will be found of the scope of each course, the manner of 
treatment, the courses prerequisite, and the like. A list of the 
Bulletins will be found on page 472. 

Anatomy 

Professor: Huntington (Executive Officer) 

Assistant Professors: Gallaudet and Schulte 

Associates: Stillman and Tilney 

Instructors: Miller (A. M.), Smith (C. H.), and Strong 

Demonstrators: Brown (A. J.), Derby, and Vaughan. 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

51-52 — Vertebrate morphology — Anatomy of the body cavities — 
Visceral and topographical course — Thorax and abdomen. Lectures 
combined with demonstrations. 3 hours. Professor Huntington 

S3 — Cranial morphology — ^Lectures, i hour. Dr. Tilney 



ANATOMY 



59 



54 — Sjmdesmology, myology, angeiology of head and neck, periph- 
eral nervous system of neck. Demonstrations i hour. Professor Gal- 

LAUDET 

35-56 — Demonstrations — Osteology, syndesmology, myology, periph- 
eral nervous system, and angeiology of the extremities. Pharynx, larynx. 

2 hours. Drs. Stillman and Derby 

Direct connection to subjects treated in laboratory course in dissection, 
57-58 

57-58 — Laboratory course — Dissection of the human body. 12 hours. 
Professors Huntington, Gallaudet, Schulte, associates, and demon- 
strators 

59-60 — Laboratory course — Dissection of the human body. 10 hours. 
Professors Huntington, Gallaudet, Schulte, associates, and demon- 
strators 

63-64 — Demonstrations and conferences — Visceral anatomy. Direct 
examination and demonstration of the preparations serving to illustrate 
course 51-52. i hour. Dr. Brown 

65-66 — Neurology. 2 hours. Drs. Tilney and Strong 

67-68 — Histology and embryology — Lectures and demonstrations, 

3 hours. Professor Schulte 

69-70 — Histology and embryology, laboratory cotu-se. 6 hours. Pro- 
fessor Schulte, Mr. Miller, and Drs. Strong and Smith 

71-72 — Histology and embryology. Conferences and demonstrations. 
I hour. Professor Schulte, Mr. Miller, and Drs. Strong and Smith 

Research 

1 1 7-1 1 8 — The laboratory of animal morphology is open for research, 
under the direction of the professor, to advanced workers. Professors 
Huntington, Schulte, and staflf 

Optional Courses 

62 — Anatomy of mouth, larynx, pharynx, auditory apparatus. 3 
hours. Professor Gallaudet 

125-126 — Development and comparative anatomy of the heart and 
vascular system. Professors Huntington, Schulte, and stafiF 

127-128 — Development and comparative anatomy of the genito-urinary 
system. Professors Huntington, Schulte, and staflE 

129-130 — Development and comparative anatomy of the respiratory 
tract. Professors Huntington, Schltlte, and staff 

131-132 — Development and comparative anatomy of the nervous 
system. Professors Huntington, Schulte, and stafif 



60 ANATOMY 

133-134 — Development and comparative anatomy of the alimentary 
canal. Professors Huntington, Schulte, and stafif 

The work in morphology is designed for laboratory exercises of at least 
two continuous hours, at any one exercise, supplemented in certain courses 
by demonstration and study of material in the Museum of Human and 
Comparative Anatomy and the departmental collections. 

The time required for the above courses, if offered as minors for the 
degree of A.M. or Ph.D., or if taken as optionals, unless otherwise 
specified, is half a day per week from October to April. 

The demands on laboratory space and teaching force render it 
necessary to limit the number of candidates admitted to these courses. 

Anatomical Laboratories 

The laboratory facilities of the department are very complete. The 
large general dissecting-room accommodates from 390 to 546 students, 
working in groups of five or seven at one table. 

The laboratory for advanced morphological research occupies the 
third story of the anatomical building. Every facility for advanced 
and research work in morphology is here extended. The established 
connections of the department furnish abundant htiman and com- 
parative material, both mature and embryonal. The private library 
of the Professor of Anatomy is at the disposal of advanced 
workers. 

Museum of Human and Comparative Anatomy 

Much work has been done in the formation of a Museum of Human 
and Comparative Anatomy, the ultimate design of which is to present, 
in as complete a manner as possible, a view of the evolution of the 
forms of animal life, and of their natural relations both in series of 
natural groups and in the comparative and relative positions of organs 
and systems. Even the approximate attainment of this aim will re- 
quire much time and work, but sufficient progress has been made to 
enable the department to offer great facilities for study and research. 
The collection, both as regards groups and the individual preparations, 
is designed for the illustration of both elementary and advanced courses. 

The second floor of the anatomical building has been furnished 
throughout with suitable exhibition and demonstration stands. It is 
the intention of the department to install in this space the portion 
of the collection most used in the medical courses, thus establishing 
an undergraduate teaching museum which will both increase the effi- 
ciency of the sectional demonstrations and render the material upon 
which they are based available at all times for study and research. 

A study-collection of human osteological preparations is so admin- 
istered as to enable every student to take out the different osteological 
series and retain them for private study as long as required. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 6l 

Anthropology 

Professors: Boas {Executive Officer), Farrand, and Saville 
Lecturers: Frachtenberg and Goldenweiser. 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 
1-2 — General introductory course. 3 hours. First half-year, Professor 
Farrand; second half-year, Professor Boas 

103-104 — Prehistoric archaeology. 2 hours. Professor Saville and 
Dr. Berkey (of the Department of Geology) 

105-106 — Ethnology — Primitive culture. 2 hours. Professor Farrand 
107-108 — Ethnography of America and Siberia. Professor Boas 
[log-iio — Ethnography of Africa and Polynesia. Professor Boas] 
[111-112 — The races of Europe. 2 hours. Professor Boas] 
115-116 — Archaeology of Mexico and Central America. 2 hours. 
Professor Saville 

117-118— American languages. 2 hours. Professor Boas 
129-130 — American languages — Advanced course. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Boas 

1 21-122 — Anthropometry, C 2 hours, L 3 hours. Professor Boas 
131-132 — Types of primitive social organization. 2 hours. Dr. Gold- 
enweiser 

133-134 — Linguistic problems in anthropology. 2 hours. Dr. Frach- 
tenberg 

201-202 — Research work in anthropology. Professors Boas, Farrand, 
and Saville 

301-302 — Seminar in ethnology. 2 hours bi-weekly. Professor Boas 
The collections and apparatus of the American Museum of Natural 
History may be used by students of anthropology. 

Summer Session 
SI — General introduction. 2 points. Professor Kroeber 
SI 02 — Problems and methods. 2 points. Professor Kroeber 

Architecture 

Professors: Hamlin {Executive Officer) and Sherman 
Assistant Professors: Harriman and Warren 
Director of Atelier: Hastings 

Associates: Nelson (F. A.), PR;fev6T, and Van Pelt 
Lecturers: Bach (R. F.), Caparn, Flanagan, Leavitt, Smith (E. R.), 
Smith (L. E.), and Vitale. 



62 'ARCHITECTURE] 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — ^The elements of architecture. The orders, balustrades, arcades, 
doors, windows, spires, vaults, domes, i hour, and work in drafting- 
room. Professor Harriman and Mr. Flanagan 

2c — Applied elements — Exercises in application of the orders and other 
features in elementary design. 15 hours. Professor Harriman and Mr. 
Flanagan 

3 — Architectural drawing. 15 hours. Professor Harriman and Mr. 
Flanagan 

5 — Shades and shadows, projections and intersections. C 3 hours, 
D 2 hours. Professor Sherman 

7 — Perspective. C 2 hours, D 2 hours. Professor Sherman 

8 — Descriptive geometry. C 5 hours, D 4 hours, 16 to 24 plates required. 
Professor Sherman 

10 — Stereotomy. C i hour, D 2 hours. Professor Sherman 

11-12 — Specifications. C 3 hours, D 6 hours in alternate weeks. Pro- 
fessor Warren 

13-14 — Building materials. C 2 hours. Professor Warren 

15-16 — Elementary structural design. C 2 hours, D 6 hours in alter- 
nate weeks. Professor Warren 

17-18 — ^Architectural engineering. C 3 hours, D 6 hours in alternate 
weeks. Professor Warren 

21-22 — ^Ancient architectural history. 2 hours. Professor Hamlin 
23-24 — Mediaeval architectural history. C 2 hours, with collateral 
reading (see 41-42, and 43-44), and 15 hours* original research for six 
weeks. Exercises in historical design (see 61-64). Professor Hamlin 

24a — Research in connection with mediaeval architectural history. 
Professor Hamlin and Mr. Bach 

25-26 — Modern architectural history — C 2 hours with collateral reading 
(see 43-44), and 15 hours' research for six weeks (see 260). Exercises in 
historical design (see 61-64). Professor Hamlin 

26a — Research in connection with modern architectural history. Pro- 
fessor Hamlin and Mr. Bach 

31-32 — History of ancient ornament. I hour. Professor Hamlin and 
Mr. Bach 

33-34 — ^History of mediaeval ornament, i hour with exercises in 
decorative design. Professor Hamlin 



ARCHITECTURE 63 

35-36 — History of modern ornament, i hour with exercises in decora- 
tive design. Professor Hamlin 

41-42 — Archaeology (in French). 2 hours. Mr. Bach 

43-44 — Historical reading in French and German. 2 hours. Mr. 
Bach 

51-32 — Theory of planning and composition. I hour. Professor 
Hamlin and special lecturers 

53 — Theory and practice of decorative arts. i hour. C i hour, D 
2 hours. Mr. Bach and special lecturers. 

54 — Theory of color. C i hour, D 2 hours. Professor Hamlin and 
special lecturers 

55 — Professional practice, i hour. Professor Hamlin and special 
lecturers 

61-62 — Elementary design. 15 hours, first half-year, and for 10 weeks 
second half-year. Messrs. Van Pelt, Nelson, Pr^v6t, and L. E. Smith 

63-64 — Intermediate design. 15 hours, first half-year, and for 10 
weeks second half-year. Messrs. Van Pelt, Nelson, Pr6v6t, and L. E. 
Smith 

71-72 — Elementary freehand drawing. 6 hours. Professor Harriman 

72a — Summer work — Drawings and designs to be executed during 
the summer vacation following the first year of residence 

73~74 — Intermediate drawing. 4 to 6 hours. Mr. Flanagan and Mr. 
E. R. Smith 

74a — Summer work — Drawings and designs to be executed during 
the second summer vacation 

75-76 — Drawing from the cast. 4 to 6 hours. Professor Harriman 

76a — Summer work — Drawings and designs to be executed during 
the third summer vacation 

111-112, 113-114, 115-116 — Advanced practice and engineering. C 
and I> 6 to 12 hours (in connection with 117-118). Professors Burr, 
Campbell, Lucke^ Warren, Williams, and Mr. MacGregor 

1280 — Research — Summer vacation essay; thesis, dissertation, previous 
to graduation. Professor Hamlin 

161-162 — ^Advanced design. 25 to 30 hours. Messrs. Van Pelt, 
Nelson, PR^vdT, and L. E. Smith 

164 — Thesis — Advanced design or research; drawings with accom- 
panying dissertation. 25 hours for 8 to 12 weeks previous to graduation. 
Professor Warren, Messrs. Van Pelt, Nelson, and Pr6v6t 

177-178 — Advanced drawing — From the antique and from life. 
6 hours (at the studios of the National Academy of Design) 



64 ARCHITECTURE 

2II-2I2, 2x3-214, 217-218 — Graduate practice, and engineering — 
Original investigations and accompanying reports. 6 hours. Professor 
Warren 

227-228 — Graduate essays — Original research with accompanying re- 
ports. 4 to 6 hours. Professor Hamlin 

261-262 — Graduate design — ^Advanced problems, etc. Messrs. Van 
Pelt, Nelson, and Pr6v6t 

Landscape Architecture 

1-2 — History and theory of landscape art. C 2 hours, D 3 hours. 
Messrs. Caparn, Leavitt, and Vitale. 

61-62, 63-64 — Landscape design, problems. D 10 hours. Messrs. 
Caparn, Leavitt, and Vitale 

720-760 — Summer work — sketches and reports. 4 months' office and 
field work 

161-162 — Advanced landscape design, problems. D 15-20 hours. 
Messrs. Caparn, Leavitt, and Vitale 

164 — Graduating thesis in landscape design. Messrs. Caparn, Leavitt , 
and Vitale 

Summer Session 

sF — Freehand drawing. 2 points. Mr. Beans 

SI — Elements of architecture. Study of the five orders. 3 points. 
Professor Harriman 

Extension 
eWi — ^Freehand drawing. Mr. Beans 

eXi-X2 — Elements and applications of algebra, geometry, and trigo- 
nometry. Professor Hodge 

eZi-Z2 — Mechanics applied to construction. 2 points. Professor 
Burnside 
eia-2a — The elements of architecture. 2 points. Professor Harriman 
e2 — ^Applied elements. 2 points. Professor Harriman 
63 — Architectural drawing. 2 points. Professor Harriman 
es — Shades and shadows. 4 points. Mr. Ingle 
e6 — Perspective. 4 points. Mr. Ingle 
621-22 — ^Ancient architectural history. 2 points. Mr. Bach 
631-32 — History of ancient ornament, i point. Mr. Bach 
67-8 — Descriptive geometry. 4 points. Mr. Harrington 
6II-12 — Specifications. 5 points. Mr. Hintermyer 
613-14 — Building materials. 2 hours. 2 points. Mr. Hintermyer 
623-24 — Medieval architectural history. 2 points. Mr. Bach 



ASTRONOMY 65 

Astronomy 

Professor: Jacoby (Executive Officer) 
Assistant Professor: Mitchell (S. A.). 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — General astronomy — Introductory course. 2 hours, and fort- 
nightly evening attendance in the Wilde Observatory. Professor Jacoby 

3-4 — General astronomy, second courses. 3 hours. Professor Mitchell 

103-104 — Spherical and practical astronomy — A more mathematical 
treatment, including practical use of instruments. 2 hours, and 2 hours' 
observatory. Professor Mitchell 

105 — Geodesy — Brief history of geodetic operations and description 
of instruments, including their adjustment and use. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Mitchell 

106 — Geodesy and practical astronomy, i hour, and 3 hours' laboratory 
Professor Mitchell 

S107 — Geodesy — Summer course in practical geodesy. Five weeks of 
practical work in the field. Professors Jacoby and Mitchell with 
assistants^ 

201-202 — Advanced spherical and practical astronomy. 2 hours, 
and 4 hours' observatory work for two years. Professor Mitchell 

205-206 — Reduction of photographic star plates, i hour, with practi- 
cal work, for two years. Professor Jacoby 

207-208 — Method of least squares, with applications to astronomy 
and geodesy, i hour. Professor Jacoby 

213-214 — ^Theoretical astrophysics. 2 hours. Professor Mitchell 
Astronomical and Geodetic Equipment 

The Wilde Observatory contains an equatorial telescope, with clock- 
work and accessories. The University has also a very complete collec- 
tion of instruments for the application of astronomy to geodesy, 
including a Bamberg universal combined prismatic transit and zenith 
telescope of 4-inch aperture; a Wanschaff zenith telescope of 8-cm.. 
aperture, suitable for latitude measures of the highest precision; two 
Wanschaff 8-inch microscope theodolites; two Fauth 8- and lo-inch 
microscope theodolites; secondary bar base and tape base apparatus, 
with stretching machines; complete outfit of engineer's instruments, 
sextants, apparatus for barometric hypsometry, clocks, chronometers, 
electric chronographs, etc. ; five computing machines. 



66 BACTERIOLOGY 

For the advanced study of astronomy proper, there are special 
facilities including two Repsold measuring machines of the latest type 
and a large collection of original astronomical photographs suitable 
for measurement and reduction. These photographs were made by 
Gill at the Cape of Good Hope, Rutherfurd at New York, Donner at 
Helsingfors, Henry at Paris, Campbell at Mt. Hamilton, etc. Funds are 
provided for the publication of researches in astronomical photogra- 
phy. (See University Bibliography.) For research work in astro- 
physics students have access to the well-equipped laboratories of the 
Department of Physics, and there is also a collection of spectrograms 
photographed with the 40-inch telescope of the Yerkes Observatory 
and machines for measuring them. 

In addition, there are a number of unmounted instruments, includ- 
ing Lewis Morris Rutherfurd 's famous 13 -inch equatorial, with its 
attachments. 

The University Library is especially strong in astronomy. Among 
other important collections, it contains the private library of the 
late Dr. Otto Struve, formerly director of the Pulkowa Observatory. 
There is also a good working library in the department. 

Bacteriology 

Professor: Hiss {Executive Officer) 
Assistant Professor: Wadsworth 
Instructor: Dwyer 
Assistant: Moak. 

Close association is maintained between this department and the 
Departments of Pathology and Clinical Pathology, so as to facilitate 
instruction and research in these closely allied subjects. 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

51 — Practical instruction in bacteriology and hygiene. 4 hours. Pro- 
fessors Hiss, Wadsworth, and Drs. Dwyer and Moak 

201 — Special laboratory course in advanced bacteriology and 
bacteriological technique. Afternoons in November, December, and 
January. Professors Hiss, Wadsworth, and Dr. Dwyer. 

203 — Laboratory course — as under Course 201 — with additional time 
for the study of known species of bacteria, their chemical products, pho- 
tomicrography and original investigation. Professor Hiss 

Summer Session 

SSI — Practical course in bacteriology. 2 points. Professor Wads- 
worth 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 67 

Research 

Research may be pursued in the laboratories of this department 
by a limited number of properly qualified, advanced workers, under 
the direction of the Professor. 

Equipment 

The Department of Bacteriology occupies the western section of the 
fifth floor of the north wing of the building of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. It comprises a large laboratory for the accommodation 
of the undergraduate and advanced classes in bacteriology, a research 
laboratory for special advanced workers, and rooms thoroughly 
equipped for the preparation of culture media and for the chemical 
study of bacterial products. 

The laboratories are well equipped with all necessary apparatus, animal 
houses, and cold-storage facilities. A large collection of bacterial species 
is kept under cultivation. 

Biological Chemistry 

Professor: GiES {Executive Officer) 

A ssistant Professor: Welker 

Associates: Eddy, Foster, and Rosenbloom 

Instructors: Clark (E. D.), Lothrop, Mosenthal, and .Seaman 
(Teachers College) 

Assistants: Ottenberg, Rose, Smith (C. S.), and Miller (Teachers 
College) 

All courses not otherwise specified are given at the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

Organic Chemistry 

51 — Organic chemistry. (Introductory to Courses loi, 102, and 104 
in physiological chemistry.) C I hour, D 1 hour, R 2 hours, L 6 hours. 
Professors Gies and Welker, and Mr. Smith 

Nutrition (Physiological and Pathological Chemistry) 

101-102 — General physiological chemistry (normal nutrition). (Teach- 
ers College, Household Arts, 25.) C i hour, R 1 hour and L 5 hours. 
Professor Gies, Miss Seaman and Mr. Miller 

104 — General physiological chemistry (normal nutrition). C 2 hours, 
R I hour, and L 6 hours. Professors Gies and Welker, Dr. Clark, and 
Messrs. Smith and Rose 



68 BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 

201-202 — Chemistry of digestion, absorption, and assimilation. (School 
of Pharmacy.) C i hour. Professor GiES 

203-204 — General biological chemistry. C i hour, L 4 hours. Dr. 
Eddy 

205-206 — Advanced physiological chemistry, including methods of 
research in nutrition. (Teachers College, Household Arts, 125.) C i 
hour, L 5 hours. Professor Gies and Miss Seaman 

207-208 — Biochemical methods of research, including clinical method. 
C I hour, L 7 hours. Professor Gies, and Dr. Lothrop and Mr. Rose 

209-210 — 'Nutrition in health and disease. C 2 hours. Professor Gies 

2 1 1-2 1 2 — Nutrition in health (advanced physiological chemistry). 
C 4 hours, L 12 hours. Professor Gies, Dr. Clark, and Mr. Rose 

213-214 — Nutrition in disease (general pathological chemistry). C 4 
hours. L 12 hours. Professor Gies 

215-216 — Advanced physiological and pathological chemistry, including 
all phases of nutrition. Research 16 hours. Professors Gies and Welker, 
Drs. Lothrop an'd Clark, and Mr. Rose 

Toxicological Chemistry 

217-218 — Effects and detection of poisons, including food preservatives 
and adulterants. L 6 hours. Professor Gies 

Botanical Chemistry 

210-220 — Chemical physiology of plants. C i hour, L 7 hours. 
Professor Gies and Dr. Clark. (The course may be taken in whole or 
in part at the New York Botanical Garden, where Professor Gies is con- 
sulting chemist.) See Botany, page 70. 

Bacteriological Chemistry 

221-222 — Chemistry of micro-organisms; fermentations, putrefactions, 
and enzyme actions in general (introduction to sanitary chemistry). 
C I hour. L 7 hours. Professor Gies and Dr. Clark 

Sanitary Chemistry 

105 — Sanitary chemistry. (Teachers College, Household Arts, 26a.) 
C I hour, L 3 hours. Professor Gies, Miss Seaman and Dr. Clark 

Biochemical Seminar 

301 — ^302 — The members of the teaching staff and all other investiga- 
tors in the department meet weekly to discuss results of recent researches 
in chemical biology. The Seminar is open to all students in the University. 
I hour. Professor Gies. 



BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY 69 

Research 

Biochemical research may be conducted by advanced workers, inde- 
pendently or imder guidance. Professor Gies consults regularly with 
investigators in the Laboratory of Zoology on Tuesday afternoons, and 
at the N. Y. Botanical Garden on Wednesday afternoons. 

Summer Session 

S104 — General physiological chemistry (normal nutrition). 3 points. 
Professor Gies and Mr. Smith 

sioi — General physiological chemistry (normal nutrition). (Teachers 
College, Household Arts, S-H. A. 25.) 3 points. Professor Gies and Miss 
Seaman 

sA — Nutrition. 2 points. Dr. Foster 

Library 

Professor Gies's library occupies a room adjoining the main laboratory 
at the medical school and is accessible, by appointment, to all workers in 
the Department. 

Equipment 

The headquarters of the Department of Biological Chemistry are 
situated at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, where eight rooms 
are well equipped for experimental work in biological chemistry. Two 
of the rooms are relatively large and will each accommodate about 
seventy workers at a time. Five smaller rooms are specially fitted'up 
for experimental investigations by advanced students. 

The laboratory of physiological chemistry at Teachers College is 
situated on the fourth floor of the Household Arts building. It 
contains two rooms that are fully stocked with apparatus and chemicals. 
The larger of these rooms will accommodate thirty-five workers at a 
time. The smaller room is intended for research by advanced students. 

Special facilities have been provided at the New York Zoological 
Park for research there in biological chemistry under the direction of 
the head of this department. 

The laboratories of the New York Botanical Garden are open to 
students of biological chemistry. 

Biochemical Association 

The Columbia University Biochemical Association holds quarterly 
scientific meetings, which are open to all students in the University. 



70 BOTANY 

Botany 

Professors: Harper (Executive Officer) and Richards 

Associate Professors: Curtis and Marquette 

Assistant Professor: Hazen 

Instructors: Darling and Latham 

Research Assistant: Dodge 

Assistants: Altenburg, Boas, Fromme, and Schwarze. 

The undergraduate courses in Botany are designed to give a broad 
general knowledge during the first year, and to permit some specializa- 
tion thereafter. Graduate courses imply the completion of the equiva- 
lent of two to three years of undergraduate work. 

Certain graduate courses at the New York Botanical Garden are also 
given, either wholly or in part, by members of the Garden staff. 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — General botany. C 2 and L 4 hours. Professor Curtis, Dr. 
Darling 

3-4 — Plant morphology. C 2 and L 4 hours. First half-year, algae aind 
fungi. Second half-year, seed plants. Professors Harper and Curtis 

6 — Economic botany. C i, Z, 4 hours. Dr. Darling 

7 — Growth and character of timber. C" i, L 3 hours. Professor 
Curtis and Dr, Darling 

101-102 — Plant physiology. C i, L 4 hours. Professor Marquette 

1 1 3-1 14 — Morphology of the higher plants. Study of the orders, 
including the structure and relationship of plants. Professor Curtis, 
Dr. Darling, and Mr. Dodge 

116 — Mycology. Advanced work on the morphology and physiology 
of fungi with special reference to forms that cause diseases of plants. Pro- 
fessor Harper. 

117-118 — Cytology. General physiology of organisms. Lectures and 
laboratory work upon the reproduction, irritability, and nutrition of the 
cell. Professor Harper 

120 — Plant reactions. Lectures and demonstrations on the responses 
of plants to external stimuli. Professor Marquette 



BOTANY 71 

201-208 — Physiology. Lines of work dealing with various problems 
in plant physiology, such as the relation of structure and function, 
growth, the irritable mechanism of the plant, and the permanent 
adaptive reactions to environmental factors. Professors Richards, 
Curtis, and Marquette 

209-210 — Physiology of nutrition — treated from a chemical stand- 
point. Professors Richards and Gies 

211-212 — Plant pathology. Diseases induced by cryptogamic para- 
sites, including work in culture methods. Drs. Murrill, Seaver, and 
Harper 

217-218 — Embryology of spermatophyta. With special work 
during two summers. Professors Curtis and Hazen 

219-226 — Morphology. Work dealing with morphological prob- 
lems in the various groups of plants. Directed by members of the 
department and Botanical Garden staff. 

227-234 — Taxonomy. — Critical study of a family, genus, or other 
group selected from any division of the plant world. Directed by 
members of the Botanical Garden staff. 

235-238 — Plant distribution. Problems dealing with regional 
botany or plant geography. Professor Britton and other members 
of the staff. 

239-240 — Developmental taxonomy — Fossil ancestors of some 
family of plants. Dr. Hollick 

241-242 — Research on the physiology of the cell and reproduction. 
Professor Harper 

243-244 — Plant breeding. Lectures and laboratory work upon the 
principles of heredity and plant genetics. Mr. Stout 

301-302 — Seminar for the study of special topics in general physiology 
and the presentation of the results of investigations. Friday 4-6. Pro- 
fessor Harper 

Convention — A botanical convention is held monthly at the library 
of the New York Botanical Garden, where members of the staff and 
students either present the results of their own work or review the 
progress of botanical research and publication elsewhere. 

51-52 — Principles of plant morphology and physiology. C2, 1,4 hours. 
Professor Richards, Misses Latham and Boas (Barnard) 

53-54^General morphology and development of plants — C 2, L 4 
hours. Professor Hazen and Miss Boas (Barnard) 

55-56 — Morphology and classification of spermatophytes — Study of 
the Natural Orders. C i hour, L 4 or 6 hours. Professor Hazen 



72 BOTANY 

153 — Anatomy of vascular plants. C 2 and a minimum of L 6 hours. 
Professor Richards and Miss Latham (Barnard) 

154 — Physiology of plants from standpoint of nutrition. C 2 and a 
minimiuR of I, 6 hours. Professor Richards and Miss Latham 
(Barnard) 

[156 — Physiology of plants from standpoint of growth — C 2 and a 
minimum of Z, 6 hours. Professor Richards and Miss Latham 
(Barnard)] 

158 — Structure and development of algae — ^Advanced course. C 1, 
L 6 hours. Professor Hazen (Barnard) 

159 — Structure and development of fungi — Advanced course. C i, 
L 6 hours. Professor Richards (Barnard) 

Coturses 158-159 are not usually given the same year. 

160 — Embryology and laboratory methods. Practice in methods of 
technique, with the study of the embryology of one or more types. L 8 
hours with occasional lectures and outside reading. Miss Latham (Bar- 
nard) 

161, 162 — Advanced physiology and morphology. Work will be ar- 
ranged to suit the needs of the students. Professors Richards and Hazen, 
and Miss Latham (Barnard) 

Summer Session 

si-sia — Nature and development of plants. 4 points. Professor 
Curtis and Mr. Dodge 

S102 or SI02C — Plant physiology. 4 points. Professor Curtis and Mr. 
Dodge 

Extension 

ei-2 — Nature and development of plants. 4 points. Dr. Darling 
eia — 2a — General botany. 2 points. Professor Curtis and Dr. 
Darling 

e3a-4a — Plant morphology. 2 points. Professor Curtis and Mr. 
Dodge 

65-6 — Students having completed ei-2, eia-20, 630-40, may register 
for es-6. Professor Curtis 

Equipment 

The Department of Botany occupies the third floor of Schermer- 
horn, and the laboratories and lecture-rooms are thoroughly equipped 
with apparatus and material for morphological, physiological, and 
cy tological_work . 



CHEMISTRY 73 

Similar opportunities are offered to women in the laboratories at 
Barnard College. 

By the agreement entered into between the University and the 
Garden, the herbarium and botanical library of the University (except 
such works as are needed for instruction) have been deposited in the 
Museum of the Botanical Garden at Bronx Park; the Garden on its 
part supplies all needed facilities for research for members of the staff 
and for properly accredited students. This combination of forces not 
only places the Department of Botany within reach of material, eqxiip- 
ment, and collections not otherwise available, but opens up facilities 
for research work under conditions that are not excelled. 

The Museum of the New York Botanical Garden is located in Bronx 
Park, and its entire upper floor is devoted to research. The physio- 
logical and morphological laboratories occupy the western end, and 
the taxonomic laboratories and herbarium the eastern end. Among 
the special features provided are to be mentioned the dark rooms, 
photographic, operating, and balance room, and laboratory for physio- 
logical chemistry. Ample opportunity for experimental work is 
afforded by the open-air plantations and extensive horticultural houses, 
and the aggregation of collections available for students is excep- 
tionally full in every group of plants. 

The library comprises over 20,000 volumes in addition to complete 
sets of the important botanical journals, which now number over one 
hundred. 

Chemistry 

Professors: Bogert, Morgan (J. L. R.), Sherman (H. C), Smith 
(Alexander) {Executive Officer), and Whitaker 

Associate Professor: Reimer 

Assistant Professors: Beans, Freas, Metzger and Tucker 

Instructors: Jouet, Keller, Kress, Moore, Neish, Nelson, and 
Zanetti 

Assistants: Bach (H. M.), Elder, Gross, Lombard, Milliken, and 
Richards 

Laboratory Assistants: Bates, Haeseler, McKirahan, and Salathe. 

Courses 

General and inorganic, 1-19; 100-119; 200-219; physical, 20-39; 
120-139; 220-239; organic, 40-59; 140-159; 240-259; analytical and food, 
60-79; 160-179; 260-279; industrial, 80-99; 180-199; 280-299. 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

Courses given in Havemeyer Hall, numbered between 100 and 200, 
may be closed to women in the discretion of the Instructor. 



74 CHEMISTRY 

A1-A2 — General elementary chemistry. C 3 hours, L 2 hours. Dr. 
Neish and Mr. Milliken 

3 or 4 — General inorganic chemistry. 3 recitations. Professor Smith 

7-8 — ^Inorganic chemistry. C 2 hours, L second half-year only, 5 after- 
noons. Professor Smith 

101-^102 — Advanced inorganic chemistry. 2 hours. Professor Smith 

103-104 — Experimental inorganic chemistry. Professor Freas 

107-108 — ^Advanced inorganic chemistry, research. Professor Smith 

207-208 — Advanced inorganic chemistry, research. Original investi- 
gation and conferences. Professor Smith 

21-22 — Elementary physical chemistry. C 2 hours first half-year, and 
3 hours second half-year, L i afternoon during second half-year. Pro- 
fessor Morgan and Assistant 

38 — Theoretical electro-chemistry. 2 hours. Professor Morgan 

23-24 — Physical chemistry, C 2 hours, L $ afternoons, second half- 
year only. Professor Morgan 

26 — Physical chemistry for College students. C 3 hours. Professor 
Morgan 

121-122 — Physical chemistry, general course. C 3 hours, L i after- 
noon, first half-year only. Professor Morgan and Assistant 

221-222 — Advanced physical chemistry, laboratory course. Con- 
ferences, and L at least 16 hours. Professor Morgan 

223-224 — Advanced physical chemistry, research. Laboratory 
work and conferences. Professor Morgan 

61 or 62 — Qualitative analysis. C4 hours, Li$ hours. Professor Beans, 
Dr. Zanetti, Dr. Moore, and Assistant 

67-68 — Qualitative analysis for College students. C 2 hours, L 4 
hours. Dr. Neish and Mr. Milliken 

65 — Quantitative analysis, inorganic, short course. C 2 hours, L 6 
hours. Professor Metzger and Dr. Jouet 

66 — Quantitative analysis, inorganic, for Mining Engineering. C 3 
hours, Z 12 hours. Professor Metzger and Dr. Jouet 

71 — Quantitative analysis for College students. C 2 hours, L 6 hours. 
Professor Metzger 

161-162 — Quantitative analysis, short course, i lecture and L 8 
hours. Professor Metzger and Mr. Bach 

163-164 — Quantitative analysis. C 4 hours, L 12 hours. Professor 
Metzger and Dr. Jouet 



CHEMISTRY 75 

167-168 — Advanced inorganic analysis. C 2 hours, L 15 hours 
second half-year for students in the course in Chemistry who elect 
thesis work in this coturse. Professor Metzger 

261-262 — Quantitative analysis — Special methods, gravimetric, 
volumetric, and electrolytic. Conferences and laboratory work at 
least 16 hours. Professor Metzger 

263-264 — Research. Conferences and laboratory work. 20 hours. 
Original investigation in inorganic analysis or inorganic chemistry. 
Professor Metzger 

171 — Organic and sanitary analysis. C 4 hours, and L 3 to 5 
afternoons. Professor Sherman and Mr. Gross 

173-174 — Advanced organic analysis. C 2 hours, and for students who 
elect thesis work in this course; L second half-year, 5 afternoons. Pro- 
fessor Sherman 

176 — Chemistry of food and nutrition. 3 hours. Professor Sherman 

178 — Food chemistry — conferences. 2 hours. Professor Sherman 

271-272 — Special methods of organic analysis and food investiga- 
tion. Conferences and laboratory work 12 hours. Professor Sherman 
and Mr. Gross 

273-274 — Research. Conferences and laboratory work 20 hours. 
Original investigation in organic analysis or food chemistry. Pro- 
fessor Sherman 

41-42 — Organic chemistry, elementary lecture course. 2 hours. Dr. 
Nelson 

43-44 — Organic chemistry, elementary laboratory course. 8 hours. 
Dr. Nelson and Mr. Elder 

141-142 — Organic chemistry. General course. 3 lectures and I reci- 
tation, L first half-year, 4 afternoons. Professor Bogert, Dr. Nelson, 
and Mr. Elder 

143-144 — Organic chemistry. Conferences, 2 hours, and for 
students who elect thesis work in organic chemistry; L second half- 
year, 5 afternoons. Professor Bogert 

150 — Organic chemistry — ^The study of organic compounds and 
reactions with particular reference to their relation to commercial 
products and manufacturing processes. C 2 hours, L 9 hours. Dr. 
Nelson and Mr. Elder 

151-152 — Advanced organic chemistry, laboratory course. 6 hours. 
Professor Bogert, Dr. Nelson, and Mr. Elder 

243-244 — ^Advanced organic chemistry, research. Professor Bogert 
and Dr. Nelson 



76 CHEMISTRY 

81-82 — Industrial chemistry, general. 3 lectures. Professor Whit- 
AKER and Dr. Kress 

83 — ^Industrial chemistry, advanced. 3 hours. Professor Whitaker 
and Dr, Kress 

84 — Food chemistry. 3 hours. Professor Sherman 

88 — Industrial chemistry, laboratory practice for students in chemistry. 
3 afternoons. Professor Whitaker, Dr. Kress 

89 — ^Industrial chemistry, laboratory practice for students in chem- 
istry. Special applications, i afternoon. Dr. Kress 

93-94 — Electro-chemistry. 2 hours, and in the second half-year 
5 afternoons. Professor Tucker 

183-184 — Industrial electro-chemistry. Lectures and short labora- 
tory course, i hour and the equivalent of 14 afternoons' laboratory 
work. Professor Tucker 

181 or 182 — Practical electro-chemistry. 5 afternoons. Professor 
Tucker 

197 — Chemical factory apparatus and machines. 3 hours. Professor 
Whitaker 

198 — Chemical factory management. 3 hours. Professor Whitaker 

295-296-— Industrial chemistry, advanced course — Original re- 
search. Personal instruction and laboratory work. Professor Whitaker 

281-282 — Electro-chemioal research — Original investigations. 16 
hours. Professor Tucker 

283-284 — Advanced electro-chemical research. Private study and 
original investigations for two years. Professor Tucker 

80 (a) — Factory inspection and summer memoir, 2d year. Pro- 
fessor Whitaker, Dr. Kress 

80 (6) — Factory inspection and summer memoir, 3d year. Pro- 
fessor Whitaker, Dr. Kress 

H199 — Chemistry of bituminous materials. Lectures, demonstrations 
and seminars. Daily. 2 weeks, beginning December 18, and counting as a 
3-hour course. Mr. Hubbard 

H200 — Chemistry of bituminous materials, laboratory course. Lec- 
tures, laboratory work. Daily, 2 weeks, beginning December 18, and 
counting as a 3-hour course. Mr. Hubbard 

5-6 — General inorganic chemistry. 5 hours. Professor Reimer, Miss 
Keller, and Miss Richards (Barnard) 

41-42 — Organic chemistry, elementary lecture course. C 3 hours. 
Professor Reimer (Barnard) 



CHEMISTRY 77 

43-44 — Organic chemistry, elementary laboratory course. L 6 hours. 
Professor Reimer (Barnard) 

63 — Qualitative analysis. C 3 hours, L 8 hours. Miss Keller 
(Barnard) 

64 — Quantitative analysis. C 3 hours, L 8 hours. Miss Keller 
(Barnard) 

105-106 — ^Inorganic chemistry, advanced course. C 3 hours, L 6 hours. 
Miss Keller (Barnard) 

[143-146 — Organic chemistry, advanced course. C 3 hours, L 6 hours. 
Professor Reimer (Barnard)] 

Journal Club. Professor Reimer and Miss Keller, i hour. 

Summer Session 

sA — General chemistry. 2 points. Messrs. Williams, Whitman, and 
Peterson 

S138 — Elementary physical chemistry. 2 points. Professor Morgan 

s6i or s6ia — Qualitative analysis. 6 points. Professor Beans 

S41 — Organic chemistry. Aliphatic series. 2 points. Dr. Nelson 

542 — Organic chemistry. Aromatic series. 2 points. Dr. Nelson 

s43-44a, b, or c — Organic chemistry, laboratory course. 6 points. 
Dr. Nelson 

si6i-i62a or b — Quantitative analysis. 6 points. Dr. Jouet and Mr. 
Bach 

siyia — Food analysis. 2 points. Professor Sherman and Mr. Mc- 
Crackan 

si8s — ^Food chemistry and food control, 2 points. Professor Sher- 
man 
sF — Chemistry of nutrition. 2 points. Professor Sherman 

S271-272, a, b, c — Problems in food chemistry or organic analysis. 
6, 4, or 2 points. Professor Sherman and Mr. Gross 

Extension 

eAi-A2 — General chemistry, college course. 4 points. Dr. Neish 

63-4 — General inorganic chemistry. 3 points. Dr. Kress 

e4i-42 — Organic chemistry, elementary lecture course. 2 points. 
Dr. Nelson 

e6i-62 — Qualitative analysis. 4 points. Professor Beans and Dr. 
Moore 



78 CHEMISTRY 

Other Courses 

For courses in Chemistry given at Teachers College and for courses 
in Chemistry and Physiological Chemistry given at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons and at the College of Pharmacy, see the 
Table of Contents and the special Announcements of these Schools. 

Equipment 

In Havemeyer Hall the Chemical Department is provided with 
ample space for its museum, lecture-rooms, and laboratories, and every 
convenience has been provided for both the instructors and students 
working in the general or special courses. 

There are five chemical lecture-rooms, all fully supplied with ap- 
paratus and instruments, the desks being equipped with pneumatic 
troughs, gas, pressure, exhaust, and electricity. The large chemical 
lecture-room on the ground floor contains 315 seats. 

The Museum of General Inorganic and Organic Chemistry and of 
the Chemical Arts, a large room occupying the whole left wing of the 
ground floor, contains the elements and all their more important com- 
pounds, inorganic and organic; materials and products illustrating 
the chemical arts, and numerous models, pictures, and diagrams. 

The Qualitative Laboratory has 112 desks, each divided into two 
sections and each thoroughly equipped. 

The Quantitative Laboratory has eighty-eight desks. Attached to 
the main laboratory is a large, well -equipped balance-room, con- 
taining accurate balances, and special rooms, provided with apparatus 
for gas, water, food, and electrolytic analysis. 

The Organic Laboratory has forty large desks, provided with gas, 
water, exhaust, and electricity, and has special rooms for balances, 
pressure ovens, glass-blowing, and combustions. 

The Laboratory of Industrial Chemistry, for the instruction of 
students in practical operations and the solution of problems in sani- 
tary chemistry and hygiene, is equipped for the manufacture of pure 
chemicals from their raw materials on an industrial scale, with fine 
batteries of steam evaporators, and with steam stills, centrifugals, 
filter presses, crushers, and the like. It includes a dyeing laboratory 
with a large stock of dye-stuffs, and with the regular equipment for the 
practical testing of dyes, including a calico-printing machine. Con- 
nected with it is a photometer-room, containing a new and complete 
outfit for the practical testing of illuminants. 

It also includes a laboratory for chemical microscopy, newly equipped 
with microscopes, polarized light apparatus, camera lucidas, etc., for 
the practical use of the microscope in chemical operations. 

A new Laboratory for Practical Electro-Chemistry has been pro- 
vided. The equipment consists of special motor-dynamos, one of which 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 79 

furnishes direct current at low voltages to the students' desks for 
general electrolytic work; the other provides heavy alternating current 
to the electric furnace room; this room is furnished with all appliances 
for electric furnace work. The students' desks are fitted with special 
switchboards and measuring instruments, and the laboratory has been 
arranged for carrying on research work in all branches of electro- 
chemistry. 

The Laboratory of Physical Chemistry is well equipped with the 
most recent apparatus adapted to a wide range of experimental work 
in the branches of heat, light, electricity, etc., as applied to chemical 
problems. 

The Chemical Library in Havemeyer Hall is supplied with an ex- 
tensive collection of chemical books and journals, and is open from 
9.00 A.M. to 5.00 P.M. 

The Department of Chemistry at Barnard College has laboratories 
well equipped with every facility for the proper study of the subjects 
offered. The desks have water, gas, and electricity. There is a small 
library of useful reference books in chemistry to which the students 
have free access during the entire day. 

The laboratories and lecture-room of Teachers College are well 
equipped for illustrating the teaching of Chemistry in secondary and 
normal schools. In these the chemistry classes of the Horace Mann 
School receive their instruction, and by observation and practical work 
in cormection with the classes the students in Education 92 are en- 
abled to become familiar with the duties of a teacher of Chemistry. 

Chinese 

(See p. 142) 

Civil Engineering 

Professors: Blanchard, Burr {Executive Officer), Lovell 
Assistant Professors: Black, Williams 
Instructors: Drowne, Finch and Macgregor 
Assistants: Briggs and Perrine. 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

2 — Theory of plane surveying. 2 hours. Professor Lovell, Mr, 
Finch and Assistants 

15 — Surveying practice — ^five weeks' field work. Professor Lovell, 
Mr. Finch, and Assistants 



80 CIVIL ENGINEERING 

21 — Highway engineering. 2 hours. Professor Lovell 

23 — ^Theory of railroad surveying — for mining engineering students. 
2 hours and one afternoon. Professor Lovell and Mr. Finch 

25 — Surveying practice — for civil engineering students, — ^five weeks' 
field work. Professor Lovell, Mr. Finch, and Assistants 

26 — ^Hydrographic surveying — combined with geodetic surveying and 
together requiring five weeks — for civil engineering students, — two 
weeks' field and office work. Professor Lovell, Mr. Finch, and Assistants 

27 — Surveying practice — for mining engineering students, — five weeks' 
field and office work. Professor Lovell, Mr. Finch, and Assistants 

28 — ^Railroad surveying — for mining engineering students, — three 
weeks' field and office work. Professor Lovell, Mr. Finch, and Assistants 

51-52 — Theory of railroad surveying — for civil engineering students, 
2 hours and one afternoon first half-year, 3 hours and one afternoon 
second half-year. Professor Lovell and Mr. Finch 

53-54 — Elasticity and resistance of materials of engineering. 5 hours 
and two afternoons first half, one afternoon only second half. Professors 
Burr and Williams, Mr. MacGregor and Mr. Briggs 

55 — Standard methods of water analysis. 2 afternoons. Professor 
Black 

57a — Statistics and interpretation of water analysis. 20 lectures. 
Mr. Whipple 

57b — Drainage of marshes and lowlands. 10 lectures. Professor 
Black 

58 — Masonry structures. 3 hours and one afternoon. Professor 
Williams 

59 — Sanitary treatment of water-supplies and of sewage. 2 hours and 
2 afternoons in January. Professor Black 

61 — Analytical theory of trusses. 2 hours and i afternoon. Professor 
Williams 

62 — Graphic statics — for civil engineering students. 2 hours and 
one afternoon. Professor Williams 

64 — Graphic statics — for mining engineering students, i hour and 
one afternoon. Professor Williams 

71 — ^Railroad surveying — for civil engineering students, — ^four weeks' 
field and office work. Professor Lovell, Mr. Finch, and Assistants 

75 — Hydraulics — ^for civil engineering students. 4 hours. Professor 
Black 

76 — Hydraulics — ^for mining engineering students. 2 hours. Professor 
Black 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 8l 

77 — Hydraulics — ^for electrical engineering students. 2 hours. 
Professor Black 

78 — Hydraulics — for mechanical engineering students. 2 hours. 
Professor Black 

85 — ^Foundations. 2 hours and i afternoon. Professor Burr 

87-88 — Design and construction of bridges, roofs, and buildings. 2 
hours and i afternoon. Professors Burr and Williams 

89-90 — Railroad engineering, construction, and operation. 3 hours 
and 2 afternoons. Professor Lovell and Mr. Finch 

94 — Design and construction of sewers and river and harbor improve- 
ments. 2 hours. Professor Black 

96 — Principles of hygiene, sanitary science, and public health. 3 hours. 

97 — ^Water-supply and irrigation engineering. 2 hours. Professor 
Black 

99-100 — Graduation thesis — a project or thesis on some civil engineer- 
ing subject, approved by the head of the department, is required of 
every candidate for the degree of Civil Engineer 

Summer Courses in Surveying 

These courses are conducted during fifteen weeks each summer 
vacation at a point in the country near Litchfield, Conn., where 
ample facilities are provided for all requisite operations, and where 
the topography is admirably adapted to the practical work of sur- 
veying. The courses there given are those announced above under 
the numbers 15, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 71. The University issues a 
special pamphlet with regard to these courses, which may be had 
upon application to the Secretary. 

Advanced Courses 
Highway Engineering 

loi — Economics and design of roads and pavements. Lectures. 2 
hours. Professor Blanchard 

102 — Macadam and other roads; block and concrete pavements. Lec- 
tures, inspection trips, and reports. 3 hours. Professor Blanchard 

103 — Bituminous surfaces and bituminous pavements. Lectures, in- 
spection trips, and reports. 3 hours. Professor Blanchard 

104 — Highway laws and systems of administration. Lectures, reading, 
and conferences. 2 hours. Professor Blanchard 

105 — Highway bridges and culverts. Lectures and problems in design 
work. I hour. Professor Burr and Mr. Drowne 



82 CIVIL ENGINEERING 

1 06 — Management engineering. Lectures, i hour. Mr. Drowne 

107 — Mechanical appHances used in highway engineering. Lectures, 
inspection trips, and reports. 2 hours. Mr. Drowne 

108 — Road material laboratory. Lectures and laboratory work. 3 
hours. Mr. Drowne 

109 — Road surveying and design. Lectures, inspection trips, and de- 
sign work. Daily, 2 weeks, beginning January 22 and counting as 3-hour 
course. Mr. Drowne 

no — Street surveying and design. Lectures, inspection trips, and de- 
sign work. Daily, 2 weeks, beginning January 22 and counting as a 3- 
hour course. Mr. Drowne 

III — Seminar in highway engineering literature. First session. Read- 
ing and conferences. 3 hours. Professor Blanchard 

112 — Seminar in highway engineering literature. Second session. 
Reading and conferences. 3 hours. Professor Blanchard 

Minor Subjects 

153-154 — Elasticity and resistance of materials. 

257-258 — Elastic and masonry arches. Conferences with reading 
and design work as required. Based upon Cotu-se 58. 

275-276 — Hydraulics (75 with additional reading). 

285-286 — Foundations, including theory of earth pressure (85, 
with additional reading). 

287-288 — Long-span bridges. Conferences with reading and de- 
sign work as reqtured. Based upon Courses 87-88. 

Major Subjects 

259-260 — Sanitary engineering. Based upon Course 59. 

277-278 — Hydraulic engineering, including the hydraulics of rivers 
and power plants and municipal water- works. 

279-280 — Municipal engineering, including water-works, sewers and 
sewage- works, streets, and other public works, and their adminis- 
tration. 

289-290 — The engineering of structures, including long-span 
bridges and deep foundations, with methods of building them, and 
advanced work in elasticity and resistance of materials. 

Summer Session 

S53 — ^Elasticity and resistance of the materials of engineering. 6 points. 
Professor Williams. 



CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY 83 

Extension 

ei-2 — Theory of plane surveying. 2 points. Mr. Finch 
eXi-X2 — Theory of railroad surveying. 3 points. Mr. Finch 

Equipment 

The department possesses an unusually full equipment of engineers' 
and solar transits, levels, plane tables, compasses, and all accessories, as 
well as smaller instruments. Current meters, hook gauges, and floats 
of various types are also used in making observations on the flow in and 
discharge of rivers and canals. A complete set of sections of iron and 
steel shapes, models, and photographs of engineering works, together 
with working plans of the latter, are in the department for the use of 
students. The hydraulic laboratory affords opportunity for the prac- 
tical operations of measuring the discharge through weirs and other 
orifices, the flow through open channels and closed pipes, frictional and 
other resistances in pipes and open channels, as well as for meter gaug- 
ings, and for general hydraulic investigations. The testing work in 
the mechanical laboratory includes the complete tests of various struc- 
tural materials in tension, compression, bending, and torsion, includ- 
ing the observation and digesting of all corresponding data. 

Classical Philology 

Professors: Egbert, Knapp, Lodge, McCrea, Moore (F. G.), Perry, 
Wheeler, and Young {Executive Officer). 
Associate Professors: Olcott and Van Hook 
Assistant Professor: Lockwood 
Associate: Shear 

Instructors: Demarest, Guernsey, Hirst, Messer, Sturtevant 
Assistants: Goodale and Wye. 

Columbia College 
See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

Greek 

1-2 — Elementary course. 3 hours. Professor Lockwood 

3 — Homer, Lucian. 3 hours. Professor Young 

4 — Lucian, Plato. 3 hours. Professor Young 

5 — Euripides, Sophocles. 3 hours. Professor Perry 

6 — Demosthenes. 3 hours. Professor Perry 

11-12 — Prose composition. First course, i hour. Mr. Demarest 



«4 CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY 

17-18 — Prose composition. Second course, i hour. Dr. Guernsey 
25 — ^schylus or Sophocles, and Aristophanes. 3 hours. Professor 
Van Hook 

26 — Thucydides. 3 hours. Dr. Guernsey 

27-28 — ^Advanced prose composition, i session weekly counting as 2 
hours. Dr. Guernsey 

29 — New Testament Epistles. 2 hours. Professor Young 
30 — New Testament Gospels. 2 hours. Professor Young 

Latin 

Ai — Terence, Phormio. Livy (Books XXI-XXII). 3 hours. Pro- 
fessors McCrea, Moore, Van Hook, Lockwood, Dr. Guernsey, Mr. 
Messer and Mr. Demarest 

A2 — Horace, Odes and Epodes. Catullus. 3 hours. Professors 
McCrea, Moore, Van Hook, Lockwood, Dr. Guernsey, Messrs. Messer 
and Demarest 

I — Horace, Satires and Epistles. Tacitus, Germania. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Lockwood 

2 — ^Juvenal, Pliny. 3 hours. Professor Moore * 

11-12 — Prose composition. First course, i hour. Professor Lockwood 
13-14 — Prose composition. Second course, i hour. Professor McCrea 
15-16 — Prose composition. Third course. I hour. Professor Moore 
17 — Cicero, Tusculans (Book I). Lucretius, selections. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor McCrea 

18 — Plautus (3 plays). Terence (i play). Seneca (i play). 3 hours. 
Professor Knapp 

Teachers College 
S1-S2T — Latin readings. 3 hours. Professor Lodge 

Barnard College 

Greek 

1-2 — ^Beginners' course. 5 hours. Dr. Sturtevant 

3 — Plato (selections). Greek life and thought. 3 hours. Dr. Hirst 

4 — Homer, Odyssey. Greek life and thought. 3 hours. Professor 

Van Hook 
5 — Euripides, Medea and Alcestis or Iphigenia. 3 hours. Dr. Guernsey 
6 — Herodotus, selections. 3 hours. Dr. Hirst 
7 — Sophocles, CEdipus Tyrannus and Antigone. 3 hours. Professor 

Perry 



CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY 85 

8 — Aristophanes, The Clouds and the Frogs. 3 hours. Professor 

Perry 

9-10 — Greek literature. Lectures and required reading. 3 sessions 

weekly, counting as 4 hours. Professor Van Hook 
11-12 — Elementary prose composition, i hour. Mr. Demarest 
13-14 — Advanced prose composition, i hour. Dr. Hirst 
19-20 — Greek life and thought, i hour. Professor Van Hook 

Latin 

Ai — ^Vergil, Eclogues. Ovid, selections. Lectures and readings in 
Roman life and thought. 3 hours. Professors Moore, Van Hook, Dr. 
Guernsey, Mr. Demarest, and Mr. Messer 

A2 — Horace, Odes and Epodes, selections. Lectui'es and readings in 
Roman life and thought. 3 hours. Professors Moore, Van Hook, 
Drs. Hirst, Guernsey, Sturtevant, Mr. Demarest and Mr. Messer 

Bi — Livy. (Books XXI-XXII). Prose composition weekly. 3 hours. 
Drs. Hirst and Sturtevant 

I — Horace, Sermones. 2 hours. Professor Knapp 

2 — Catullus. Martial. 2 hours. Dr. Hirst 

3 — Terence, Andria and Adelphoe. 2 hours. Dr. Sturtevant 

4 — Plautus, Captivi and Mostellaria. 2 hours. Dr. Sturtevant 

5 — ^Tacitus (Annales I-VI). 3 hours. Dr. Hirst 

6 — Lucretius. 3 hours. Professor McCrea 

9-10 — ^Latin literature. 3 sessions weekly, counting as 4 hours. Pro- 
fessor Knapp 

11-12 — Elementary prose composition, i hour. Professor Knapp, 
Mr. Messer, and Miss Goodale 

15-16 — Intermediate prose composition. 1 hour. Dr. Hirst 

17-18 — ^Advanced prose composition, i hour. Dr. Hirst 

19-20 — ^Roman life and thought, i hour. Professor Knapp 

Graduate Courses 
Greek 

27-28 — ^Advanced prose composition, i session weekly. Dr. Guernsey 
loi — Greek literature. Part I : Poetry. 3 hours. Professor Wheeler 
115 — Greek oratory. Early Attic orators. 3 hours. Professor Perry 
116 — Greek oratory. Later Attic orators. 3 hours. Professor Perry 
119 — Greek tragedy. 3 hours. Professor Wheeler 



86 CLASSICAL PHILOLOGY 

120 — Greek comedy. 3 hours. Professor Young 

253-254 — Greek epigraphy. Part I. 2 hours. Professor Young 

Teachers College 

Education 171-172 — Theory and practice of teaching Greek in secondary 
schools — Lectures, reports, and practical work. 3 hours. Professor 
Lodge 

Latin 

119 — Prose composition. Advanced course. Latin idiom. 2 hours. 
Professor McCrea and Mr. Demarest 

120 — Prose composition. Advanced course. Construction of the 
paragraph. 2 hours. Professor McCrea and Mr. Demarest 

151 — Roman epigraphy. Introductory course. 2 hours. Professor 
Egbert 

152 — Roman epigraphy. Official and sepulchral inscriptions. 2 hours. 
Professor Egbert 

205-206 — Roman lyric and elegiac poetry. 3 hours. Professor Mc- 
Crea 

239-240 — Roman historiography. 3 hours. Professor Moore 
Teachers College 

Education 175-176 — Theory and practice of teaching Latin in second- 
ary schools — Lectures, reports, and practical work. 3 hours. Professor 
Lodge 
201-202T — Latin conversation. 2 hours. Professor Lodge 
Education 275-276 — Practicum in Latin. Caesar and Vergil. 2 hours. 
Professor Lodge 

Classical Archaeology ^ 

149 — Greek archeology. Introductory course. 3 hours. Professors 
Wheeler and Young 

154 — Greek archasology. Part II: Sculpture. 3 hours. Professor 
Young 

159 — The Acropolis of Athens. 3 hours. Professor Wheeler 

155-156 — ^Roman life. 2 hours. Professor Lockwood 

Comparative Philology 

181-182 — Comparative grammar of Greek and Latin. 2 hours. Dr. 
Sturtevant 

Classical Proseminar 

Proseminar in Greek and Latin. 2 hours. One session weekly. Pro- 
fessor Knapp 



CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 87 

Classical Seminar 

Greek section. One or more plays of Sophocles or Euripides. 2 hours. 
One session weekly. Professor Perry 

Latin section. The satires of Horace. 2 hours. One session weekly. 
Professor Knapp 

Summer Session 
Greek 

SI — Elementary course. 2 points. Professor Macurdy 

S2 — Greek drama. 2 points. Professor Macurdy 

sY — Xenophon. 3 points. Professor Knapp 

Latin 

sX — ^Elementary course. 2 points. Miss Wye 

sZ — Latin prose composition. 2 points. Miss Wye 

sA2 — Horace. Cattillus. 3 points. Professor Moore 

SII-12 — Latin prose composition. 2 points. Professor McCrea 

S129 — ^Tacitus. 2 points. Professor Moore 

S131 — ^Vergil's .^Eneid, Books I-VI. 2 points. Professor McCrea 

S209 — Research course in Roman satire. 2 points. Professor Knapp 

Extension 

Latin 

eAi — Collegiate Latin. Terence, Phormio; Livy (Books XXI-XXII). 
3 points. Dr. Sturtevant 

eA2 — CoUegiate Latin. Horace, Odes and Epodes; Catullus. 3 points. 
Dr. Sturtevant 

eXi — Elementary Latin. 4 points. Miss Wye 

eX2 — Caesar, Nepos, and prose composition. 4 points. Miss Wye 

eYi — Ovid and Vergil. 4 points. Miss Wye 

eY2 — Cicero and Sallust. 4 points. Miss Wye 

eY4 — Latin prose composition. 2 points. Miss Wye 

Clinical Instruction 

in Dermatology, Genito- Urinary Diseases, Laryngology, Ophthalmology, 
Orthopedic Surgery, and Otology. For Clinical Instruction in Medicine, 
Surgery, Obstetrics, Gynecology, Hydrotherapy, Neurology, and Pediatrics, 
details will be found under the general heading of these departments. 

Professors: Bacon, Chappell, Denig, Gibney, Hayden, Jackson 
(G. T.), Knapp (A. H.), Lewis, and Simpson 

Assistant Professor: Whitman 

Instructors: Blackwell, Carr, Cocks, Frothingham, Hodgson, 
Holden, Jaeger, McMurtry, Michaelis, Reynolds, Saunders, Stein, 
Thurber, and Tyson 



88 CLINICAL INSTRUCTION 

Clinical Assistants 

Clinical Assistants: — Orthopedic Surgery — Epstein, Frieder, Klein- 
berg; Otology — Carr, Michaelis, Nisselson, Osgood (C); Dermatology 
— Aldrich, Dade, Fox, Gold, Hubbard, McMurtry, Morrison, 
Rainforth; Ophthalmology — Goodfriend, Grout, O'Connell, Thomp- 
son; Laryngology — Coll, Kobler, Leshure, Osgood, Myers, Smith 
(F. C), Van Wagenen, Voorhees, Whiting; Genito-Urinury Diseases — 
Brouner, Cowan, Feldstein, Kohn, Owen, Titsworth 

Courses 

See introdtictory paragraphs, page S7 

Dermatology 

SI-S2 — Practical instruction, diagnosis and treatment of the diseases 
of the skin. Vanderbilt Clinic. 10-12 lessons for each student. Dr. 
Hodgson 

53-54 — Practical clinical lectures. 16 lessons for each student. Pro- 
fessor Jackson 

55-56 — Histo-pathology of skin diseases (optional). Dr. McMurtry 

Genito-Urinary Diseases 

51-52 — Geni to-urinary and venereal diseases. Clinical lectures. Van- 
derbilt Clinic. I hour. Professor Hayden 

S3~S4 — Practical instruction in diagnosis and treatment. Vanderbilt 
Clinic. 10-12 lessons. Dr. Reynolds 

55 — Hospital clinics. Bellevue Hospital, September to February. 
Professor Hayden 

Laryngology 

51-52 — Practical clinical lectures, i hour. Professor Simpson 

53~54 — Practical clinical instruction in the use of instruments. 12 
lessons for each student. Dr. Thurber 

55-56 — Individual clinical demonstrations, special attention being 
given to the questions of general diagnosis, differential and bacterio- 
logical diagnosis, and treatment. Dr, Frothingham 

57-58 — Operative clinics at the Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat 
Hospital. Professor Chappell and Dr. Cocks 

Ophthalmology 

52 — Clinical lectures upon the diseases of the eye. Vanderbilt Clinic. 
I hour. Professor Knapp 



CLINICAL PATHOLOGY 89 

53-54 — Practical instruction at the Vanderbilt Clinic. 10-12 lessons 
for each student. Drs. Holden and Tyson 

56 — Hospital clinics. N. Y. Ophthalmic and Aural Institute. Pro- 
fessor Knapp 

57-58 — Hospital clinic. German Hospital, Professor Denig 

Orthopedic Surgery 

51-52 — Clinical lectures in orthopedic surgery and diseases of the 
joints. Vanderbilt Clinic, i hour. Professor Gibney 

53-54 — Practical instruction. 8 lessons for each student. Hospital 
for Ruptured and Crippled. Professor Whitman 

55-56 — Practical instruction. 8 lessons for each student. Vanderbilt 
Clinic. Dr. Jaeger 

59-60 — Operations. Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled. Professor 
Gibney 

Otology 

51 — Didactic instruction in pathology and therapeutic methods. 16 
lectures. Professor Bacon 

53-54 — Practical instruction in the diagnosis of the diseases of the eye. 
Vanderbilt Clinic. 10-12 lessons. Drs. Saunders, Michaelis, and Carr 

55-56 — Operative clinics. New York Eye and Ear Infirmary. Pro- 
fessors Bacon and Lewis 

Clinical Pathology 

Professor: Wood (F. C.) {Executive Officer) 

Assistant Professor: Vogel 

Instructor: Jessup 

Assistants: Cussler, Hopkins, Irving, and Snyder 

Close association is maintained between this department and the 
Departments of Pathology and Bacteriology and Hygiene, so as to 
facilitate instruction and research in these closely allied subjects. 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

Courses 

52 — Systematic instruction in clinical pathology. 4 hours for half 
the academic year. Professors Wood and Vogel, Drs. Jessup, Irving, 
and Hopkins 

53-54 — Practical exercises in clinical pathology. Vanderbilt Clinic 
laboratory. 10 hours for one fourth of the academic year. Professors 
Wood and Vogel, Drs. Cussler and Snyder 



90 DISEASES OF CHILDREN 

200 — Special laboratory course in clinical pathology. Professor 
Wood and Vogel 

Research 

Qualified workers may pursue research either in the laboratory 
of Clinical Pathology on the fourth floor of the north wing of the College 
building, in the Vanderbilt Clinic laboratory, or in the Pathological 
laboratories of St. Luke's Hospital. Professors Wood and Vogel 

Summer Session 

sS2 and 200 — Clinical pathology. 2 points. Professors Wood and 
Vogel 

Equipment 

Systematic instruction in clinical pathology is given in the west 
lecture-room on the fifth floor of the Vanderbilt Clinic building. 
Students are furnished with apparatus sufficient to enable them to 
carry out such tests as are necessary for the exposition of the subject; 
and demonstrations are made of special methods and more complicated 
apparatus. In order to permit the student to make independently 
such examinations as are needed in the diagnosis and treatment of 
disease, a new laboratory has been erected between the Vanderbilt 
Clinic and the Sloane Maternity Hospital, with accommodations and 
apparatus for twenty workers. In this laboratory the students make 
examinations of the secretions and excretions of patients from the 
clinical courses at the Vanderbilt Clinic and the hospitals 

Comparative Literature 

(See p. 107) 

Design 

For list of officers and other information see Faculty of Fine Arts 

1-2 — History of art — Collateral reading and research. 4 hours. Pro- 
fessors Alexander and Dow and Mr. E. R. Smith 

101-102 — History of art — ^Advanced reading and research. 8 hours. 
Professors Alexander and Dow and Mr. E. R. Smith 

Diseases of Children 

Professor: Holt {Executive Officer) 

Associates: Berg (H. W.) and La Fetra 

Instrtictors: Bartlett, Haynes, Herrman, Norton, and Park 

Assistants: Bingham, Haas, Silver, Wilcox, and Yard 

Clinical Assistants: Wile, Schnefel, Hamilton, Abbott, Groeschel 



DRAFTING 9I 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

51 — Clinical lectures. Vanderbilt Clinic, i hour. Professor Holt 

52 — Didactic lectures, i hour. Professor Holt 

53-54 — Hospital clinic — Foundling or Babies' Hospital. 3 hours. 
Professor Holt 

55-56 — Examination and diagnosis of the diseases of children. Vander- 
bilt Clinic. 10-12 lessons. Dr. Herrman and Assistants 

57 — ^A weekly recitation in pediatrics. Dr. Bartlett 

59-60 — Bedside instruction in contagious diseases. Riverside, WiUard 
Parker, and Scarlet Fever Hospitals. Drs. Berg and Haynes 

61-62 — Practical clinical instruction — Bellevue Hospital Out- 
Patient Department. Drs. LaFetra and Wilcox 

Post -Graduate Instruction 

A limited ntimber of students will be received in this department for 
post-graduate instruction. 

No students will be admitted for less than one half the academic 
year. 

The instruction will include clinical work in general diagnosis and 
treatment of diseases of children in the wards of the Babies' and 
Foundling Hospitals, in the Children's Ward of Bellevue, and in 
the Vanderbilt Clinic, together with special instruction in contagious 
diseases at WiUard Parker and the Scarlet Fever Hospitals, and oppor- 
tunities for witnessing post-mortem examinations. 

Domestic Art and Domestic Science 

Some eighty courses in these and related fields are provided by the 
School of Household Arts of Teachers College and described in the special 
circular of that School and in the general Announcement of Teachers 
College. 

Drafting 

Associate Professor: Mayer (Executive Officer) 
Assistant Professor: Miller 
Instructors: Beans, Harrington 
Assistant: Tupper 

Courses 
See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

I, 2 — (a) Elements of mechanical drawing; freehand lettering; (b) 
Projections; (c) Machine drawing — sketches, tracing; (d) Topography. 



92 ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

1 hour and 14 hours drafting. Professors Mayer, Miller, Mr. Harring- 
ton, Mr. Beans, and Mr. Tupper 

3,4 — Descriptive geometry — Problems on point, line, and plane; tangent 
planes; intersections; developments; warped surfaces. 3 hours. Profes- 
sors Mayer, Miller, Mr. Harrington, and Mr. Beans 

5,6 — (o) Graphics — Shades and shadows; perspective; (6) Stone-cutting. 
6 hours. Professors Mayer, Miller, and Mr. Harrington 

7, 8 — (a) Structural drawing; (&) Machine drawing. 6 hours. Pro- 
fessors Mayer, Miller, and Mr. Harrington 

Summer Session 

sT — Mechanical drafting. Teachers' course in mechanical drafting. 

2 points. Professor Mayer 

si-2 — Mechanical drafting. 3 points. Professor Mayer 
S3-4 — Descriptive geometry. 2 points. Professor Mayer 
sS-6 and 7-8 — Advanced mechanical drafting. 3 points. Professor 
Mayer 

Extension 

ei-2 — Mechanical drafting. 2j^ points. Mr. Harrington 
e3-4 — Descriptive geometry. 2 points. Mr. Harrington 
es — Graphics. 3 points. Mr. Harrington 

e8 — Specialized engineering drafting, (a) Structural drafting, {b) 
Machine drafting. 3 points. Mr. Harrington 

Economics and Social Science 

Professors: Clark, Devine, Giddings, Lindsay, Moore (H. L.), 
Seager, and Seligman {Executive Officer) 
Associate Professors: Mussey and Simkhovitch (V. G.) 
Assistant Professors: Agger, Chaddock, and Tenney 
Associates: Bayles and Simkhovitch (M. K.) 
Instructor: Anderson 
Assistants: Brandt and Whitin 

Political Economy and Finance 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

A1-A2 — Outlines of economics — Practical economic problems. Reci- 
tations, lectures, and essays. 3 hours. Professors Mussey and Agger, 
and Dr. Anderson (Barnard College) 

1-2 — Introduction to economics — Practical economic problems, 

3 hours. Professors Seligman, Mussey, Agger, and Dr. Anderson 



ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 93 

3-4 — Money and banking. 2 hours. Professor Agger 

loi — Science of finance — I: Public revenues. 2 hours. Professor 
Seligman 

102 — Science of finance — ^11: Public expenditures, public debts, and the 
budget. 2 hours. Professor Seugman 

104 — Commerce and commercial policy. 2 hours. Professor Mussey 

105 — ^The labor problem. 2 hours. Professor Seager 
This course is also given at Barnard College as a three-hour (four point) course (117) 

106 — ^The trust and corporation problem. 2 hours. Professor Seager 

107 — ^Fiscal and industrial history of the United States. 2 hours. 
Professor Seligman 

108 — Railroad problems, economic, social, and legal. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Seligman 

109 — History of socialism, 2 hours. Professor Simkhovitch 

114 — Marx and post-Marxian socialism. 2 hours. Professor Sim- 
khovitch 

117 — ^The labor problem. 3 hours. Professor Seager (Barnard) 

201 — Economic readings — I: Classical English economists. 2 hours. 
Professor Seager 

202 — Economic readings. — II: Contemporary economists. 2 hours. 
Professor Seager 

[203 — History of economics to Adam Smith. 2 hours. Professor 
Seligman] 

[204 — History of economics since Adam Smith. 2 hours. Professor 
Seligman] 

206 — Economic theory. Conditions of economic progress. 2 hours. 
Professor Clark 

211 — Statistical economics. I. 2 hours. Professor H. L. Moore 

212 — Statistical economics. II. 2 hours. Professor H. L. Moore 

[241 — ^Economic and social evolution of Russia since 1800. 2 hours. 
Professor Simkhovitch] 

242 — ^Radicalism and social reform as reflected in the literature of the 
nineteenth century. 2 hours. Professor Simkhovitch 

301 — Seminar in political economy and finance. 2 hours. Professors 
Seligman and Seager 

302 — Seminar in political economy and finance. 2 hours. Professors 
Seligman and Seager 

303 — Seminar in political economy and finance. 2 hours. Professors 
Simkhovitch and Mussey 

304 — Seminar in political economy and finance. 2 hours. |Professors 
Simkhovitch and Mussey 



94 ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Summer Session 

SI — Principles of economics. 2 points. Professor Mussey 

S104 — Commerce and commercial policy. 2 points. Professor Mussey 

S108 — Transportation. 2 points. Professor Meeker 

SI 12 — Money and Banking. 2 points. Professor Meeker 

S20 — Accounting. 2 points. Professor Hatfield 

S120 — Corporation finance. 2 points. Professor Hatfield 

Sociology and Statistics 

151 — Principles of sociology: analytical and descriptive. 2 hours. 
Professors Giddings and Tenney 

152 — Principles of sociology: historical. 2 hours. Professors Gid- 
dings and Tenney 

251 — Social evolution: ethnic and civil origins. 2 hours. Professor 
Giddings 

252 — Social evolution: civilization, liberty, and democracy. 2 hours. 
Professor Giddings 

255 — Theory of statistics — Lectures and laboratory. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Chaddock 

256 — Social statistics — Lectures and laboratory. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Chaddock 

257 — Historical types of society, ancient: the theory of progress. 2 
hours. Professor Giddings 

258 — Historical types of society, modern: the theory of progress. 2 
hours. Professor Giddings 

259 — ^Ecclesiology. i hour. Dr. Bayles 

311 — General seminar. Sociological theory: historical. 2 hours. 
Professors Giddings and Tenney 

312 — General seminar. Sociological theory: systematic. 2 hours. 
Professors Giddings and Tenney- 

315 — Seminar in modern problems of social evolution. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Tenney 

317 — ^Advanced seminar. Problems and methods of sociological 
research. 2 hours. Professor Giddings 

3x8 — ^Advanced seminar. Dissertations in preparation. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Giddings 

319-320 — The relation of social theory to public policy. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Giddings 



ECONOMICS AND SOCIAL SCIENCE 95 

Summer Session 

sioi — Principles of sociology, analytical. 2 points. Professor Ward 
S102 — Principles of sociology, historical. 2 points. Professor Giddings 
S311 — General seminar. Problems and methods. 2 points. Professor 
Giddings 

Social Economy 

III — The industrial family. 2 hours. Mrs. M. K. Simkhovitch 

(Teachers College) 
112 — Social progress in cities. 2 hours. Mrs. M, K. Simkhovitch 

(Teachers College) 
281 — Misery and its causes. 2 hours. Professor Devine 
282 — Efficiency and relief. 2 hours. Professor Devine 
283 — Social legislation: (I) Workshop and factory. 2 hours. Professor 

Lindsay 

284 — Social legislation: (II) Humane legislation. 2 hours. Professor 

Lindsay 

[285 — The standard of living. 2 hours. Miss Brandt] 

[286 — Social aspects of crime and abnormality. Professor Devine] 

287 — Social legislation: (III) Urban and rural community life. 2 hours. 

Professor Lindsay 
288 — Social legislation: (IV) Methods and tendencies in lawmaking. 

2 hours. Professor Lindsay 
321-322 — Seminar in social economy. 2 hours. Professor Devine 
323-324 — Seminar in social legislation. 2 hours. Professor Lindsay 

Eqmpment 

The Library facilities are unexcelled. Every journal of importance, 
American or foreign, dealing with economics or social science, is taken 
regularly by the Library. Any book needed by advanced students 
can usually be bought at once. The special library of history and 
political science alone comprises more than 'eighty thousand volumes. 

Students of economics and social science will find New York a 
centre of library facilities unrivalled elsewhere in this country. In 
addition to the University Library, there are rich treasures at the New 
York Public Library on the Astor, Lenox, and Tilden foundation, New 
York Historical Library, Long Island Historical Library, Library of 
the New York School of Philanthropy, the Bar Association Library, and 
the Law Institute Library, to each of which students have access 
under favorable conditions. Advanced students also have at their 
disposal the library of the McVickar Professor of Political Economy, 



96 EDUCATION 

which contains the most complete collections of works on earlier eco- 
nomics to be found in the United States. 

The facilities offered to students of sociology and social economy 
include a large library of general and special works, and unusual oppor- 
tunities for field work. A generous gift for works on sociology has pro- 
vided a very complete equipment of publications on sociological theory, 
the history of the family, pauperism, crime, and penology. Arrange- 
ments have been made with the Charity Organization Society, the State 
Charities Aid Association, the University Settlement, the East-Side 
House, and the Brooklyn Bureau of Charities by which students can 
become fully acquainted with actual work among the people and 
with the most perfect methods. 

The Statistical Laboratory, conducted by Professor H. L. Moore, 
is equipped with the Hollerith tabulating machines, comptometers, 
and all other modern facilities. 

Students also have the privilege of attending all of the courses in 
the School of Philanthropy conducted by the Charity Organization 
Society. 

Education 

Teachers College is the Division of Education of Columbia Uni- 
versity. In the section of the Catalogue devoted to Teachers College 
(see Table of Contents) will be found a list of its officers and a state- 
ment of its equipment for instruction and research in education. 

All Teachers College courses are open to men and women on equal 
terms. For the significance of course numbers see page 57. 

A full statement of the nature of each of the following courses, the work 
prerequisite to it, and the credit which may be received for it in partial 
fulfilment of the requirements for the several degrees and diplomas, and 
similar statements concerning nearly 200 semi-professional courses offered 
by Teachers College, but not listed here, -will be found in the current edition 
of the Announcement of Teachers College. 

History of Education 

B — History and principles of education. 3 hours. Professors 
Monroe, Suzzallo, Goodsell and Kilpatrick 

B (a and 6) — ^History of education — Special sections for students in 
Household and Industrial Arts. 2 hours. 

Be — Principles of education, i hour. Professor Kilpatrick 

103-104 — Educational theories of Herbart and Froebel. 2 hours. 
Professor Kilpatrick 

[109-110 — Social and philosophical foundations of Greek and Roman 
education. 2 hours.] 

201-202 — History of education — Special graduate section of 
course B, above. 2 hours. Professor Monroe 



EDUCATION 97 

203-204 — Practicum — History of education in the United States. 
2 hours. Professor Monrob 

[209-210 — Practicum — ^History of education in England. 2 hours. 
Professor Monroe] 

303-304 — Seminar — ^The historical foundations of modem education. 
Professor Monrob 

Philosophy of Education 

B (c) — Principles of education, i hour. Professor Suzzallo 
[6 — Logic as applied to problems of teaching. 3 hours. Professor Dewey] 
7 — Social life and the school curriculum. 2 houra. Professor Dewey 
105-106 — Philosophy of education. 2 hours. Professor MacVannel 
107-108 — Educational sociology. 2 hours. Professor Suzzallo 
205-206 — Practiciun — Philosophy of education. 2 hours. Professor 

MacVannel 
207-208 — Practicum — Educational Sociology. 2 hours. Professor 

Suzzallo 
[209 — Practictun — ^Historic relations of philosophy and education. 2 

hours. Professor Dewey] 
305-306 — Seminar — Philosophy and sociology of education. Professors 

MacVannel, Dewey, and Suzzallo 

Educational Administration 

1 1 i-i 1 2 — School admmistration. 2 hours. Professor Duttok 

113 — Comparative education. 3 hours. Prof^sor Farrington 

1 1 5-1 1 6 — Organization and administration of school systems. 2 

hours. Professor Strayer 
213 — Practicum — Comparative education. 2 hours. Professor Far- 

RiNGTON and Dean Russell 
215-216 — Practicum — Administration of public education in the United 

States. 2 hours. Professor Strayer 
3 1 1-3 1 2 — Seminar — Educational administration. Dean Russell and 

Professors Dutton, Strayer, and Farrington 

Educational Psychology 

A — General and educational psychology. I hour lectures. 2 hours con- 
ferences. Professors Thorndike, Norsworthy, Ruger, and Dr. Whitley 

19-20 — Readings in educational psychology, a hours. Professor 
Norsworthy 

21-22 — The psychology of childhood. « hours. Professor Nors- 
worthy 



98 EDUCATION 

24 — The psychology and education of exceptional children. 2 hours. 
Professors Thorndike and Norsworthy 

117-118 — The applications of experimental and physiological psy- 
chology to education. 2 hours. Professor Ruger 

121-122 — Educational psychology, advanced course. 2 hours. 
Professor Thorndike 

124 — ^I'he psychology of the elementary school subjects. 2 hours. 
Professor Thorndike 

221-222 — ^Educational psychology. 2 hours. Professor Thorndike 

223-224 — Practicum — The application of psychological and statis- 
tical methods to education. 2 hours. Professor Thorndike 

321-322 — Seminar — Genetic and comparative psychology. Pro- 
fessor Thorndike 

Secondary Education 

125-126 — Secondary education, general course. 3 hours. Professor 
Sachs and Miss Stevens 

127-128 — Secondary education, advanced course. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Sachs and Miss Stevens 

[129 — Secondary education in Germany. 2 hours. Professor Sachs] 
225-226 — Problems in secondary education. 2 hours. Professor Sachs 
229-230 — Practicum — Secondary education. 2 hours. Professor Sachs 
325-326 — Seminar in secondary education. Professor Sachs 
153-154 — The teaching of biological sciences in secondary schools. 
3 hours. Professor Bigelow and Miss Broadhurst 

154 (a) — Biology as related to education. 2 hours. Professor Bigelow 
253-254 — Practicum in the teaching of biological sciences in sec- 
ondary and normal schools. 2 hours. Professor Bigelow 

161-162 — ^The teaching of English in secondary schools. 3 hours. 
Professor Baker 

261-262 — Practicum in the teaching of English in secondary schools. 

2 hours. Professor Baker 

63-64 — Theory and practice of teaching art. 3 hours. Professor Dow 
[163-164 — Supervision of fine arts. 2 hours. Professor Dow] 
165-166 — The teaching of French. 3 hours. Professor Cohn 
167-168 — The teaching of geography. 3 hours. Professor Dodge 

and Miss Kirchwey 

267-268 — Practicum in geography. 2 hours. Professor Dodge 
169-170 — ^The teaching of German in secondary schools, 3 hours. 

Professor Bagster-Collins 



EDUCATION 99 

269-270 — Practicum in German. 2 hours. Professor Bagster-Collins 
1 71-172 — The teaching of Greek in secondary schools. 3 hours. 
Professor Lodge 

173-174 — The teaching of history in secondary schools. 3 hours. 
Professor Johnson 
273-274 — ^Practicum in history. 2 hours. Professor Johnson 
175-176 — The teaching of Latin in secondary schools. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Lodge 

275-276 — Practicum in Latin — Caesar and Vergil. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Lodge 

375-376 — Seminar — Problems in Latin S3mtax. Professor Lodge 
179-180 — The teaching of mathematics in secondary schools. 3 
hours. Professor Smith and Mr. Breckenridge 

279-280 — Practicum in the history and teaching of mathematics, 
2 hours. Professor Smith 

379-380 — Seminar in the history and teaching of mathematics. 
Professor Smith 

81-82 — ^The teaching of school music. 3 hours. Professor Farnsworth 
1 81-182 — Supervision of school music. 2 hours. Professor Farns- 
worth 

87 — Personal hygiene. 3 hours. Professor Wood 
88 — Institutional hygiene. 3 hours. Professor Wood 
189-190 — The teaching of physical education. 3 hours. Professor 
Wood, and Assistants 

289-290 — Practicum in physical education. 2 hours. Professor Wood 

191-192 — The teaching of physical science in secondary schools. 3 
hours. Professor Woodhull 

291-292 — Practicum in physical science. 2 hours. Professor 
Woodhull 

Elementary Education 

131-132 — Theory and practice of teaching in elementary schools. 
5 hours. Professors Hillegas, Baker, Dodge, Smith, Bigelow, and 
Johnson 

i3ifflZ>-i32a& — Theory and practice of teaching in elementary schools. 
First half of above course. 2 hours. Professor Hillegas 

133 — Criticism and supervision of instruction in the elementary 
school. 2 hours. Professor McMurry 

231 — Criticism and supervision of instruction in the elementary 
school. 3 hours. Professor McMuRRY 

233-234 — Practicum — Current problems in elementary education. 
2 hours. Professor Hillegas 



100 EDUCATION 

333-334 — Seminar. Professors McMurry and Hillegas 

61 — The teaching of English in elementary schools, if hours. Mr. 

Briggs 

63-64 — The teaching of art, 3 hours. Professor Dow 
[163-164 — Supervision of fine arts. 2 hours. Professor Dow] 
68 — The teaching of geography. 2 hours. Miss EIirchwey 
71-72 — Encyclopedia of elementary mathematics for teachers. 2 

hours. Professor Upton 

81-82 — ^The teaching of school music. 3 hours. Professor Farnsworth 
83-84 — Elementary course in music education for students of piano. 
1 1 hours. Mr. Cady 

1 81-182 — Supervision of school music. 2 hours. Professor Farns- 
worth 

183 — ^The teaching of nature-study. 3 hours. Professors Bigelow 
and WooDHULL and Miss Broadhurst 

87 — Personal hygiene. 3 hours. Professor Wood 
88 — Institutional hygiene. 3 hours. Professor Wood 
189-190 — The teaching of physical education. 3 hours. Professor 
Wood, and Assistants 

Kindergarten Education 

41-42 — Kindergarten principles. 2 hours. Professor Fulmer 
45-46 — ^Theory and practice of kindergarten teaching. 2 hours. 
Professor Fulmer 

47-48 — The primary school: its methods and subject matter. 2 hours. 
Miss Moore 

49-50 — Literature in the kindergarten and primary grades. 2 hours. 
Miss Moore 

49a-5oa — One-half of the above course, i hour. Miss Moore 

141-142 — Relationship of the kindergarten to the primary school. 2 
hours. Miss Moore 

1410-1420 — Relationship of the kindergarten to the primary school. I 
hour. Miss Moore 

.143-144 — Kindergarten conference. 3 hours. Professor Hill 

145-146 — Curricula for kindergarten normal schools and problems in 
kindergarten supervision. 3 hours. Professor Hill 

Seven other, introductory, courses in kindergarten are also given. 

Religious Education 

Education 51 — The Sunday School. 2 hours. Professor CoE 
Education 52 — The training of Sunday-School teachers. 2 hours. 
Professor Coe 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING lOI 

Education 151 — ^The psychology of religion. 2 hours. Professor Coe 

Education 152— The theory of religious education. 2 hours. Profes- 
sor Coe 

Education 249 — Selected topics in applied psychology. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Coe 

Education 251-252 — Practicum. The psychology of mysticism. 2 
hours. Professor Coe 

Technical Education 

Education 2 — Principles of teaching. 2 hours. Professors McMurry, 
SuzzALLO, and Bonser 

Education 155-156 — The teaching of household arts. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessors KiNNE and Cooley, Miss Cora Winchell and Miss Florence 

WiNCHELL 

Education 157-158 — Supervision and critic teaching in the household 
arts. 2 hours. Professors Kinne and Woolman 

Education 257-258 — Practicum in household arts. 2 hours. Profes- 
sors Kinne and Woolman 

Education 160 — Teaching in industrial and trade schools for women. 
2 hours. Professor Woolman 

Education 73-74 — Teaching in training schools for nurses. 2 hours. 
Professors Nutting and Bigelow and Miss Stewart 

Education 75 — History of nursing, i hour. Professor Nutting 

Education 76 — Training school administration. i3^ hours. Professor 
Nutting and Miss Goodrich 

Education 186 — Nurses' education. Professor Nutting 

Education i — Problems of technical education. 

Education 86 — Teaching and administration in district nursing, i hour. 
Miss Wald, Miss Crandall, and other Lecturers 

Education 177-178 — Teaching industrial arts. 3 hours. Professors 
Bonser and Noyes, Mr. Weick and Mr. Sleffel. 

Electrical Engineering 

Professors: ^ Crocker, Slighter (Executive Officer) 

Assistant Professors: Arendt, Morecroft 

Instructors: Hehre, Mason 

Assistant: Keller 

Professors M, I. Pupin and W. A. Wills of the Department of Physics 
give instruction in electro-mechanics to the Electrical Engineering 
students. 

See the statement of the Department of Physics. 

'Absent on leave 1911-13 



102 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Courses 

For the significance of course numbers see page S7 

2 — Elements of dynamo-electric machinery. 2 hours. Professors 
Arendt and Morecroft, Messrs. Hehre and Mason 

4 — ^Electric distribution, for Civil, Mechanical, Mining, and Metallurgical 
Engineering students. 2 hours. Professor Arendt and Mr. Hehre 

52 — Design of direct-current machinery. 2 hours and i afternoon. 
Professor Arendt 

54 — Design of alternating-current machinery. 2 hours and i afternoon. 
Professor Slighter 

72 — Direct-current laboratory — Short course for students in Mining, 
Civil, Metallurgical, Sanitary, and Chemical Engineering, i afternoon. 
Messrs. Hehre, Mason, and Keller 

73 — ^Direct-current laboratory — Short course for students in Mechanical 
Engineering, i afternoon. Messrs. Hehre, Mason, and Keller 

75 — ^Alternating-current laboratory — Short course for students in 
Mining, Metallurgical, and Mechanical Engineering, i afternoon. Pro- 
fessor Morecroft and Messrs. Hehre, Mason, and Keller 

76 — ^Alternating-current laboratory. Same as E. E. 75. For students 
in Civil Engineering, i afternoon. Professor Morecroft and Mr. Mason 

98 — Thesis — Original work and report on a subiect approved by the 
head of the department. Optional 

loi — Generator and motor practice — Principles, construction, operation, 
and testing. 3 hours. Professor Slighter and Mr. Hehre 

103 — ^Electric motor — Electric motors, their action, control, and appli- 
cation. 3 hours. Professor Arendt 

103A — Electric motors — 103 abridged for Mechanical Engineering 
students. 2 hours. Professor Arendt 

104 — Electric distribution — Principles and methods of transmitting 
and distributing direct and alternating currents. 3 hours. Professor 
Slighter 

105 — Alternating-current engineering. 3 hours. Professor Slighter 

105A — Alternating-current engineering — 105 abridged for Mechanical 
Engineering students. 2 hours. Professor Slighter 

106 — Electric plants — Operation, organization, and administration. 
2 hours. Professors Slighter and Arendt and special lecturers 

107-108 — Plant inspection. 2 hours. Professors Slighter and Arendt 

109-110 — Telegraphy and telephony, i hour. Professor Arendt 

XI2 — ^Electric railways — ^Their design, installation, and operation. 2 
hours. Professor Slighter 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING IO3 

112A — Electric railway — 112 abridged for students in Civil Engineer- 
ing, 2 hours. Professor Slighter 

173-174 — Direct-current laboratory — Practice in the use of instru- 
ments and in the operation and testing of direct-current dynamos and 
motors. 2 afternoons. Messrs. Hehre and Keller 

175-176 — Alternating-current laboratory — Practice in the use of instru- 
ments and in the operation and testing of alternating-current generators, 
motors, and transformers, i hour and i day. Professor Morecroft 

177 — Instrument laboratory Electrical measurements, storage-battery 
testing, photometry of electric lamps, i hour and 2 afternoons. Mr. Mason 

For Mechanics 107, 108, 109, iii, see Physics, page 159. 

Summer Session 

s2 — General principles of electricity and magnetism. 5 hours. Professor 
Morecroft 

Equipment 

The offices, laboratories, museums, and lecture-rooms of the Electrical 
Engineering Department are in the southern portion of the Engineering 
Building. 

The laboratories located in the basement contain direct and alternating- 
current machinery and apparatus. The various machines in these labora- 
tories are respectively examples of constant-potential generators, constant- 
current arc-lighting dynamos, many types of stationary and railway 
motors, and motor-dynamos. Complete sets of ampere, volt, and watt 
meters, speed indicators, transmission and absorption dynamometers are 
available for testing the various generators and motors. 

The alternating-current apparatus includes single-phase and polyphase 
generators, induction and synchronous motors, rotary converters, mercury 
arc rectifiers, and various types and sizes of transformers. Test boards 
and complete sets of alternating-current measuring instruments and curve- 
tracing apparatus, such as an oscillograph and ondograph, are also provided. 

The lecture-rooms are provided with an ample supply of electrical 
currents of different forms, and other facilities for experimental demon- 
strations. The museum contains collections of apparatus, models, and 
materials relating to electrical engineering. 

The large instrument laboratory on the third floor contains various 
forms of galvanometers, ampere balances, potentiometers, standard 
cells and resistances, measuring apparatus, laboratory standard volt 
and ammeters, as well as the high-tension testing sets. A storage battery 
is provided for testing, calibration, and standardization purposes. 

The photometric laboratory of this department is situated in the base- 
ment of Havemeyer Hall and it is equipped with various forms of photo- 
meters for gas, arc, and incandescent lamp testing. 



104 ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

English and Comparative Literature 

Professors: Baker, Baldwin, Brewster, Fletcher, Gildersleeve, 
Krapp, Matthews, Odell, Sykes, Thorndike (A. H.) {Executive Officer), 
and Trent 

Associate Professors: Erskine, Hubbard, and Lawrence 

Assistant Professors: Ayres, Latham, and Tassin 

Associate: Weeks (M. F.) 

Instructors: Haller, Ristine, Steeves, Van Doren, Wright, and 
Davis 

Lecturers: Howard and Sturtevant (E.) 

Assistants: Cook and Fox 

English 
For tht significance of course numbers see page 57 

A — English composition. 3 hours. Professor Erskine, Messrs. Steeves 
and Dr. Van Doren (Columbia College); Professors Baldwin and 
Hubbard, Miss Weeks, Miss Haskell, Mr. Haller, Miss Cook, and 
Miss Fox (Barnard College) 

B — English literature and composition. 2 hours (Columbia); 3 hours 
(Barnard). Professors Odell and Erskine, Dr. Wright and Messrs. 
Steeves, and Dr. Van Doren (Columbia); Professor Baldwin, Mr. 
Haller, Miss Cook, Miss Howard, and Miss Fox (Barnard) 

1-2 — English composition — Daily themes and fortnightly essays, 
lectures, and consultations. 3 hours. Professor Tassin (Columbia), 
Professor Baldwin (Barnard) 

7-8 — Vocal training and elocution. 3 hours. Professor Tassin (Colum- 
bia and Barnard) 

11-12 — Public speaking. 3 hours. Professor Tassin (Columbia) 

15-16 — English versification. 2 hours. Professor Brander Mat- 
thews (Columbia) 

17-18 — English modem literature. 2 hours. Mr. Steeves and Dr. 
Van Doren (Columbia) 

19-20 — American literature, a hours. Professor Brander Mat- 
thews (Columbia) 

[21-22 — English literature from 1780 to 1830. 3 hours. Professor 
Odell (Columbia)] 

Courses 21-22 and 23-34 are given in alternate years. 

23-24 — English literature from 1830 to 1890, 3 hours. Professor 
Erskine (Columbia) 

[25-26 — English literature from 1557 to 1660. 3 hours. Professor 
Erskine (Columbia); Professor Trent (Barnard)] 

Coiurses 25-36 and 37-28 are given in alternate years. 



ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 105 

27-28 — English literature from 1660 to 1780. 3 hours. Professor 
Odell (Columbia), Professor Trent (Barnard) 

29-30 — English literature from the earliest period to the Norman con- 
quest. 3 hours. Professor Ayres (Columbia) , Professor Krapp (Barnard) 

[31-32 — English literature from the Norman conquest to 1550. 3 hours. 
Professor Ayres (Columbia and Barnard)] 

Course 31-32 is not given at Columbia in 1911-12. 

33-34 — English literature in the nineteenth century after 1830. 3 

hours (Barnard). Professor Hubbard 

35-36 — Shakespeare. 2 hours. Professor Lawrence (Coltunbia) ; 3 

hours. Professor Gildersleeve (Barnard) 

[37-38 — Types of literature, prose and verse. 2 hours. Professor 

Brewster (Barnard)] 

[39-40 — The development of English fiction. 2 hours. Professor 

Brander Matthews (Columbia)] 
41-42 — The development of the English drama. 2 hours. Professor 

Odell (Columbia) and Professor Tassin (Barnard) 
45-46 — English literary criticism. 2 hours. Professor Hubbard 

(Barnard) 
201 — English composition. 2 hours. Professor Baldwin 
[203-204 — Studies in English style. 2 hours. Professor Krapp] 
205-206 — Development of English prose from Wiclif to Bacon. 2 

hours. Professor Krapp 

207-208 — History of the English language. 2 hours. Professor Krapp 
212 — English sounds. A course in the phonetic history of the language. 

2 hours. Professor Krapp 
[213 — Historical English grammar. 2 hours. Professor Krapp] 
215 — ^Anglo-Saxon prose. 2 hours. Professor Ayres 
[216 — Caedmon and Cynewulf. 2 hours. Professor Lawrence] 
218 — Beowulf. 2 hours. Professor Lawrence 
[219-220 — Middle English language and literature. 2^hours. Professors 

Krapp and Ayres] 

[222 — History of Anglo-Saxon literature. 2 hours. Professor Ayres] 
227-228 — Chaucer. 2 hours. Professors Ayres and Lawrence 
229-230 — Non-dramatic literature in the sixteenth century. 2 hours. 

Professor Fletcher 

[231-232 — English literature in the seventeenth century. 2 hours. 

Professor Trent] 

233-234 — English literature in the eighteenth century. 2 hours. 

Professor^^TRENT 



I06 ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

235-236 — English literature, 1798-1832. 2 hours. Professor Thorn- 
dike 

[239-240 — English literature in the Victorian period. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Thorndike] 

241-242 — The development of the drama. 2 hours. Professor 
Brander Matthews 

[247-248 — ^English comedy: its history and its methods. 2 hours. 
Professor Brander Matthews] 

[249-250 — Shakespeare as a playwright. 2 hours. Professor Brander 
Matthews] 

[251-252 — ^The English drama from the beginning to 1642. 2 hours. 
Professor Thorndike] 

253-254 — Textual criticism of Shakespeare's plays. 2 hours. Professor 
Thorndike 

[258 — The English lyric in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. 
2 hours. Professor Erskine] 

[261-262 — English prose in the eighteenth century. 2 hours. Professor 
Odell] 

263-264 — English prose in the nineteenth century. 2 hours. Professor 
Odell 

267-268 — ^American literature. 2 liours. Professor Erskine 

301-302 — Seminar — Studies in the Elizabethan drama. 2 hours. 
Professor Thorndike 

303-304 — Seminar — Studies in the seventeenth century. Professor 
Trent 

305-306 — Seminar — Studies in Middle English literature. 2 hours. 
Professors Lawrence and Ayres 

309-310 — Seminar — Discussion of dissertations. Professors Trent, 
Fletcher, Thorndike, Lawrence, and Ayres 

3 1 1 — Seminar in linguistic problems. 2 hours. Professor Schick 

Undergraduate Courses in Teachers College 

51-52 — English speech. 2 hours. Professor Latham 

53-54 — English usage. 2 hours. Professor Baker 

55-56 — Nineteenth century writers. 3 hours. Professor Sykes 

59-60 — Typical forms of literature. 2 hours. Professor Baker 



ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 107 

61-62 — ^Reading and story telling. 2 hours. Professor Latham 
63-64 — Reading and speaking. Advanced course. 2 hours. Professor 
Latham 

Comparative Literature 

271-272 — Medieval literature: ballad and epic. 2 hours. Professor 
Lawrence 

[273-274 — Medieval literature: romances. 2 hours. Professor Law- 
rence] 

275-276 — Dante and medieval culture. 2 hours. Professor Fletcher 
281-282 — The Renaissance in Europe: introductory course. 2 hours. 

Professor Fletcher 
285-286 — Classicism in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 2 

hours. Dr. Ristine and Dr. Van Doren 
287-288 — The romantic movement. 2 hours. Dr. Wright 
291-292 — Moli^re and the Restoration comedy. 2 hours. Professor 

Brander Matthews 
[293-294 — Dramatists of the nineteenth century. 2 hours. Professor 

Brander Matthews] 
295 — Heroes of old Teutonic poetry. 2 hours. Professor Schick 
307-308 — Relations between English and Continental literatures in 

the sixteenth century. Professor Fletcher 

Summer Session 

sAi — Rhetoric and English composition. 2 points. Professor Denny, 
Mr. Haller, and Miss Lape 

sB2 — English composition. 2 points. Dr. Wright and Mr. Haller 

SI — Advanced composition. 2 points. Professor Mead 

This course is limited to 20 students. 

S19 — New England writers. 2 points. Professor Cairns 

S23 — English literature in the first half of the nineteenth century. 2 
points. Dr. Wright 

S27 — English literature in the eighteenth century, 2 points. Professor 
Denny 

S35 — Shakespeare. 2 points. Professor Ayres 

s6i — Elements of oral expression. 4 points. Professor Davis and Mr. 
Johnson 

s62 — Vocal interpretation of English classics. 4 points. Professor 
Davis and Mr. Johnson 

S63 — Platform speaking. 4 points. Professor Davis and Mr. Johnson 



I08 ENGLISH AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

8x30 — Chaucer. 2 points. Professor Ayres 
8327 — Chaucer. 2 points. Professor Mead 

S341 — ^The beginnings of a national literature in America. 2 points. 
Professor Cairns 

S251 — ^The English drama from the beginning to 1642. Professor 
Thorndike 

Extension ' 

eVi-V2 — English for foreigners. Mr. Duncan 

eWi-Wa — English grammar and composition. Business English. Mr. 
Duncan, Also in Newark. Mr. Pifer 

eXi-X2 — College entrance English. Mr. Gaston 

eYi-Y2 — College entrance English. Mr. Mitchill 

eAi-A2 — English composition. 3 points. Dr. Wolff. Also in Newark. 
Mr. Pifer 
eA3-A4 — Composition and rhetoric, i J^ points. Dr. Wolff 

ei7-i8 — Modem literature, English and foreign. 2 points. Mr. 
Steeves 
eia-2a — ^English composition. Advanced, i }i points. Dr. Wolff 
eib-2b — English composition. The short story. Mr. Pitkin 

eic-2c — English composition (advanced). The short story. Mr. 
Pitkin 

eg-io — The English language and modem English grammar. 2 points. 
Professor Griffin 

eiia-i2a — Public speaking. 2 points. Mr. Dow 

6x9-20 — ^The history of American literature. 2 points. Dr. Van 
Doren 

e23a-24a — ^The history of English literature. 2 points. Professor 
Tucker 

e3Sa-36a — Shakespeare. 2 points. Professor Tassin 

e4ia-42a — Contemporary dramatic literature. 2 points. Mr. Hamil- 
ton 

e4ib-42b — Technic of the drama. History and theory of dramatic 
composition. 2 points. Mr. Tynan 
e5ia-52a — ^Voice and oral reading, i point. Miss Cook 
e59a-6oa — Typical forms of literature. 2 points. Mr. Pifer 

e6za-62a — Oral composition in elementary schools, i point. Miss 
Cook 



GEOGRAPHY IO9 

Fine Arts 

(See Architecture, Music, and Design) 

In addition eighteen courses in Fine Arts are offered under the auspices 
of Teachers College. For details see the Announcement of Teachers 
College and the special circular of the department. 

See also the Statement of the School of Fine Arts, page 322. 

French 

(See Romance Languages and Literatures) 

Geography 

Professor: Dodge 
Instructor: Kirchwey (C. B.) 

Courses 
See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — General geography. 3 hours. Professor Dodge and Miss 
Kirchwey 

53-54 — Continental geography for schools. 2 hours. Miss Kirch- 
wey 

55 — Geography for primary grades. 2 hours. Miss Kirchwey 
56 — Man and his environment. 2 hours. Professor Dodge 
57 — Elements of industrial geography. 3 hours. Professor Dodge 
101-102 — The geography of the United States and Western Europe. 
2 hours. Professor Dodge and Miss Kirchwey 
See also Education 68, 167-168, 267-268 

Siunmer Session 

558 — Commercial and industrial geography. 2 points. Professor 
Calkins 

Equipment 

The Department of Geography occupies a suite of three rooms on the 
fourth floor of Teachers College. A lecture-room and laboratory cap- 
able of holding fifty, an office, and a combined office and stock-room com- 
pose the suite. The department is furnished with lantern slides, models, 
and wall maps; and has a set of the more important weather instru- 
ments in an outdoor shelter. The supply of topographic, climatic, and 
special maps, of diagrams, of physical models, and of lantern slides is 
large, and has been especially chosen for use in the several courses 
announced above. 



no GEOLOGY 

Geology 

Professors: Grabau and Kemp {Executive Officer) 

Assistant Professor: Berkey 

Instructor: Ogilvie 

Curator: Hahn 

Assistants: Fettke, Hintze, and Maury 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — General geology. C 2 hours, L 2 hours. Professors Grabau 
and Berkey 

4 — Petrography. C 2 hours, L 4 hours for two months. Compare 
Mineralogy 6. Professor Berkey 

5-6 — General geology. 3 hours. Professors Kemp, Grabau, and 
Berkey 

15 — Elementary paleontology. C i hour, L 2 hours. Professor Grabau 
and Mr. Hintze 

16 — Index fossils. C i hour, L 8 or more hours. Prerequisite, Course 
1-2, 6 or 18. Professor Grabau and Mr. Hintze 

18 — General geology. C 3 hours. Field work on Saturdays (last 
six weeks). Professor Berkey 

19 — Physiographic geology — ^Topographic features and map inter- 
pretation. C 2 hours, L 2 hours. Professor Berkey 

20 — Rocks and soils. Origin, structure, constituents, and variety 
of soils. C 2 hours, L 2 hours. Professor Berkey 

51-52 — Principles of geology. 2 hours. Professors Grabau and 
Berkey 

105-106 — Economic geology. 3 hours. Professor Kemp 

107-108 — Invertebrate paleontology. C 2 hours, L at least 4 hours. 
Professor Grabau and Mr. Hintze 

no — Geological examinations and surveys — Field methods and 
organization. 2 hours. Professor Kemp 

112 — Field geology — One week's field work, and report upon the 
same, immediately at the close of the spring examinations. Professors 
Kemp, Grabau, and Berkey 

1 13-1 14— -Prehistoric archaeology. 20 lectures on geologic basis of 
archaeology. Professor Berkey 



GEOLOGY III 

119 — Physiographic geology. (19 with additional study of literature 
for advanced students.) 3 hours. Professor Berkey 

151-152 — Principles of geology. C 2 hours, L 4 hours or more. 
(51-52 with additional laboratory and library work.) Professors 
Grabau and Berkey 

175 — Field geology in Paleozoic rocks of eastern North America. 
4 weeks in the summer. Officers of the department. 

201-202 — Petrology. C 2 hours, L at least 4 hours. Professors 
ICemp and Berkey 

205-206 — Comparative geology of North America — A comparative 
description and study of the geological formations of North America. 
C 3 hours, 4 hours reading and laboratory. Professors Kemp and Grabau 

209-210 — Comparative geology of Europe. C 2 hours, 4 hours labora- 
tory and library work. Professor Grabau 

211 — Phylogeny of the Gastropoda. C i hour, L 6 hours. Professor 
Grabau 

212 — Phylogeny of the Cephalopoda. C i hour, L 6 hours. Professor 
Grabau 

213-214 — Fossil faunas of North America. C i hour, L 6 hours. 
Professor Grabau and Mr. Hintze 

301-302 — Paleogeography of North America. Development and 
changes of former continents and ocean basins. i hour seminar 
and laboratory according to arrangement. C i hour, L 6 hours to 2 
days. Professor Grabau 

303-304 — Journal Club and seminar conducted by officers of the 
department. 2 evenings a month. 

307-308 — Research in areal, structural, economic, or physiographic 
geology under officers of the department. 

311-312 — Phylogeny of a special group of invertebrates. Research 
course. Professor Grabau 

315-316 — Stratigraphy. Research course. L 6 hours or more. 
Professor Grabau 

B 1-2 — General geology. Elementary course. C 2 hours, L 2 hours. 
6 points. Drs. Ogilvie and Maury 

B 101-102 — General geology. Course 1-2 with L 4 hours additional. 
8 points. Drs. Ogilvie and Maury 

B 113 — Summer field course — Two weeks in the field, and subse- 
quent preparation of a report. Dr. Ogilvie 

B 1 5-16— Paleontology. C 1 hour, L 2 hours. Drs. Ogilvie and Maury 



112 GEOLOGY 

B 1 1 7-1 1 8 — rGlacial geology and advanced physiography. C i 
hour. L to be arranged. Dr. Ogilvie 

B 1 19-120 — General geology, advanced course. C and L to be 
arranged; 4, 6, or 8 hours. Dr. Ogilvie 
For the courses in geography see page 109. 

H215 — Engineering geology. Lectures, laboratory and field work. 3 
hours. Professors Kemp and Berkey 

Ha 16 — Lithology and petrology. Lectures and laboratory work. 2 
hours. Professors Kemp and Berkey 

Summer Session j 

S2— Elementary historical geology. Professor Grabau and Miss Kurtz 
S2a, identical with s2, with i hour laboratory, one-half day field work, 
per week 
S151 — Principles of geology. 2 points. Professor Grabau 
si75_Geology. Field work in New York State. Professor Grabau 

Extension 

ei — General geology — a general introduction to the subject of geology. 
3 points. Professor Grabau 

62 — Historical geology— the origin of the earth and its astronomical 
relationships. 3 points. Professor Grabau 



The following courses in paleobotany are oSered at the New York 
Botanical Garden by Dr. Arthur Hollick : 

General paleobotany — Developmental history and structure of the 
fossil flora of some selected locaUty. Laboratory and museum. 

Cretaceous flora of eastern North America — Collection and deter- 
mination of specimens from some station with attention to strati- 
graphic relations. Field and laboratory. 

Equipment 

The department has ample laboratories and^ a'^ fuir equipment 
for its several lines of work. For details see the separately printed 
Announcement. 

The paleobotanical library and collections of Columbia University 
have been deposited at the New York Botanical Garden, 



GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES II3 

Germanic Languages and Literatures 

Professors: Carpenter {Executive Officer) and Thomas 

Associate Professors: Bagster-Coluns, Braun, Hervey, and Tombo 

Assistant Professor: Remy 

Instructors: Bechert, Haskell, Heuser, PoRXERFiELD.and Schultze 

Lecturer: Richard 

For the significance of course numbers see page $7 
German 

A1-A2 — Elementary course. 3 hours. Messrs. Heuser and Schulze 
(Columbia); Professor Braun, Mr. Bechert, Drs. Porterfield and 
Haskell (Barnard) 

B1-B2 — Intermediate course. 3 hours. Mr. Schulze (Columbia); 
Mr. Bechert, Drs. Porterfield and Haskell (Barnard) 

3-4 — Composition and colloquial practice. Elementary course. 2 
hours. Mr. Heuser (Columbia), Mr. Bechert (Barnard) 

5-6 — Selected works of Goethe, Schiller, and Lessing. 3 hours. 
Professor Hervey and Mr. Heuser (Columbia). Professor Braun, 
Mr. Bechert, and Dr. Porterfield (Barnard) 

7-8 — Modern German prose. 3 hours. Professor Tombo (Columbia), 
Dr. Porterfield (Barnard) 

9 — Lessing's Laocoon. 2 hours. Mr. Schulze 

10 — Lessing's Hamburgische Dramaturgie. 2 hours. Mr. Schulze 

9, ID — Intermediate practice course. 2 hours. Professor Braun 
(Barnard) 

11-12 — Composition and colloquial practice. Advanced course. 2 
hours. Mr. Heuser 

13-14 — Nineteenth-century writers. Kleist and Grillparzer. 2 hours. 
Mr. Heuser 

[15-16 — Nineteenth-century writers. Hebbel and Hauptmann. 2 hours. 
Mr. Heuser] 

17a — Life and works of Goethe. 4 hours. Professor Hervey 
[19-20 — Life and works of Schiller. 2 hours. Professor Hervey] 
[21, 22 — Goethe. Life and selected works. 3 hours. Dr. Haskell 
(Barnard)] 

23, 24 — Schiller. Life and selected works. 3 hours. Dr. Haskell 
(Barnard) 
23-24 — History of German civilization. 3 hours. Dr. Richard 
25-26 — Selected dramas of the nineteenth century. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Braun (Barnard) 



114 GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

37> 38 — History of German literature. 2 hours. Professor Braun 
(Barnard) 

39, 40 — Goethe's Faust. First and second parts. 2 hours. Professor 
Thomas (Barnard) 

51-52 — German in secondary schools. 3 hours. Professor Bagster- 
CoLLiNs. Given in Teachers College 

53-54 — Educational German. 2 hours. Professor Bagster-Col- 
LiNS. Given in Teachers College 

61 and 1 01 — History of German literature from the earliest times to 
the Reformation. 3 hours. Professor Thomas 

62 and 102 — History of German literature from the Reformation to 
the nineteenth century. 3 hours. Professor Thomas 

63-64 and 103-104 — Goethe's Faust. First and second parts. 2 hours. 
Professor Thomas 

105 — German literature in the nineteenth century. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Thomas 

106 — Contemporary German literature. 2 hours. Professor Tombo 
107 — History of the German language. 2 hours. Professor Remy 
108 — The German of to-day. 2 hours. Professor Remy 
113 — Middle High German. 2 hours. Professor Remy 
114 — Middle High German poetry. 2 hours. Professor Remy 
128 — Old High German and Old Saxon. 3 hours. Professor Remy 
129-130 — Outlines of the history of German civilization, 2 hours. 
Dr. Richard 

141 — Phonetics. 2 hours. Professor Bagster-Collins. Given in 
Teachers College 

Education 269-270 — Practice course. 3 hours; practical work, 3 
hours. Professor Bagster-Collins. Given in Teachers College 
201 — Proseminar. Lessing. 2 hours. Professor Thomas 
202 — Proseminar. Goethe. 2 hours. Professor Thomas 
207 — Proseminar. Hauptmann. 2 hours. Professor Tombo 
208 — Proseminar. Fontane. 2 hours. Professor Tombo 

Scandinavian 

121 — Elementary Icelandic. 2 hours. Professor Remy 
122 — Advanced Icelandic. 2 hours. Professor Remy 

Gothic 
127 — Gothic. 3 hours. Professor Remy 



GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES II5 

Germanic Philology 

205-206 — Comparative philology of the Germanic dialects. 2 hours. 
Professor Remy 

Germanic Seminar 

301 — ^Walter von der Vogelweide. 2 hours. Professor Carpenter 
302 — Literary relations of England and Germany in the eighteenth 
century. 2 hours. Professor Thomas 

Summer Session 

sAi — Elementary course. 2 points. Professor Braun, Dr. Porter- 
field, and Mr. Schulze 

sA2 — Elementary reading and oral practice. 2 points. Dr. Porter- 
field and Mr. Schulze 

SA3 — Supplementary course. 2 points. Mr. Heuser and Mr. Schulze 
sBi — Intermedinte course. First part. 2 points. Dr. Porterfield 
sB2 — Intermediate course. Second part. 2 points. Professor Remy 
S3-4 — Composition and oral practice. Intermediate course. 2 points. 
Professor Braun 

S5-6 — Introduction to the classics. 4 points. Mr. Heuser 
S101-102 — History of German literature. 2 points. Professor von 
Klenze 
S103-104 — Goethe's Faust. 2 points. Professor Braun 
SI 07 — History of the German language. 2 points. Professor Remy 
S127-128 — Gothic. 2 points. Professor Remy. 

S145 — Modern German usage and advanced syntax. 2 points. Mr. 
Heuser 

S151 — Die Entstehung und Entwicklung der deutschen Novelle im 
achtzehnten und neunzehnten Jahrhundert. Vortrage, Berichte, Unter- 
suchungen. 2 points. Professor von Klenze 

S203 — Proseminar C. Great German writers: Schiller, 3 points. Pro- 
fessor Hervey 

Extension 

eAi-A2 — Elementary course. 6 points. Mr. Heuser, Dr. Porterfield 
(and in Brooklyn), Mr. M. G. Bach 
eA3-A4 — Elementary course. First half. 3 points. Mr. M. G. Bach 

eA5-A6 — Elementary course. Second half. 3 points. Mr. M, G. 
Bach 



Il6 GERMANIC LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

e B1-B2 — Intermediate course. 6 points. M. Schulze 

683-84 — Shorter intermediate course. 4 points. Professor Braun 

63-4 — Composition and oral practice. Intermediate course. 2 points. 

Professor Braun 
65-6 — Introduction to the classics. 4 points. Professor Hervey and 

Mr. Heuser 

Public Lectures 

Lectures in the German language on popular subjects, intended 
primarily for the students of the University, but to which the general 
public is also invited, are given each year under the auspices of the 
department. 

Journal Club 

The Germanic Club is an organization founded in 1902 for the purpose 
of reviewing and discussing important contributions to recent scholarship 
in the Germanic field. The Club consists of the ofificers, fellows, and 
scholars of the department. Meetings are held monthly. 

Deutsche! Verein 

The Deutscher Verein of Columbia University, founded in 1898, is 
an association of the students and instructors of the University who 
are interested in the study of the German language and literature, 
and in the acquisition of a more intimate knowledge of Germany, of 
German institutions, and of the German people than is furnished by 
academic study alone. The active membership consists of instructors 
in all departments of the University, of students in residence to the 
limited number of fifty, and of previous members of the Verein who 
are no longer students. An honorary membership is made up of 
prominent German-speaking citizens of New York. Stated meetings 
are held on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month in the 
room assigned to the Verein in West Hall. 

Equipment 

The University Library offers excellent facilities for the study of 
German, both on the literary and the linguistic side. In German 
literature all periods are well represented. The Goethe collection, 
which consists of more than 1300 titles, affords to the student of Ger- 
many's greatest author an exceptional opportunity for the prosecution 
of his researches. The Scandinavian collection contains a good repre- 
sentation of the ancient saga and poetical literature, and most of the 
eminent writers of modern Norway, Denmark, and Sweden. The 
Holland Society library, deposited with the University in 1901, contains 
a considerable collection of books and pamphlets in the Dutch language 
from all periods. 



GYNECOLOGY II7 

The Library has sets and the current numbers of all the important 
periodicals which deal with Germanic literature and Germanic and 
general philology. It has also sets of periodicals no longer published, 
and a large collection of the transactions and publications of the learned 
societies of America and Europe. 

A reference library of 1200 volumes, containing the most important 
subsidia for the critical study of the Germanic languages and litera- 
tures — dictionaries, bibliographies, biographies, histories of literature, 
and the like — and independent of the main collection in the University 
Library, is placed in a room adjacent to the lecture-room and offices 
of the department in University Hall. 

The income of the Carl Schurz Library Fund ($10,000), contributed 
by citizens of New York in commemoration of the seventieth birthday 
of Carl Schurz, is, by the terms of the gift, devoted in perpetuity to the 
purchase of books in the field of the German language and literature. 

For the Carl Schurz Fellowship in the German Language and Litera- 
ture, see index. 

Greek 

(See page 83) 
Gynecology 

Professor: Cragin {Executive Officer) 
Professor of Clinical Gynecology: Chambers 
Associates: Oastler and Ward 

Instructors: Ayres, Lobenstine, Proben, Williams (P. H.), and 
Ryder 

Clinical Assistants: Bradley, Roff, Kellogg, Silleck, Knapp 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 
52 — The principles and practice of gynecology — Lectures, 3 a week, 
2 didactic and i clinical. Professor Cragin 

53 — Recitations and demonstrations, i hour a week for each stu- 
dent. Dr. Ward 

57-58 — Clinic in operative gynecology to small sections at Lincoln 
Hospital. I hour. Dr. Oastler 

59-60 — Practical instruction in the diagnosis, to sections of the class — 
10-12 lessons for each student, Vanderbilt Clinic. Drs. Oastler, Proben, 
Ryder, and Williams 

61-62 — Practical instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of vene- 
real diseases in women to sections of the class — 2 lessons for each 
student at Bellevue Hospital. Dr. Lobenstine 



Il8 HISTORY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 

63-64 — Clinic in operative gynecology — Woman's Hospital, i hour. 
Professor Chambers. 
For equipment, see the Sloane Hospital for Women, p. 233 

History and Political Philosophy 

Professors: Botsford, Dunning {Executive Officer), Johnson (H.), 
Osgood, Shepherd, Shotwell, Sloane, and Robinson 
Assistant Professors: Hayes and Schuyler 
Associate: Muzzey 

Instructors: Green, Humphrey, and Huttmann 
Assistant: Hutchinson 

Coiirses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

A1-A2 — Epochs of European history. 3 hours. Professors Hayes 
and Schuyler, Messrs. Humphrey and Green (Columbia College); 
Miss Huttmann, Dr. Muzzey, and Miss Hutchinson (Barnard College) 

[3-4 — Greece and early Italy. 3 hours. Barnard College and Colum- 
bia College. Professor Botsford] 

5-6 — The Roman Empire. 3 hours. Professor Botsford 

7-8 — Europe in the Middle Ages. 3 hours. Mr. Humphrey (Columbia 
College) 

9-10 — Europe in the nineteenth century. 2 hours. Professor Hayes, 
(Columbia College) ; Professor Shotwell, Dr. Muzzey, and Miss Hutch- 
inson (Barnard College) 

11-12 — A survey of English history. 3 hours. Professor Schuyler 
(Columbia College), Dr. Muzzey (Barnard College) 

13 — History of the United States from 1783 to the war with Mexico. 
3 hours. Professor Schuyler (Columbia College), Professor Shepherd 
(Barnard College) 

14 — History of the United States since the war with Mexico. 3 hours. 
Professor Dunning (Columbia College), Professor Shepherd (Barnard 
College) 

19-20 — Laboratory in contemporaneous European history. 2 hours. 
Professor Hayes and Mr. Green (Columbia College) 

51-52 — The literature of American history. 2 hours. Professor Johnson 
(Teachers College) 

[11 7-1 1 8 — The period of transition in Roman history from the republic 
to the principate. 2 hours. Professor Botsford] 

121 — History of the intellectual class in Europe. 4 hours. Professor 
Robinson 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY II9 

[125-126 — ^The history of England to 1660. 2 hours.] 

[151 — ^European history, 18 15-1848. 2 hours. Professor Sloane] 

IS3 — Contemporary European history since 1848. 4 hours. Pro- 
fessor Sloane 

[155 — The social history of England. 2 hours. Professor Shotwell] 

156 — The social and industrial history of modern England. 2 hours. 
Professor Shotwell 

[157-158 — History of Great Britain, principally during the eighteenth 
and nineteenth centuries. 2 hours.] 

161 — The formation of the American constitutional system. 2 hours. 
Professor Beard 

162 — The development of the American constitutional system. 2 
hours. Professor Beard 

[168 — Historical geography of Europe. 2 hours. Professor Shepherd] 

169 — Historical geography of modern colonization. 2 hours. Professor 
Shepherd 

170 — Modern colonization. 2 hours. Professor Shepherd 

213-214 — The Roman Empire, political, social, and intellectual. 3 
hours. Professor Botsford 

[215-216 — History of Greece, political, social, and intellectual. 3 hours. 
Professor Botsford] 

217-218 — Constitutional history of Greece. 2 hours. Professor 
Botsford 

[221— Later Roman Empire and early Middle Ages. 2 hours. Professor 
Shotwell] 

222 — Primitive institutions. Paganism and Christianity. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Shotwell 

[225— The later Middle Ages. 2 hours. Professor Shotwell] 

[226 — Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Shotwell] 

227 — ^The Protestant revolt. 2 hours. Professor Robinson 

[228— The Catholic Reformation {i. e., the so-called Counter Reforma- 
tion) and the Council of Trent. 2 hours. Professor Robinson] 

'229— General Church history. Period I: The ancient Church to 
590 A.D. 2 hours. Professor McGiffert 

'230— General Church history. Periods II and III: The Medieval 
and Modern Church, 590-1789. 2 hours. Professor Rockwell 

['231— History of Christian doctrine. I: History of thought in the 
Primitive and Catholic Church. 4 hours. Professor McGiffert] 

' Given at Union Theological Seminary. 



120 HISTORY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 

[ ^232 — History of Christian doctrine. II : History of Protestant thought. 
4 hours. Professor McGiffert] 

'234 — Christianity in the light of its history. 2 hours. Professor 
McGiffert 

[^235 — History of the New Testament Canon. 2 hours. Mr. Tryon] 

'237 — History of New Testament times. 2 hours. Mr. Tryon 

'238 — History of early Christian literature. 2 hours. Professor Mc- 
Giffert 

['239 — Readings in the early fathers. 2 hours. Mr. Tryon] 
['240 — The influence of contemporary cults on early Christianity. Mr. 
Tryon] 

^241 — Medieval Church history, 590-1517. 2 hours. Professor Rock- 
well 

['242 — History of the Papacy. 2 hours. Mr. Tryon] 

'243 — English Church history (Reformation and post-Reformation 
periods). 2 hours. Professor McGiffert 

['245 — European Church history in the nineteenth century. Professor 
Rockwell] 

^246 — ^American Church history. 2 hours. Professor Rockwell 
^247 — The Church during the first three centuries. 3 hours. Professor 
Jenks 

^248 — The Church from the Council of Nicaea to Charlemg-gne. 3 hours. 
Professor Jenks 

'249 — The Church of England. 3 hours. Professor Jenks 

^250 — ^The Church from Charlemagne to modern times. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Jenks 

[252 — ^The reforms of the French Revolution. 2 hours. Professor 
Robinson] 

[254 — The progress of the French Revolution (1789 to 1800) with special 
attention to the sources. 2 hours. Professor Robinson] 

[261-262 — ^American colonial history during the seventeenth century. 
2 hours. Professor Osgood] 

263 — ^American colonial history during the eighteenth century. 4 hours. 
Professor Osgood 

267-268 — ^The United States from 1850, with special reference to the 
Civil War and Reconstruction. 2 hours. Professor Dunning 

269 — Hispanic institutions and culture. 2 hours. Professor Shepherd 

' Given at Union Theological Seminary. 

2 Given at the General Theological Seminary. 



HISTORY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 121 

271 — Spanish and French colonization in the United States to 1763. 
2 hours. Professor Shepherd 

272 — Spanish colonization and the westward movement in the United 
States, 1763-1821. 2 hours. Professor Shepherd 

275 — Colonial Latin America. 2 hours. Professor Shepherd 

276 — The republics of Latin America. 2 hours. Professor Shepherd 

279 — General history of political theories, ancient and medieval. 2 
hours. Professor Dunning 

280 — General history of modern political theories. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Dunning 

[281 — ^American political philosophy before 1850. 2 hours. Professor 
Dunning] 

[282 — American political philosophy since 1850. 2 hours. Professor 
Dunning] 

3 1 1-3 1 2 — Seminar in Greek and Roman history, i hour. Professor 
Botsford 

^315-316 — Historical seminar. 2 hours. Professor McGiffert 
['317-318 — Historical training class. 2 hours. Professor Rockwell] 

'319-320 — Religious thought in France in the eighteenth century. 2 
hours. Professor McGiffert 

321 — Historical bibliography; the sources of European history; 
methods of historical study. 2 hours. Professors Robinson and SiM- 

KHOVITCH 

322 — Seminar in primitive institutions in Europe. 2 hours. Professor 
Shot WELL 

356 — Seminar in the social history of England during the industrial 
revolution. 2 hours. Professor Shotwell 

357 — The work of Napoleon. 2 hours. Professor Sloane 

361-362 — ^The American Revolution. 2 hours. Professor Osgood 

363-364 — Seminar in American colonial history, i hour. Professor 
Osgood 

365 — European politics and the war of 1812. 2 hours. Professor 
Sloane 

367-368 — Seminar in later United States history, i hour. Professor 
Dunning 

[381-382 — Seminar in political philosophy, i hour. Professor Dunning] 

' Given at Union Theological Seminary. ' 



122 HISTORY AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY 

Summer Session 

sAi — Europe in the Middle Ages: the chief political, economic, and 
intellectual achievements. 3 points. Professor Krehbiel 

sA2 — Modern and contemporary European history. 3 points. Pro- 
fessor Schuyler 

si3-i4b — American history: political history of the United States 
from 1815 to 1889. 2 points. Professor Bassett 

SI 05 — History of Greece: from the beginning of the Cretan-Mycenaean 
civilization to the age of Pericles. 2 points. Professor Botsford 

SI 17 — History of Rome: the transition from republic to principate. 
2 points. Professor Botsford 

SI 21-122 — Medieval culture and the Renaissance. 2 points. Professor 
Krehbiel 

SI 57-1 58 — English history since 1660. 2 points. Dr. Sullivan 

S167-168 — Recent history of the United States: from 1877 to 1905. 
2 points. Professor Bassett 

SI 69 — ^American colonization and expansion from 1700 to 1800. Pro- 
fessor HULBERT 

Extension 

eAi — Europe in the Middle Ages. 3 points. Mr. Hall 
eA2 — Modem and contemporary European history. 3 points. Pro- 
fessor Hayes 

eiia-i2a — English history. 2 points. Mr. Sait 
ei3-i4 — American history. 2 points. Professor Schuyler 
l.s.A — The Protestant revolt. 15 lectures. Professor Robinson 
l.s.D — Political history of Europe in the nineteenth century. 3 points. 
Professor Shot well 

Equipment 

The University Library contains many of the great published col- 
lections for the study of ancient, mediEeval, and modern history. 
The special library of history and political science numbers upwards 
of 150,000 volumes. The great libraries of New York, Astor, Lenox, 
and Tilden foundations, those of the New York and Long Island His- 
torical Societies, and of the Bar Association are, under certain con- 
ditions, also accessible to students. Fuller information as to courses 
and opportunities for historical work is given in the Announcement of 
the Division of History, Economics, and Public Law, which may be 
obtained by applying to the Secretary of the University. Under the 
auspices of the Academy of Political Science, to which advanced stu- 
dents are eligible as members, opportunities are given for the discus- 
sion of questions of interest as presented in papers by specialists. 



HOUSEHOLD ARTS I23 

Household Arts 

The school of Household Arts of Teachers College provides eighty 
courses in Household Arts Education, Nutrition and Food Economics, 
Household Chemistry, Physiological Chemistry, Foods and Cookery, 
Textiles and Clothing, Household Art, Household and Institutional 
Administration, and Nursing and Health. Part-time students are pro- 
vided for by Special Classes. These courses and the Household Arts 
building and equipment are described in a special circular and in the 
Announcement of Teachers College. There is a summer session of the 
School. 

Industrial Arts 

The School of Industrial Arts of Teachers College provides fifty-four 
courses in Industrial Arts Education, Drawing and Design, Industrial 
Mathematics, Wood-Working, Metal-Working, Photography, Ceramics, 
Book-Binding, Library Economy, and Commercial Education. Special 
provision is made for part-time students by a large group of Evening 
Technical Courses. These courses and the Macy Manual Arts building 
and equipment are described in the special circular of the School and in 
the Announcement of Teachers College. There is a summer session of 
the School. 

Latin 

(See page 83) 

LAW 

Municipal or Private Law 

Professors: Abbott, Burdick, Canfield, Guthrie. Kirchwey, Red- 
field, Stone {Executive Officer), and Terry 
Associates: Dorr and Reynolds 
Assistant: Whitaker 

Courses 
See introductory paragraphs, page 57 
101-102 — Contracts. 4 hours. Professor Terry 
103 — Criminal law. 3 hours. Professor Stone 
IDS — Elements of law. 3 hours. Professor Munroe Smith 
107 — Pleading I. 3 hours. Professor Redfield 
108 — Property I. 4 hours. Professor Kirchwey 
no — Torts. 2 hours. Professor Burdick 
III — American constitutional law I. i hour. Professor Guthrie 



124 ^^^ 

201 — ^Agency. 3 hours. Mr. Reynolds 

202 — Carriers. 3 hours. Mr. Reynolds 

203 — ^Admiralty. 2 hours. Mr. Dorr 

20s — Domestic relations. 2 hours. Professor Abbott 

206 — Bankruptcy. 2 hours. Professor Kirchwey 

207 — Equity I. 3 hours. Professor Abbott 

208 — Trusts. 3 hours. Professor Stone 

210 — Negotiable paper. 3 hours. Professor Burdick 

21X — Insurance.' 2 hours. Mr. Dorr 

212 — Federal jurisdiction. 2 hours. Mr. Dorr 

213 — Pleading II. 4 hours. Professor Redfield 

215 — Property II. 4 hours. Professor Kirchwey 

216 — ^American constitutional law II. 4 hours. Mr. Powell 

218 — Quasi contracts. 3 hours. Professor Abbott 

219-220 — Sales. 2 hours. Professor Burdick 

221-222 — Corporations. 2 hours. Professor Canpield 

223 — Equity II. 3 hours. Professor Stone 

225 — Evidence. 4 hours. Professor Kirchwey. 

235 — ^Wills. 3 hours. Professor Redfield 

228 — New York trusts. 2 hours. Professor Canpield 

229 — Partnership. 3 hours. Professor Burdick 

230 — Mortgages. 3 hours. Professor Stone 

231 — Pleading III. 3 hours. Professor Redfield 

232 — Suretyship. 2 hours. Professor Abbott 

233-234 — Property III. 2 hours. Professor Abbott 

236 — ^Trial evidence, i hour. Mr. Dorr 

Siumner Session 

Real and personal property I. 4 points. Professor Kirchwey 
Criminal law. 3 points. Professor Gifford 
Negotiable paper. 3 points. Professor Moore 
Carriers. 3 points. Mr. Dorr 

Domestic relations and the law of persons. 2 points. Professor Gif- 
ford 
S203 — Constitutional law. 2 points. Mr. Powell 
S204 — Constitutional law. 2 points. Mr. Powell 

' Omitted during 1911-13. 



PUBLIC LAW AND JURISPRUDENCE 1 25 

Public Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 

Professors: Burgess {Executive Officer), 'Goodnow, Moore (J. B."), 
MuNROE Smith 
Associate Professor: Beard 
Instructor: Sait 
Lecturer: Powell 

I. Coxirses in Public Law 

A — Politics and Constitutional Law 

1-2 — Elementary course. 3 hours. Professor Beard and Dr. Sait 

3-4 — (Identical with 1-2). Professor Beard and Dr. Sait 

5-6 — (Identical with 1-2). Professor Beard and Dr. Sait 

7 — Contemporary problems of American federal politics. 2 hours. 
Dr. Sait 

8 — Contemporary state and municipal problems. 2 hours. Dr. Sait 

1 01 — Formation of the American constitutional system. 2 hours. 
Professor Beard. (Identical with History 161.) 

102 — Development of the American constitutional system. 2 hours. 
Professor Beard. (Identical with History 162.) 

[103-104 — Comparative politics and government. 2 hours. Professor 
Beard] 

105 — Party government in the United States. 2 hours. Professor 
Beard 

[106 — ^American state government. 2 hours. Professor Beard] 

201 — Introduction to the constitutional law of the United States, i 
hour. Professor Guthrie 

204 — Constitutional law of the United States. 2 hours. Mr. Powell 

301-302 — Seminar in constitutional and administrative law. i hour. 
Professor Beard and Mr. Powell 

Summer Session 

si — American federal government. 2 points. Professor Haines 
S2 — ^American state government. 2 points. Professor Haines 
S204 — Constitutional law of the United States. Mr. Powell 

' Absent on leave, 1911-12. 



126 PUBLIC LAW AND JURISPRUDENCE 

Extension 
ei-2 — American government. 3 points. Mr. Ross 
Administrative Law 

143 — Municipal science and administration. 2 hours. Professor GooD- 

NOW (not given in 1911-12) 

146 — Municipal functions. Professor Beard 

241 — Law of officers (extraordinary legal remedies). 2 hours. Mr. 

Powell 
245 — Law of taxation. 2 hotirs. Mr. Powell 
246 — Law of municipal corporations. 2 hours. Mr. Powell 
341-342 — Seminar in constitutional and administrative law. i hour. 

Professor Beard and Mr. Powell 

International Law 

120 — History of American diplomacy. 2 hours. Professor J. B. Moore 
221 — History of diplomacy. 2 hours. Professor J. B. Moore 
223-224 — International law. 2 hours. Professor J. B. Moore 
321-322 — Seminar in international law. 2 hours. Professor J. B. 
Moore 

IL Comparative Jurisprudence 

161 — Elements of law. 3 hours. Professor M UN roe Smith 
263 — Roman law. 3 hours. Professor Munroe Smith 
266 — History of European law. 3 hours. Professor Munroe Smith 
268 — Modern civil law of western Europe. 3 hours. Professor Mun- 
roe Smith 
269-270 — Conflict of laws, i hour. Professor J. B. Moore 
361-362 — Seminar in legal history, i hour. Professor Munroe Smith 
363-364 — Seminar in comparative jurisprudence. Professor Munroe 
Smith 

Public Lectures 

Public lectures of special interest to students of politics and juris- 
prudence are maintained by specific endowments, such as the 
Beer lectures in political science, the Blumenthal lectures in politics, 
and the Carpentler lectures in law. Some of these lectures are given 
by distinguished foreigners, others by men prominent in public life 
in the United States. 



MA THEM A TICS 12/ 

Library ^Facilities 

In addition to excellent working collections of constitutions, codes, 
session laws, judicial decisions, government reports, legal treatises, 
transactions of legal societies, and law journals of the principal foreign 
countries as well as of the United States, the Library of Columbia 
University offers special advantages to students of politics, public law, 
and comparative jurisprudence in the collections of Henry Livingston 
Thomas, late chief translator to the Department of State, of the 
Holland Society of New York, and of the Reform Club of the City of 
New York, of which the Columbia Library is the depositary. The 
materials thus furnished are richly supplemented by those in the 
libraries of public institutions, learned societies, and civic organiza- 
tions, particularly the Hispanic Society of America, with its unique 
collection of materials relating to the history, institutions, and culture 
of Spain, Portugal, and Latin America, the Bar Association, and the 
Law Institute. To these libraries advanced students have access under 
favorable conditions. 

Manual Training 

Fifty -four courses in Industrial Arts are offered under the auspices of 
Teachers College. For details see the Announcement of Teachers College, 
which will be sent without charge, upon application to the Secretary of 
the University. 

(See also Shopwork, page 170) 

Materia Medica 

(See page 147) 

Matliematics 

Professors: Cole, Fiske, Fite, Hawkes, Kasner, Keyser {Executive 
Officer), M ACL AY, Mitchell (H. B.), and Smith (D. E.) 
Assistant Professor: Grove 

Instructors: Curtis, Dines, Graves, Lennes, Reddick, and Siceloff 
Assistants: Nowlan and Pfeiffer 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 
Courses 

Ai or A4 — Plane trigonometry and algebra. 3 hours. Professors H. B. 
Mitchell and Fite, Mr. Siceloff, Dr. Reddick and Mr. Graves 

A2— Solid geometry, i hour. Professors Hawkes and Grove, Mr. 
Siceloff and Dr. Reddick 



128 MA THEM A TICS 

I or 2 — Algebra. Professors Hawkes, Fite, and Grove, Mr. Siceloff, 
Dr. Reddick, Dr. Lennes, and Mr. Graves 

3 or 4 — ^Analytical geometry. 3 hours. Professors Mitchell, Hawkes, 
Fite, and Grove, Mr. Siceloff, Dr. Reddick, Dr. Lennes, and Mr. 
Graves 

5 or 6 — ^Algebra. 3 hours. Professor Grove, Messrs. Siceloff and 
Graves 

12 — Mathematics of statistics. 3 hours. Professor Grove 

13 — Differential equations. 3 hours. Dr. Reddick 

14 — Higher algebra. 3 hours. Mr. Siceloff 

15-16 — Differential and integral calculus. Short course. 3 hours. 
Professors Mitchell and Hawkes 

17 — Advanced calculus. 3 hours. Professor Hawkes 

18 — ^Advanced analytical geometry. 3 hours. Mr. Graves 

19 — Projective geometry. 3 hours. Professor Fite 

20 — Ftmdamental concepts in mathematics. 3 hours. Professor 
Hawkes 

64-65 or 67-68 — Calculus. 5 hours. Professors Keyser, Fiske, 
Maclay, Mitchell, Hawkes, Fite, and Grove, Mr. Siceloff, Dr. 
Reddick, Dr. Lennes and Mr. Graves 

101-102 — Modern theories in geometry. 3 hours. Professor Keyser 
111-112 — Modern higher algebra. 3 hours. Professor Maclay 
122 — Differential equations. 3 hours. Professor Kasner 
(Mathematics 13 may be counted as a graduate course by those who 
also complete 122) 

151-152 — History of mathematics. 2 hours. Lectures and collateral 
reading. Professor Smith (Teachers College) 

201-202 — Advanced calculus. Introduction to the theory of functions 
of a real variable. 3 hours. Professor Fiske 

203-204 — The theory of functions of a complex variable. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Fiske 

[205-206 — Introduction to the theory of Functions. 3 hours. Profes- 
sor Cole] 

[221-222 — Theory of plane curves. 3 hours. Professor Cole] 
251-252 — History of mathematics. Lectures and collateral reading. 
3 hours. Professor Smith (Teachers College) 
307-308 — Theory of groups. 3 hours. Professor Cole 

[309-310 — Functions defined by linear differential equations. 3 hours. 
Professor Fiske] 



MATHEMATICS 1 29 

311-312 — ^The general theory of assemblages. 3 hours. Dr. Lennes 
313-314 — ^Theory of invariants. 3 hours. Professor Cole 
323-324 — The principles of mathematics. 3 hours. Professor Keyser 
337-338 — Dynamical geometry. 2 hours. Professor Kasner 
[339-340 — Geometry of differential equations. 2 hours. Professor 
Kasner] 
341-342 — Elliptic functions. 3 hours. Professor Maclay 
[343-344 — Differential geometry. 3 hours. Professor Maclay] 

Summer Session 

sAi — Solid geometry. 2 points. Mr. Siceloff and Dr. Reddick 

sA2 — Algebra. 2 points. Professor Fite and Mr. Siceloff 

SA3 — Logarithms and trigonometry. 2 points. Mr. Siceloff and Dr. 

Reddick 
S3 — Plane analytical geometry. 3 points. Professor Grove 
S4 — Plane and solid analytical geometry. 3 points. Professor Grove 
85 — Differential calculus. 3 points. Professor White 
s6 — Integral calculus. 3 points. Professor Kasner 
SI 1 1 — Higher algebra. 3 points. Professor Fite 
S129 — Differential geometry. 3 points. Professor Kasner 
S20I — ^Theory of functions of a real variable. 3 points. Professor 

White 

Extension 

eAi — ^Trigonometry and algebra. 3 points. Mr. Siceloff 
also evenings in Brooklyn 
also evenings in Newark 

eA2 — Solid geometry. 3 points. Mr. Siceloff 
also evenings in Brooklyn 
also evenings in Newark 

es — ^Algebra. 3 points. Dr. Reddick 

63 — ^Analytical geometry. 3 points. Professor Grove 

eis-i6 — Calculus. 3 points. Mr. Wilson 

eXi-X2 — Algebra, elementary course. Mr. Simpson 

eYi-Y2 — Plane geometry. Mr. Simpson 

Equipment 

In connection with the Department of Mathematics and in addition 
to the regular library facilities there is a large and fully equipped 



130 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

reading-room, io8 Library, in which are available the current numbers 
of over one hundred and fifty mathematical journals and periodicals, 
including nearly every mathematical journal of standing published. 

The laboratory equipment of the department has been greatly in- 
creased and is among the best in the country. The recent acquisitions 
of mathematical models and instruments include the famous collections 
of Wiener and Schilling. By means of models and charts are illus- 
trated the theory of elementary solid geometry, plane and solid ana- 
lytic geometry, descriptive and projective geometry, higher plane and 
twisted curves, and higher surfaces and their singularities, together 
with many of the more intricate concepts and forms in the general 
theory of functions, elliptic functions, infinite series and products, 
and analysis situs. Room 503 Fayerweather has been set apart as a 
mathematical laboratory and model room. 

Teachers College is well supplied with models and apparatus for use 
in teaching mathematics in all grades, from the kindergarten through 
the high school, together with various instruments for mechanical 
computation, including a Stanley arithmometer. The large collection of 
instruments, autographs, portraits, and other material illustrating the 
historical development of mathematics, the property of Professor Smith, is 
placed at the disposal of the students, as is his extensive library on the 
history and teaching of the subject. Arrangements may be made by which 
advanced students in the history of mathematics may have access to the 
library of George A. Plimpton, Esq., which is particularly rich in manu- 
scripts, incunabula, and sixteenth-century works on the subject. The 
department has a large collection of stereopticon slides illustrating many 
important manuscripts and early works from this and other libraries. 

Mechanical Engineering 

Professors: Lucke {Executive Officer) and Rautenstrauch 
Assistant Professors: Parr and Thomas (C. W.) 
Associates: Halsey, Longacre, and Moss 
Instructors: Gunn, Herrick, and Thurston 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

II-I2 — Steam-power machinery. 3 hours and i afternoon, second 
half-year. Professors Lucke, Parr, and Mr. Gunn 

13-14 — Steam-power machinery, shorter course. 3 hours. Professor 
Lucke and Mr. Gunn 

17-18 — Engineering thermodynamics. 2 hours. Professor Lucke 
and Mr. Gunn 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 13I 

19-20 — Engine design. 3 hours and 3 afternoons. Professors Rauten- 
STRAUCH and Thomas 

22 — Gas-power machinery. 4 hours and i afternoon. Professors 
LucKE, Parr, and Mr. Gunn 

25 — Steam-power. 3 hours and 2 afternoons. Professor Lucke and 
Mr. Gunn 

31-32 — Standard tests and research methods, i hour and i afternoon. 
Mr. Thurston 

33 — Standard tests and research methods— Continuation of Course 
31-32. 2 hours and i afternoon. Professor Parr and Mr. Thurston 

35-36 — Kinematics of machinery, i afternoon. Professor Thomas 

37 — Machine design, i hour and 2 afternoons. Professor Rauten- 

STRAUCH 

39-40 — Machine design, i hour and 2 afternoons, first half-year, 
2 hours and 2 afternoons, second half-year. Professor Rautenstrauch 
41 — Machine design. Short course for students in Civil and Elec- 
trical Engineering, i hour and i afternoon. Professor Thomas 
46 — ^Water-power machinery. 3 hours. Mr. Herrick 
52 — Organization and management. 2 hours. Professor Rautenstrauch 
53 — Steam turbines. 2 hours. Professor Parr and associates 
54 — Shop processes: tools and time study. 2 hours. Professor 
Rautenstrauch and associates 

56 — ^Water-power installations, i hour. Mr. Herrick 
59 — Empiric design. 2 hours and i afternoon. Professor Thomas 
60 — Hydraulic laboratory, i afternoon. Mr. Herrick 
62 — Refrigerating machinery, i hour. Mr. Thurston 
63 — Hydraulic laboratory. Same as 60. i afternoon. Mr. Herrick 
64 — Air machinery. 2 hours. Mr. Longacre 
66 — Elevators and conveyors, i hour. Mr. Moss 
68 — Shops and factories. 2 hours and i afternoon. Professor Rauten- 
strauch and others 
70 — Pumping machinery. 2 hours. Mr. Thurston 
72 — Gas-power machinery — Selections from 22. 2 hours and i after- 
noon. Professor Lucke 

74 — Gas-power machinery — Selections from 22. 2 hours. Professor 
Lucke 

76-77 — Standard tests — Selections from 31-32, 33. Professor Parr 
and Mr. Thurston 

78 — Kinematics — Selections from 36. i afternoon. Professor Thomas 
82 — Heating and ventilation. 3 hours. Professor Lucke 



132 



METALLURGY 



94s — Shop and factory work — Memoir on second stimmer work. Pro- 
fessor Rautenstrauch 

96s — Steam-power plant summer work — ^Memoir on third summer work. 
Professor Lucke 

Equipment 

This department is well equipped with offices for the usual work and 
rooms for student conferences ; lecture-rooms of various sizes ; valuable 
collections of models and specimens to illustrate the lectures; and 
drafting-rooms provided with large numbers of blue-prints, photo- 
graphs, and catalogues of standard and special machinery supplied by 
manufacturers, but the departm^ental equipment is chiefly remarkable 
in the excellent facilities available for the prosecution of experimental 
work, both for undergraduate students and graduate research. This 
experimental equipment includes all the standard and many special 
forms of measuring instruments, means for their calibration, and an 
unusually large collection of full-size standard machinery, covering 
practically every important class. This equipment is valued at ap- 
proximately $80,000.00, and the experimental laboratories, in which 
it is maintained, cover a floor space of approximately 10,000 sq. ft. 
Further details of this equipment are given in the departmental 
announcement. 

Metallurgy 

Professors: Howe and Walker {Executive Officer) 
Associate Professor: Campbell 
Assistant Professors: Hall and Kern 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

69 or 170 — ^Assaying — Ores and metallurgical products. 2 hours and 3 

afternoons. Professor Hall 

loi — General metallurgy. 3 hours, first half of term. Professor Kern 
1 1 1 — Metallurgy of copper. 3 hours, second half of term. Professor Kern 
118 — Metallurgy of copper — Advanced course, i hour. Professor Kern 
122 — Metallurgy of lead, silver, gold, and zinc. 3 hours. Professor 

Walker 

128 — Metallurgy of lead, etc. — Advanced course, i hour. Professor 

Walker 

131 — Metallurgy of iron and steel — Shorter course, i hour. Professor 

Campbell 

134 — Metalliu"gy of iron and steel — Longer course. 2 hours. Professors 

Howe and Campbell 



METALLURGY I33 

138 — Metallurgy of iron and steel — Advanced course, i hour. Pro- 
fessor Campbell 

141 — Electrometallurgy, i hour. Professor Kern 
148 — ^Electrometallurgy — Advanced course, i hour. Professor Kern 
151 — Constitution and properties of alloys. 2 hours. Professor Campbell 
I55~IS6 — Metallography of iron, steel, and industrial alloys. Total 
of 6 lectures and 3 or more afternoons laboratory. Professor Campbell 
158 — ^Advanced course on constitution and property of aUoys. i hour. 
Professor Campbell 
62s — Summer course in non-ferrous metallurgy. Professor Kern 
64s — Summer course in ferrous metallurgy. Professor Campbell 
66s — Summer course in non-ferrous metallurgy. Professor Kern 
72 — Metallurgical laboratory. 10 consecutive afternoons. Professors 
Campbell and Kern 

171-172 — Metallurgical laboratory. 5 afternoons. Professors Walker 
Campbell, and Kern 

173-174 — Advanced metallurgical laboratory 

175 — Metallurgical investigation, i hour. Professors Walker and 
Campbell 
177 — Metallurgical plant construction. Professor Walker 

201-202 — Special courses in pyrometry, the microstructure of met- 
als and alloys, the chemistry of roasting processes, etc., consisting of 
personal instruction and original experimental investigation. Pro- 
fessors Walker, Campbell, and Kern 

Metallrgicalu Excursions — During the term the students see, at 
the metallurgical works near the city, iron blast furnaces, Bessemer 
and open-hearth steel making, lead and copper smelting, copper 
Bessemerizing and refining by furnace and electrolytic methods, the 
desilverizing of base bullion, and the parting and refining of gold and 
silver by electrolytic and acid methods. 

Equipment 

Lecture Diagrams — There are very many large lecture diagrams 
showing the various metallurgical appliances, and the sequence of 
metallurgical processes, besides many models, drawings, and apparatus 
for lecture demonstrations — for instance, in the heat-treatment and 
rolling of metals and in wet processes. 

Metallurgical Collection — ^There is a collection of about 3000 
specimens of ores, metals, and metallurgical products, and a rapidly 
forming collection of microscopic sections and photomicrographs of 
metals and alloys. 

Analytical Laboratory — The department has an analytical 
laboratory open to the students in Metallurgy. 



134 MINERALOGY 

The Assay Laboratory is provided with crucible and muflfle furnaces, 
both gas and coal, for the fire assay of ores; also with crushing, pulver- 
izing, and sampling machinery, balance-room, storeroom, and well- 
equipped working desks. It also contains all the apparatus necessary 
for the wet assay of silver bullion and for laboratory tests of ores. 

Metallurgical Laboratory — i. Instruments of Precision of 
Metallurgy — There are enough Le Chatelier thermo-electric pyrometers 
to give each student the exclusive use of one throughout his covirse, 
and many others of various kinds, some of great precision, some with 
autographic attachments, etc. 

For the microscopic study of metals there are many special micro- 
scopes, with appliances for polishing, sclerometers, a drop-testing 
machine, a Fremont drop-testing machine, special testing machines for 
metals, ammeters, etc. 

2. For Analytical Metallurgy, or the study of the principles and 
reactions of metallurgy taken singly as distinguished from the several 
industrial processes each taken as a unit, there are many special fur- 
naces heated by electricity or gas, a small power-driven roll-train, etc. 

3. For Applied Metallurgy there are, besides the common furnaces, 
special crucible melting furnaces, muffles, etc., two small reverbera- 
tory roasting furnaces, a set of hxiviating and precipitating vats, amal- 
gamating pans, kettles for desilverizing lead, a chlorinating barrel, 
Abb6 pebble-mill. Abbe jar-mill, storage batteries, voltmeters and 
ammeters for electrolysis, and a working stock of Qres, refractory 
materials, fluxes, alloys, iron, and of very many varieties of steel. 

4. Advanced Students — The laboratory gives advanced students 
and practitioners unusual advantages for investigating accurately 
the scientific and many of the economic problems of metallurgy. 

Metallurgical Library — The Metallurgical Department has a 
special metallurgical library of about sixteen hundred volumes. 

Mineralogy 

Professor: Moses {Executive Officer) 
Assistant Professor: Luquer 
Instructor: Lamme 
Assistant: Bruce 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — Descriptive and determinative mineralogy. C 3 hours, L 2 after- 
noons, first term; L i C 3 hours, afternoon, second term. Professors 
Moses and Luquer, Dr. Lamme and Mr. Bruce 

3-4 — General mineralogy — C 2 hours, L i afternoon. Professor Moses 



MINERALOGY I 35 

5 — The minerals of building-stones. C 2 hours, and L i afternoon. 
Professor Luquer and Assistants 

6 — Optical mineralogy — Minerals in rock sections. L 2 afternoons 
for two months. Professor Luquer and Assistants 

7-8 — Descriptive and determinative mineralogy. C 3 hours, L i after- 
noon. Professors Moses and Luquer, Dr. Lamme and Mr. Bruce 

15-16 — Mineralogy — Minerals important in the chemical industries. 
L I afternoon. Professor Moses and Assistants 

207-208 — Optical mineralogy. C i hour, L i afternoon. Professor 
Luquer 

209-210 — Physical crystallography. C i hour, L i afternoon. 
Professor Moses 

211-212 — Mineralogy — Study of assigned subject. 12 hours for 
two years. Professor Moses 

H214 — Optical mineralogy. Lectures and laboratory work, i hour. 
Professor Luquer 

Summer Session 

SI — Common minerals. 3 points. Professor Moses 

S2 — Methods of studying crystals. 2 points. Professor Moses 

Equipment 

The work of the students in the college courses and in general min- 
eralogy is performed in the lecture-room, in the blowpipe laboratory, 
and in the adjoining conference-room, in which are the student collec- 
tions of crystal models and minerals and several thousand unlabelled 
specimens used in determinative work. The department possesses also 
about 1200 sections of minerals and rocks, and 1500 crystal models in 
wood and glass. Students in optical mineralogy use a separate room 
with north light, and for crystal measurements and monochrom.atic 
light determinations there is provided a large dark-room. 

The Egleston Mineralogical Museum contains about 30,000 labelled 
specimens, and includes a systematic collection ; an economic collec- 
tion of ores, building materials, and minerals used in chemical indus- 
tries; a collection illustrating the genesis and alteration of minerals; 
a collection illustrating the characters of minerals; and small collec- 
tions of artificial minerals and New York City minerals. 

Mining 

Professors: Munroe {Executive Officer) and Peele 
Assistant Prof essor: Kurtz 
Instructor: Judd 



136 MINING 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page $y 

51 — Excavation and tunnelling. 3 hours. Professor Peele 
52 — Boring and shaft-sinking. 2 hours. Professor Peele 
53 — Excavation, tunnelling, boring, and shaft -sinking. Condensed 
from courses 51 and 52 for students in Civil Engineering. 2 hours. Mr. 

JUDD 

54 — Exploration, development, and methods of working. 3 hours. 
Professor Munroe 
56 — Mine engineering. 3 hours. Professor Munroe 
71-72 — Mine plant. 3 hours. Professor Peele 
73 — Mine constructions, i hour. Professor Peele 

75 — Design of mine plant. 4 afternoons. Professors Peele and Kurtz 
and Mr. Judd 

77-78 — Graduating thesis or project. Professor Peele 

80 — Mill constructions, i hour. Professor Kurtz 

81 — Ore dressing, milling, and the mechanical preparation of coal. 
4 hours. Professor Monroe 

82 — Ore-dressing laboratory. Afternoon work for three weeks. Pro- 
fessors Munroe and Kurtz and Mr. Judd 

91 — Mine administration. 2 hours. Professors Munroe and Kurtz 

94 — Mining law. 2 hours. Professor Kurtz 

95 — Mining conference, i hour. Mr. Judd 

58s — Summer course in mine surveying, i week. Professors Munroe 
and Kurtz and Mr. Judd 

59s — Summer course in practical mining. 6 weeks. Professors Peele 
and Kurtz and Mr. Judd 

The summer course includes four to five weeks' detailed study of 
the plant and methods of working at some important mine or mines 
selected for the purpose; and one week or more of exctirsions to other 
mines and mining regions. Arrangements are also made by which 
students in small groups may substitute, for the above, independent 
study at different mines under the general direction of the department. 

Graduate Courses 

Special courses, consisting of personal instruction, reading, and ex- 
perimental investigation, will be arranged for advanced students ac- 
cording to their individual needs and ability. These investigations 



MINING 137 

will be made at mines and dressing works, either in connection with 
the summer school or elsewhere as assigned, with additional work, as 
required, in the library and in the laboratories of the department. 
These courses vary in difficulty and in the amount of time necessary 
according as the student is a candidate for the degree of A.M. or Ph.D. 
and according as he pursues mining as a major or a minor subject. 
The time required is governed by the rule that a course or courses 
should occupy about 18 hours a week (outside reading and study in- 
cluded) if taken as a major subject, and about 9 hours a week if taken 
as a minor subject. Any of the following courses may be offered as a 
minor for the degree of A. M. by students who have had the appropriate 
prerequisites: 

101-102 — Mining and ore dressing — Mining 54, 81, and 82. 4 hours, 
with laboratory work and reading as required. 

103-104 — Mining engineering — Mining 54, 56, and 91. 4 hours 
lectures and reading as required. 

105-106 — Design of mine plant — Mining 71-72, 73, and 75. 3 
hours and 4 afternoons draughting-room work. 

107-108 — Design of ore-dressing works — Mining 80, 81, 82, 73, and 
75, with I hour conference additional, first half-year. 3 hours and 
5 afternoons laboratory and draughting-room work. 

109-110 — Mining — All the undergraduate courses in the Department 
of Mining. 

Under the regulations for the degrees of A.M. and Ph.D. the following 
courses may be offered by graduate students who have had all the 
undergraduate courses in Mining or their equivalent: 

201-202 — Methods of mining — Critical study of methods used in 
some mining region, or for a certain class of deposits. 

203-204 — Mining plant — Critical study of rock drilling, or coal 
cutting, or hoisting, or haulage, or ventilating plant at some mine or 
mines. 

205-206— Deep mining — Study of problems involved. 

207-208 — Ore dressing — Critical study of some detail of the ordinary 
dressing methods. 

209-2io^Examination of a coal-washing plant, or an ore-dressing 
plant — 4 to 6 weeks' work in the mill and in the laboratory, with 
conferences. 

21 IS — Examination of a mineral property, or a mine — 4 to 6 weeks 
devoted to field and underground work, with conferences at con- 
venience of professor. 

213-214 — Economic studies in mining — Study of existing conditions 
affecting the production and cost of some mineral or metal. 



138 MINING 

Equipment 

Lecture Illustrations — ^The lectures on mining are illustrated by 
6 sets of books aggregating over 300 volumes, and containing 90,000 
blue-prints from negatives made for the purpose. There are a suf- 
ficient number of these books, illustrating the diflEerent courses of 
lectures, so that each student has the use of one or more for reference 
during the lectures and for home study. These blue-prints have many 
advantages over the usual form of lecture illustrations by lantern 
slides or wall diagrams. The latter are, however, used when neces- 
sary to supplement the blue-prints. 

Mining Library — The University Library contains sets of the trans- 
actions of all mining, metallurgical, and engineering societies, and of 
the more important periodical publications on these subjects. There 
is also a large collection of books on mining, and all new publications of 
value are added as they appear. In addition, a small departmental 
reference library has been created, which is accessible to students at 
all times. 

Mining Museum — The subject of mining is illustrated by collections 
as follows: Maps of coal and metal mines of this and other countries. 
Working drawings, diagrams, and photographs of mine plant, and of 
mining and dressing machinery. Models of mines and parts of mines 
and of mine plant. Mining tools: picks, shovels, hammers, drills, 
blasting apparatus, lamps, safety-lamps, anemometers, and machine 
drills. Ores and dressing products from typical works in this and other 
countries. Surveying instruments: geological compasses and clino- 
meters, attraction compasses, dipping needles, hanging compasses and 
arcs, transits, lamp signals, rods, and apparatus for plumbing and 
measuring shafts. 

Mining Laboratories — The basement and sub-basement of the 
School of Mines are equipped as laboratories for the Department of 
Mining. These laboratories serve four purposes: i. To illustrate the 
physical laws bearing on mineral separation. 2 . To aflEord opportunity 
for quantitative working tests. 3. To train students in the adjust- 
ment and operation of concentrating machinery, and in the making 
of efficiency tests under working conditions. 4. To give advanced 
students and others all necessary facilities for original investigation. 

Mines and Dressing Works — Many coal, iron, and other mines, 
slate and stone quarries, and metallurgical works are easily accessible. 
Within a radius of one hundred miles of New York City may be 
studied numerous examples of the best practice in mining and metal- 
lurgy under most varied conditions, and some of the most modern and 
effective mining and dressing machinery and smelting plants in the 



MUSIC 139 

country. The excursions of the Summer Class in Mining extend as 
far as the iron, copper, zinc, lead, silver, and gold regions of Michigan, 
Missouri, Montana, Colorado, Arizona, Utah, and California. 

The metropolitan situation of the School renders it possible to pre- 
sent, also, as parts of the regvdar courses in mining, special lectures by 
prominent engineers. The list of such lecturers for 1911-12 and more 
detailed information as to the courses offered and as to the facilities 
for instruction will be found in the Announcement of the Schools oj 
Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry, 1911-12. 

Music 

Professor: Rubner {Executive Officer) 
Assistant Professor: Mason 
Associate: Ward 
Conductor of Chorus: Hall 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — History of music. 2 hours. Professor Mason 

3-4 — History of music, advanced. 2 hours. Professor Mason 

7-8 — Harmony. 3 hours. Mr. Ward 

9-10 — ^Advanced harmony and elementary form. 2 hours. Professor 
Mason 

11-12 — Counterpoint. 2 hours. Professor Mason 

13-14 — Composition and orchestration. 2 hours. Professor 
Rubner 

31-32 — University orchestra. 2 hours. Professor Rubner 
33-34— University chorus. Mr. Hall 

101-102 — Advanced composition, orchestration, and symphonic 
form. 2 hours. Professor Rubner 

Summer Session 

si-2 — General musical course. 2 points. Professor Cole 
S7-8 — Harmony. 2 points. Professor Cole 

Extension 

eXi-X2 — Vocal training for service In choirs, i }/2 points. Mr. NiCH ot s 
633-34 — University chorus. 2 points. Mr. Hall 
eZ — Sight-reading and accompanying for key-board instruments. 2 
points. Mr. Lamond 



140 NEUROLOGY 

Fourteen courses in teaching and supervision of music are offered 
at Teachers College. (See the Announcement of Teachers College.) 

The Department of Music offers numerous concerts and recitals 
to the University. These include various concerts of chamber music, 
organ recitals, an annual recital of original compositions by students in 
the department, and the regular concerts of the University Orchestra 

Equipment 

A collection of music and of books of reference is placed at the dis- 
posal of students. It includes the complete works of various com- 
posers, many orchestral and opera scores, the piano-forte classics, and 
vocal music, besides many theoretical, historical, and biographical 
works. The department has also a collection of instruments for the 
use of students participating in the University Orchestra. 

Nature Study 

(See Botany and ZoOlogy) 

Five courses in nature study for elementary and high schools are 
offered under the auspices of Teachers College. For details see the 
Announcement of Teachers College. 

Neurology 

Professors: Peterson and Starr {Executive Officer) 

Associate Professor: Hunt (J. R.) 

Associate: Scripture 

Instructors: Haberman, Hunt (E. L.), and Gregory 

Clinical Assistants: Neurology — Atwood, Beling, Brill, Clark (J. E.), 
FisK, Garretson, Haberman, Humphreys, Hunt, Jelliffe, Macrae, 
Macumber, McEntree, Pou; Psychiatry — Brill, Gregory {Chief), 
Haviland, and Pou 

Courses 
See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

51 — Didactic lectures with lantern demonstration on nervous 
diseases, i hour. Professor Starr 

53-54 — Clinical lectures, i hour. Professor Starr 

55-56 — Practical neurology. 2 hours for 8 weeks. Professor Hunt, 
Drs. E. L. Hunt, Scripture, and Haberman 

57 — Psychiatry. Clinics at Belle vue Hospital, i hour. October, 
November, and December. Prof. Peterson 



OBSTETRICS I4I 

59-60 — Practical instruction in examination and diagnosis of insane 
patients is given in sections at Bellevue. Professor Peterson 

61-62 — A research laboratory for the study of border-line cases at 
the Vanderbilt Clinic by Dr. Scripture 

64 — Lectures on neurological subjects — 6 lectures, one hour each. 
Professor J. Ramsey Hunt 

Nursing and Health 

Sixteen courses in Nurses' Education, Hospital Administration, School 
and Municipal Nursing are provided by the School of Household Arts 
of Teachers College and described in the special circular of that School 
and of the Department of Nursing and Health. 



Obstetrics 

Professors: Cragin {Executive Officer) and Painter 
Assistant Professor: Voorhees 
Associate: Davis 
Instructor: Lyon 
Assistant: Sicard 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

51 — Theory and practice. 3 hours, two didactic and one clinical. Pro- 
fessor Cragin 

53-54 — Recitations and demonstrations, i hour. Dr. Voorhees 

55-56 — Practical instruction at the Sloane Hospital for Women. 3 
weeks. Dr. Lyon 

57-58 — Out-patient service at the New York Infant Asylum, 2 weeks. 
Professor Painter and Drs. Davis and Sicard 

The Sloane Hospital for Women 

The Sloane Hospital for Women is situated at the corner of Fifty- 
ninth Street and Amsterdam Avemue, and is equipped with all modern 
conveniences for the care of both obstetrical and gynecological cases. 

The wards of the hospital furnish one hundred and twenty-two obstetri- 
cal beds, aside from the babies' cribs, and twenty-eight gynecological 
beds. In addition there are forty private-room beds and ample accom- 
modations for the house staff, nurses, and students. 

The service of the hospital is under the exclusive direction of the Pro- 
fessor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the College of Physicians and 



142 ORIENTAL LANGUAGES 

Surgeons, an Instructor in Obstetrics and an Instructor in Gynecology 
being Resident Officers. There are two large operating rooms, one for 
obstetrics and one for gynecology, each equipped with all modern appli- 
ances for dealing with these conditions, and here Professor Cragin holds 
weekly clinics throughout the year. 

The deliveries during the year 1910 numbered 18 10. 

With the completion of the Gynecological Department of the Sloane 
Hospital, the operative material of the large gynecological service of 
the Vanderbilt Clinic is made available for teaching purposes, so that 
now students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons receive on the 
college grounds practical instruction, not only in normal and complicated 
obstetrics and the care of young babies, but in the treatment, operative 
and palliative, of all diseases of the female pelvic organs. 

Oriental Languages 

CHINESE 

Professor: Hirth 

Courses 101-102, 103-104, and 105-106, are open to Seniors in Co- 
lumbia College. 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

101-102 — ^Elementary course — Study of Chinese characters and lan- 
guage. 3 hours. Professor Hirth 

103-104 — The Mandarin dialect. 2 hours. Professor Hirth 

105-106 — History of China, with remarks on language, literature, gov- 
ernment, art, and social life. 2 hours. Professor Hirth 

201-202 — ^Analysis and translation of easy documents written in the 
Chinese modem business style. 2 hours. Professor Hirth 

203-204 — ^Analysis and translation of easy literary texts. 2 hours. 
Professor Hirth 

205-206 — Helps and keys in Chinese literature. 2 hours. Professor 
Hirth 

301-302 — Seminar for the study of Chinese government matters. 
2 hours. Professor Hirth 

303-304 — Seminar for historical studies in Chinese literature. 2 hours. 
Professor Hirth 

305-306 — Seminar for the study of Chinese art, industry, and general 
culture. 2 hours. Professor Hirth 



INDO-IRANIAN LANGUAGES 



Professor: Jackson 
Lecturer: Yohannan 



ORIENTAL LANGUAGES 1 43 

Coiirses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

loi — Sanskrit, elementary course. Grammar and reading of texts. 
3 hours. Professor Jackson 

102 — Sanskrit, second course. 3 hours. Reading of texts. Professor 
Jackson 

103 — Avestan, elementary course. Grammar and reading of texts. 
2 hours. Professor Jackson 

104 — Avestan, second course. Reading of texts. Professor Jackson 
los — Sanskrit, advanced course. 2 hours. Professor Jackson 
106 — Sanskrit, advanced course. 2 hours. Professor Jackson 
107 — Modern Persian, introductory course. 2 hours. Dr. Yohannan 
108 — Modern Persian, second course. 2 hours. Dr. Yohannan 
109 — History of India and of Persia. 2 hours. Professor Jackson 
201-202 — Avestan, advanced course. 2 hours. Professor Jackson 
203-204 — Pali, elementary course. I hour. Professor Jackson 
205 — Old Persian cuneiform inscriptions, i hour. Professor Jackson 
206 — Pahlavi, introductory course, i hour. Professor Jackson 
207-208 — Sanskrit literature, i hour. Professor Jackson 
209 — Zoroastrian Gathas. i hour. Professor Jackson 
210 — Zoroaster and Buddha, their life and teachings. i hour. Pro- 
fessor Jackson 

211-212 — Modern Persian, second-year course. 2 hours. Dr. Yohan- 
nan 

301-302 — Indo-Iranian seminar. 2 hours. Professor Jackson 

Armenian 

213-214 — Principles of the grammar with selected readings. 2 hours. 
Dr. Yohannan 

Turkish 

215 — Principles of the grammar. 2 hours. Dr. Yohannan 
216 — Exercises in Turkish conversation and in the reading of Turkish 
newspapers. 2 hours. Dr. Yohannan 

The Science of Language 

111-112 — Introduction to the study of language. 2 hours. Professor 
Jackson, in co-operation with Professors Boas (American languages), 



144 ORIENTAL LANGUAGES 

Carpenter (Germanic), Farrand (linguistic pathology), Gottheil 
(Semitic), Hallock (acoustics), Hirth (Chinese), Krapp (English), 
Lodge (Latin), Olcott (Italic), Perry (Greek), Prince (Sumerian and 
Egyptian), Remy (special linguistic phenomena), Todd (Romance). 

113-114 — Types of language. 2 hours. The Professors of the various 
departments concerned. 

Public Lectures 

A course of public lectures on the literature, antiquities, and religion 
of the Orient is given each year. 

SEMITIC LANGUAGES 

Professors: Gottheil {Executive Officer) and Prince 
Lecturers: Koenig and Vanderburgh 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page S7 

101-102 — Biblical Hebrew, elementary course. 2 hours. Professor 
Gottheil and Dr. Koenig 

103 — Biblical Hebrew, second course. 2 hours. Professor Prince 

103a — Biblical Hebrew, second course. Poetry. 2 hours. Dr. Koenig 

104 — Biblical Hebrew, third course. 2 hours. Professor Gottheil 

[105 — Biblical Hebrew, archaeology and the Old Testament. 2 hours. 
Professor Gottheil] 

TTnion Theological Seminary 

1-2 — The history, literature, and religion of the Old Testament in 
outline. 2 hours. Professor F. Brown 

64 — Exegetical Class. Psalms. 2 hours. Professor Bewer 

106 — Textual criticism of the Old Testament. 2 hours. Professor 
Bewer 

30 — Selections from the Exilic and post- Exilic Prophets. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Bewer 

Seminar: Ecclesiastes. 2 hours. Professor Bewer 

Rabbinical Hebrew 

[107-108 — Selected readings from the Mishnah. 2 hours. Professor 
Gottheil] 



ORIENTAL LANGUAGES I45 

109-110 — Selected readings from the Talmud, Treatise Berachoth. 
2 hours. Professor Gottheil 

201 — Selected readings from Hebrew historical works of the Middle 
Ages. 2 hours. Professor Gottheil 

Epigraphy 

203 — Interpretation of the Phcenician inscriptions, with an introduction 
to Semitic palaeography and the history of the alphabet. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Gottheil 

204 — Interpretation of the Aramaean inscriptions of Sinjirli. 2 hours. 

[208 — Interpretation of the Sabaean and Himyaritic inscriptions con- 
tained in the Corpus Inscriptionum Semiticarum, vol. iv. i hour. 
Professor Gottheil] 

Assyrian 

in — Elementary course. 2 hours. Professor Prince 

H2 — Second course — Study of the Syllabary, 2 hours. Professor 
Prince 

209 — ^Third course — Study of texts. 2 hours. Professor Prince 

209A — Third course — Readings. Dr. Vanderburgh 

2X0 — Fourth course — Study of texts. 3 hours. Professor Prince, Dr. 
Vanderburgh 

211 — Advanced course — Sumerian Lexicography. 2 hours. Professor 
Prince 

212 — ^Advanced course — Sumerian hymns from cuneiform texts in the 
British Museum. 2 hours. Professor Prince 

Arabic 

113 — ^Elementary course. 2 hours. Dr. Koenig 

114 — Second course. 2 hours. Dr. Koenig 

215-216 — Modem Arabic, Dialect of Egypt. Professors Gottheil and 
Prince 

213 — ^Advanced course — Selections from geographical writers. 2 hours. 
Dr, Koenig 

214 — Advanced course — Selections from al-BuMiari. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Gottheil 

Syriac 

115 — First course. 2 hours. Dr. Koenig 
116 — Second course. 2 hours. Dr. Koenig 



146 PATHOLOGY 

117 — ^Third course. 2 hours. Professor Gottheil and Dr. Yohannan 
1 18 — ^Fourth course. 2 hours. Professor Gottheil and Dr, Yohannan 

Ethiopic 

216-217 — Principles of the grammar, and reading of extracts. 2 hours. 
Professor Gottheil 

Oriental History 

119 — The ancient history of Western Asia from the earliest times 
until the period of Alexander the Great. 2 hours. Professor Prince 

This course is identical with History 109 

[120 — ^The rise of Arabian civilization and the spread of Mohammedan- 
ism. 2 hours. Professor Gottheil] 

This course is identical with History 104 

122 — Political and social evolution of Modem Turkey and Egypt. 2 
hours. Professor Gottheil 

123-124 — Lectures on Arabic literature. 2 hours. Dr. Koenig 

Semitic Seminar 

301-302 — Study of current questions in Semitic philology and history 
with especial reference to modern methods of research. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessors Gottheil and Prince 

Egyptian 

218 — Elementary course in Coptic, i hour. Professor Prince 

[219 — Egyptian hieroglyphs and advanced Coptic. Professor Prince] 

Pathology 

Professor: MacCallum {Executive Officer) 
Assistant Professors: Larkin and Stewart 
Associates: Haines, Levin, and Pappenheimer 
Instructors: Humphreys and Lambert 
Assistants: Lamb and Soper 

Courses 

See also introductory paragraphs, page 57 

52 — General pathology. 9 hours. Professors MacCallum, Larkin, 
and Stewart, and Drs. Hanes, Pappenheimer, and Rosenbloom 

54 — Conference in general pathology — Recitation or conference dealing 
with subjects studied during the preceding week, i hour. Professor 
MacCallitm 



PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS . 147 

35-56 — Gross pathological anatomy — Demonstration of autopsy- 
material. 2 hours. Professors MacCallum, Larkin, and others 

57-58 — ^Autopsy technique. 3 times a week in different hospitals. 
Professors MacCallum, Stewart, and Larkin, and Dr. Hanes and others 

59-60 — Advanced pathology and research. Professor MacCallum 

61 — Experimental pathology. Professor Stewart 

63-64 — Clinical and pathological conference, ij^ hours for 12 weeks. 
Professors Janeway and MacCallum, Drs. Longcope, Hanes, and others 

65 — Optional pathological anatomy of the diseases of children. Pro- 
fessor MacCallum 

Museum 

The Museum of Pathology, in charge of Professor Larkin, is made 
use of in the work of this department, both for the instruction of medical 
students and as a place of deposit for specimens showing new or rare 
forms of lesions. 

Equipment 

The Department of Pathology occupies the greater part of the fourth 
floor of the north wing of the College building, together with large class 
laboratories, amphitheatre, photographic rooms, etc., on the fifth 
floor. On the roof there is commodious accommodation for animals, 
together with small special rooms for experimental work. 

On the fourth floor there are, besides the rooms devoted to the staff, 
large rooms with abundant desk room for special workers, several 
specially equipped operating rooms for aseptic experimental work, a 
small chemical laboratory, the museum, preparation rooms, cold 
storage, etc. Two rooms on this floor are occupied by the library, 
which is accessible to workers in this and related departments. 

The entire space is amply lighted, fully furnished, and equipped with 
apparatus necessary for routine teaching and special research. 



Pharmacology, Materia Medica, and Therapeutics 

Professors: Baruch and Lambert {Executive Officer) 
Assistant Professor: Williams (W. R.) 
Associates: Bastedo, Lieb, and Patterson 
Instructors: Class, Haberman, Hale, Shrady, and Schulman 
Assistants: Boyd and Hutton 

Clinical Assistants in Applied Therapeutics: Fink, Bartholow, Burn- 
ham, Beck (B. J.), Beck (S.), Devoe, Strong 
Clinical Assistant in Hydrotherapy: Wittson 



148 PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

SI — Conferences on applied therapeutics, i hour. Professor Lambert 
S3~S4 — Clinical instruction in therapeutics. 13 hours for 8 weeks, 

at the Vanderbilt Clinic. Professor Lambert and Drs. Hale, Schx^^man, 

Haberman, Class, Bqyd, Hutton, and Cussler 

55-56 — ^Recitations on general therapeutics. 2 hours. Professor 

Williams 

57-58 — Lectures on the principles of pharmacology and therapeutics. 

1 hour. Professor Williams, Drs. Patterson and Foster 

59-60 — Lectures on materia medica, pharmacology, and therapeutics. 

2 hours. Dr. Bastedo 

61 — Practical instruction in the pharmaceutical laboratory. 2}4 hours. 
Dr. Bastedo 
62 — Laboratory course in experimental pharmacology. 2 hours. Dr. 

LlEB 

63-64 — Recitations in materia medica and pharmacology. 2 hours. 
Dr. LiEB 

66 — Prescription writing, i hour during fourth quarter year. Dr. 
Bastedo 

70 — Lectures on hydrotherapy, i hour. Professor Baruch 

71-72 — Practical instruction in hydrotherapy. Eight 2-hour exercises. 
Professor Baruch and Dr. Shrady 

In the Vanderbilt Clinic the Department of Hydrotherapy is equipped 
with all appliances for the practical applications of water in disease, and 
every student is called upon to make practical use of the apparatus. 

75 — ^Lectures bearing upon the practical work of examining for life 
insurance. 4 or 5 lectures. Dr. Rogers 

Research 

The research laboratory of pharmacology is open to a limited num- 
ber of workers. 

Pharmacy 

The New York College of Pharmacy is the Division of Pharmacy 
of Columbia University. In the section of the Catalogue devoted to 
the College of Pharmacy will be found a list of its officers and in- 
formation as to the equipment and method of instruction. The 
Program of Studies includes the following courses: 



PHARMACY 149 

Junior Year 

Physics — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. Professor Arny 

General and Pharmaceutical Chemistry — Lectures, Professor Arny; 
recitations. Professor Oehler 

Analytical Chemistry — Laboratory work, Professor Vorisek; reci- 
tations, Dr. Leslie 

Mathematics of Pharmacy — Practical exercises, Professor Vorisek 
Theory of Pharmacy — Lectures, Professor Diekman; recitations, 

Mr. HOHMANN 

Practical Pharmacy — Laboratoiy course. Professors Diekman and 
WiMMER, and Mr. Hohmann 

Dispensing Pharmacy — Laboratory course, Professors Diekman and 
WiMMER and Mr. Hohmann 

Botany — Lectures, Professor Rusby; recitations, Dr. Ballard 

Pharmacognosy — General laboratory course. Professor Rusby; his- 
tological laboratory course. Professor Mansfield and Dr. Ballard 

Physiology — Lectures, Professor Rusby ; recitations. Professor 
Rusby and Dr. Ballard 

Toxicology and Posology — Recitations, Dr. Ballard 
Biology — Professor Mansfield 

Senior Year 

Organic Chemistry — Lectures, Professor Arny; recitations, Professor 
Oehler 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry (inorganic and organic) — Lectures, 
Professor Arny; recitations, Professor Oehler 

Analytical .Chemistry — Laboratory work, Professor Vorisek and Dr. 
Leslie 

Practical Pharmacy — Lectures and recitations. Professor Diekman; 
laboratory course, Professors Diekman and Wimmer 

Dispensing Pharmacy — Laboratory course. Professors Diekman and 
Wimmer, and Mr. Hohmann 

Materia Medica — Lectures, Professor Rusby; recitations. Professor 
Rusby and Dr. Ballard 

Toxicology — Lectures, Professor Rusby; recitations, Professor 
Rusby and Dr. Ballard 

Commercial Pharmacognosy — Laboratory, Professor Mansfield 
and Dr.; Ballard 



150 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 



Histological Pharmacognosy — Laboratory course, Professor Mans- 
field and Dr. Ballard 

Biology — Professor Mansfield 

Graduate Courses 

Plant Analysis — Laboratory, Professor Rusby 
Technical Microscopy — Laboratory, Professor Mansfield 
Bacteriology — Laboratory course, Professor Jessup 
Quantitative Analysis — Laboratory, Professor Vorisek 
Organic Analysis — Laboratory, Professor Arny 
Theory and Practice of Inorganic Quantitative Analysis — Lec- 
tures, Professor Vorisek 

Commercial Organic Analysis and Toxicology — Lectures, Professor 
Arny 

Pharmaceutical Assaying and Higher Pharmacy — Lectures and 
laboratory work, Professors Diekman and Wimmer, and Mr. Hohmann 
Physiological Chemistry — Lectures, Professor Gies 
Food and Drug Course 

Commercial Organic Analysis and Toxicology — Lectures and lab- 
oratory course. Professor Arny 

Inorganic Quantitative Analysis — Lectures and laboratory course, 
Professor Vorisek 

Pharmaceutical Assaying — Lectures and laboratory course. Pro- 
fessors Diekman and Wimmer and Mr. Hohmann 

Technical Microscopy — Laboratory course. Professor Mansfield 

Food and Drug Inspection — Lectures, Professor Duff 

Philosophy and Psychology 

Professors: Adler, Cattell, Dewey, Fullerton, Lord, MacVannel, 
Miller (D. S.), Strong, Thorndike (E. L.), Woodbridge (Executive 
Officer, Philosophy), and Wood worth (Executive Officer, Psychology) 

Associate Professors: Jones, Montague, Norsworthy, and Ruger 

Associates: Bush and Pitkin 

Instructors: Brown, Cooley, Hollingworth, and Whitley 

Lecturers: Wells and Hartmann 

Assistants: Coss, Dashiell, Poffenberger, and Todd 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

A1-A2 — Principles of science. 3 hours. (Columbia College.) Pro- 
fessor Jones, Drs. Brown and Cooley and Mr. Hartmann. Introductory 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 151 

psychology. 3 hours, first half-year. Introductory logic. 3 hours, 
second half-year. (Barnard College.) Professor Montague, Dr. Hol- 
LiNGWORTH, and Dr. Brown 

21-22 — ^Ethics. 3 hours. Professor Lord 

61-62 — History of philosophy. 3 hours. Professor Woodbridge 
(Columbia). Professor Montague (Barnard) 

79-80 — Contemporary philosophy and metaphysics. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Montague and Dr. Brown (Columbia), contemporary philosophy. 
2 hours. Dr. Brown (Barnard). 

105 — Theories of experience. 2 hours. Professor Dewey 
106 — The mind and the world. 2 hours. Professor Fullerton 
108 — Philosophy and life in the light of modern thought. 2 hours. 
Professor Fullerton 

115-116 — ^Types of theistic approach. 2 hours. Dr. Cooley 
126 — ^The ethics of social reform. 2 hours. Professor Abler 
131 — Moral and political philosophy. 2 hours. Professor Dewey 
142 — Esthetics. 2 hours. Dr. Bush 
165 — British philosophy. 3 hours. Mr. Pitkin 

166 — Continental philosophy, Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. 3 hours. 
Dr. Bush 

167 — Kant. 2 hours. Professor Woodbridge 
173 — Plato. 3 hours. Dr. Bush 
174 — ^Aristotle. 2 hours. Professor Woodbridge 

181-182 — Philosophy of education. 2 hours. Professor MacVannel 
202 — Outline of a realistic metaphysic. 2 hours. Mr. Pitkin 
203 — ^The theory of consciousness in philosophy since Descartes. 2 
hours. Professor Woodbridge 

206 — Seminar: Selected problems in philosophy. 2 hours. Professor 
Fullerton 
211 — Research work on theses. Professor Dewey 
213-214 — ^Research work on theses. Professor Woodbridge 
219 — Research work in symbolic logic. Dr. Brown 
225-226 — Seminar in ethics. 2 hours. Professor Adler 
279-280 — Contemporary philosophy. 2 hours. Professor Montague 
281-282 — Seminar in the philosophy of education. Professor Mac- 
Vannel 

411-416 — Philosophy of religion. Professor Knox (at the Union Theo- 
logical Seminary) 

417-420 — Philosophy of religion. Professor Miller (at the General 
Theological Seminary) 



152 PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

421-426 — Ethics. Professor T. C. Hall (at the Union Theological 
Seminary) 

427-430 — ^Ethics. Professor Hunt (at the General Theological Semi- 
nary) 

Summer Session 

sAi — Principles of science: methods, deductive and inductive logic. 
3 points. Dr. Brown 

sA2 — Principles of science: concepts and problems of philosophy. 3 
points. Dr. Cooley 

s6i — History of ancient philosophy. 2 points. Professor Woodbridge 

s62 — ^The history of modern philosophy. 2 points. Professor Mon- 
tague 

sioo — Philosophy of religion. 2 points. Prof essor Wood 

sioi — History of religion. 2 points. Professor Wood 

S109 — Foundations of methods. Professor Dewey 

SI 67 — Schopenhauer and contemporary pessimism. 2 points. Dr. 
Brown 

SI 79 — Contemporary pragmatism. 2 points. Professor Montague 

S203 — Metaphysics. 2 points. Professor Woodbridge 

Extension 

eAi — Principles of science: methods, deductive and inductive logic. 

3 points. Dr. Brown 

eA2 — Principles of science: concepts and problems of philosophy. 3 
points. Dr. Brown 
ei6i-i62 — History of philosophy. 2 points. Dr. Cooley 

Psychology 

1-2 — Elements of psychology. 3 hours. Professor Lord 
3-4 — Elements of experimental psychology. C 2 hours, L 4 hours. 
Professor Woodworth, Messrs. Todd and Poffenberger 

7-8 — Experimental psychology, introductory course. C 2 hours, L 

4 hours. Dr. Hollingworth (Barnard) 

9-10 — Experimental psychology, intermediate course. 2 hours. Dr. 
Hollingworth (Barnard) 

2X-22 — ^The psychology of childhood. 2 hours. Professor Nors- 

WORTHY 

24 — ^The psychology and education of exceptional children. 2 hours. 
Professors Thorndike and Norsworthy 



PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 153 

111-112 — Experimental psychology, advanced course. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Cattell 

113-114 — Experimental psychology. Laboratory work. 2 to 8 hours. 
Professor Cattell and Mr. Todd 

117-118 — ^Applications of experimental psychology to education. 2 
hours. Professor Ruger 

121-122 — Educational psychology, advanced course. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Thorndike and Mr. O'Gorman 

124 — The psychology of the elementary school subjects, i hour. Pro- 
fessor Thorndike 

131 — Physiological psychology. 2 hours. Professor Woodworth 

133 — Laboratory course in physiological psychology. Professor Wood- 
worth and Mr. Poffenberger 

136 — Pathological psychology. 2 hours. Dr. Wells 

170^-171 — The psychology of rehgion. Professor Coe 

221-222 — Educational psychology, advanced course. 2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Thorndike 

231 — Problems and methods of psychology. 2 hours. Professor 
Woodworth 

232 — Psychology of association. 2 hours. Dr. Wells 

233-234 — ^Application of psychological and statistical methods to edu- 
cation. 2 hours. Professor Thorndike 

235-236 — Pathological psychology, advanced course. 2 hotirs. Dr. 
Wells 

251-252 — Neurology and psychiatry, i hour, four months. Not 
open to women. Professor Starr 

281-282 — Seminar in psychology. 2 hours. Professors Cattell and 
Woodworth 

283-284 — Research in psychology. Professors Cattell and Wood 
worth, Messrs. Todd and Poffenberger 

301-302 — Colloquium in psychology. Professor Cattell 

321-322 — Seminar in educational psychology. Professor Thorn- 
dike 

Summer Session 

SI — Elements of psychology. 2 points. Professors Pillsbury, Dodge, 
and Book 

sioi — Comparative and genetic psychology. 2 points. Professor 
Pillsbury 

/Union Theological. Seminary. 



154 PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

SI 04 — Experimental psychology. 2 points. Professor Wood worth 
SI 1 1 — The psychology of learning. 2 points. Professor Book 
S131 — Physiological psychology. 2 points. Professor Wood worth 
S161 — Analytic psychology. 2 points. Professor Dodge 
S283 — Research course. 2-4 points. Professors Woodworth, Dodge, 
PiLLSBURY, and Book and Mr. Todd 

Extension 

ei-2 — Elements of psychology. 3 points. Dr. Hollingworth 
ei4i — ^Applied psychology. 2 points. Dr. Strong 
ei42 — Psychology of advertising. 2 points. Dr. Strong 

Equipment 

Library Facilities — The library facilities of Columbia University 
and of the city of New York, for students of philosophy and psychol- 
ogy, are unusually good. The collection of books on the history of 
philosophy in the University Library is very large, that on Kant and 
his philosophy being especially complete. About 1000 periodicals 
are regularly received, and among them will be found every journal 
of importance, American or foreign, dealing with philosophy or psy- 
chology. DupUcates of the more important psychological books and 
journals are placed in the Psychological Laboratory, where there is 
also a card index of psychological literature containing over 25,000 
titles. Students of psychology will also find much of value in the 
Library of the Academy of Medicine, 17 West 43d Street, which is 
open to students free of charge. The New York Public Library is 
also available for students, when introduced by one of the instructors, 
on especially favorable terms. 

The Psychological Laboratory — The laboratory is in Schermer- 
horn Hall, a building "devoted to the advancement of natural sci- 
ence." It occupies the eastern half of the second floor and part of the 
floor immediately above, the rooms being as follows. A lecture-room, 
seating one hundred students, used also as a general laboratory; a 
seminar room with a department library, a workshop, a photographic 
and chemical room, an apparatus cabinet, an anthropometric labora- 
tory, five rooms used as offices and laboratories by the officers of the 
department, and eight research laboratories. Two of these are dark- 
rooms, specially constructed to exclude sound as well as light, 18 feet 
high and well ventilated. The laboratory has light from the north 
and south, is supplied with electric current of both high and low poten- 
tial, and is in all respects equipped both for instruction and research. 
The collection of apparatus includes: (i) Outfit for making and re- 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 1 55 

pairing apparatus, electric motors, etc. A skilled instrument-maker 
is continually employed, adding greatly to the efficiency of the labora- 
tory. (3) The outfit of an anthropometric laboratory with which 
Freshmen in the college and others are annually tested. (3) The ap- 
paratus, preparations, charts, etc., needed for complete courses in 
experimental and physiological psychology; and (4) the appa- 
ratus that has been used or is being used in special researches, a 
large part of which has been made especially for the laboratory. The 
outfit for the courses of instruction is now in large measure secured, 
and the annual appropriations can be used chiefly for apparatus needed 
in special researches. 



Physical Education 

Professor: Wood {Executive Officer) 
Associate Professor: Meylan 
Instructors: Fette and Skarstrom 

Assistants: Fowler, Bloom, Foster, Gray (W.), Holm, Kennedy, 
Smith (F. D.), Weeman, Warshowsky (A.), and Bosch (E.) 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 
For Men 

1-2 — Hygiene. Lectures, quizzes, and a report on some phase of 
personal and commtinity hygiene. 3 hours. Professor Meylan 

A1-A2 — Elementary graded gymnastic exercises, swimming, and lectures 
on personal hygiene. 2 hours. Dr. Skarstrom 

B1-B2 — Graded gymnastic exercises, athletics, and lectures on personal 
hygiene and sanitation. 2 hours. Professor Meylan, Mr. Fette, and 
Assistants 

Extension 

eXi-Xz — Gymnastics. 2 points. Mr. Fette 
For Women 

A1-A2 — Elementary graded gymnastic exercises and lectures on 
personal hygiene. In sections. 2 hours. Miss Calhoun 

B1-B2 — Graded gymnastic exercises and lectures on personal 
hygiene. In sections. 2 hours. Miss Calhoun 

C1-C2 — National folk and sesthetic dancing. 2 hours. Miss 
Calhoun 



156 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

There are also fifteen courses given under the auspices of Teachers 
College: Physical Education 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, 9-10, 105, 107-108, 109- 
iio, 114, 115-116, 119-120, 121-122, Education 87-88, 187-188. 189- 
190, and 289-290. 

Equipment 

The main exercising room is semicircular in shape, and has a floor 
area of 16,000 square feet. The ceiling is 35 feet high, and the room 
is well lighted and well ventilated, both naturally and artificially. 
The running track is 11 feet wide, with ends raised, and measures 
10 laps to the mile. On the same floor as the running track are the 
Gymnasium and Director's offices, an auxiliary g5nnnasium 40 x 60 
feet, rooms for fencing, boxing, and handball, two large dressing-rooms 
with 2000 steel lockers, and 32 shower-baths. Below the exercising 
room is the swimming pool, semicircular in shape; it measures 100 
by 50 feet on its axes, and contains 200,000 gallons of water. The 
depth is from 4 to 10 feet. Around the pool are the dressing-rooms 
and 20 shower-, needle-, and tub-baths. On this floor is also a large 
room and two dressing-rooms equipped with shower-baths and lava- 
tories, for the use of the various athletic teams. 

The athletic field is equipped with a M mile running track, baseball 
field, facilities for jumping, pole vaulting, putting the shot, etc., and eleven 
tennis courts. 

The Gould Boat-house, located on the Hudson River, at the foot of 
1 1 6th Street, is equipped with boats of all descriptions, lockers, baths, etc. 

The Frederick Ferris Thompson Memorial Building, given to Teach- 
ers College by Mrs. F. F. Thompson, has been recently completed. 
It is a building of four stories devoted to the purposes of physical 
education and school hygiene. It contains offices, examination 
rooms, lecture- and class-rooms, laboratories, handball courts, bowl- 
ing alleys, a swimming pool, four gymnasiums, rooms for corrective 
exercises, dressing-rooms, shower-baths, fencing-room, and a suite 
of rooms for photographic purposes. This building provides physical- 
training facilities for the women, the pupils of the Horace Mann School, 
and the varied equipment for the theoretical and practical instruction 
of professional students in Physical Education. 

The Gymnasium is open daily during the academic year, except on 
Sundays and legal holidays, from 8.30 a.m. to 6.30 p.m., Saturdays to 
5 P.M. It is closed for the entire day only on Thanksgiving, Christmas, 
New Year's, and Good Friday. On all other holidays it is open from 
2 to 6 P.M. One or more of the instructors are on the floor at all times 
when the Gymnasium is open. 

A course in physical education is required of all Freshmen and Sopho- 
mores in Columbia College, and first- and second-year students in the 
Schools of Mines, Engineering and Chemistry, except students holding 



PHYSICS 157 

degrees from otner colleges. A physical examination is required of 
each student in these classes upon entrance and at the end of the 
second year, and of all other students taking part in athletics. 

Every student is entitled to a physical examination by the Medical 
Director. On the basis of this examination advice is given as to the 
kind and amount of exercise best adapted to his needs. 



Physics 

Professors: Hallock, Poor, Pupin, Wendell, Wills, and Woodhull 

Assistant Professors: Burnside, Davis, Maltby, and Pegram {Execu- 
tive Officer) 

Associate: Simpson 

Instrtictors: Farwell, Kendall, Langford, Morse, Severinghaus, 
Trowbridge, Webb, and Weinrich 

Lecturer: Day 

Assistants: Brainin, Frazee, Hines, Nelms, Sandford, Scott, and 
Stifler 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

A1-A2 — General elementary physics. C 3 hours and L 2 hours. Profes- 
sor Davis, Mr. Farwell, Dr. Stifler and Mr. Frazee 

3-4-5 — General physics. C 5 hours. Professor Wendell, Dr. Morse, 
Mr. Farwell, Dr. Weinrich, Mr. Severinghaus, Mr. Kendall, Mr. 
Nelms, Mr. Scott, and Mr. Hines 

II — Elementary mechanics. C 3 hours. Dr. Webb 

12 — Properties of matter and heat. C 3 hours. Professor Hallock 

41, 42 — Laboratory physics. L 2, 4, or 6 hours, in connection with 11 
or 12. Mr. Farwell 

13 — Electricity and magnetism. C 3 hours. Professor Hallock 

14 — Light and radiation. C 3 hours. Dr. Morse 

43-44 — Physical laboratory. L 3 hours. For Engineering students. 
Professor Wendell, Dr. Morse, Dr. Weinrich, Mr. Severinghaus, 
Mr. Kendall, Mr. Nelms, Mr. Scott, and Mr. Hines 

61, 62 — Laboratory physics. L 2, 4, or 6 hours, in connection with 13 
or 14. Mr. Farwell 

71-72 — Advanced laboratorj^ physics. Z 4 or 6 hours. Dr. Trow- 
bridge 

loi — Electricity and magnetism. 3 hours. Professor Davis 

102 — Sound and theory of oscillations. 2 hours. Professor Davis 



158 PHYSICS 

103 — Light. 3 hours. Professor Hallock 
105 — Physical measurements. 2 hours. Professor Hallock 
108 — Kinetic theory of gases. 2 hours. Professor Davis 
151-152 — ^Advanced laboratory course. C 1 hour, L 4-16 hours. Dr. 
Trowbridge 

201 — Discharge of electricity through gases. 3 hours. Professor 
Davis 

204 — The design and construction of apparatus, i hour. Professor 
Hallock 

205 — Heat. 3 hours. Dr. Day 

206 — Phenomena of radio-activity. 2 hours. Professor Pegram 

211 — ^Phenomena of radiation. 2 hours. Dr. Morse 

271-272 — Original research under the direction of professors. 

Barnard College 

11-12 — General physics. C 3 hours, L 2 hours. Professor Maltby 
31 — Mechanics. C 3 hours, I, 2 or 4 hours. Miss Langford 
32 — Heat and properties of matter. C 3 hours, L 2 or 4 hours. Miss 
Langford 

33 — Sound. C 3 hours, L 2 or 4 hours. Professor Maltby 
34 — Light. C 3 hours, L 2 or 4 hours. Miss Langford 
35 — ^Electricity and magnetism. Professor Maltby 
138 — Theory of electricity. 3 hours. Professor Maltby 
145-146 — Physical chemistry. Professor Maltby 

Teachers College 

Physical science 51 — General course for teachers. 4 hours. Professor 

WOODHULL 

Summer Session 

sA — Elementary course in general physics. 4 points. Professor Hull, 
Messrs. Farwell, Nelms, Foster, and Marvin 

S3a — Elementary mechanics. 3 points. Mr. Farwell 

s3b — Elementary mechanics, wave-motion, and hydrostatics. 3 points. 
Mr. Farwell 

s4a — Heat. 3 points. Dr. Morse 

s4b — Light. 3 points. Dr. Morse 

S43 — Laboratory course in general physics. 3 points. Mr. Severing- 

HAUS 



PHYSICS 159 

S330, or b — Intermediate laboratory course in general physics. 3 
points. Mr. Severinghaus 
sioi — Electricity and magnetism. 2 points. Professor Hallock 
S107 — The teaching of elementary physics. 3 points. Professor Hxjll 
S204 — Optics. 3 points. Professor Hallock 
S272 — Research course. 2-4 points. Professor Hallock 

Extension 

eAi-A2 — Elementary course in general physics. 4 points. Mr. Far- 
well 
Optometry 1-2 — Theoretical optics. C 3 hours, L 2 hours. Dr. Stifler 
Optometry 3-4 — Physiological optics. 3 hours. Professor Hallock 
Optometry 9-10 — Theoretical optics. C 3 hours, L 2 hours. Dr. 
Stifler 

Optometry 11-12 — Physiological optics. 3 hours. Professor Hallock 

Mathematical Physics 

I — Mechanics: statics. 2 hours. Professors Burnside, Pegram, 
Dr. Webb, and Mr. Simpson 

15-16 — Analytical mechanics. 3 hours. Professor Pegram 
102 — Mechanics: continuation of mechanics i. 5 hours. Professors 
Burnside, Pegram and Dr. Webb 

103-104 — ^Theoretical mechanics. 3 hours. Professor Pegram 
los — Thermodynamics. 2 hours. Professor Wills 
107-108 — Theory of electricity and magnetism. 2 hours first 
half-year, 3 hours second half-year. Professor Wills 

109-110 — Theory of alternating current machines and theory of elec- 
trical currents. 4 hours first half-year, 3 hours second half-year. Pro- 
fessor PUPIN 

201 — Mechanics. 4 hours. Professor Wills 
202 — Theory of elasticity. 2 hours. Professor Wills 
204 — Hydrokinetics. 2 hours. Professor Wills 
20s — Electricity and magnetism. 4 hours. Professor Pupin 
208 — ^Theory of sound. 4 hours. Professor Pegram 
209— Theory of radiation. 2 hours. Professor Pegram 
210 — ^Theory of light. 3 hours. Professor Hallock 
212 — Partial differential equations of physics. 4 hours. Professor 
Wills 

213 — Thermodynamics and kinetic theory of gases. 4 hours. 
Professor Pegram 



l60 PHYSICS 

214 — Statistical mechanics. 4 hours. Professor Wills 
215 — Vector analysis and mathematical introduction. 4 hours. Pro- 
fessor Wills 

217 — ^The relativity theory. 2 hours. Professor Pegram 

219-220 — Recent advances in electrical theory. 2 hours. Professor 

PUPIN 

251 — Celestial mechanics, elementary course. 2 hours. Professor Poor 

252 — Celestial mechanics, advanced course. 2 hours. Professor Poor 

253 — Tides and tidal currents. 2 hours. Professor Poor 

254 — The reduction of observations. 2 hours. Professor Poor 

The advanced courses offered in mathematical physics are not all 

given in the same year. 

Journal Club — The Journal Club of the Department meets every 

week for the discussion of the current literature of physics, and for 

reports of special investigations. 

Summer Session 

si — Mechanics: statics. 2 points. Professors Burnside and Hodge 
si02a — Statics. 3 points. Professors Burnside and Hodge 
S1026 — Dynamics. 3 points. Professors Burnside and Hodge 

Equipment 

The laboratories and lecture-rooms of the Department of Physics 
are in Fayerweather Hall on the eastern side of the University grounds 
and in the basement of Philosophy Hall. The building is supplied with 
the usual general equipment of a physical laboratory. Gas, water, com- 
pressed air, and direct, alternating, and storage battery current for light, 
power, and experimental use is available throughout the laboratories. 

The elementary laboratory for students in Columbia College is on the 
second floor. The two laboratories for the students in the School of 
Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry are on the basement floor. These 
undergraduate laboratories have been supplied with much new apparatus 
in the last three years. More advanced laboratory work, especially for 
first-year graduate students, is provided for in rooms on the third 
floor. 

The laboratories used for research work have been named by the Trus- 
tees the "Phoenix Physical Laboratories," in memory of Mr. Stephen 
Whitney Phoenix, who bequeathed to the University a generous sum 
as an endowment for research in the physical sciences. Since 1903 the 
Department has been receiving sufficient appropriation from the income 
of the Phoenix ftmd to make extensive additions to its stock of apparatus. 
In addition to the supply from the Phoenix fund, the Department has 



PHYSIOLOGY l6l 

received considerable gifts of apparatus in the last few years, among 
which may be mentioned the physical apparatus of the late Ernest 
Kempton Adams, and a high potential, 7000 volts, generating set com- 
plete, from Dr. Peter Cooper Hewitt. 

Under the professor of electro-mechanics extensive new laboratories in 
the Philosophy building are being equipped for research in the subjects 
of electricity and magnetism, at a cost for apparatus of $20,000. The 
laboratories afford unusual opportunities for students desiring to specialize 
in electricity and magnetism. 

The Department employs two mechanics and laboratory helpers. The 
shops are well equipped with tools and machines. 

The physical laboratories at Barnard occupy the second floor and 
part of the basement of Fiskc Hall. They are well equipped laboratories 
for quantitative experimental work in the courses offered. 

The physics laboratories and lecture-room of Teachers College are es- 
pecially well equipped for illustrating the teaching of physics in secondary 
and normal schools. 

Physiology 

Professor: Lee {Executive Officer) 

Associate Professor: Burton-Opitz 

Assistant Professor: Pike 

Associates: Emerson and Williams (H. B.) 

Instructors: Bingham, Gordon, Keator, Shearer, and Terriberry 

Courses 

Courses 101-102, 103-104, and 105, as well as the courses of the Summer 
Session, are open to women. 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — Elementary physiology. C 1 hour, L 2 hours. Professor Pike 
101-102 — General physiology, i hour. Professor Lee 

103-104 — Laboratory course in general physiology. 5 hours. Pro- 
fessor Pike 

105 — Laboratory course in special physiology. 3 hours. Professor 
Burton-Opitz 

106-107 — Human physiology. C 5 hours, D 1 hour, L 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Burton-Opitz, Drs. Bingham, Gordon, Keator, Shearer, 
Terriberry, and Williams 

201 — Clinical physiology. C i hour, L 2 hours. Professors Burton- 
Opitz and Pike, Drs. Emerson and Williams. 



l52 PRACTICE OF MEDICINE 

Research 

The laboratory is open for research, tinder the direction of its officers, 
to advanced workers. 

Journal Club 

A journal club, composed of the members of the staff and graduate 
students, holds weekly meetings for the discussion of current literature 
and special investigations. 

Summer Session 
si or sia — ^Elementary physiology, 2 points. Professor Burton-Opitz 
s2 — ^Advanced physiology. I point. Professor Burton-Opitz 
S103 — General physiology. I point. Professor Burton-Opitz 
S104 — Advanced practical physiology. 2 points. Professor Bur- 
ton-Opitz 

Equipment 

The main equipment of the Department of Physiology is at the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons. It comprises one large laboratory, which is 
provided with special apparatus for teaching purposes; one large and four 
small laboratories for research; several private rooms for the use of the 
officers of the department; the Swift Physiological Cabinet, containing 
a specially endowed and very full collection of apparatus of precision, 
mainly for research; a library containing complete sets of all of the physio- 
logical journals, monographs and other books, and many'reprints of special 
articles: two dark rooms for optical and photographic work, and an outfit 
of machines and tools for working in wood and metal. A skilled mechanic 
gives his entire time to the design, manufacture, and repair of apparatus. 
The laboratories are connected by wires with the Vanderbilt Clinic so that 
the string galvanometers of the department are available for making 
electrocardiographic records from patients at the clinic. In Schermerhom 
Hall at Morningside Heights the department has the use of a laboratory 
equipment for the instruction of undergraduates. 

Political Economy and Finance 

(See page 92) 

Political Philosophy 

(See page 118) 

Politics 
(See page 125) 

Practice of Medicine 

Professor: T. C. Janeway {Executive Officer) 

Professors of Clinical Medicine: Brill, Draper, Evans, Huber, Jack- 



PRACTICE OF MEDICINE I63 

SON (F. W.), James (W. B.), Kaufmann, Kinnicutt, Libman, Lock- 
wood, NoRRiE, Teacher, and Stadtmuller 

Assistant Professor: Longcope 

Assistant Professors of Clinical Medicine: BovAiRD, Camac, Miller, 
and Potter 

Associates: Frissell and Hart 

Associates in Clinical Medicine: Carter, Hollis, Sumner, Swift, 
TuTTLE, and Williams (L. R.) 

Instructors: Emerson, Herrick, Mason, Mosenthal and Swann 

Instructors in Clinical Medicine: Cecil, Hensel, Schwerdtfeger, 
Shearer, and Woodruff 

Assistants: James (H.), Park, Snyder, Strong, and Thacher (H. C.) 

Assistants in Clinical Medicine: Barrett, Erdwurm, Gillette and 
Brenner 

Chiefs of Clinic: Herrick and Mason 

Clinical Assistants: Brownell, Cossitt, Bounce, Fleming, Jacobus, 
James, Keller, Likely, Martin, McCabe, Merriman, Mosenthal, 
Park, Strong, Swann, Thacher, Weinstein 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

51 — Physical diagnosis — Lecture demonstrations, i hour. November 
I to Febraary i. Professor Janeway, Drs. Emerson and Thacher 

52 — Physical diagnosis — Vanderbilt Clinic. 4 hours for five weeks. 
Drs. Emerson and Teacher 

54 — ^Elementary medical clinic — Vanderbilt Clinic. 2 hours. Professor 

Janeway and Dr. Emerson 
55-56 — Theoretical instruction, i hour. Professor Janeway 
57-58 — Clinical lecture on general medicine. Vanderbilt Clinic. I hour. 

Professor Janeway 

59-60 — Clinical lecture on general medicine — City Hospital. 1 3^ hours. 
Professor Evans 

61-62 — Physical and medical diagnosis — Vanderbilt Clinic and the 
Out-patient Departments of Presbyterian and Bellevue Hospitals. 48 
hours for each student. Drs. Hart, Frissell, Carter, Shearer, Bar- 
rett, Swann, and James 
63-64 — Recitations in general medicine. 2 hours. Dr. Frissell 
65-66 — Recitations in general medicine. 2 hours. Dr. Herrick 
67-68 — Clinical lectures in general medicine — Roosevelt Hospital. 2 
hours. Professors Evans, Jackson, Teacher, and Dr. Sumner 

69-70 — Clinical instruction — Presbyterian Hospital. 6 hours for 4 
weeks. Professors Janeway, James, Kinnicutt, Thacher, Longcope, 
and Bovaird 



1 64 RELIGION 

71-72 — Clinical and pathological conference. ij^ hours for twelve 
weeks. Professors Janeway, MacCallum, Longcope, and Dr. Snyder 

73-74 — Clinical instruction — St. Mary's Free Hospital for Children. 
I hour for four weeks. Dr. Swift 

73-76 — Clinical instruction — City Hospital. 2 hours a week for eight 
weeks. Professors Potter, Camac, and Dr. Williams 

77 — Recitations in general medicine. 2 hours. Dr. Mosenthal 

Clinical Clerkships — For particulars see page 236. 

79-80 — In the wards of the Presbyterian Hospital. Professors Janeway, 
Longcope, and Bovaird 

81-82 — In the wards of St. Luke's Hospital. Professors Lambert and 
NoRRiE, and Drs. Hollis, Patterson, and Frissell 

83-84 — In the wards of Bellevue Hospital. Professors Lockwood, 
Draper, Norrie, Miller, and Dr. Woodruff 

85-86 — In the wards of the German Hospital. Professors Kaltfmann, 
Stadtmijller, and Denig, and Drs. Schwerdtfeger and Hensel 

87-88 — In the wards of Mt. Sinai Hospital. Professors Brill and 

LiBMAN 

202 — Special course in pulmonary tuberculosis — ^This course, con- 
sisting of 12 clinical lectures combined with practical instruction, offers 
an opportunity for a limited number of graduates in medicine to study 
the special diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. At the 
Bellevue Tuberculosis Clinic. Professor Miller 
Summer Session 
S63-64 — Physical and medical diagnosis. 2 points. Dr. Miller 

Psychology 

(See page 152) 

Public Law and Jurisprudence 

(See page 125) 

Religion 

In addition to courses offered in conjunction with the Union and General 
Theological Seminaries, the following courses in Religion are given in 
Columbia College. 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

x-3 — Introduction to the study of the Bible. 2 hours. Chaplain 
Knox 

3-4 — Fundamentals of Religion. 3 hours. Professor Thomas C. Hall 
of Union Theological Seminary 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 165 

Rhetoric and English Composition 

(See page 104) 

Romance Languages and Literatures 

Professors: Cohn {Executive Officer), Lanson, Todd, and Weeks 
Assistant Professors: Fontaine, Gerig, Jordan, Livingston, and 

LOISEAUX' 

Instructors: Bigongiari, Fortier, Miiller, and Imbert 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

For courses under 100 there is a special numbering under French, 
Italian, and Spanish respectively. Courses above 100 are all numbered 
under the general heading Romance Languages and Literatures. 

French 

A1-A2 — Elementary course. 3 hours. Professor Weeks and Messrs. 
Muller and Fortier (Columbia), Professor Gerig and Messrs. Muller 
and Imbert (Barnard) 

B1-B2 — Syntax reading, and composition. 3 hours. Professors Cohn 
and Gerig (Columbia), and Messrs. Muller and Imbert (Barnard) 

B4 — Grammar, reading, and composition. 5 hours, second half-year. 
Professor Fontaine 

C1-C2 — Elementary course for graduate students. 2 hours. Professor 
Jordan 

1-2 — General introduction to the study of French literature. 3 hours. 
Professor Fontaine and Mr. Fortier (Columbia), Mr. Muller, Professor 
Fontaine, and Mr. Bigongiari (Barnard) 

3 — Composition and conversation based on the history of France. 3 
hours. Professor Jordan 

3-4 — Modern prose writers, especially the historians. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Jordan (Barnard) 

4 — Composition and conversation based upon scientific French. 3 
hours. Professor Jordan 

5-6 — History of French literature in the seventeenth century. 3 hours. 
Professor Loiseaux (Columbia), Professor Weeks (Barnard) 

9-10 — Composition, i hour. Professor Jordan (Columbia), Mr. 
Muller (Barnard) 



l66 ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

11-12 — ^Advanced composition and conversation, i hour. Professor 
Jordan 

21-22 — Advanced grammar and composition. 3 hours. Professor Cohn 
(Teachers College) 

loi — History of French literature in the seventeenth century down to 
1660. 3 hours. Professors Weeks and Loiseaux 

102 — History of French literature in the seventeenth century after 1660. 
3 hours. Professors Loiseaux and Weeks 

103 — History of French literature in the eighteenth century down to 
1750- 3 hours. Professor Loiseaux 

104 — History of French literature in the eighteenth century after 1750. 
3 hours. Professor Loiseaux 

105 — History of French literature in the nineteenth century down to 
1852. 3 hoars. Professor Weeks 

106 — History of French literature in the nineteenth century after 1852. 
3 hours. Professor We^iks 

1 1 i-i 12 — History of French literature of the sixteenth century. 2 hours. 
Professor Gerig 

113-114 — Old French. 2 hours. Professor Todd 

121-122 — Methods of teaching French in secondary schools. Professor 
Cohn. (Identical with Education 165-166) 

[205-206 — Special topics in nineteenth-century French literature. 2 
hours. Professor Cohn] 

207 — Special topics in eighteenth-century French literature. 2 hours. 
Professors Lanson and Cohn 

207a — Special topics in eighteenth-century French literature, practical 
exercises, i hour. Professor Lanson 

208 — Special topics in eighteenth-century French literature. 2 hours. 
Professor Cohn 

209-210 — Special topics in sixteenth-century literature. 2 hours. 
Professor Gerig 

Education 165-166 — Methods of teaching French in secondary schools. 
2 hours. Professor Cohn (Teachers College) 

301-302 — Seminar — ^Literary criticism in France, from the inception of 
the Lundis to the death of Sainte-Beuve. 2 hours. Professor Cohn 

Italian 

1-2 — ^Elementary course. 3 hours. Professor Livingston (Columbia), 
Mr. Bigongiari (Barnard) 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 167 

3-4 — General introduction to the study of Italian literature. 3 hours. 
Professor Livingston (Columbia), Mr. Bigongiari (Barnard) 

131-132 — The philosophical antecedents of the Divina Commedia of 
Dante. 3 hours. Mr. Bigongiari 

133-134 — Petrarch and Humanism: the Petrarchist movement. 3 
hours. Professor Livingston 

135-136 — Italian literature of the nineteenth century. 2 hours. Mr. 
Bigongiari 

137-138 — Special topics in Italian literature. 2 hours. Professor 
Livingston 

Spanish 

1-2 — Elementary course. 3 hours. Mr. Imbert (Columbia) , Professor 
Fontaine (Barnard) 
3-4 — General introduction to Spanish literature. 3 hours. Professor 

LOISEAUX 

[11-12 — Spanish conversation, i hour. Professor Loiseaux] 
[141-142 — The novela of the golden age. 3 hours. Professor Loiseaux] 
143-144 — ^The Spanish comedia. 3 hours. Professor Loiseaux 

Romance Philology 

151-152 — Introduction to Romance philology. 2 hours. Professor 
Todd 

[253-254 — Oldest monuments of the French language, i hour. Pro- 
fessor Todd] 

255-256 — Critical constitution of texts, i hour. Professor Todd 

257 — Old Provengal. i hour. Professor Todd 

259-260 — Oldest monuments of the Italian and Spanish languages, i 
hour. Professor Livingston 

271-272 — Portuguese, i hour. Professor Todd 

273-274 — Rumanian. 2 hours. Professor Cohn 

303-304 — Seminar — Presertation and discussion of doctoral disserta- 
tion work. 1)4. hours. Professors Todd, Weeks, and Gerig 

Summer Session 
French 

sAi — ^Elementary course. 2 points. Mr. Muller and Dr. Alexander 
sA2 — Elementary reading and oral practice. 2 points. Mr. Fortier 
sA3 — Supplementary course. 2 points. "Professor Jordan and Mr. 
Muller 



l68 ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 

This course may be taken simultaneotisly with sAi with the special 
permission of the instructor. 

sBi — Intermediate: first course. 2 points. Dr. Alexander 

sB2 — Intermediate: second course. 2 points. Dr. Alexander 

SI — General introduction to the study of French literature. I. 2 
points. Professor Jordan 

S2 — General introduction to the study of French literature. II. 2 
points. Mr. Muller 

S4 — French conversation and composition, based upon scientific French. 
2 points. Professor Jordan 

s6 — History of French literature in the seventeenth century. Second 
course. 2 points. Professor Loiseaux 

S104 — History of French literature in the second half of the eighteenth 
century. 2 points. Professor Lois^Aux 

SI06 — History of the French literary movement in the second half of 
the nineteenth century. Period 1 850-1 870. Mr. Fortier 

SI 13 — Old French. 2 points. Professor Weeks 

Italian 

SI — Elementary: first course. 2 points. Professor Marinoni 
S2 — Elementary: second course. 2 points. Professor Marinoni 
S3 — General introduction to the study of Italian literature. 2 points. 
Professor Marinoni 

Spanish 

SI — Elementary I. 2 points. Professor Fitz-Gerald 

S2 — Elementary II. 2 points. Professor Loiseaux 

S3 — General introduction to Spanish literature. I. 2 point?. Mr. 
Fortier 

S4 — General introduction to Spanish literature. II. 2 points. Pro- 
fessor Fitz-Gerald 

Romance Philology 

S152 — Introduction to Romance philology. 2 points. Professor Fitz- 
Gerald 

S275 — Phonetics. 2 points. Professor Weeks 

Extension 

French 

eAi-A2 — Elementary course. 3 points. Messrs. Muller and Imbert. 
(Also in Brooklyn and Newark) 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES 169 

eA3-A4 — Elementary course. I. ij^ points. Mr. Farnsworth 
eA5-A6 — Elementary course. II. 1 3^2 points. Mr. Farnsworth 
eBi-B2 — Intermediate course. 3 points. Professor Fontaine, Mr. 

Imbert. (Also in Newark) 
ei-2 — General introduction to the study of French literature. 3 points. 

Professor Loiseaux 
03-4 — Conversation and composition based upon the history of France. 

3 points. Mr. Fortier 

Italian 

ei-2 — Elementary course. 3 points. Professor Livingston 

Spanish 

ei-2 — Elementary course. 3 points. Mr. Imbert. (Also in Brooklyn) 
63-4 — ^Advanced course. 3 points. Mr. Imbert 

Public Lectures 

Occasional lectures in French, in Italian, and in Spanish, open to all mem- 
bers of the University, are given by the members of the department and 
by invited lecttirers. 

The Romance Club 

The Romance Club consists of all the instructors and advanced 
students in the department. At its meetings, which are partly of a 
social character, an account is given of the most important articles on 
the Romance languages and literatures in the recent French, English, 
German, Italian, and Spanish periodicals; new books are discussed, 
letters from absent instructors and former students in the department 
are read, etc. 

Eqtiipment 

The Library of Columbia University is well supplied with French, 
Spanish, and Italian works, as well as with works upon Romance 
philology. Its list of periodicals of interest for students in the depart- 
ment is especially rich. The Library has also complete sets of the 
most important series and collections, such as the Altfranzosische 
Bibliothek, Romanische Bibliothek, publications of the Modern Lan- 
guage Association, publications of the Socidt6 des anciens Textes 
frangais, Histoire litteraire de la France, Ausgaben und Abhandlungen 
aus dem Gebiete der romanische Philologie, Jahrbuch fur romanische 
und englische sprachen, etc. 



170 SHOPWORK 

A further special privilege enjoyed by the faculty and students of the 
Department of Romance Languages is that of using the library of the 
Hispanic Society of America, richest in the literature of Spain, but rich 
also in other related fields. The library is reached from Broadway, 
between 155th and 156th Streets. 

Co-operation with the Alliance Frangaise 

Elementary evening classes in French are conducted by the department 
of Extension Teaching in co-operation with the Alliance Frangaise. 

French Societiea 

Two societies have been organized for the purpose of fostering the 
use of the French language among the members of the University, viz., 
the Soci6t6 Franjaise de 1' University Columbia, which admits only men, 
and the Soci6t6 Franjaise de Barnard College, which admits only 
women. They give performances of French plays. The following 
plays have been presented in recent years: Scribe and Legouv6, 
Bataille de Dames; Meilhac and Hal6vy, L' Et6 de la Saint Martin; 
Eugene Labiche, Le Voyage de M. Perrichon, Un Monsieur qui prend 
la mouche; Le Point de Mire; Moli^re, Le M6decin malgri lui, Les 
Fourberies de Scapin, etc. 

Shopwork 

Offered by the School of Industrial Arts at Teachers College 

Instructor: Sleffel 

Shop Assistants: Ross and Walsh 

I — ^Wood-turning and pattern-making. 2 half-days. Mr. Ross 
2 — Molding and foundry practice, i afternoon. Mr. Sleffel 
loS — Machine work. 3 weeks. Mr. Walsh 
II — Machine work. 2 half-days. Mr. Walsh 
12 — Forging. 2 half-days. Mr. Sleffel 
13-14 — Machine work, i afternoon. Mr. Walsh 
15 — Forging and foundry practice, i afternoon. Mr. Sleffel 
16 — Machine work, i afternoon. Mr. Walsh 

18S — Pattern-making, forging, and machine work. Three weeks. 
Messrs. Sleffel, Ross, and Walsh 

Social Economy 

(See page 92) 

Sociology and Statistics 
(See page 94) 



SURGERY 171 

Surgery 

Professors: Blake (Executive Officer), Hayden 

Professors of Clinical Surgery: Brewer, Dowd, Gerster, Hartley, 
HoTCHKiss, Johnson, Kammerer, Kihani, Peck, and Walker 

Associates: Clarke and Martin 

Associates in Clinical Surgery: Abbe and Berg (A. A.) 

Instructors: Auchincloss, Connell, Cox, Janeway (H. H.), Kenyon, 
Lyle, Schmitt, Van Beuren, Reynolds, and Vosburgh 

Instructors in Clinical Surgery: Collins, Conley, Darrach, Fischer, 
Lambert (A. V. S.), McWilliams, Pool, Russell, Stetten, Turnure, 
and Whipple 

Assistants: D wight. Hooker, Vaughan, and Whiting 

Clinical Assistants: Kingsley, Leggett, Phelps, and Whiting 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

For courses in Genito-Urinary Diseases see under Clinical Instruction, 
page 88 

51-52 — Surgical pathology and general regional surgery, i hour. 
Professor Blake 

53-54 — Clinic in general surgery. Vanderbilt Clinic, i hour. Professor 
Blake 

55 — Clinic in general surgery, i hour. Roosevelt Hospital. Professor 
Peck 

56 — Clinic in general surgery. Presbyterian Hospital. I hour. Pro- 
fessor Blake 

57-58 — Clinic in general surgery. Vanderbilt Clinic, i hour. Professor 
Brewer 

59-60 — Clinic in general surgery. Roosevelt Hospital, i hour. Profes- 
sor Brewer 

61-62 — Operative surgery on the cadaver. 10-12 lessons. Drs. Martin, 
Schmitt, Cox, and Kenyon 

65-66 — Recitations and clinic in surgical pathology. 3 hours. Dr. 
Clarke 

68 — Demonstration. Anatomy of fractures, i hour. Dr. Dwight 

69-70 — Clinical clerkships. Presbyterian, Professor Blake, Drs. 
McWilliams and Whipple; German, Professors Kiliani, Kammerer, 
Drs. Fischer and Stetten; Mt. Sinai, Professor Gerster and Dr. Berg; 
New York, Professor Johnson, Drs. Pool and Turnure; Bellevue, Pro- 
fessors HoTCHKiss, Walker, Drs. Vosburgh, Lambert, and Conley 



172 ZOOLOGY 

71-72 — Practical instruction in surgical technic in the laboratory for 
surgical research. 4 hours for four weeks. Dr. H. H. Janeway 

73-74 — Practical instruction in surgical pathology. 2 hours for 8 
weeks. Drs. Clarke, Auchincloss, and Whipple 

75-76 — Practical instruction. St. Mary's Free Hospital for Children. 
I hour for four weeks. Professor Dowd 

79-80 — Minor surgery and bandaging. Practical instruction at the 
Vanderbilt Clinic. 48 lessons. Drs. Van Beuren and Whiting 

81-82 — Minor surgery and bandaging. Practical instruction at the 
Roosevelt Hospital Out-patient Department. 48 lessons. Dr. Russell 

83-84 — Recitations in general and regional surgery, 2 hours. Dr. 

VOSBURGH 

85-86 — Recitations in general and regional surgery. 2 hours. Dr. 

CONNELL 

87-88 — Hospital Clinics — Optional'. 

New York Hospital — i a week. Professor Hartley or Johnson 
St. Luke's Hospital — i a week. Dr. Abbe 

Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled — 2 a week. Professor Gib- 
NEY and Dr. Walker. 2 a week, Professor Whitman 

St. Mary's Free Hospital for Children — i a week. Professor Dowd 
General Memorial Hospital — 2 a week. Professor Dowd 



Zo51ogy 

Professors: Bigelow, Calkins, Crampton, Dean (B.), Morgan (T. 
H.), OsBORN, and Wilson {Executive Officer) 
Assistant Professors: McGregor and Osburn 
Instructors: Dederer and Gregory (L. H.) 
Lecturer: Gregory (W. K.) 
Assistants: Dean (R. C.) and Packard 

Of the following courses 1-2, 3-4, 91-92, and 101-102 are given 
separately at Barnard College, 5 and 151-152 only at Barnard, 

For courses given at Teachers College see the current Announcement 
of Teachers College. 

Courses 

See introductory paragraphs, page 57 

1-2 — Elementary biology, zoology, general principles of biology. 
Prerequisite, Science A or elementary chemistry or physics. C 2 
hours, L 4 hours. Professors Calkins, Dean, and McGregor 



ZOOLOGY 173 

I — General biology and invertebrate zo61ogy. Professors Calkins 
and McGregor] 

[2 — Evolution and vertebrate zoSlogy. Professors Dean and Mc- 
Gregor] 

(Course 3-4 may with advantage be taken with 1-2 to form a more 
comprehensive course. It may be taken only in connection with or 
subsequent to 1-2) 

3-4 — General histology. C i hour, L 2 hours. Professor McGregor. 
General embryology. C i hour, L 2 hours. Professor Morgan 

91-92 — General zoSlogy (to follow 1-2). Professor McGregor 

[91 — Invertebrates. C 3 hours, L 6 hours] 

[92 — Vertebrates. C 3 hours, L 6 hours] 

94 — Embryology of vertebrates. C 1 hour, L 2 hours. Professor 
McGregor. Prerequisite, 1-4 

101-102 — General zoSlogy. C 3 hours, L 6 hours, and assigned 
work. Professor McGregor 

no — The parasitic protozoa. C i hour, L 5 hours. Professor 
Calkins 

1 51-152 — General physiology (for women). C 2 hours, L 4 hours. 
Professor Osburn and Miss Gregory 

201 — Special topics in invertebrate zoology. Two days. Professor 
Wilson 

203-204 — Mammals, living and fossil. Lectures and laboratory 
course. 6 hours (one day). Dr. Gregory. The latter part of this 
course is given in the American Museum of Natural History. 

207 — Zoological research. Individual study of special biological 
problems. 

208-209 — Comparative embryology. One day. Professors Dean 
and Calkins 

212 — The experimental study of ^evolution, with special reference to 
statistical work. One day. Professor Crampton 

213 — Experimental study of reflex action and tropisms. i hour, 
with demonstrations and opportunities for laboratory work. Pro- 
fessor Morgan 

214 — Experimental study of instincts. One hour. Professor 
Morgan 

215-216 — Experimental zoSlogy. i hour with laboratory work on 
special problems. Professor Morgan 

217 — Experimental study of regeneration, i hour. Professor 
Morgan 



174 ZOOLOGY 

218 — Experimental embryology, parallel to 220, i hour. Pro- 
fessor Morgan 

220 — Cellular embryology, i hour. Professor Wilson 

221-222 — Protozoology. C i hour, L 5 hours. Professor Calkins 

223-224 — Evolution of the vertebrates. One day. Dr. Gregory 

225-226 — Cellular biology — General structure and functions of the cell. 
C I hour, L 5 hours. Professor Wilson 

228 — Fishes, living and fossil. C i hour, L 2 hours. Professor 
Dean 

Journal Club — Reports and discussions of recent literature by 
members of the staff, graduate students, and others, i hour a week 
throughout the year. Under direction of the staff. 

Seminar — Critical discussion of selected topics by members of the 
staff and graduate students. Subject and time are specially arranged. 

University Biological Lectures — A course of lectures on general 
topics, given from time to time by members of the staff and eminent 
specialists from other institutions. These lectures form the basis of 
the Columbia Biological Series, edited by Professors Osborn and 
Wilson 

Summer Session 

SI — Elementary biology and zoology. 4 points. Professor McGregor, 
Messrs. Packard and Dean 

33-4 — Vertebrate embryology and histology. 4 points. Professor 
McGregor, Messrs. Packard and Dean 

Laboratories^ Libraries, and Equipment 

The zoological laboratories on the upper floor of Schermerhorn 
comprise a large general undergraduate laboratory, three graduate 
laboratories, and eight rooms for private research, besides special 
rooms for supplies, aquaria, and preparation. There are also a com- 
modious lecture-room and library. The laboratories are well equipped 
with optical instruments, microtomes, and other apparatus for ad- 
vanced work. The teaching collections include a series of the Med- 
iterranean and American marine types, and the injected vertebrate 
series of Fric and MuUer, a set of standard and specially prepared 
charts and wax models, and a variety of living animals and plants 
contained in fresh-water and marine aquaria. 

The departmental library, a part of the University Library kept in 
the laboratory, the gift of Charles H. Senff, Esq., is a memorial to the 
late Dr. John L Northrop. It embraces sets of the standard bio- 
logical works and includes the journals and a rapidly increasing col- 
lection of special monographs. A fund is available for the purchase 



ZOOLOGY 175 

of literature needed in connection with the special researches of 
students. 

Important adjuncts to zoological work are offered by the American 
Museum of Natural History, the Bronx Zo6logical Garden, the New 
York Aquarium, and by the marine biological laboratories to which the 
University contributes support. Several investigators' tables are held 
at the Wood's Hole laboratory, one at the South Harpswell laboratory, 
and the John D. Jones scholarship is available at the Cold Spring Harbor 
laboratory. A table at the Naples Zoological Station is also supported 
by the University. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Committee on Undergraduate Admissions 

Professors Jones, Chairman, Brewster, Cole, McCrea, McGregor 
(J. H.), Mayer, Morgan (J. L. R.), Odell, Rautenstrauch, Rusby, 
Sachs, Sherman, Van Hook 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

There are no examinations for admission to the Schools of Law, 
Medicine, Political Science, Philosophy, Pure Science, and Fine Arts 
(courses leading to degrees) , or to Teachers College. For the require- 
ments for admission to these departments, see the separate announce- 
ments of the Schools and Faculties concerned. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Except for reasons of weight, candidates for admission to the Fresh- 
man class in Columbia College or Barnard College must be at least fifteen 
years of age at the time of matriculation and correspondingly older for 
admission to advanced standing; and for admission to the Schools of Mines, 
Engineering, Chemistry, Architecture, Music, and Design, at least eighteen 
years of age. 

The examination requirements for admission may be satisfied by 
any one of the three following means, or by any approved combination 
thereof : 

1. By the examinations of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. — These examinations are held annually in June, in 1912 beginning 
on June 17, at Columbia University and at about one hundred and fifty 
other educational centres in the United States and Europe. A complete 
list of the places and times of such examinations, together with the regula- 
tions governing them, is published about March i annually and may be 
obtained from the Secretary of the College Entrance Examination Board, 
Post Office Sub-Station 84, New York City. 

2. By the examinations conducted by the Columbia University 
Committee on Undergraduate Admissions. — These examinations are 
held in September and January of each year (beginning on September 
16, 1912, and January 14, 1913), and only at the University. 

176 



122 W^ STREET 



121 ''STREET 




s 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITYiNTBcCITYofNEW YORK 



I . 


Horace Mann Schools 


18 


2. 


Thompson Memorial Building 


19. 


^• 


Milbank Memorial Chapel 


20. 


4- 


Macy 


21. 


s- 


Main Building (Teachers) 


22 


6. 


Domestic Science 


23 


7- 


Peabody Greenhouse 


24- 


b. 


Women's Dormitory 


25- 


Q. 


Fiske 


26. 


lO. 


Milbank 


27. 


II. 


Brinkerhoff 


28 


12. 


Wilde Observatory 


29 


i^- 


Class of 1882 Gates 


^0 


14. 


Statue, Great God Pan 


31- 


IS. 


Mapes Gates 


^2 


16. 


University 


33 


17- 


Milbank Quadrangle 


34- 



Havemeyer 35. 

Schermerhorn 36. 

Avery 37. 

Engineering 38. 

West 39. 

Fayerweather 40. 

Earl 41. 

Library 42. 

St. Paul's Chapel 43. 

Mines 44. 

Lafayette Post Flag Staff 45. 

Class of 1881 Flag Staff 46. 

East 47. 

Philosophy 48. 

Brooks 49. 

Subway Station 50. 
Faculty Club 



Statue, Alma Mater 

Kent 

Hamilton 

Statue, Alexander Hamilton 

Hartley 

Livingston 

South Field 

Journalism 

Class of 1885 Sun Dial 

Botany Greenhouse 

President's House 

Class of 1886 Exedra 

Deutches Haus 

Residence of Dean 

" " Chaplain 

Carnegie Endowment 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 1 77 

3. By the examinations of the State Examination Board of the 
New York State Education Department. — These examinations are 
held in January and June at more than six hundred high schools 
and other institutions throughout the State of New York, but, save 
in exceptional circumstances, are open onlj^ to students in those 
schools. Full information regarding the regulations governing them 
may be obtained by application to the New York State Education 
Department, Albany, New York. 

A copy of the time-scheme of the examinations held by the College 
Entrance Examination Board in June, and by Columbia University 
in September and January, together with information as to the proper 
method of filing application-blanks for these examinations, the pay- 
ment of fees, the division of examinations, and also detailed defi- 
nitions of the requirements in each admission subject, is given in the 
Bulletin of Entrance Examinations and Admission which may be had 
upon application to the Secretary of the University. 

All persons taking the January examinations will receive due credit 
for the results of the examinations. Students may be admitted, at the 
beginning of the second half-year, to Columbia College and Barnard 
College. 

APPLICATION FOR EXAMINATION 

Every candidate for examination is required to file an application. 

For the examinations in June, 1912, the application must be filed 
with the Secretary of the College Entrance Examination Board. Applica- 
tions for examination in the United States east of the Mississippi River 
must be filed on or before June 3. Applications for examination elsewhere 
in the United States or in Canada must be filed on or before May 27. 
Applications for examination outside of the United States and Canada must 
be filed on or before May 13. 

For the examinations in January and September, 1912, applications 
should reach the Registrar of Columbia University on or before January 
8, and September 9. 

EXAMINATIOIT FEE 

Each application for examination in June must be accompanied 
by a fee of $5 for all candidates examined at points in the United 
States and Canada, and $15 for all candidates examined at points 
outside of the United States and Canada. 

Each application for examination in January or September must 
be accompanied either by a fee of $5, by a receipt from the Bursar for 
an examination fee previously paid, or by the receipt issued by the 
Secretary of the College Entrance Examination Board for the June 
examinations immediately preceding. The latter will be accepted in 
either September or January, but not in both ; and a single fee paid to tht 



178 ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

University will cover only two consecutive series of examinations, namely, 
January and September or September and January. 

If a late application is accepted either by the College Entrance 
Examination Board, or by the University, a second fee of $5 must be 
paid. 

The examination fee receipt should be carefully preserved. It 
must be presented by the candidate to the Supervisor in charge of 
the examinations which he attends as evidence that he is entitled to 
be admitted to the same. No candidate will be admitted to the 
January or September examinations upon the receipt of the Board, 
unless that receipt bears the certification of the Registrar of Columbia 
University that the candidate's application has been filed. 

RESTRICTIONS GOVERNING CREDITS FOR EXAMINATIONS 

A candidate may present himself at any of the series of examina- 
tions scheduled above, and the results may be credited towards the 
fulfilment of the requirements for admission, subject to the following 
restrictions : 

1 . A candidate in making application for examination must submit 
a statement from the principal of his school, or from his last instructor, 
indicating the extent and character of his preparation in each subject 
in which he applies for examination, and credit may be withheld when 
this requirement is not met. 

2 . The results of an examination may stand to the candidate's credit 
for twenty-nine months, but no longer. 

3 . A candidate may not present himself for examination more than 
four times, except by special consent of the Committee on Admissions. 

4. The results of the examinations conducted by the New York 
State Examination Board can be credited only in so far as the subject 
matter of these examinations specifically covers the subjects, or 
lettered or numbered parts of subjects, which are accepted for ad- 
mission to Columbia University. Candidates who have been granted 
the College Entrance Diploma issued by the New York State Edu- 
cation Department may be admitted to the undergraduate departments 
free of conditions if the directions given in the Columbia University 
Bulletin of Entrance Examinations and Admission have been observed. 
The diploma should be forwarded to the Secretary of the University 
together with the application for admission. The proper credentials for 
individual subjects wUl be accepted in so far as they correspond to the 
entrance requirements. 

5. In order to be credited towards entrance, the reports of a can- 
didate's examinations, together with the statement of the extent 
and character of his preparation in each subject offered, must be in 
the hands of the Committee on Admissions one week prior to the open- 
ing of the term in September or January. 



ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 1 79 

6. The reports of all examinations must be rendered to the Com- 
mittee on Admissions in percentages. The Committee interprets 
these percentages as Passed (P), Conditioned (Q), or Failed (F). Credit 
towards admission is given only for such examinations as receive a 
grade of P. 

Note. The September examinations are intended for candidates who 
plan to enter college immediately. Preliminary examinations should not 
be taken at this time. 

EXAMINATION SUBJECTS 

Columbia University recognizes the following examination subjects 
which may be offered for admission to one or more of the colleges and 
schools included in the University, each subject counting for a specific 
number of units as indicated in parentheses. The unit here represents 
the number of years at the rate of five periods a week, which will 
normally be required in the secondary school to prepare adequately for 
the college examination. 

Columbia College: A.B. 143^ units. Prescribed, g}4 units — English (3); 
elementary mathematics (2}^); elementary Latin (4). Elective, 5 unitS' — 
of which not more than 4 from elementary French (2), elementary German 
(2), Italian (2), Spanish (2); not more than 3 units from botany (i), 
chemistry (i), physics (i), physiography (i), shopwork (i), zoology (l); 
any of the following, except that to offer an advanced subject involves 
offering at the same time or earlier the corresponding elementary subject: 
elementary Greek (3), elementary history (2) or (i), drawing (i), music 
(l), intermediate French (i), intermediate German (i), advanced English 
(i), advanced Greek (i), advanced history (i), advanced Latin (i), 
advanced mathematics (3^-i3^). 

B.S. 143^ units. The same as for the A.B. excepting that chemistry 
(i), physics (i),and intermediate or advanced subjects (2) may be offered 
in place of elementary Latin (4) ; in which case elementary Latin (2 or 4) 
becomes elective. 

Barnard College: A.B. 14 J^ units. Same as Columbia College with 
the exception of shopwork, which is not an entrance subject for Barnard 
College. 

B.S. 143^^ units. Prescribed, I2>^ units, — English (3) ; elementary mathe- 
matics (2j^); 2 units from botany (i), chemistry (i), physics (i), 
physiography (i), zoology (i), and intermediate or advanced subjects 
(2) may be offered in place of elementary Latin (4); in which case 
elementary Latin (2 or 4) becomes elective. Elective, 2 units — as given 
under Elective Columbia College. 

General two years' course 14^ units. Prescribed, 5}^ units — English 
(3); mathematics (23^). Elective, 9 units — Ancient or modern foreign lan- 
guages (4); history, foreign languages, mathematics or science (5). 



l80 SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS 

Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry: To uniform first year. 
14^ units. Prescribed, iij/^ units — Chemistry (i), drawing (i), elemen- 
tary French or elementary German (2), English (3), mathematics (sJ^), 
physics (i). Elective, 3 units — Elementary German or elementary French 
(2), American history (i), ancient history (i), English history (i), medlEeval 
and modern history (i), elementary Latin (2), botany (i), physiography 
(i), shopwork (i), Spanish (2), zoology (2), intermediate French or inter- 
mediate German (i). 

School of Architecture: For certificate i2j^ units. Prescribed, 6J^ units 
— English (3), mathematics (3K). drawing (i). Elective, 5 units — 
Elementary French (2), elementary German (2), elementary history 
(2) or (i), elementary Latin (2), physics (2), chemistry (i), Spanish (2), 
advanced mathematics (i). 

School of Music: For the certificate in Music 9^^ units. Prescribed, 
3 units — English (3). Elective, 6)4, units — Elementary French (2) or (1), 
elementary Latin (2), elementary mathematics (23^), physics (i), Italian 
(2), harmony (i), musical appreciation (i), musical performance (2), ad- 
vanced history (i), advanced mathematics (i). 

School of Design: For the certificate in Design 93^ units. Prescribed, 
6 units — Drawing (i); English (3); either elementary French, elementary 
German, or elementary Italian (2). Elective, 3 3^ units — Either elemen- 
tary Greek (3) or elementary Latin (2), elementary history (2) or (i), 
elementary mathematics (23^), elementary physics (i), chemistry (i), 
advanced mathematics (i). 

College of Pharmacy: Phar. C. ii3^ units. To offer an advanced sub- 
ject involves offering either at the same time or earlier the corresponding 
elementary subject. English (3), elementary French (2), elementary 
German (2), elementary Greek (3), elementary history (2) or (i), elemen- 
tary Latin (4) or (2), elementary mathematics (23^), physics (i), inter- 
mediate French (i). Intermediate German (i), advanced Greek (i), 
advanced history (i), advanced Latin (i), advanced mathematics (i), 
botany (i), chemistry (i), drawing (i), physiography (i), Spanish (2), 
zoology (i). 

SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS 

The examinations at Columbia University will be held as follows : 

For men, in Earl Hall in January, and in the Gymnasium in June and 
September. 

For women, in Barnard College in January, June, and September. 

Candidates taking these examinations must report to the Supervisor, 
in the examination room, fifteen minutes in advance of the first ex- 
amination which they are to attend. 



SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS l8l 

Schedule 
January is-32, 1912, and Jane 17-24, 1912 

Monday, January 15 and June 17 

Mathematics a (Elementary Algebra, complete) 9 • 3o~i3 . 30 

Mathematics a, i (Algebra to Quadratics) 9. 30- 11.30 

Mathematics a, ii (Quadratics and beyond) 9. 30- 11 .30 

History 6 (Mediaeval and Modern History) i . 30-3 . 30 

History d (American History) i • 3o~3 • 3° 

Physics 3 -45-5 -45 

Botany 3 •45-5-45 

Zoology 3 -45-5 -45 

Tuesday, January 16 and June 18 

Mathematics c (Plane Geometry) 9-1 1 

Mathematics d (Solid Geometry) 9-11 

Mathematics cd (Plane and Solid Geometry) 9-12 

History a (Ancient History) i . 30-3 . 30 

History c (English History) i . 30-3 . 30 

German a (Elementary) 3 -45-5 -45 

Wednesday, January 17 and June ig 

N R I, N R 2 (Grammar, and Elementary Prose Composi- 
tion) 9-12.30 

Latin N R3 (Second Year Latin) 9-1 1 

fLatin b (Caesar) 9-1 1 

f Latin m (Elementary Sight Translation of Prose) 11 . 15-12.30 

French a (Elementary) i • 30-3 . 30 

German b (Intermediate) 3 -45-5 -45 

Spanish 3.45-5.45 

*Italian 3 • 45-5 • 45 

Thursday, January 18 and June 20 

Latin N R 4 (Cicero — Manilian Law and Archias, and 

Sight Translation of Prose) 9-1 1 

fLatin c (Cicero) g-i i 

fLatin a (Grammar and Elementary Prose Composition). 11 . 1 5-1 a .30 

*Shopwork (Written) i . 30-3 

Latin N R S (Vergil — ^neid I, II, and IV or VI, and 

Sight Translation of Poetry) i .30-3 -30 

fLatin d (Vergil) i . 30-3 • 3© 

French b (Intermediate) 3 -45-5 -45 

* Not offered in June. 

fThe old requirements in Latin may not be offered for admission after February, I5)ii. 



1 82 SUBMISSION OF NOTE-BOOKS^ ETC. 

Friday, January ig and June 21 

English a (Reading and Practice) 9-1 1 

Latin N R 6 (Advanced Prose Composition) 11 . 15- 12 .30 

fLatin I (Prose Composition) 11 .15-12 . 30 

English h (Study and Practice) i . 30-3 . 30 

Chemistry 3 -45-5 -45 

Physiography 3 -45-5 -45 

Greek c (Homer's Iliad, Books I-III) 3 . 45-5 . 45 

Music h (Harmony) 3 -45-5 -45 

Saturday, January 20 and June 22 

Greek h (Xenophon's Anabasis) 9-1 1 

Drawing 9-1 1 

Mathematics h (Advanced Algebra) 9-1 1 

Greek a (Grammar and Elementary Prose Composition) 11-12.30 

Mathematics / (Plane Trigonometry) i . 30-3 . 30 

Greek g (Sight Translation of Prose) i . 30-3 . 30 

Greek / (Prose Composition) 3 . 45-5 • ^ 5 

Music a (Appreciation) 3 . 45-5 • 45 

Monday, January 22 

♦Advanced English 9-12 

♦Advanced Greek 9-12 

♦Shopwork (Laboratory) 10-12 

♦Advanced Latin 1-4 

♦Advanced History 1-4 

SUBMISSION OF NOTE-BOOKS, DRAWINGS, ETC. 

All work submitted must be duly certified to in ink by the teacher 
in the following form: 

"I certify that this is a true and original record of work actually 

performed by while in attendance at during 

the year 19 

Instructor in 

Drawings should bear a similar certification, or in case of work 
not done under instruction should be accompanied by the candidate's 
own signed declaration. 

All note-books unless otherwise specified should be submitted at 
the time for examination. Candidates desiring their return should 
apply to the Chairman of the Committee on Admissions. 

* Not offered in June. 

■j"The old requirements in Latin may not be offered for admission after February, 
1911. 



DEFINITIONS OF REQUIREMENTS 183 

English exercise books, submitted in lieu of examination, Ad- 
vanced English essays, or Advanced History note-books, should be 
sent to the Secretary of the University at least two weeks before the 
examinations begin. Within ten days the candidate will be informed 
whether or not the work submitted has been accepted. English 
exercise books will not be returned to the writers. All note-books 
uncalled for one year from the date of submission will be destroyed. 

Admission to Advanced and Special Standing 

(See Faculty Statements, page 194 et seq.) 

DEFINITIONS OF REQUIREMENTS 

(Specimens of the question papers set by Columbia University are 
on file in the University Library or may be obtained from the Chair- 
man of the Committee on Undergraduate Admissions upon applica- 
tion. The question papers set by the College Entrance Examination 
Board are published annually in book form by Ginn & Company, 
Nev/ York.) 

The following abridged statements are intended merely to indicate 
the general scope of the requirements. The official definition of each 
requirement is printed in full in the Bulletin of Entrance Examinations 
and Admission, and any person who intends to take the examinations 
himself or to prepare others for them should procure this Bulletin. 

Botany* (One unit), (i) Structure and life history of 16 or more 
types of representative families of plants, 10 of them seed plants. 
(2) Elementary plant physiology. (3) Elementary natural 
history (ecology of plants). Requiring one year of laboratory 
and class-room instruction, for the course. 

Chemistry « (One unit). Preparation and properties of the common 
elements and their important compounds. 

Mastery of the more usual chemical terms and ability to make 
simple calculations and explanations of chemical processes. 
Preparation should include lectures and demonstrations, study 
of standard elementary text-books, and forty or more laboratory 
exercises. 

Drawing » (One unit). The ability to sketch free-hand with 
reasonable accuracy — (a) From dictation: Simple geometrical 
figures; (b) From the object: A vase, household utensil, or other 
familiar object; (c) From the copy: Enlarging or reducing simple 
pieces of machinery or architectural or decorative detail. (At 
Je^st 20 freehand drawings must be submitted.) 

) ^ certified and indexed note-book must be submitted (see p. 182). 



1 84 DEFINITIONS OF REQUIREMENTS 

English (Tliree units), (a) Reading and Practice (this part of the 
test may be fulfilled in whole or in part by an exercise book). 
(See page 182.) A test of training in English composition. A 
list of the books prescribed for reading appears in the Bulletin. 
(b) Study and Practice. The subject-matter, form, and structure 
of certain specified works, and incidentally English grammar 
and English literary history. Prescribed for 1912: Macbeth; 
L'AUegro and II Penseroso; or Tennyson's Goreth and Lynette; 
Launcelot and Elaine; and the Passing of Arthur; Burke on Concili- 
ation, or Washington's Farewell Address and Webster's First 
Bunker Hill Oration; Macaulay's Life of Johnson, or Carlyle's 
Essay on Burns. (For succeeding years see Bulletin.) 

English, Advanced (One unit). Candidates must have covered 
substantially the same ground as that included under English 
A1-A2 (seepage 104). (i) English composition, presupposing the 
elements of rhetoric. (2) General history of English literature, 
and selected works (a list of which may be obtained from the 
Secretary of the University). Ten essays of at least 500 words 
each must also be submitted. (See p. 182.) 

French, Elementary (Two units). Accurate pronunciation and 
the ability to read at sight easy prose and to put into French 
simple English sentences. The rudiments of the grammar, in- 
volving all but the rare irregular verb forms and the simpler uses 
of conditional and subjunctive. The preparation should include, 
beside the mastery of a good elementary text-book, the reading 
of 300-600 pp. of easy French." 

French, Intermediate (One unit). Additional reading, 400-600 pp. 
including dramatic works. Grammar completed. Further drill 
in composition. 

German, Elementary (Two units). Accurate pronunciation and the 
ability to read easy dialogue and narrative prose, and a working 
knowledge of grammar and composition adequate for the putting 
into German of simple English sentences based upon a familiar 
vocabulary. The preparation should include, beside the mastery 
of a good elementary text-book, the reading of 150-200 pp. of 
easy German.* 

German, Intermediate (One unit). Additional reading, 400 pp. of 
moderately difficult prose and poetry. Further drill in grammar 
and composition, with special reference to syntax. 

1 A list of the reading recommended will be found in the Bulletin. 



DEFINITIONS OF REQUIREMENTS 185 

Greek, Elementary (Three units), (a) i and 2. — Attic grammar 
and elementary composition, based on Anabasis I-II. (b) 
Anabasis I-IV. (c) Iliad I-III (except II, 494-end) with tests 
concerning constructions, poetic forms, and prosody, (f) Trans- 
lation into Greek of simple continuous English prose, (g) Trans- 
lation into English at sight of continuous Greek prose. 

Greek, Advanced (One unit). Candidates must have covered substan- 
tially the same ground as that included under Greek 3-4 (see p. 
83): at least 1200 additional lines in Homer, Herodotus, Bk. vi., 
and Plato's Apology. » Also at least fifteen exercises in Spieker's 
Greek Prose Composition. 

History, Elementary (Each of the four divisions a, b, c, and d counts 
one unit. Candidates for admission to the Schools of Mines, 
Engineering, and Chemistry may offer one or more of the di- 
visions without restriction. All other candidates may offer 
any one or any two of the divisions without restriction), (a) 
Ancient, beginning with brief study of Oriental peoples and com- 
ing down to the death of Charlemagne, with reference to art, lit- 
erature, and government, (b) From 800 on including growth of 
the State system, (c) English history, including social and politi- 
cal developments, (d) American history with the elements of 
civil government. 

Each field may best be covered by an accurate text-book of 
300 pp. plus, say, 300 pp. of selected supplementary reading. 

History, Advanced ' (One unit). (Candidates must have offered for 
elementary history either a and b or c and d. and must present 
themselves for examination upon the two divisions which they did 
not offer as an elementary subject.) The work performed must 
have been of the same kind, amount, and quality as that required 
for History A1-A2 (see page 118). Supplementary reading empha- 
sizing the significance of historical phenomena. The candidate 
must present at least 5000 words of notes on each historical field 
offered, and show practice in making historical parallels in pre- 
paring digests of outside reading, and in the vise of historical 
maps. 

Italian, Elementary (Two units). The requirement corresponds to 
that m Elementary French (see p. 165). 

Latin Elementary (Pour units) i.e., NR 4, NR 5, and NR 6; or two units, 
i.e., NR I, NR 2, and NR 4 or NR 5, or, except for Columbia College, 

* For information concerning possible substitutions, see BuUelin. 
2 A certified note-book must be submitted (see p. X82). 



1 86 DEFINITIONS OF REQUIREMENTS 

Barnard College, and the Schools of Music and Design (courses leading 
to a certificate in Music or Design) NR 3, NR i, Grammar; NR 2, 
Elementary prose composition; NR 3, Second year Latin (Cssar 
and Nepos); NR 4, Cicero and sight translation of prose; NR 5, 
Vergil and sight translation of poetry; NR 6, Advanced prose com- 
position. ^ 

Latin, Advanced (One unit). Candidates must have covered substan- 
tially the same ground as that included under Latin A1-A2 (see 
page 83). Horace, Odes, Bks. I and III, with incidental prosody, 
and Livy, Bk. XXI and Chapters 41-53, Bk. XXII» (or, for 
Barnard College, Vergil, Eclogues, and Ovid, selections). Fifteen 
exercises from Part I and ten from Part II of Gildersleeve and 
Lodge's Prose Composition. 

Mathematics, Elementary (Two and one-half units), (a) Elementary 
algebra, including — i, the four fundamental operations for rational 
expressions, and such topics as lowest common multiple, ratio 
and proportion, linear equations, radicals, fractional and negative 
exponents; ii, quadratic equations, arithmetic and geometric 
progressions, the binomial theorem for positive integral exponents, 
the use of graphical methods. (c) Plane geometry — original 
sxercises, loci, mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. 

Mathematics, Advanced (One-half to one and one-half units), (b) Ad- 
vanced Algebra (One half -unit): Permutations and combinations, 
complex numbers, determinants, numerical equations of higher degree, 
theory of equations, graphical methods, Descartes's rule of signs, and 
Horner's method, (d) Solid geometry (One half -unit): Original 
exercises , loci problems , mensuration of surfaces and solids . (e) Trigo- 
nometry (One half-unit): The principal formulas, simple equations 
and triangles, theory and use of logarithms (without infinite series). 
Candidates for admission to the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and 
Chemistry and for the School of Architecture must offer solid geometry 
and plane trigonometry. 

Music. Note — A candidate for admission to Columbia College may 
offer either a or b. A candidate for admission to the School of 
Music (courses leading to a certificate in Music) may offer either 
a or b or both — ^with or without the addition of Musical Per- 
formance. 

'For old requirement alternative to the new In February, 191 2, and discontinued 
.after that date, see Bulletin of Entrance Examinations and Admission. 
' For Information as to possible sybstit^tiong, see Bulletin. 



DEFINITIONS OF REQUIREMENT'S 1 87 

(a) Musical Appreciation (not involving ability to perform 
nor to read from printed music) (One unit), (i) The principal 
musical forms and their historical development; (2) the lives 
and environment of Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, and 
Chopin, and five other composers; (3) familiarity with certain 
compositions designated in Bulletin. 

(b) Harmony (One unit). The elements of simple harmo- 
nization. 

(c) Musical Performance (Two units). The candidate should 
communicate with the School of Music regarding this require- 
ment. 

Physics » (One unit). The most important facts and laws in ele- 
mentary physics. Preparation should include the mastery of a 
standard text-book supplemented by numerical problems, in- 
struction by lecture with demonstrations and individual labora- 
tory exercises — say, mechanics, 13; sound, 3; heat, 5; light, 6; 
electricity, 8. 

Physiography » (One unit). Preparation includes modern text-books 
and at least forty individual laboratory and field exercises — say, 
earth as a globe, 5 ; ocean, 5 ; atmosphere, 12 ; land, 18. 

Shopwork (One unit). Involving in each subject 180 laboratory 
hours, examination, both written and practical, on the use and 
structure of tools, nature of shop processes, methods of construc- 
tion, and properties of materials. Authenticated models may be 
presented as evidence of technical skill. 

The candidate may offer either (a) Woodwork — i, joinery; 
ii, turning and pattemmaking, or (b) Forging, or (c) Machine- 
work. 

Spanish, Elementary (Two units). The requirements correspond 
to those in elementary French, see page 165. 

Zoology (One unit). Laboratory and field study, supplemented 
by text-book and further reading, (i) General natural history 
of common American animal types. (2) Classification of animals 
into phyla and leading classes. (3) Structure of typical animals — 
say, frog or fish, decapod, earthworm, hydra, protozoon. (4) 
Physiology of the types studied and comparison of life-processes 
of animals and plants. (5 and 6) (in a very elementary way) 
Reproduction, embryology, and (optional) elements of cytology. 
(7) (optional) biological history. 

* A certified note-book must be submitted (see p. 182). 

2 This is identical withi the subject called Geography by the College Entrance 
Examination Board. 



REGULATIONS FOR THE DEGREES OF 
MASTER OF ARTS AND DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Note. — Attention is particularly called to the new regulations for the Masters' degree 

as given in the Announcement of like Faculties of Political Science 

Philosophy, and Pure Science. 

1 . Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Phi- 
losophy known as the Higher Degrees must hold a baccalaureate de- 
gree in arts, letters, philosophy, or science, or an engineering degree, 
or have an education equivalent to that represented by one of these 
degrees, such equivalence to be passed upon in every case by the 
Executive Committee of the University Council. 

Each candidate for a higher degree must present to the Dean 
satisfactory evidence that he is qualified for the studies he desires to 
undertake. 

2. Candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of 
Philosophy must pursue their studies in residence for a minimum 
period of one and two years, respectively.' The year spent in study 
for the former is credited on account of the requirement for the latter. 
Residence at other universities may be credited to a candidate. In 
certain cases and by special arrangement, time exclusively devoted 
to investigation in the field will be credited in partial fulfilment of 
the requirement of residence. No degree will be conferred upon any 
student who has not been in residence at Columbia University as a 
graduate student for at least one year. The satisfactory completion 
of work at four consecutive Summer Sessions or two consecutive Sum- 
mer Sessions together with the half-year preceding, intervening, or im- 
mediately following, will be accepted as fulfilling the minimum require- 
ment of one year's university residence for the degree of Master of Arts. 

3. Each student who declares himself a candidate for a higher de- 
gree shall designate one principal or major subject and two sub- 
ordinate or minor subjects. 

Candidates are expected to devote about one-half of their time 
throughout their course of study to the major subject, and about one- 
quarter to each minor subject. 

Except by vote of the Executive Committee of the University 
Council upon the recommendation of the Dean and the head of the 

•In practice three years of university residence subsequent to the attainment of 
the Bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, are usually necessary to obtain the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. 

188 



REGULATIONS FOR TEE UNIVERSITY DEGREES 189 

department concerned, no candidate may choose his major and both 
minor subjects under one department. 

Major and minor subjects may not be changed except by permission 
of the Dean, on the approval of the heads of the departments concerned. 

Both the professor in charge of the major subject and the Dean 
must pass upon the student's qualifications for the course of study 
he desires to pursue, and approve his choice of subjects before regis- 
tration can be effected. 

4. The subjects from which the candidate's selection must be made 



Under the Faculty op Political Science 

Group I. — History and political philosophy : (i) Ancient and orien- 
tal history; (2) mediaeval history and church history; (3) modern 
European history from the opening of the i6th century; (4) American 
history; (5) political philosophy. 

Group II. — Public law and comparative jurisprudence: (i) Consti- 
tutional law; (2) international law; (3) administrative law; (4) Roman 
law and comparative jurisprudence. 

Group III. — Economics and social science: (i) Political economy 
and finance; (2) sociology and statistics; (3) social economy. 

In his choice of subjects under this Faculty, the candidate whose 
major subject lies within its jurisdiction is limited by the following 
rules : 

A candidate for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy 
must select one minor subject outside of the group which includes 
his major subject. 

A candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must select one 
minor subject within the group which includes his major subject. 

The candidate for the degree of Master of Arts must take, in each 
subject, courses occupying at least two hours weekly throughout one 
year. In his major subject he must also attend a Seminar. 

The candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must take, in 
his major subject, courses occupying at least four hours weekly duri];ig 
each required year of residence (provided that this number of hours 
be offered in the subject), and must also attend a Seminar during the 
period of residence. In each minor subject he must take courses 
occupying at least two hours weekly during each required year of 
residence. 

Under the Faculty of Philosophy 

I. Major Subjects: (i) Philosophy; (2) psychology; (3) anthropology; 
(4) education; (5) linguistics; (6) comparative literature; (7) classical 



190 REGULATIONS FOR THE UNIVERSITY DEGREES 

archeeology and epigraphy; (8) Greek language and literature, and, 
incidentally, Grecian history; (9) Latin language and literature, and, 
incidentally, Roman history; and the following, including in each 
case the study of both the language and the literature: (10) English; 

(11) Germanic; (12) Romance; (13) Sanskrit (with Pall) and Iranian; 
(14) Semitic languages; (15) Chinese. Nos. i, 2, 3, 4, 6, 10, 11, 12, 13, 
14, and 15 may each be offered as the equivalent of a major and one 
minor subject. 

II. Minor Subjects: (i) Philosophy; (2) psychology; (3) anthro- 
pology; (4) education; (5) linguistics; (6) comparative literature; (7) 
Greek; (8) Greek archaeology; (9) Latin; (10) Roman archaeology; 
(n) Sanskrit; (12) Iranian; (13) English; (14) Anglo-Saxon; (15) 
Gothic; (16) Germanic philology; (17) German language and litera- 
ture; (18) Scandinavian languages and literatures; (19) Romance 
philology; (20) French language and literature; (21) Spanish language 
and literature; (22) Italian language and literature; (23) Hebrew; 
(24) Arabic; (25) Assyrian; (26) Syriac; (27) Ethiopic; (28) Semitic 
epigraphy; (29) Turkish; (30) Armenian; (31) Chinese; (32) Coptic; 
(33) Celtic; (34) comparative religion. 

A candidate for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy 
may, with the consent of the Dean and of the heads of the departments 
concerned, select both minor subjects within the same department, 
and may divide a minor subject, taking parts of two subjects germane 
to his major subject. 

Under the Faculty of Pure Science 

(i) Anatomy; (2) astronomy; (3) bacteriology; (4) botany; (5) bio- 
logical chemistry; (6) chemistry; (7) civil and sanitary engineering; 
(8) electrical engineering; (9) geodesy; (10) geology; (11) mathematics; 

(12) mechanical engineering; (13) mechanics and electro-mechanics; 
(14) metallurgy; (15) mineralogy; (16) mining; (17) paleontology; 
(18) pathology; (19) physics; (20) physiology; (21) zoology. 

With the consent of the Dean, the major and one minor subject may 
be taken under one department. Both minor subjects may not be 
taken under one department without the consent of the Faculty. 

5. Each student is given a registration-book in which to keep the 
record of courses attended. At the beginning and end of each course 
the professor in charge certifies the student's attendance by his signa- 
ture. Before presenting himself for examination for any degi'ee, the 
student shall submit his registration-book to the Dean in order that 
the Dean may satisfy himself that the required minimum number of 
courses has been attended. 

6. Each candidate for the degree of Master of Arts is required 
to present an essay on some topic previously approved by the 



REGULATIONS FOR THE UNIVERSITY DEGREES 191 

professor in charge of his major subject. The Faculty of Political 
Science requires this essay to be a paper read during the year before 
the Seminar of which the candidate is a member. 

When the essay has been approved, the candidate is required to file 
with the Registrar two legibly written or typewritten copies on firm, 
strong paper, eleven by eight-and-a-half inches in size with an inner 
margin of one-and-a-half inches. The title-page shall contain the words : 
"Submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Degree of 
Master of Arts, in the Faculty of , Columbia University. " 

7. Diplomas are issued on Commencement day, on the third Tuesday 
in October, and on the third Tuesday in February. Corresponding to 
these dates, respectively, applications for examination for the degree of 
Master of Arts must be filed with the Registrar by April 15, July 15, and 
December 15. The application should be accompanied by the completed 
essay required for the degree. Extension of time for the completion of the 
essay may be granted only by the Dean of the Graduate Faculties, or 
(in July) by the Director of the Summer Session, A candidate must have 
such general knowledge of his principal subje«t, apart from the satisfactory 
completion of particular numbered courses, as may be deemed necessary 
by the department concerned. 

Applications for the oral examination for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy must be filed with the Registrar at least two months be- 
fore one of the three dates at which diplomas are issued (viz., October, 
February, and June) in order to secure examination before that date. 

8. Each candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy shall pre- 
sent a dissertation embodying the results of original investigation and 
research on some topic previously approved by the professor in charge 
of the major subject. When such dissertation has been approved, it 
shall be printed by the candidate, and thirty copies shall be delivered 
to the Registrar. On the title-page of every such dissertation shall 
be printed the words: "Submitted in partial fulfilment of the re- 
quirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy, in the Faculty 
of , Columbia University. " 

Each dissertation shall contain upon its title-page the full name of 
the author; the full title of the dissertation; the year and place of imprint, 
and, if a reprint, the title, volume, and pagination of the publication from 
which it was reprinted; and there shall be printed and appended to each 
dissertation, in the form of a Vita, a statement of the place and date of 
birth of the author, of the educational institutions that he has attended, 
and a list of the degrees and honors conferred upon him, as well as the 
titles of his previous publications. 

g. No candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy is admitted 
to examination except on the recommendation of the professor who 
has approved the topic selected for the dissertation, indorsed by the 



192 REGULATIONS FOR THE UNIVERSITY DEGREES 

professors in charge of the major and minor subjects. Every candidate 
must pass, besides such otlier examinations as the Faculty in charge 
of the major subject may require, an oral examination on all three 
subjects, and must defend the dissertation in the presence of that 
Faculty, or of so many of its members as may desire or as may be 
designated to attend. 

In the Faculty of Political Science, the examination on the major 
and minor subjects and on languages, but not on the dissertation 
itself, may be held before the printed dissertation is submitted. 

In the Faculties of Philosophy and Pure Science, the disserta- 
tion is not required to be printed until after the examination of the 
candidate. 

The general examination for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy 
will not be confined to the courses which the candidate has attended 
in Columbia University or elsewhere, or even to the field covered by 
such courses. The candidate is expected to show a satisfactory grasp 
of his major subject as a whole and a general acquaintance with the 
broader field of knowledge of which this subject forms a part. 

The ability to read at sight French and German, to be certified in 
each case by the Dean, is required by all the Faculties. 

In the Faculty of Political Science, the candidate must also show 
that he is able to read ordinary Latin, unless it shall have been pre- 
viously certified by the professor, or professors, in charge of the major 
subject that ability to use this language is not necessary for the proper 
prosecution of the candidate's researches. On application to the 
Dean, the candidate may be examined on the required languages one 
year before presenting himself for the general examination on his 
major and minor subjects. If no such application be made, he will 
be examined on the languages in connection with the general examina- 
tion on these subjects. 

In the Faculty of Philosophy, admission as a regular student or as a 
candidate for the degree of Master of Arts does not admit to candidacy 
for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Only those students are ad- 
mitted to candidacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy who (i) are 
recommended for such candidacy by the heads of the departments in 
which their major and minor subjects of study lie; (2) are certified 
as to their ability to read French and German by the heads of those 
departments; (3) are certified as to their ability to read Latin by 
the head of that department, provided that students whose major 
subject is psychology, anthropology, or education, shall not be re- 
quired to meet this test when it is certified by the professor in charge 
of their major subject that an ability to read Latin is not necessary for 
the proper prosecution of their researches. The examinations in Latin, 
French, and German shall be passed at least one academic year before 
the candidate presents himself for the degree. 



REGULATIONS FOR THE UNIVERSITY DEGREES 193 

10. Students holding the required first degree who are primarily 
registered in a professional school of Columbia University, or in an 
allied professional school, may be registered as candidates for the 
higher degrees in the Faculty of PoHtical Science, the Faculty of 
Philosophy, or the Faculty of Pure Science. In such a case the candi- 
date must take his major subject under one of these Faculties, and 
must conform to all its rules as regards examinations, essay, and disser- 
tation; but he may offer, as the equivalent of the two mmor subjects, 
such of his professional courses as may be approved for that purpose 
by the Dean of the Graduate Faculties. 

11. No student may continue to be a candidate for the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy for a longer period than three years from the 
time he ceases to be in residence, nor for a longer period than six years 
from the time of his initial registration for a higher degree. 

MASTER OF LAWS 

Any student who has satisfactorily completed a three-year course of 
study in Columbia College, or in any other approved college or scientific 
school, and who has also satisfactorily completed a three-year course of 
study in the School of Law of Columbia University, or in any other 
approved law school, or who has otherwise obtained a substantially 
equivalent preliminary training, may obtain the degree of Master of Laws, 
after one year of residence in Columbia University, on the satisfactory 
completion of a course of study under the Faculties of Law and Political 
Science. Further information may be obtained from the Dean of either 
of these Faculties. 



COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

The Faculty 

The President of the University- 
Dean Keppel 
Term expires IQ12: Professors Calkins, Cohn, Curtis, Egbert, 

Farrand, Fite, GrovEj^Hervey, Jacob y, Kemp, Loiseaux, Lord, S. A. 

Mitchell, Odell, Perry, Thomas 

Term expires ipij : Professors Davis, Erskine, Hawkes, Hayes, 

Jones, Lockwood, Maclay, Mason, F. G, Moore, Seager, Shepherd, 

woodbridge,^ wood worth, young 

Term expires IQ14: Professors Agger, Beard, Dunning, Fiske, 

Fontaine, Jordan, Keyser, McCrea, McGregor, Meylan, H. B. 

Mitchell, Schuyler, Seligman,' Shotwell, Alexander Smith, Tassin 

Officers of the Faculty 

Mr. Keppel Dean and ex-officio Member of the University Council 

Professor S. A. Mitchell Secretary 

Professor Thomas (Term expires 1913) ) Elected Delegates to 

Professor Lord (Term expires 1914) ) University Council 

Standing Committees 

On Instruction: The Dean, chairman. Professors Kemp, Thomas, 
Young, H. B. Mitchell, Beard, and Erskine 

On Scholarships: The Dean, chairman, Professors Hawkes and 
Lockwood 

ADMISSION 

To the Freshman Class 
(See page 176) 

Advanced Standing 

A candidate for admission to advanced standing upon the basis of 
work done at other colleges should obtain and file, at least one week be- 
fore the September or January entrance examinations, the appropriate 
application blank, with a transcript of his academic record, and a marked 
catalogue of the institution that he leaves. 

^ Absent on leave firstShalf -year. * Absent on leave second half-year. 

194 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES I95 

Appropriate credits up to a maximum of 18 points of the 124 required 
may be made by students who offer more than the prescribed number of 
units at entrance. 

Special Coiirses 

Students of serious purpose who are in a position to fulfil the require- 
ments for admission to the Freshman class or who have had a valuable 
educative experience in practical life, may be admitted as non-matriculated 
students to pursue courses without reference to any degree. For details 
see the current Announcement of Columbia College. 

Probation 

Every Freshman admitted conditionally will be held under probation 
during the first half-year of residence, and the character of his work during 
that period will determine whether, at its close, he shall be admitted to full 
standing, have his period of probation extended, or be dropped from the roll. 

An entrance condition in any subject may be removed by the mark 
of C, B, or A, in an appropriately related college course. All entrance 
conditions must be removed within one year. 

Registration and Fees 

(See page 142) 

Scholarships 

(See page 432) 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

The period within which the requirements for the degree of A.B. or 
B.S. may be satisfied varies with the capability and industry of the 
individual student. In most cases four years are spent in making the 
required number of points; students of ability and industry frequently 
complete the course in less time, especially if advantage be taken of courses 
in the Summer Session, or additional credit be gained by high standing; 
no student may spend more than six years as a candidate for a degree. 

The following rules must be observed. Exceptions under rules 3-7 
may be made by the Dean on recommendation of the Committee on 
Instruction. 

1. The requirement for graduation is 124 points, the term "point" 
signifying the satisfactory completion of work requiring attendance 
one hour a week for one half-year, laboratory hours counting one-half. 

2. When practicable, prescribed subjects must be taken during the first 
two years. 

3. No combination of courses amounting to less than 12 or more 
than 19 points may be made in any half-year. 



196 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

4. Prior to graduation the student must have completed the equivalent 
of three years of sequential study, in courses aggregating at least 18 
points beyond the elementary requirement for admission, in each of two 
departments. 

For A.B. candidates at least one sequence must be in Classical Phi- 
lology, English, Germanic Languages and Literatures, History, Philosophy, 
or Romance Languages and Literatures; and for B.S. candidates at least 
one in Botany, Chemistry, Geology and Mineralogy, Mathematics, Physics, 
or Zoology. 

5. Admission to courses depends strictly upon completion of the stated 
prerequisites. Where none is stated the course may be taken and 
counted for a degree by any student of the College. 

6. A student whose record as to prescribed subjects is satisfactory to 
the Committee on Instruction, is permitted upon completion of 64 points 
to elect one, and on completion of 94 points to elect two graduate courses 
which his previous training will enable him to pursue with profit. 

7. No student may take more than four hours' work (not including 
laboratory work) on the same day, or more than nine hours' work 
per week in any one department. 

8. No one-hour course will be allowed unless taken in connection 
with or as a supplement to a cognate course. 

9. To be recommended for a degree, a student must have made at 
least 84 points in actual college residence and of these at least 24 in 
Columbia College. (The Faculty has power to suspend this rule in 
individual cases; but a Statute of the University forbids the granting 
of a degree to any person who has not been a member of the Univer- 
sity for a full academic year, i. e., two half-years.) 

Program of Studies for a Degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science with Honors 

1. Conditions of candidacy. Any student free from entrance con- 
ditions may, with the approval of the Committee on Instruction, elect 
to study for a degree with honors and pursue a curriculum involving less 
prescribed work but more independent reading and more thorough study 
in chosen subjects than are required of the general candidates for a degree. 
Such students are listed as "Candidates for a degree with honors," so 
long as they maintain honor standing; other students are Usted as "Can- 
didates for a degree." 

2. The choice of honor subjects. While it may, in appropriate cases, 
be made at a later date, the choice between the honor curriculum and 
the general curriculum is ordinarily to be made not later than April 15 
of the Freshman year. 

The candidate shall then choose one department in which he will oflEer 
honor work and shall be assigned to a representative of that department 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES 1 97 

who shall thereafter act as his Faculty Adviser. In consultation with 
this Adviser the student shall elect, as he prefers, either one or two other 
sequential series of honor courses (see Rule 4, page 196), arrange a schedule 
of studies for the coming year, and submit the same for the approval of 
the Committee on Instruction not later than May i. 

3. The honor sequences. The granting of honors is dependent upon the 
completion with high standing of two or three approved three- year sequences 
together with such supplementary reading as may be required in connec- 
tion therewith, and upon the candidate's performance in a final general 
examination covering the entire field of his honor work. 

4. In the first year no extra work is required of the candidate for 
honors and no extra credit is given. In the second and the third years, 
the candidate is assigned supplementary reading, and provision is made 
for guiding this reading through personal conference or pro-seminars. 
In each subject an additional credit of two points each term is allowed for 
this supplementary reading when satisfactorily completed. 

The attainment of an honor grade in the final 'general examination 
(see paragraph 7) entitles the student to an extra credit of four points for 
each sequence of courses. 

5. Prescribed courses. The candidate for a degree with honors is 
relieved from much of the work prescribed for other students and in the 
case of students offering three honor sequences the following courses only 
are definitely prescribed: English A, History A, Mathematics A, Physical 
Education; and also Latin A or Greek 3-4, for A.B. candidates only; French 
A and B or German A and B, for B.S. candidates only. 

Candidates offering but two honor sequences are expected to complete all 
the prescribed courses as given on page 198, or their substantial equivalent. 

6. Standing required of honor men. If at the end of any term exami- 
nation a student fail in two of his honor subjects to attain a grade of A 
or B, he is rejected as a candidate for honors and given appropriate credit 
toward an ordinary degree. 

7. Final examination for honors. Upon the attainment of 112 points 
of College credit, including the satisfactory completion of the three honor 
sequences, the candidate is given a final general examination in each of 
his three subjects. These examinations cover the class-room work of the 
three years, and test the extent and thoroughness of the assigned supple- 
mentary reading. A grade of A in all subjects entitles the candidate to 
receive a Bachelor's degree with highest honors. A combination of A's 
and B's entitles him to a degree "with high honors," and uniform grades 
of B to a degree "with honors." A candidate failing to win honors 
at his final general examination may be given appropriate credit towards 
an ordinary degree. 

8. The time required for the attainment of a degree with honors. If a 
candidate chooses three honor sequences in subjects in which he presented 
the full entrance offering and which he pursued in his Freshman year, 



198 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

it is possible for him to attain a degree with honors in three years of Col- 
lege residence, without attending the Summer Session, but using the 
vacation for honor reading. Other candidates will require four years. 

By remaining in residence four years the candidate may concentrate 
the general courses in the Freshman and Sophomore years, and devote 
his entire time as Junior and Senior to the pursuit of his honor study. 
This course is recommended wherever practicable. 

9. Honors as a preparation for professional study. Students looking 
forward to entering upon the study of a profession will find in the appro- 
priate honor courses the most thorough preparation for their later work; 
and the opportunity which is offered to obtain a Bachelor's degree with 
honors in three years preserves to the candidate for honors the advan- 
tages of the combined collegiate and professional course. 

Program of Studies for the Degree of A.B. or B.S. 

Unless the equivalents have been offered for admission, the following 
courses, counting in points as indicated, are prescribed for students who 
are candidates for a degree but not for honors: 

English A and B (10) ; History A (6) ; French or German, A and B (12) ; 
Mathematics A (6); Philosophy A (6); Physical Education (2 or 4). 

For A.B. candidates. Latin A or Greek 3-4 (6); two half-year courses 
in Natural Science (6) minimum. 

For B.S. candidates. Chemistry A and Physics A (16). 

The prescription with regard to two sequential courses of study must 
also be met, see Rule 4, page 196. 

In general it is advisable for a student intending to spend four years 
in College residence to postpone History A to the second year, and 
Philosophy A to the second or third year. 

Options in the Professional Schools 

A student desiring to enter upon professional studies before graduation 
from the College, who has completed not less than 64 points in Columbia 
College' and with no deficiencies in prescribed work, may exercise one of the 
following options : 

(a) Upon receiving 72 points' credit he may take the studies of the first 
year in any one of the following professional schools of the University, 
provided he can satisfy the stated requirements for admission thereto, 
and may receive the degree of A.B. or B.S. upon the satisfactory 
completion of two years' work in such professional course: 
The Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry 
The College of Physicians and Surgeons 
The Schools of Fine Arts (Architecture and Music) 

1 In exceptional cases, students of high scholarship who have completed two years 
of College work elsewhere may satisfy the residence requirement by the completion of 
34 points, not including Summer Session or Extension Teaching. 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES 1 99 

(6) Upon receiving 94 points credit he may similarly take and count 

towards the bachelor's degree one year's work in any of the above 

schools and also in the School of Law or as a candidate for a diploma 

in teaching in Teachers College.^ 

It should be noted that in general no course for which credit is given 

toward a professional degree may be included in the preliminary credit 

requirement. 

Additional Options 

In addition to the professional options outlined above, the sttidents of 
the College may become candidates for the certificate of preparation for 
foreign service. See page (281). 

They may also under suitable circumstances offer toward the' Bachelor's 
degree courses given at the Union Theological Seminary or the General 
Theological Seminary, or if they are within twelve points of receiving the 
Bachelor's degree, they may take certain graduate courses in addition to 
their undergraduate programs. 

Additional Credit for High Standing 

At the end of every half-year additional credit for high standing is 
given as follows: 

The mark A in any two courses (no course being counted twice) 
entitles the student to one point of extra credit, provided he has not 
fallen below the mark B in any of the courses pursued by him during 
the half-year, other than Physical Education A and B, in which he 
must not have fallen below the grade of C. 

The student having made 94 points, including all prescribed work, may 
receive i or 2 extra credits under conditions of candidacy set forth in the 
Announcement, by earning a grade of A or B for an essay prepared 
in connection with the work of one or two graduate courses elected under 
the provisions of Rule 6. 

Choice of Studies 

For recommendations in regard to the choice of studies the reader 
is referred to the Announcement of Columbia College for IQII-12. 

Examinations in Course 

Two series of Stated Examinations are held in January and May (see 
Academic Calendar, page 488). 

Deficiency Examinations are held within the two weeks immediately 
preceding the opening of the College in the autumn; and, in addition, by 
special permission, during the first week in May. 

For details see Columbia College Announcement of ipii-12. 

^ Such candidates register and pay their fees in Teachers College and become subject 
to the educational control of its faculty. 



200 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Advice to Students 

All students admitted with conditions are assigned for advice to the 
Committee on Admissions until such time as their entrance deficiencies 
or conditions be removed. All candidates for honors are assigned for 
advice to a representative of the department in which they first elect 
honor work. All other students are assigned to the Dean of the College, 
or to such ofl&cer of instruction or administration as he may designate. 

Grades, Credit, and Reports 

The student's performance in a course is reported according to the 
following grades : A, excellent ; B, good ; C, fair ; D, poor ; F, failure. 
Grades A, B, C, and D pass a student in the course. 

A student who receives a mark of F in any prescribed course must 
repeat that course. In any half-year or Siunmer Session not more than 
one course, whether prescribed or elective, in which the student is marked 
D, may be counted toward a degree. 

Within three weeks after the close of an examination period a final 
report of standing for the half-year will be sent to the student, to 
his parent or guardian, and to his faculty adviser. The report will 
also indicate the number of points which the student has obtained 
to date and his deficiencies, if any, in entrance requirements and in 
prescribed courses Tentative reports are also made at mid-term. 

All petitions for changes in, or additions to, a student's record must 
be made within four months of the time at which the entry was made 
or should have been made. 

Classification of Students 

Matriculated students whose record as to entrance conditions and the 
completion of prescribed courses is satisfactory to the Committee on In- 
struction, are classified in the University Catalogue as follows: 

Freshmen, those who have less than 26 points. 
Sophomores, those who have completed 26 points. 
Juniors, those who have completed 58 points. 
Seniors, those who have completed 88 points. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Note. — Matriculated students are classified according to the regulations printed in 
the College Announcement for 1911-12. Under these regulations some students who 
will graduate in 1912 and 1913, respectively, are enrolled in the lower classes. 

SENIORS— CLASS OF 1912. 

DE ActJERO, Miguel E., Jr New York City 

Ahearn, Thomas James, Jr New York City 

Ahearn, William Daniel New York City 

Alley, James Burke Muskogee, Okla. 

Armstrong, Francis Tuttle Katonah, N. Y. 

Bachrach, Dudley Jerome New York City 

Bainton, William Lewis New York City 

Baker, Walter Ernest New York City 

Barker, Henry Morgan Newark, N. J. 

Barrett, Beach Bloomfield, N. J. 

Beard, James Thorn Scranton, Pa. 

Bernstein, Benjamin New York City 

Bosch, Ernest New York City 

Brenner, Arthur Bearns New York City 

Brill, Isidor C Portland, Ore. 

Broderick, Edward Vincent Yonkers, N. Y. 

Bullwinkel, Edward John New York City 

Bunzl, Julius Victor New York City 

Calahan, Harold Augustin New York City 

Carroll, Joseph William New York City 

Clyne, Herbert H New York City 

Coffin, Lewis Augustus, Jr New York City 

Conway, Joseph Aloysius New York City 

Corwin, Hilary Huntington, N. Y. 

Crouze, Albert P New York City 

Culman, Frederick New York City 

Cummings, Arthur Roland New York City 

Darlington, Gilbert S. B Harrisburg, Pa. 

Davis, Ausley George New York City 

Dingman, Norman McLeod Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Dinkelspiel, Leonard New York City 

DjEVAD, Eyoub Constantinople, Turkey 

Dwight, Ben Hunter Durant. Okla. 

Ebeling, William Bruno New York City 

Elsasser, Henry New York City 

Faas, Charles Thorne Great Neck, N. Y. 

Fairbairn, Russell Arnold New York City 

Feinsod, Elias New York City 

FiNLAYSON, Frank Lathrop New York City 

Forster, William W Yonkers, N. Y. 

201 



202 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Frank, Lawrence Kelso New York City 

Gerstle, Henry S New York City 

Gray, William Alexander New York City 

Griscom, Ludlow New York City 

Grunow, William Ranald Waterbury, Conn. 

Henle, James Henry New York City 

Herrlich, V/illiam New York City 

Heyman, David Melville New York City 

HoLzwoRTH, John M New York City 

Horton, Mark M , Whittier, Calif. 

Hunt, Horace H., A.B. Denison 1911 Granville, Ohio 

Iaason, Alfred Herbert New York City 

ISBELL, Orrin Castle New York City 

Jackson, Samuel L New York City 

Jacques, Henri C New York City 

Joseph, Pascal I New YorkiCity 

Kemp, James Taylor New York City 

Kerley, James Hoyt New York City 

Ketels, Luther Henry Newark, N. J. 

Knopf, Alfred A Lawrence, N. J. 

KoENiG, Egmont Louis Francis New York City 

KoPELOFF, Nicholas New York City 

Kunzman, Irving Plainfield, N. J. 

KwAN, Yan Cho Canton, China 

Levy, Joseph New York City 

LiFF, Joseph New York City 

Luhman, Chester New Rochelle. N. Y. 

McMackin, Frank Joseph Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mackey, Richard Joseph Jersey City, N. J, 

Mackintosh, James Jefferson Valley, N. Y. 

Macmahon, Arthur Whittier Lyndhurst, N. J. 

Maul, William Frederick New York City 

Maurer, George Lane New York City 

Maurice, Stewart Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Mayer, Max D New York City 

Meyer, Charles Harrison New York City 

MiNSKY, Herbert New York City 

Moore, Alexander Parks New York City 

Moses, Alfred Staunton Southport, Me. 

MOfarrij, Toufik Lebanon, Syria 

NoRDLiNGER, Henry Harold New York City 

Northrop, John Howard Yonkers, N. Y. 

Norton, Kenneth B New York City 

O'Flanagan, Edmond New York City 

O'SuLLivAN, Thomas Francis New York City 

Paddock, Eugene Hiram, Jr : New York City 

Park, Joseph Hendershot Port Murry, N. J. 

Paynter, Richard H., 30 New York City 

Peters, Andrew, Jr New York City 

Pitts, Alfred Leigh Valley Stream, N. Y. 

Podell, Jacob New York City 

Porter, Fitz John New York City 

Prox, Claus Carl Herrmann New York City 

PuLLEYN, John New York City 

Pyne, Warner Charles New York City 

Reynolds, Robert Jesse Potsdam, N. Y . 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 203 

RiEGEL, Guy Lebanon, Pa. 

ROGOW, Charles New York City 

RoTHENBERG, BENJAMIN New York City 

RoTHWELL, Austin Sherwood New York City 

RuNGE, Otto Ernst New York City 

Sanders, Theodore Michael New York City 

Sapiro, David New York City 

Saxe, William Vogel New York City 

Schechter, Frank New York City 

Scratchley, George Kenner Salina, Kan. 

Selig, Solomon New York City 

Shears, Lambert A New York City 

Shirley, Amos Reginald New York City 

Shrewsbury, William New York^City 

SiEMON, William S Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

SiFF, Albert Leon New York City 

Smale, William P., Jr New York City 

Smallheiser, Albert Lee New York City 

Smith, Allan Hamilton Kingston, N. Y. 

Smith, Augustus C, Jr New York City 

Smith, Wesley L Baldwin, N. Y. 

Stearns, Wilbur Watkins Yonkers, N. Y. 

Strang, Benjamin Bergen New York '"ity 

Sturtevant, Alfred Henry Kushla, Ala. 

Swain, Joseph Ward Dillon, Mont. 

SWAZEY, Edward Scott San Antonio, Tex. 

Thurlow, Lewis Kelmond, Jr New York City 

Trimble, Rufus James New York City 

Watson, Thomas H., Jr New York City 

Whitlock, Bache McE New York City 

WiMMER, John Davidson Minden, Neb. 

Wolf, Morris Philadelphia, Pa. 

WooDWELL, Carolus S Pomona, Fla. 

Yates, Miles Lowell Ilion, N. Y. 

Young, Ralph Howard Newport, R. I. 

Younger, David H Newark, N. J. 

Zoller, Harold New York City 

[133] 

JUNIORS— CLASS OF 1913 

Aaronson, Isaac New York City 

Baar, Emil N New York City 

Bankson, Philetus Cooley Erie, Pa. 

Beemer, James G., Jr Yonkers, N. Y. 

Berk, William Leonard New York City 

Bernstein, Alfred New York City 

Birnbaum, Harry New York City 

Bitterman, Albert Yonkers, N. Y. 

Bluestone, Ephraim Michael New York City 

Bourne, Randolph Silliman Bloomfield, N. J. 

Braus, Leon New York City 

Bridges, Calvin Blackman River Edge, N. J. 

Brock, Arnold J New York City 

Burkhard, Russell Vietor New York City 

Burstein, Abraham Cleveland, Ohio 

Caldwell, George Danforth Louisville, Ky. 



204 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Campbell, William M New York City 

Chipkin, Israel Solomon New York City 

Christie, Chester I New York City 

Colby, Elbridge New York City 

Cole, Charles A Montclair, N. J. 

CoLP, Ralph New York City 

Cooper, Morris, Jr New York City 

Cox, Wesley Cintra New York City 

Crow, Allen Benjamin Keokuk, Iowa 

Curry, Vincent Edward Hyde Park, N. Y. 

Dickie, Douglas Perry New York City 

Downes, Elliott Hawkeridge New York City 

Du Bois, Arthur Mason New York City 

Ellenwood, James Lee Dannemora, N. Y. 

Engel, Gabriel New York City 

Pike, Tracy R. V New York City 

FiTz Randolph, John Anderson New York City 

Fleck, Harry Deegan New York City 

FooTE, J. WiLFORD Elkland, Pa. 

Fowler, Dudley Frederick New York City 

Frank, Victor Chicago, 111. 

Friou, George New York City 

Gahagan, Andrew J Coushatta, La. 

Glover, Calvin Shearman New York City 

Gottesman, Michael New York City 

Greenberg, Hyman New York City 

Griffin, Egbert Bradney New York City 

Griscom, Acton New York City 

Harris, Ralph Scott Birmingham, Ala. 

Hartig, Siegfried H New York City 

Henderson, Harry Buck Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Hewetson, Joseph Henry Bayonne, N. J. 

Holzman, Martin New York City 

Houghton, S. Phillips New York City 

Howell, Ralph Williams Washington, D. C. 

Hyman, Maxwell New York City 

Jaques, Sandford Elizabeth, N. J. 

Johnston, Henry T Ishpeming, Mich. 

Kadison, Milton New York City 

Kamaiky, David E New York City 

Kaplan, Michael New York City 

King, Emanuel New York City 

Klein, Eugene New York City 

Kloster, Walter Joseph New York City 

Kupfer, Walter Scott New York City 

La Dow, Stanley Vaughan New York City 

Lahey, William Stewart Jersey City, N. J. 

Levitt, Albert Meadville, Pa. 

Levy, Jerome New York City 

Lewis, Clarence Leslie New York City 

Liang, Chi Shuen Canton, China 

Little, John Theodore New York City 

Louis, Sidney M New York City 

McCormick, John Kernan New York City 

McElvare, George G New York City 

McKenna, Edward Laurence New York City 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 205 

Manning, Clarence Augustus New York City 

Marcus, Sidney Buffalo, N. Y. 

Marion, Pierce Bayonne. N. J. 

MiLHEisER, Clarence Frederick Galveston, Texas 

Mohr, Walter R New York City 

Moon, Parker Le Roy Yonkers, N. Y. 

Moore, Charles Allerton Binghamton, N. Y. 

Mulwitz, Jacob Port Chester, N. Y. 

Netter, William New York City 

O'Neill, James Allan Jersey City, N. J. 

Osserman, Hyman Aaron Edgewater, N. J. 

Pardee, Irving Hotchkiss , New York City 

Perlowitz, Charles New York City 

Polhemus, George W Washington, D. C . 

Price, Joseph New York City 

Propper, Karl New York City 

Reed, Lynn Powers New York City 

Reeder, Edwin Hewett Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Reutter, Robert Henry New York City 

Robinson, Franklin Willard Long Beach, Calif. 

Rosenthal, William Joseph New York City 

Rothschild, Jay Leo New York City 

ScHEUER, Simon H New York City 

Sellew, Waldo White New York City 

Shanks, Nathan New York City 

Shelley, Henry Vogel, Jr New York City 

Shibley, Gerald Spencer New York City 

Singer, Anton West Hoboken, N. J. 

Slater, Alexander New York City 

Slosson, Preston William New York City 

Smith, Alan De Forest New York City 

Spooner, Malcolm Graeme Brookfield, N. Y. 

Springer, Allan Paul New York City 

Stearns, George Raynolds, Jr Buffalo, N. Y. 

Steckler, Edward L New York City 

Steinhardt, Laurence A New York City 

Strauss, Irwin Dernham Holyoke, Mass. 

Sulzberger, Arthur Hays New York City 

Tanzola, Vincent New York City 

Thompson, William Gordon New York City 

Valensi, Albert r New York City 

Wack, William H New York City 

Watson, Cuthbert Melrose West New York, N. J. 

Weill, Milton New York City 

Wellington, Herbert Galbraith Ft. Worth, Texas 

White, Wallace New York City 

Wilson, James Perry Newark, N. J. 

Wilson, Sinclair J New York City 

Wye, Tom Shew New York City 

Zukerman, David New York City 

fl22l 

SOPHOMORES— CLASS OF 1914 

Adler, Hamilton New York City 

Agnew, Gordon Granger Cincinnati, Ohio 

Allen, Ralph Bergen Manhasset, N. Y. 



206 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Allison, Milton Myers Ingram, Pa. 

Altschuler, Rex Baine Hackensack, N. J. 

d'Amato, Orlando New York City 

Anderson, Herbert Hampton New York City 

Bailey, William Bancker New York City 

Ball, David Spencer New York City 

Barnett, Carlyle Reginald New York City 

Barr, Simon New York City 

Barth, Ernest Albert New York City 

Baturin, Moses Harrisburg, Pa. 

Beidleman, Fred Allen New York City 

Bender, Raymond C Elizabeth, N. J. 

Berliner, Irwin M New York City 

Bernheim, Alfred L New York City 

Bernstein, Bernard New York City 

Bird, J. Malcolm New York City 

BoBEfi, Sidney Samuel New York City 

Bokshitzky, Mitchell Eli New York City 

Botsford, Jay Barrett Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Brady, Leopold New York City 

Bramwell, George Moffat New York City 

Brandes, Walter William Washington, D. C. 

Brennecke, Henry Carl New York City 

Brown, Frank J New York City 

BucHTENKiRCH, George Charles New York City 

van Buren, Maurice Pelham New York City 

Butler, Charles Selen New York City 

BuTTERWORTH, George Forrest, Jr New York City 

Cawl, Franklin R New York City 

Chan, Yew Yung Shanghai, China 

Chapin, Warren B., Jr New York City 

Chase, Charles Harry Julesburg, Colo. 

Class, John Lyons New York City 

Coates, Archibald A New York City 

Cohen, Samuel New York City 

CoHN, Clarence New York City 

Cole, Harry Dix New York City 

CoRRiGAN, Michael A New York City 

Crampton, William De Witt, Jr Naugatuck, Conn. 

Dahman, Wallace W Woodhaven, N. Y. 

Danzig, Samuel Albany, N. Y. 

Demuth, Frank W . . . .' New York City 

Dreisbach, Paltl William Weehawken, N. J. 

Dresher, Hudson W New York City 

Egbert, Lester Darling New York City 

Eskolsky, Morris J New York City 

Evans, Lewis Alexander New York City 

ExsTEiN, Myron Weisman New York City 

Farrell, Harry Joseph New York City 

Fichter, William Leopold New York City 

Fine, Nathan New York City 

Fisher, Henry Lape New York City 

FoLKOFF, Meyer Caspar New York City 

Ford, Russell Hews White Plains, N. Y. 

Frech, Robert Hubert West Hoboken, N. J, 

Fries, Julius Frederick New York City 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 207 

Galinger, George W New York City 

Geer, Francis Hunt New York City 

Gerson, Bernard F Montgomery, Ala . 

Goldenberg, George New York City 

Gordon, Frank Abraham Elizabeth, N. J. 

Gottlieb, Bernard New York City 

Grafton, Horace Kirby New York City 

Green, Albert A New York City 

Greenberg, David New York City 

Griffen, Richard Field New York City 

Hale, Richards New York City 

Halsted, John Pennington New York City 

Hambidge, Gove Jay New York City 

Harvitt, Adolph New York City 

Hassinger, Philip Edward New York City 

Hicks, Clarence John, Jr White Plains, N. J. 

HiLLAS, Roland A West Hoboken, N. J. 

HiRSHCOPF, Pincus New York City 

HiRSHLEiFER, Louis JuDSON New York City 

' VOR HoFE, George D., Jr New York City 

HoLLMANN, RichardJF New York City 

House, Nathan C New York City 

Huang, Chen-Hua Tientsin, China 

Ingalls, Roscoe Cunningham New York City 

Jensen, Erik Leonhard New York City 

Jessup, Henry Herbert New York City 

Johnson, Norman R New York City 

Johnson, Paul Barrus New York City 

Kauffman, Henry Hackensack, N. J. 

Kaufman, Samuel Newark, N. J. 

Keeler, Howard New York City 

Kerr, D. Renwick New York City 

King, Robert M New York City 

Kinney, Morris Butler, N. J. 

Knapp, Charles Merriam New York City 

Konarski, Michael Miecryslaw New York City 

KoTTEK, Herbert New York City 

Krolfifer, Julius Frederic New York City 

Kroll, Abraham New York City 

Krug, Carl New York City 

KuHN, Isidor New York City 

Laguardia, Garibaldi New York City 

Lasher, John Kennedy, Jr Yonkers, N. Y. 

Laurier, Carl Allendale, N. J. 

Laurier, Ludwig Allendale, N. J. 

Lawton, Ernest Beattie New York City 

Lebendiger, Israel New York City 

Leggett, Thomas Haight, Jr Plainfield, N. J. 

Levinson, Nathan H j^ew York City 

LiNTZ, Joseph New York City 

LipscHULTZ, Jacob New York City 

Logan, Walter New York City 

Lorentz, Milton New York City 

LowENSTEiN, Abraham Gabriel New York City 

Lynch, James A., Jr New York City 

McCalujm, James Dow West Nutley, N. J. 



208 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

McElvare, Rowland R New York City 

McNuLTY, Donald Stuart New York City 

MacRossie, Allan Albert New York City 

Magnette, Jules, Jr Newark, N. J. 

Mandell, Ambrose J. E New York City 

Mann, Jacob New York City 

Marks, William Bennett New York City 

Matheson, George Wilson New York City 

Mathews, William Elmer Potsdam, N. Y. 

Meenan, Daniel, Jr New York City 

Miller, Harold Wharton New York City 

Minor, James Henry ' Plainville, Conn. 

Mook, Charles Craig Metuchen, N. J. 

Moskowitz, David H New York City 

Murnen, Arthur Lee Tacoma, Wash. 

Mutscheller, Arthur New York City 

Nankin, Isaac New York City 

Neumann, Emanuel New York City 

Nielsen, Lawrence Henry New York City 

NussBAUM, Benjamin New York City 

Nyland, Fritz Charles Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Oldfield, Charles Norfolk, Va. 

Perlzweig, William Alexander New York City 

Person, Charles William Syracuse, N. Y. 

Peterson, Chester William New York City 

Phillips, Robert Beach Alexandria, Ind. 

Phipps, Francis Harloe Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Pike, Samuel M New York City 

Pincus, Sol New York City 

Pistner, Bernard New York City 

Poppen, John Ryer Athenia, N. J. 

Pretat, Robert Waterville, Conn. 

PuRDY, James Howard, Jr New York City 

Rappaport, Jack L New York City 

Reichman, Robert New York City 

Reilly, Howard New York City 

Reutter, Charles Ernest New York City 

Robbin, Lewis Steelton, Pa. 

Robbins, James Bulger Babylon, N. Y. 

Robinson, Karl Davis New York City 

Roney, John Lee North Franklin, N. Y. 

Root, William Raymond New York City 

Rose, Albert Anson Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rosenblatt, William New YorkCity. 

Roth, Solo New York City 

RoTHWELL, Albert Cyril New York City 

Rubin, Samuel New York City 

Sachs, Samuel New York City 

Sachs, Samuel Ezekiel New York City 

Samuels, Archie H New York City 

Samuels, Milton M New York City 

Schlesinger, Laurence A New York City 

Schlottman, Gustave New York City 

Scott, Peter Alfred New York City 

Shaw, Frank New York City 

SiLVERSXEiN, Abraham New York City 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 209 

Sinclair, Ralph H New York City 

Skipp, Francis Edwin New York City 

Smith, Irving D Harriman, N. Y. 

Smithers, Adelbert F New York City 

Spencer, Edgar Allen B New York City 

Staubitz, Henry Charles Jersey City, N. J. 

Stern, Herbert James New York City 

Stiefel, Walther Albert South Orange, N. J. 

Strausburg, Abram Easton, Pa. 

SuTLiFF, Edward Harrison New York City 

Swords, Albert T New York City 

Tang, Young-lee Tientsin, China 

TiMMONS, William Judson Texline, Texas 

TisHMAN, Louis New York City 

Tragitt, Horatio N Milbank, S. D. 

Underbill, Edward Marvin Fishkill, N. Y. 

Untermyer, Eugene Maurice New York City 

Valentine, Kenneth New York City 

VooRHiES, Jay New York City 

Ward, Edward Denver Ironton, Ohio 

Waterbury, Charles Harold Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Webb, G. Raymond Buffalo, N. Y. 

Wechsler, Philip New York City 

Weiner, Stanley F New York City 

Weinstein, Alexander New York City 

Weiskotten, Herbert Theberath New York City 

Wellenkamp, John New York City 

West, William L New York City 

Whelan, Francis R New York City 

Wilson, James Jersey City, N. J. 

Windsor, Burtis Noble Hornell, N. Y. 

Wise, Herbert Alvin New York City 

WoLK, Abraham Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Worthington, Joseph Edward, Jr East Orange, N. J. 

Zeman, Frederic David New York City 

ZviRiN, Emil Larchmont, N. Y. 

[207] 

FRESHMEN— CLASS OF 191s 

Almand, Arthur Winfree Conyers, Ga. 

Alvord, Donald Barnum New York City 

Anthony, Harold Elmer Ironside, Ore. 

Armstrong, Joseph Bartlett Whitestone, N. Y. 

Aronescu, Leon I New York City 

AxELROD, Herman New York City 

Baer, Sterling New York City 

Bagg, Halsey J New York City 

Bakovitz, Harry New York City 

Barnes, Frank Edward Pownal, Vt. 

Baron, Joseph New York City 

Baron, Joseph Louis New York City 

Bartholow, Benjamin Hilsdon Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Baxter, Leo Maurice Orange, N. J. 

Beatty. Lawrence Richmond New York City 

Beckwith, Albert Jacob New York City 

Bell, A. L. Loomis Englewood, N. J, 



210 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Benvie, George New York City 

Bernstein, Louis New York City 

Bhadkamear, Purushottam Bombay, India 

BiERMAN, William New York City 

BijuR, Sherman M New York City 

BiLDER, Walter Jennings Paterson, N. J. 

Blackwell, James Madison New York City 

Bloch, James Joseph New York City 

Bogert, Edward Osgood New York City 

BoNAET, Colman Isaac New York City 

Bonvicino, Louis Anthony New York City 

Booth, Frank New York City 

Brady, Francis Loyd New York City 

Brager, Louis New York City 

Brainerd, Howard New York City 

Braislin, William Donald New York City 

Braverman, Benjamin New York City 

Bridges, Milton Arlanden New York City 

Brieant, Charles La Monte Ossining, N. Y. 

Brinkerhoff, Harold New York City 

Brown, Cyril J Great Neck, N. Y. 

Brown, John Earle New York City 

BuNZL, Walter New York City 

Burghard, Edward George New York City 

Butler, George Prentiss, Jr Yonkers, N. Y. 

Campbell, Duncan New York City 

Cannon, Townsend L New York City 

Catzen, Bertram Baltimore, Md. 

Cawston, Arthur Hamilton Los Angeles, Calif. 

Chen, Chia-Hsun Hanan, China 

Cheney. Guy A Morrisville, Vt. 

Chui, Leong Canton, China 

Church, John Root Hamburg, Germany 

Clark, Edward Burcham New York City 

Clark, William Katonah, N. Y. 

Colletti, James New York City 

Cooper, Leo Myer New York City 

Cowan, John Harding New York City 

Coykendall, Glenn Brown New York City 

Crane, Albert Loyal New York City 

Cronenberg, Charles Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Curry, Truman Minor, Jr New York City 

Danielson, Lester Clark New York City 

Dawson, George Millard Denver, Colo. 

Derbyshire, Alfred James New York City 

De Veau, Louis B., Jr New York City 

Dickinson, Herbert Codwise Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Dinsmore, Alvin Lenhart Harrisburg, Pa. 

Drechsler, Emil New York City 

Du Bois, Robert Ogden New York City 

Duncan, James Donald New York City 

DwYER, Walter William New York City 

Dzung, Kai-ying Che-kiang, China 

Edinger, Ernest Harold Jersey City, N. J. 

Eisner, Moses N Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Elunger, Louis Julius New York City 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 211 

Elstiin/ Chaju.es New York" City 

Elwyn, Adolph New York City 

Emerick, Benjamin Irving Ardsley, N. Y. 

Ensign, Wilbur River Falls, Wis. 

Evans, Gwilym Dudley Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Fallon, Joseph M Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Fay, Thomas New York City 

Fein, Jacob New York City 

Feinberg, Clement New York City 

Ferber, Jacob New York City 

Fern, Samuel Sidney Elizabeth, N. J. 

Fink, Emil Henry White Plains, N. Y. 

FoERSTER, Walter Frank Louis New York City 

Fowler, Franklyn Dunning New York City 

Friedrich, Charles H. S New York City 

Frommer, Samuel New Haven, Conn. 

FusFELD, Irving S New York City 

Garry, Louis S New York City 

Gates, Wilton John Nyack, N. Y. 

Gibson, Charles Raymond Corley Yonkers, N. Y. 

Gilbert, Edward Holmes, Jr Flushing, N. Y. 

GiLMAN, CoBURN Denver, Colo. 

Ginsberg, Isidore New York City 

Goodman, Herman New York City 

Goodman, Israel New York City 

Goodstein, Philip New York City 

Goodwin, Walter Campbell New York City 

Gordon, Philip Newark, N. J. 

Graham, Alvin Liddon New York City 

Graham, Sterling E New York City 

Grant, Pryor McNeill Birmingham, Ala. 

Greenberg, Jacob W Arverne, N Y. 

Grossbaum, Benjamin New York City 

Gwathmey, William Riddle Nashville, Tenn. 

Haaren, Arthur Herman New York City 

Haines, Dallas Way New York City 

Haldenstein, Alfred Augustus New York City 

HANJ-rER, Jack Lockwood New York City 

Hastings, Frederick Allen New York City 

Hauben, Louis New York City 

Hayden, Roy A Gran, Mo. 

Hearn, Cornelius, Jr New York City 

Henne, Arthur William New York City 

Henry, Leonard New York City 

Herbert, William H New York City 

Herkert, Karl Yonkers, N. Y. 

Herman, Harold New York City 

Hersey, Charles Addison Yonkers, N. Y. 

Hildreth, Leland Jaggar Southampton, N. Y. 

Hill, Arthur Willmot New York City 

HocH, Samuel New York City 

Hoffmann, Albert Sigfried New York City 

Hoffman, Moses David Newark, N. J. 

Holzinger, John Jacob New York City 

Hubbard, J. Slater New York City 

HiTYLBR, Washington Connor Tenafly, N. J . 



212 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Ilsen, Werner Reginald New York City 

Ingalls, Frederick Wilson New York City 

Jabine, Louis Yonkers, N. Y. 

Jacobson, David Lyon Jersey City, N. J. 

Jagendorf, Moritz Adolf New York City 

Janney, Samuel Macpherson, Jr New York City 

Jewett, Frederick William New York City 

Jimenis, Edwin A New York City 

Johnson, Alfred Englewood, N. J. 

Johnston, William Sherman New York City 

Kaplan, Julius New York City 

Kaufman, Frank New York City 

Keil, Gunther New York City 

Kemp, Philip New York City 

Kemp van Ee, John Charles, Jr New York City 

Kimm, Willard Ives Montrose, N. Y. 

Klingenstein, Paul Henry New York City 

Knuth, Harvey Grey Newark, N. J. 

La Corte, Salvatore Francis Elizabeth, N. J. 

Lander, William Peter Sirius New York City 

Lane, Lester Barker Peekskill, N. Y. 

Lazrus, Benjamin New York City 

Lee, John Charles, Jr New York City 

Lee, Young W Kwong-tung, China 

Lehman, Edward Weston, W. Va. 

Leonard, Chester F Flushing, N. Y. 

Loesch, Hugo New York City 

Logan, Charles Thomas, Jr Palisade, N. J. 

Los Kamp, Harold New York City 

Love, John Wheatley, Jr New York City 

McElhinny, John Joseph New York City 

McHale, William Joseph New York City 

MacLachlan, Howard J Yonkers, N. Y. 

MacNair, Ira Preston New York City 

Mandl, Max Macbeth New York City 

Marcus, Lazarus New York City 

Matthews, Harold Hilliard New York City 

May, Mortimer New York City 

Mayer, Jack Wilbur, Jr New York City 

Meierhof, Harold Lee New York City 

Menken, Harold D New York City 

Meyer, Herbert Lincoln New York City 

Milbank, Robert Watkinson New York City 

Miller, Sloane Erastus New York City 

Mischlich, Henry Litchfield New York City 

Moore, Walter V New York City 

MooRHOUSE, Ernest Bird Tarry1;own, N. Y. 

Moriarty, Louis Ossining, N. Y. 

Morris, Lloyd Reginald New York City 

Mueller, Harold Herman New York City 

Murphy, George B New York City 

Murphy, James A Bufialo, N. Y. 

Nekarda, Victor Francis New York City 

Nevin, William New York City 

Newcomb, Henry Fields New York City 

Nichoson, Alexander Almy Jersey City, N. J. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 21 S 

Nolan, Jambs Francis Yonkcrs, N. Y. 

NooNAN, Raymond L New York City 

NoREK, Alfred New York City 

Oakley, George Washington, Jr Pleasantville, N. Y. 

Oelrichs, Hermann New York City 

O'Neale, James Saunders, Jr New York City 

Osgood, Harold S New York City 

OsTERHUS, GusTAV KvALE New York City 

OSTERMAN, CONRAD Jersey City, N.J. 

Pace, Orestes Newark, N. J. 

Palmer, Roger New York City 

Paszek, Leon Frank New York City 

Patterson, William A New York City 

Pink, Clarence Edward New York City 

Potter, Michael New York City 

Prince, John Dyneley, Jr Sterlington, N. Y. 

Reibel, Julius Elizabeth, N. J. 

Rhinehart, Archie E New York City 

Rice, Hugh S Madison, N. J. 

Rice, Julian New York Cit y 

Richard, Edward Karl New York City 

Richardson, John Edward Atlantic City, N. J. 

RiGGS, Benjamin R Philadelphia, Pa. 

Roberts, Llewelyn New York City 

ROHRS, George Carlton New York City 

Romanoff, Moses New York City 

RosEFF, Alexander Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Rotheneerg, David M New York City 

Sage, Edward W New York City 

Salwen, Emanuel New York City 

Samuel, Milton Bayonne, N. J. 

Sanborn, Vincent New York City 

Sandhusen, Louis Henry New York City 

Sands, Walter Harold New York City 

Sarachek, Joseph New York City 

ScEVA, Lewis New York City 

Schmuckler, Jacob New York City 

Seedorff, Henry Christopher New York City 

Shalleck, Joseph New York City 

Sheldon, Bruce Smith New York City 

Shibley, Maurice New York City 

Simon, Henry New York City 

Singer, Clarence New York City 

Smith, Sol W New York City 

Somerville, Randolph New Yoik City 

Spence, Philip Sumner New York City 

Sperling, Elliott Mark New York City 

Stam, Peter, Jr Paterson, N. J. 

Stein, Morris New York City 

Stern, Jacob Bayonne, N. J. 

Stevens, William Covert Port Chester, N. Y. 

Stolberg, Benjamin Munich, Germany 

Stover, Sumner East Orange, N. J. 

SussMAN, Samuel Abraham New York City 

Sweeney, John Gordon Utica, N. Y. 

Tanner, William Fay New York City 



214 COLUMBIA COLLEGE 

Tanzola, Joseph Johm New York City 

Taylor, Edmund Wilet New York City 

Tenopyr, Ottokar New York City 

TiCHENOR, Clifford Leigh Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

TiTLAR, Ralph S Ossinins. N. Y. 

Todd, Warwick Hanford Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

Trainer, Camillus Rogers Huntington, N. Y. 

TuRETS, David Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Valentine, Irving New York City 

Van Buskirk, George Luther New York City 

Van Gaasbeek, Harold C Kingston, N. Y. 

Vessa, Michael C New York City 

VoORHEES, William de Forrest New York City 

Watkins, Walter Kenneth New York City 

Weed, Lowrey Albert Hillsdale, N. J. 

Weeks, William Cornell Huntington, N. Y. 

Weidinger, Carl Englewood, N. J. 

Weil, Frank Leopold New York City 

Weinberg, Charles Elizabeth, N. J. 

Westerfield, Walter Henry Yonkers, N. Y. 

Williams, Bryant Waldo Lowville, N. Y. 

Willis, Harold Satterlee Flushing, N. Y. 

WiLMOT, Arthur Montgomery Middleport, N. Y. 

Wilson, John Albert Thwaite Moss, Bentham, England 

Wilson, William Satterlee New York City 

Wood, Alexander H Kent, Conn. 

wolfing, Frederick William New York City 

WuRM, Carl New York City 

Zahn, George Walter New York City 

Zeydel, Edwin New York City 

'^'^^ non-matriculated students. 

Bellinger, William H New York City 

Berman, Louis E New York City 

Bhattacharya, Basudeb Calcutta, India 

Bush, Abraham M New York City 

Cattell, McKeen Garrison-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Dills, Duane R Scranton, Pa. 

Emmerich, William Maurice . . New York City 

Flower, Wlliam P., Jr New Orleans, .La. 

French, Charles Eltinge St. Paul, Minn. 

Goldfarb, Israel New York City 

Helck, Walter Boston. Mais. 

Hull, Maurice C Danbury, Conn. 

Leslie, Robert, Jr New York City 

Little, Julian McCarty Newport, R. I. 

Mears, John Henry Chicago, 111. 

Pullen, Frederick J New York City 

Reuben, Milton Harold New York City 

Safford, Warren Clay Spring Valley, N. Y. 

ScHiEL, Walter E New York City 

Suckley, Robert Bowne, Jr Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

Tag, Shumou Peking, China 

Valentine, Herbert New York City 

WiNWARD, Albert Tiverton, R. I. 

{t3l 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 215 

SUMMARY 

Candidates for Degrees: 

Seniors — Class of 1912 133 

Juniors — Class of 1913 122 

Sophomores — Class of 1914 207 

Freshmen — Class of 1915 271 

Non- Matriculated Students 23 

Total 7S6 

20 matriculated Students in the College attended the Summer Session of 191 1, but 
did not register in the College for the first term of the academic year 1911-1912. 



SCHOOL OF LAW 

The Faculty 

The President of the University 
Dean Stone 

Professors Abbott, Burdick, Burgess, Canfield, ' Goodnow, Guth- 
rie, KiRCHWEY, Moore (J. B.)i Smith (Munroe), Redfield, Terry 



Mr. Dorr Mr. Reynolds Mr. Whitaker 

Officers of the Faculty 

Professor Stone Dean and ex-officio Member of the 

University Council 

Professor Redfield Secretary 

Professor Redfield {Term expires 19 14) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 

Professor Burdick {Term expires 1912) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 

PURPOSES OF THE SCHOOL 

The design of the School of Law is to afford a thorough, practical, and 
scientific education in the principles of: The common and statute law 
of the United States. The English and American system of equity juris- 
diction. The pubUc law of the United States and Europe. The Roman 
law — ancient and modern. Theoretical and comparative jurisprudence. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All appUcants for admission must present satisfactory evidence of 
good moral character. 

Admission to the School of Law as a matriculated student will be upon 
one of the following three conditions: 

(o) Graduation from an approved college or scientific school of collegiate 
rank. 

(&) The successful completion of three years of undergraduate study 
in an approved college or scientific school, which course of study must 
have included satisfactory courses in Economics and in English and 
American History. 

^ Absent on leave 1911-12. 
216 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES 21 7 

(c) In lieu of either of the above, the presentation of satisfactory evi- 
dence of preliminary training obtained in higher institutions of learning, 
in this country or abroad, equivalent to that prescribed in either of the 
foregoing paragraphs (a) or (6). 

To Advanced Standing 

Students complying with the above requirements for admission to 
the School, who have, in addition, successfully pursued the study of law 
for at least a year in an approved law school, may, on giving satisfactory 
evidence of proficiency in the studies of the first year, be admitted to 
advanced standing as members of the second-year class. 

No one will be admitted to advanced standing beyond the second year 
except by special vote of the Faculty. 

The examinations for advanced standing cover all the work previously 
done by the class to which admission is sought, and are held at the end of 
the academic year and during the week preceding the opening of the fall 
term. Examinations may be dispensed with and credit given on certifi- 
cate for courses satisfactorily completed in an approved law school in 
cases where such courses are deemed by the Faculty equivalent to the 
corresponding courses given in this School. 

Duly qualified persons not candidates for the degree of LL.B. may be 
admitted as non-matriculated students on presenting such evidence as the 
Faculty may require of their exceptional fitness to undertake with advan- 
tage the study of law. Applicants should have at least three years of 
College or Law School work to their credit and must be at least twenty- 
one years of age. 

Non-matriculated students who have been members of the School 
for at least two years may become eligible for the degree if they shall have 
attained an average of B in all the work prescribed therefor. 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

First Year 

Contracts — Keener's Cases on Contracts. 4 hours. Professor Terry 
Criminal Law — Beale's Cases on Criminal Law. 3 hours, first half- 
year. Professor Stone 

American Constitutional Law, I — Guthrie's Cases on Constitutional 
Law; Thayer's Cases on Constitutional Law; McClain's Cases on Constitu- 
tional Law (2d ed.). i hour, first half-year. Professor Guthrie 

Elements of Law — Lectures and Selected Readings. 3 hours, first 
half-year. Professor Munroe Smith 

Pleading and Practice — Ames's Cases on Common Law Pleading; 
Perry on Common Law Pleading. 3 hours, second half-year. Professor 
Redfield 



2l8 SCHOOL OF LAW 

Real and Personal Property — Kirchwey's Readings in Real Prop- 
erty; Gray's Cases on Property, vol. i (2d ed.)- 4 hours, second half- 
year. Professor Kirchwey 

Torts — Burdick's Cases on Torts (3d ed.) ; Burdick on Torts. 2 hours. 
Professor Burdick 

Second Year 

*Admiralty — Ames's Cases on Admiralty. 2 hours, first half-year. 
Mr. Dorr 

Agency — ^Wambaugh's Cases on Agency. 3 hours, first half-year. 
Mr. Reynolds 

Carriers — Beale and Wyman's Cases on Public Service Companies. 
3 hours, second half-year. Mr. Reynolds 

*Bankruptcy and Insolvency — Williston's Cases on Bankruptcy. 
2 hours, first half-year. Professor Kirchwey 

Domestic Relations — ^Woodruff's Cases on Domestic Relations. 
2 hours, first half-year. Professor Abbott 

Equity — Ames's Cases on Equity, vols, i and 11. 3 hours, first half- 
year. Professor Abbott 

flNSURANCE — Wambaugh's Cases on Insurance. 2 hours, first half- 
year. Mr. Dorr 

Negotiable Paper — Ames's Cases on Bills and Notes. 3 hours, 
second half-year. Professor Burdick 

Pleading and Practice — Redfield's Cases on Code Pleading and 
Practice; Thompson's Cases on Equity Pleading and Practice; New 
York Code of Civil Procedure. 4 hours, second half-year. Professor 
Redfield 

Quasi-Contracts — Case book to be announced. 3 hours, second 
half-year. Professor Abbott 

Real and Personal Property — Gray's Cases on Property, vols. 
11 (2d ed.) and iii (2d ed.). 4 hours, second half-year. Professor Kirch- 
wey 

Sales of Personal Property — Burdick's Cases on Sales (2d ed.). 
Burdick on Sales (2d ed.). 2 hours. Professor Burdick 

Trusts — Ames's Cases on Trusts. 3 hours, second half-year. Pro- 
fessor Stone 

American Constitutional Law, II — McClain's Cases on Constitu- 
tional Law (2d ed.). 2 hours. Professor Goodnow 

Institutes of Roman Law — ^3 hours, first half-year. Professor Mun- 
ROE Smith 

* Omitted la 1912-13. f Omitted In 1911-12. 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES 219 

Third Year 

CoRPOKATiONS — Keener 's Cases on Corporations. 2 hours. Professor 
Canfield 

Equity — Ames's Cases on Equit^^ vols, i and 11. 3 hours, first half- 
year. Professor Stone 

Evidence — Thayer's Cases on Evidence (2d ed.). 4 hours, first half- 
year. Professor Kirchwey 

Trial Evidence — i hour, second half-year. Mr. Dorr 

Mortgages — Kirchwey's Cases on Mortgages. 3 hours, second half- 
year. Professor Stone 

Partnership — Burdick's Cases on Partnership; Burdick on Partner- 
ship (2d ed.). 3 hours, first half-year. Professor Burdick 

Pleading and Practice — Redfield's Cases on Code Pleading and 
Practice; New York Code of Civil Procedure. 3 hours, first half-year. 
Professor Redfield 

Real and Personal Property — Gray's Cases on Property, vols, v 
and VI. 2 hours. Professor Abbott 

Suretyship — Ames's Cases on Suretyship. 2 hours, second half-year. 
Professor Abbott 

Trusts and Perpetuities — Under the Revised Statutes of New York. 
2 hours, second half-year. Professor Canfield 

Wills and Administration — Gray's Cases on Property, vol. iv (2d 
ed.). 3 hours, second half-year. Professor Redfield 

Conflict of Laws — Beale's Cases on the Conflict of Laws, i hour. 
Professor Moore 

History of European Law — 3 hours, second half-year. Professor 
Munroe Smith 

International Law — Moore's Digest of International Law. 2 hours. 
Professor Moore 

Modern Civil Law — 3 hours, second half-year. Professor Munroe 
Smith 

Municipal Corporations — ^Abbott's Cases on Public Corporations; 
Smith's Cases on Municipal Corporations. 2 hours, second half-year. 
Professor Goodnow 

Law of Officers — Goodnow's Cases on the Law of Officers. 2 hours, 
first half-year. 

Law of Taxation — Goodnow's Cases on Taxation. 2 hours, first 
half-year. Mr. Powell 



220 SCHOOL OF LAW 

THE CURRICULUM 
Degree of Bachelor of Laws 

The required work for the degree of Bachelor of Laws consists of 74 
points, and covers a period of three years. Each point represents the 
satisfactory completion of work requiring attendance one hour a week 
for one half-year. No student may take less than twelve nor more than 
fourteen points in any half-year without the consent of the Dean. 

The work of the first year is prescribed. All the courses of the second 
and third years are elective. Courses not taken in the second year may be 
elected as a part of the work of the following year, but third-year courses 
will not in general be open to second-year students. A few courses are 
given only in alternate years ; these may^be taken both by second-'and third- 
year students. 

Registration is limited to courses taken for a degree, and students will 
be held responsible for the satisfactory completion of all courses for which 
they are registered. 

The work selected by a law student is subject in every case to the ap- 
proval of the Dean. 

Examinations 

Written examinations are held at the end of each academic year on 
the subjects of that year, and on the subjects of the first and second years, 
during the week preceding the opening of the academic year. 

All students, whether matriculated or non-matriculated, must, unless 
excused by the Dean, present themselves for examination in all the sub- 
jects for which they are registered at the first examination held therein, 
and, in case of excuse from any examination, must take the next examina- 
tion offered in such subject. Students are not permitted to take examina- 
tions in courses for which they are not regularly registered. 

At all stated examinations the standing of students will be indicated 
by the letters A, B, C, D, and F, representing Excellent, Good, Fair, Poor, 
and Failure, respectively. These grades will be part of the record of 
the students in the office of the Registrar and will be reported to them as 
soon as possible after each examination. 

No student is admitted to the second-year class who is deficient in 
more than four hours of the work of the first year. No student will be 
admitted to the third-year class who is deficient in any subject of the first 
year or in more than one full course or in more than two half-year courses 
of the second year. 

No student failing in any subject will be permitted to take a second 
examination therein without having again taken the course in which 
such failure occurred, nor will any student failing a second time in any 



THE CURRICULUM 221 

subject be allowed to continue in the School except by special vote of the 
Faculty. 

No special examinations are given. 

Not more than one full course nor more than two half-year courses in 
which the student receives a mark of D may be counted toward a degree 
in any one year. 

No student failing in any subject on the final examination of his class 
will be admitted to the degree unless within two years of such failure 
he presents himself for re-examination and receives a mark of C, at least, 
therein. 

Scholarships and Prizes 
(See page 432) 

Fees 

(See page 43) 

Law Library 

The law library has been greatly extended and improved, and now 
consists of upwards of 40,000 volumes which have been carefully selected 
to meet the wants of students. It is especially rich in American, English, 
and British Colonial reports. In addition extensive collections of works 
relating to international, public, and Roman law are shelved in close 
proximity to the books on private law. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

School of Law 

THIRD YEAR— CLASS OF 191 2 

Alexander, Arthur Douglas, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Andrews, Paul Shipman, A.B. Yale 1909 Syracuse, N. Y. 

Bagnell, Robert Harold, A.B. 1908 New York City 

Berinstein, Benjamin, A.B. 1910 New York City 

BiCKEL, Paul Jared, A.B. Franklin and Marshall 1907 Sinking Spring, Pa. 

Bieber, Paul David, B.S. 1910 New York City 

BiGELOw, Mason Huntington, A.B. Amherst 1909 Utica, N. Y. 

BissELL, Pelham St. George, Jr., A.B. 1909, A.M. 1910 New York City 

Blum, Isidor, A.B. Johns Hopkins 1909 Baltimore, Md. 

Brenner, Mortimer, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Bristol, Arthur E., A.B. Amherst 1909 New York City 

Butts, James Earle, A.B. Hobart 1908 Geneva, N. Y. 

Byoir, Carl Robert, A.B.Iowa 1910 Des Moines, Iowa 

Cahill, Roy Robert, B.S. Whitman 1909 Dayton, Wash. 

Carlton, Doyle Elam, A.B. Chicago 1909 Wauchula, Fla. 

Castell, George Oliver, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Celler, Emanuel, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Civic, Maxwell.'B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Cody, Thomas Hughes, A.B. Southwestern 1909 Georgetown, Texas 

Cohen, George Lionel, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Cohen, Joseph George, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

CouLSON, Robert Earl, A.B. Cornell 1909 Buffalo, N. Y. 

Criado, Roger F., A.B. 1909 New York City 

Cunningham, Frank Loughram, A.B. Princeton 1909 New York City 

Da viDOW, Leonard Harold, B.S. 1910, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Delavina, Fred Valentine, A.B. Bowdoin 1908 Portland, Me. 

De Luca, George B., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Derby, James Lloyd, A.B. Harvard 1908 New York City 

Dowling, Noel Thomas, A.B. Vanderbilt 1909 Ozark, Ala. 

Dupie, William Kent, Jr., A.B. Ohio State 1910 Portsmouth, Ohio 

DuRKiN, Edmund Lawrence Spokane, Wash. 

Elliott, Donald F., A.B. De Pauw 1909 Kokomo, Ind. 

Elsasser, Frederick R., A.B. 1910 New York ""ity 

Emerson, Harold Brown, Ph.B. Wooster 1908 Bellefontaine, Ohio 

Epstein, Albert, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Epstein, Maurice, A.B. 1908 New York City 

Field, Henry Cromwell, A.B. Swarthmore 1909 New York City 

FiSK, Brenton Kern, A.B. Kingfisher 1907 Kingfisher, Okla. 

Flouton, Allen Brown, A.B. Syracuse 1909 Troy, N. Y. 

Gamble, Ralph Abernethy, Litt.B. Princeton 1909 Larchmont, N Y. 

Garcia, Francis J., A.B. St. John's 1909 New York City 

George, Nathan Flower, A.B. Yale 1910 Danbury, Conn. 

Gibson, Leon Wells, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Glovbr, Dawson Coleman, A.B. Harvard 1909 Fairfield, Conn. 

222 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 223 

Goodman, Sydney L.,A.B. 1910 New York City 

GooDNOW, David Franklin, A.B. Amherst 1909 New York City 

Goodwin, Edward Nute, A.B. Amherst 1909 New York City 

Gordon, George Anderson, A.B. Harvard 1906 New Bedford, Mass. 

Gordon, Irving, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Greenbaum, Lawrence Samuel, A.B. Williams 1909 New York City 

Hanagan, Thomas P., A.B. Cornell 1910 Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Hartshorne. Richard, Litt.B. Princeton 1909 Newark, N. J. 

Hartzell, William H., Jr., A.B. Lafayette 1909 Easton, Pa. 

Hewitt, John Vance, A.B. Missouri 1905 Shelbyville, Mo. 

Howenstein, Wilbur Morton, A.B. Oberlin 1909 Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Johnson, Tom Chambles, Jr., A.B. Southwestern 1907 San Marcos, Texas 

Kain, William Frederick, Litt.B. Princeton 1908 Dallas, Texas 

Kaufman, Elias Raas, A.B. Vanderbilt 1909 Lake Charles, La. 

Kellogg, Winthrop Huntington, A.B. Hamilton 1908 Lakeville, N. Y. 

Kessler, George W., A.B. Pennsylvania 1908 Sac City, Iowa 

Kirsting, David A., A.B. St. Marys 190S New York City 

Klein. Leonard, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Lesser, Myron Lawrence, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Leve. Julian Arthur, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

LOhrs, Immanuel, A.B. 1909 Jersey City, N. J. 

Lynde. George Pleasants, A.B. Williams 1908 New York City 

McLain, Harold Orlando, A.B. Michigan 1910 Chicago, 111. 

Mahon, Robert Vincent, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Medina, Harold Raymond, A.B. Princeton 1909 New York City 

Merrell, Clarence Fuson, A.B. Wabash 1909 Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Michael, Jerome, A.B. Georgia 1909 Athens, Ga. 

Moses, Eugene Frederic, A.B. 1910 New York City 

NoRRis, Francis Ely. A.B. Yale 1908 Boonton, N.J. 

Nourse, Charles Joseph. A.B. Harvard 1909 New York City 

Ogden, Alfred, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Osterhout, Edgar Howard, A.B. 1910 Freeport, N. Y. 

Perkins, Edward N V/indsor, Vt. 

Pierrepont, Rutherfurd Stuyvesant,'A.B. 190S New York City 

Pollack, Edgar Allen, A.B. C.C.N. Y. 1909 New York Tity 

Preston, Eugene Dumont, A.B. Denver 1910 Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Price, Dorr Clendenin, A.B. Cornell 1909 Batavia, N. Y. 

Raynor, Francis Ketchum, A.B. Cornell 1907 Sag Harbor, N. Y. 

Robinson, Louis Harry, A.B. 1910 Curwinsville, Pa. 

ROCKWOOD, N. Otis, A.B. 1911 Montclair, N. J. 

Sanborn, John Carfield, A.B. Oberlin 1908 Bliss, Idaho 

Scholle, Howard Abraham, A.B. Williams 1906 New York City 

ScHUR, Robert P., A.B. 1910 New York City 

Scott, Andrew Horace, Litt.B. Princeton 1908 Little Rock, Ark. 

Smith, Young Berryman, B.S. Georgia 1909 Atlanta, Ga. 

Sterrit. James E., A.B. 1910 Ossining, N Y. 

Stewart, Earl, A.B. Iowa 1910 Grimes, Iowa 

Stockton, Sanford Delwin, Jr., A.B. Yale 1909 Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Story, Harold Van Vredenburgh, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Stumberg, George Wilfred, A.B. Louisiana State 1909 Baton Rouge, La. 

Tannenbaum, Samuel William, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Thompson, Raymond C, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Thornton, Thomas Francis, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Troutfelt, Edgar M., Ph.B. Lafayette 1909 Easton, Pa. 

Von Glahn, John Christopher, A.B. Cornell 1910 New York City 

Walter, Rowland Ottmann, A.B. Cornell 1910 New York City 



224 SCHOOL OF LAW 

Warner, Harold L., A.B. Amherst 1910 New York City 

Warner, John BiRCHARD, A.B.Amherst 1910 New York City 

Washburn, Frank Brissenden, A.B. Harvard 1909 New York;City 

Werner, Paul Charles, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Whitaker, Karl Erroll, B.S. Vanderbilt 1909 Tampa, Fla. 

Williams, Paul, A.B. Cornell 1910 Salt Lake City, Utah 

Wilson, Harry Nathaniel, A.B. Cornell 1910 Dansville, N. Y. 

WoLBARST, Eli S., B.S. 1910 New York City 

ZiPRES, ViRGiNius Victor, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Third Year — Class of 1912 109 

SECOND YEAR— CLASS OF 1913 

Acheson, Albert Atwood, B.L. California 1911 Berkeley, Calif. 

Allen, Winfred Colwell, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Alvino, John Francis, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

AxMAN, Laurence H., A.B. 1911 New York City 

Baker, Charles Silas, A.B. Cornell 1911 Washington, D. C. 

Bangs, Francis Nathan, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Barber, Thomas Hunt, A.B. Harvard 1910 Southampton, N. Y. 

Behr, Norman Max, A.B. Indiana 1911 Noblesville, Ind. 

Bender, Sidney, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Berliner, Ephraim, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Blaber, Joseph Thomas, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Brandt, Robert Carl, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Brodsky, Hyman, A.B. Harvard 1910 Bayonne, N. J. 

Brown, Harold Stuart, B.S. Amherst 1908 Belmont, N. Y. 

Butler, Lyman Collins, A.B. Princeton 1910 New York City 

Calhoun, Harold Gilmore, A.B. Tarkio 1906 Summ.erfield, Kan. 

Carlin, J. Francis, A.B. Georgetown 1910 New York City 

Carr, Edward Quintin, A.B. Georgetown 1910 New York City 

Caruso, Carmine William, A.B. 1911 Newark, N. J. 

CoAD, Ralph George, A.B. Nebraska 1911 Omaha, Neb. 

CoLVER, Frederic Beecher, A.B. Princeton 1910 Tenafly, N. J. 

CoMPTON, George Brokaw, A.B. 1909 Interlaken, N. Y. 

Conroy, James Gardiner, A.B. Holy Cross 1910 New York City 

Cornelius, Charles L., A.B. Vanderbilt 1910 Nashville, Tenn. 

Crater, Joseph Force, A.B. Lafayette 1910 Easton, Pa . 

Crispell, Reuben Bernard, A.B. Yale 1910 Kingston, N. Y. 

Davenport, Harry Thompson, B.L. Whitman 1908 Colfax, Wash. 

David, Walter F., A.B. William'^Jewell 1910 Maryville, Mo. 

Dawkins, Spencer Morgan, A.B. Wofford 1903 Spartanburg, S. C. 

DeGroot, Mitchell B., A.B. Amherst 1910 Troy, N. Y. 

DeSilver, Albert, A.B. Yale 1910 New York City 

Duggan, James Edward, A.B. Spring Hill 1910 Mobile, Ala. 

Eichmann, Meyer, A.B. 1911 West Hoboken, N. J. 

Ely, David Jay, A.B. Yale 1910 New York City 

Erskine, Robert Scarborough, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Fallon, Perlie, A.B. Clark 1910 Groton, Mass. 

Farkas, Leonard, B.S. Georgia 1910 Albany, Ga. 

Farnsworth, James A., A.B. Cornell 191 1 Muscatine, Iowa 

Farr, Henry Bartow, A.B. Princeton 1910 New York City 

Farr, William M., A.B. William Jewell 1909 CarroUton, Mo. 

Felbel, Frank Julius, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Ferguson, Franklin Pomeroy, A.B. Harvard 1910 Jamaica, N. Y. 

Ferreira, Avelino Vincenxe, A.B, 1911 New York City 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 225 

FiNDLEY, Everett Thornton, A.B. Princeton 1910 Newark, N. J. 

FoNDiLLER, Richard, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1903 New York City 

Frank, Max, A.B. igir New York City 

Fraser, Leon. A.B. 1910 New York City 

Frerichs, Ernest Vivian, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Fritts, Frank, A.B. Princeton 1910 Chester, N. Y. 

Garrard, William, Jr., B.S. Georgia 1910 Savannah, Ga. 

George. Roland Jones, A.B. Allegheny 1910 Saegertown, Pa. 

GiBBS, William Francis, A.B. Harvard 1910 Haverford, Pa. 

Gluck. Edwin Lawrence, A.B. 191 1 New York City 

Gore, Arthur Derwood, A.B. Wake Forest 1911 Clarendon, N. C. 

Graff. Joseph Rae, A.B Dartmouth 1909 Peoria, 111. 

Greenbaum. Edward Samuel, A.B. Williams 1910 New York City 

Greenebaum, Milton, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Grill, Abraham Maurice. A.B. 1911 New York City 

Haber, IsADOR,A.B. 1911 West Hoboken, N. J. 

Hall, Sherwood Estabrook, A.M. 1911 Brandon, Vt. 

Hartigan, John Patrick, A.B. Brown 1910 Providence, R. I. 

Healy. Charles Edward, A.B. St. Francis Xavier 1910 New York City 

Herbermann, Henry Frederick, A.B. St. Francis Xavier 1910 New York City 

Hill, Dudleich, A.B 1910 New York City 

Hobart, Charles Edwin, A.B. Beloit 1909 Roscoe, 111. 

Holden, Harry D., A.B. Amherst 1910 Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Huser, Thomas E., Ph.B. Hamline 1910 Cumberland. Wis. 

Jefferson, Charles Frederic, A.B. Yale 1910 New York City 

Jervey, Huger Wilkinson, A.M. Univ. of South 1900 Charleston, S. C. 

Kahn Alberi Felix, Ph.B. Lafayette 1910 Easton. Pa. 

Keim, John Howard, A.B. Amherst 1910 New York City 

Kellogg. William Raymond, A.B. Amherst 1910 Katonah, N. Y. 

KiENDL, Theodore, Jr., A.B. 1910 New York City 

King. LeRoy, A.B. Harvard 1906 Newport. R. I. 

Klugescheid, Richard Charles, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Knight, Fredericks., A.B. Amherst 1910 New York City 

KOENIG, Leo, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Korn, Samuel Seymour, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Levine, Samuel, A.B. Tulane 1911 Bonham, Texas 

Levy, L. M., A.B. 1911 New York City 

Lloyd, Gardner Pleasants, A.B. Princeton 1910 Red Bank, N. J. 

Lowrie, John Marshall, A.B. Knox 1908 Galesburg, 111. 

McAdoo, Francis Huger. A.B. Princeton 1910 Irvington, N. Y. 

McCarthy, Wilson Raymond, Alberta, Can. 

McEntegart, Thomas Emmet, A.B. Manhattan 1910 New York City 

McMahon, Daniel Francis, B.S. Manhattan 1909 New York City 

McManus, James P., LL.B. N. Y. Univ. 1909 New York City 

McViCKER, Hugh Brewster, A.B. Michigan 1910 Lisbon, Ohio 

Marchmont, John Hamilton, A.B. 1910 Alma, Mich. 

Marcus, Bernard Kent, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Mei, Hua-Chuen, B.S. 1911 Sunning, China 

Morrison, Stuart F. B.. A.B. Amherst 1910 Red Hook, N. Y. 

Mulqueen, Joseph Francis, A.B. St. Francis Xavier 1910 New York City 

Myers, Daniel Herman. A.B. Yale 1910 Albany. N. Y. 

Noble. Ransom. A.B. 1910 New York City 

Norton, Delbert Austin, A.B Arkansas 1909 Portland, Ore. 

Osborne, Earl William, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Pascarella, Frank, A.B. 1911 Emerson, N. J. 

Paton, Thomas Bugard, Jr., A.B. 1911 New York City 



226 SCHOOL OF LAW 

Perry, Thomas Asberry, Jr., B.S. Georgia 1907 Altanta, Ga. 

Ramsdell. C. Homer, A.B. Columbia 1910 New York City 

Richardson, William Emanuel, A.B. Princeton 1910 Bernville, Pa. 

Robinson, Hamilton Whitney, Litt. B. Princeton 1909 Yonkers, N. Y. 

RuBiNO, Gabriel, A.B. 1911 New York City 

RucH, Clinton Joseph, A.B. Lafayette 1908 Hellertown, Pa. 

Ryan, John Power, A. B., Williams 1910 Troy, N. Y. 

ScHEEL,fGEORGESGoTTGEN, A.B. Harvard 1909 New York City 

Schmidt, ArnoldSM., A.B. 191 1 New York City 

Seipp,'HenryG., A.B. Cornell 1911 New York City 

Seymour, RaymondjB., A.B. Dartmouth 1910 New York City 

Shalek.'Bernard Aal., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Shepherd,^ Benjamin Armistead, A.B. Virginia 1909 Palmyra, Va. 

Shiland, Andrew.Romaine, A.B. Williams 1910 New York City 

Silverman, Abram, A.B. Harvard!i9io New York City 

Skerritt, Harry Huse, Ph.B. Syracuse 191 1 Syracuse, N. Y. 

Smith, Henry Montague, Jr., A.B. Yale 1910 Morristown, N. J. 

Smith, Lisle Archibald, A.B. Oberlin 1909 Oberlin, Ohio 

Smith, Ray Patton, Ph.B. Dickinson 191 1 Carlisle. Pa. 

Springer, Milton P., B.S. 1911 New York City 

Stryker, Laurence Clarkson, A.B. Princeton 1910 New York City 

Taylor, Martin, A.B. Trinity 1908 New York City 

ToNNELfi, Theodore Mills, A.B. Princeton 1910 New York City 

ToviTNSEND, Dallas Selwyn, A.B. 1910 Raeford, N. C. 

TuRCK, Charles Joseph, A.B. Tulane 1911 New York City 

Turk, Elkan, A.B. Illinois 1910 Litchfield, 111. 

VanJAlstyne, W. Thomas, Ph.B. Yale 1910 New York City 

Vanderbilt, Arthur T., A.B. Wesleyan 1910 Newark, N. J. 

Van Fossan, Ernest H., A.B. 1911 Lisbon, Ohio 

Veness, Thaddeus Wellington, A.B. Oberlin 1906 Albert Lea, Minn. 

Walsh, St. Clair, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Ward, Wilbert, Jr., A.B. DePauw 1910 South Bend, Ind. 

Webber, William Thomas, A.B. 1911 New York City 

von Wedell, Hans Adam, A.B. Gymnasium Ger. 1902 New York City 

Weeks, Richard F., A.B. Princeton 1910 New York City 

Wheeler, Irwin, B.S. 191 r New Brunswick, N. J. 

Wilfert, Ernest William, A.B. Cincinnati 1910 Cincinnati, Ohio 

Wilson, Howard Charles, A.B. Cornell Dansville, N. Y. 

Wolfe. Charlemagne Tower, Ph.B. Bucknell 1910 Lewisburg, Pa. 

Wolff, Herbert Alfred, A.B. Dartmouth 1910 New York City 

WoLFSON, George Morris,' A.B. Cornell 1911 New York City 

Wollison, Ira, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

WooLEY, Frederick Hearne, A.B. Harvard 1910 New York City 

Worthington, Bond Valentine Thomas, A.B . Oxford 19 10 New York City 

Zipp, ClarenceStoll, B.S. Trinity 19 II Hartford, Conn. 

Zorn, Frederick, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Second Year — Class of 1913 14S 

FIRST YEAR— CLASS OF 1914 

Alley, Rayford Wardlaw, A.B. Washington and Lee 1910 Muskogee, Okla. 

Anderson, Forest Milton, B.S. Fort Worth 1911 Ft. Worth, Texas 

Angulo, Charles, A.B. Georgetown 1911 Havana, Cuba 

Bailey, Clarence Alfred, A.B. Denver 1911 Denver, Colo. 

Banks, James Lenox, Jr., A.B.Yale 1911 New York City 

Barnum, Ray Foster, A.B. 1910 White Plains, N. Y. 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 227 

Battey, Louis Le Garde, A.B. Sacred Heart 1910 Augusta, Ga. 

Becker, William Voigt, A.B. Rutgers 1911 Newark, N. J. 

Beer, Thomas, A.B. Yale 1911 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Bright, Arthur A., B.S. Pennsylvania Coll. 1909 Harrisburg, Pa. 

Brooks, George Bruce, A.B. Williams 1911 New Rochelle. N. Y. 

Brown, Harry H.. A.B, Georgetown 1911 New York City 

Bruen, William Walter, B.L. Princeton 1911 Madison, N. J. 

Bruns, Thomas Maldrup Logan Howardsville, Va. 

Budner, Harold Sydney, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Burton, Lucius Wesley M., A.B. William Jev/ell 1909 Strand, Okla. 

Calhoun, Earle Clark, A.B. Mercer 1911 Eastman, Ga. 

Calhoun, Roy Emmett,'A.B. Mercer 1911 Eastman, Ga, 

Catacouzinos, John, A.B. Metelin, Turkey 1903 New York City 

Cherry, William M., A.B. McGill 1911 Toledo. Ohio 

Claiborne, Robert W., A.B. Virginia 1909 Petersburg, Va. 

Clark, Kenneth Francis, A.B. Dartmouth 1911 New York City 

Clark, William Evans, A.B. Amherst 1910 New York City 

Coaxes, Arthur Pierce, A.B. Yale 1910 Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Cohen, Reuben Solomon New York City 

Cohen, Samuel Michael, A.B. Yale 1910 Hartford, Conn 

Curtis, Monroe, A.B. Western Reserve 191 1 Cleveland, Ohio 

Dallaley, Charles ' New York City 

De Friece, Frank W., A.B. Emery and Henry 1903 Meadowview,Va. 

Dwight, Maitland, A.B. Princeton 1911 Convent Station, N. J. 

Elder, Robert Dull, A.B. Princeton 1911 Leadville, Colo. 

Esdale, James, E.M.Alabama Poly. 1907 Birmingham, Ala. 

Evans, ArthurILewis, A.B. Hamilton 19 n Remsen, N. Y. 

Evans, Charles S., A.B. Livingston 1904 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Fales, DeCoursey, A.B. Harvard 1911 New York City 

Fay, Martin J., B.S. Fordham 1908 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Fee, James Alger, A.B. Whitman 1910 Pendleton, Ore. 

FiMMEN, Edward Augustus, Ph.B. Iowa, Wesleyan 191 1 Burlington, la. 

FouLK, Thomas Bond, B.S. West Virginia 1908 Huntington, W. Va. 

Frost, Benson Ralph, A.B. Brown 1908 Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

Fuller, Ernest Michael Freeport, N. Y. 

Galvin, William Austin, B.S. 1910 New York, City 

Gerstein, Samuel Ralph, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Gianella, Percy, M.E. Brooklyn Poly. 1910 New York City 

Giegerich, Leonard A., Jr., A.B. St. Francis Xavier 1910 Riverdale-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Goodhue, Fisher, A.B. Yale 1911 New York City 

Hall, Bartow Harwood, A.B. Amherst 1910 Colorado Springs, Colo. 

Hall, Henry Twitchell, A.B. Williams 191 1 East Orange, N. J. 

Heydecker, Wayne Darlington, A.B. 1911 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Hill, John Warren, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Hirsch, Morse S., A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Hobbs, Richard Junius Mendenhall, A.B. Guilford 1909 Guilford, N. C. 

Hoyt, Carl Cari.yle, A.B. Marietta 1911 Marietta, Ohio 

Jewell, Ralph Herbert, A.B.Yale 1911 Washington, D. C. 

Jewell, Thomas Brownson, Jr., A.B. Oberlin 1910 Washington, D. C. 

Jordan, David Leo, A.B. Fordham 1904 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Keen, Edwin Le Roy, Ph.B. Dickinson 1907 Wisconisco, Pa. 

Kent, Stephen Girard, A.B. Williams 1911 Summit, N. J. 

Kenyon, Theodore Stanwood, A.B. Harvard 1911 New York City 

Keough, Austin Campbell, A.B. Dartmouth 1911 New York City 

Landis, William B., Ph.B. Dickinson 1911 Rock Glen, Pa. 

Levinson, Samuel Joshua, A.B. 1911 New York City 



228 SCHOOL OF LAW 

Levy, Morris. A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Lewis, Read, A.B. Wisconsin 1909 Oak Park, 111. 

LiNDLEY, Adelbert, H., Ph.B. Alma 1911 Lupton, Mich. 

Livingston, Robert R., Litt. B. Princeton 1910 Tivoli-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Manice, William DeForest, A.B. Yale 1911 New York City 

Marks, Alexander Drummond, A.B. Yale 191 1 New York City 

Mason, Gregory, A.B. Williams 1911 New York City 

M.\tteson, Leonard Jerome, A.B. Colgate 1911 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Meisel, Charles J. W., A.B. 191 1 New York City 

Merritt, George Hiller, A.B. Oregon 1906 Jacksonville, Ore. 

Merryman, Alfred, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

MoNOSMiTH, George Waldo Wellington, Ohio 

Morrison, Robert Henry, A.B. Wabash 1911 Frankfort, Ind. 

Muller,' John A., B.S. 1911 New York City 

Murphy, John Joseph, A.B. 1911 Hartford, Conn. 

Palley, David Maurice, A.B. Cornell 1910 New York City 

Palmer, Elwell, Ph.B. Yale 1910 New York City 

Pettit, George Emerson, A.B. Yale 1911 New York City 

Philson, Benjamin, A.B. Gettysburg 1909 Berlin, Pa. 

Pierce, W. L., Jr Englewood, N. J. 

Powell, Richard R. B., A.B. Rochester 1911 Rochester, N. Y. 

Rapp, Stephen Kaufman, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 191 1 New York City 

Reich, Lorenz, Jr., A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Remsen, William, A.B. 191 1 New York City 

Reynolds, Henry, Ph.B. North Carolina 1900 Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Rice, Marvin, A.B. 1908 New York City 

RoBBiNS, Franklin, A.B. Wesleyan 1911 Detroit, Mich. 

Roche, Ernest Spencer, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Rothwell, Vincent H New York City 

Ruble, Jesse J., A.B. Wisconsin 1911 Platteville, Wis. 

Ryder, Robert Child, A.B. Middlebury 1910 Middlebury, Vt. 

Samuels, Sumner Lawrence, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Shand, Joseph Walter, A.B. Florida 1911 Gainesville, Fla. 

Skidmore, Lemuel, Jr., A.B. Princeton 1911 Summit, N. J. 

Sprague, Martin Lima, Ohio 

Steffensen, Kearney K., A.B.Utah 1910 Salt Lake City, Utah 

Steinemann, Robert New York City 

Stinson, Joseph Whitla, C.E. 1907 New York City 

Sullivan, Raymond Eugene, A.B. Boston 1909 Roxbury, Mass. 

Swain, David Whiton, A.B. Dartmouth 1911 Nantucket, Mass. 

Swan, Clinton Combes, A.B. Williams'1911 New York City 

Thiesing, Theodore Heinrich, A.B. Gymnasium Germany 1910 New York City 

Thomson, Charles Edward Scranton, Pa. 

Thorne, Cleveland, Ph.B. Yale 1907 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Todd, Russell Webster, A.B. Princeton 1910 New York City 

TouART, Anthony Joseph,?A.B. Spring Hill 1909 Mobile, Ala. 

Troutman, Robert Battey, A.B.JGeorgia 1911 Atlanta, Ga. 

Turner, Cyrus Calhoun, Jr., A.B. Yale 19 11 New York City 

Ungerer, Heiby Wetling, A.B.Hobart 1911 Lyons, N. Y. 

VooRHEES, Tracy Stebbins, A.B. Rutgers 1911 New Brunswick, N. J. 

Vredenburgh, Eugene Harramond, A.B. Princeton 1911 Freehold, N. J. 

Washburn, W. Mayhew, A.B. Harvard 1908 New York City 

Weaver, Robert Augustus Kenton, Ohio 

Weis, Walter Moses, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Wendt, Edmund Charles, A.B. Harvard 1910 New York City 

West, Johnson Edwin Bellefontaine, Ohio 



SUMMARY 229 

White,' Clarence R.. Ph.B. Vermont 191 1 Burlington, Vt. 

WiLLARD, Charles Bunnell, A.B. Hamilton 1911 New York City 

WiLLiNGHAM, James C. A.B. Missouri Valley 1909 Hobart, Okla. 

Wilson. Paul, A.B. Wabash 1911 Glen Ridge, N. J. 

WiNANT, Clinton Darlington, Litt. B. Princeton 1911 New York City 

WooDHOusE, Charles Douglas, A.B. Williams 1910 Buriington, Vt. 

Yeung, Fong, A.B. Richmond 1909 Canton, China 

Young, Richard W., Jr., A.B. Utah 1909 Salt Lake City, Utah 

First Year— Class of 1914 ^26 

NON-MATRICULATED STUDENTS. 

d'Autremont, Herbert Hart, LL.B. Cornell 191 1 New York City 

Baumer, Herbert Peter, B.B. 1911 New York City 

Bertram, Wifredo, A.B. Barcelona 1909 Humacao, P. R. 

Bowers, William Cram, 2d New York City 

Brock, Raymond Elliott St. Louis, Mo. 

Childs, Clarence Chester, Ph.B. Yale Fremont, Ohio 

Clarke, Herbert Fanning, A.B. Oregon 1909 Portland, Ore. 

EuBANKS, Clarence M., LL.B. Oregon 1911 Portland, Ore. 

Gatliff, Edward Moss, B.S. Michigan 1910 Williamsburg. Ky. 

GoDDARD, Harold Olympia, Wash. 

Goldberger, Morris Leopold Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Ham, Wilkie Clay Caddoa. Colo. 

VON Helmolt, Carl, Jr New York City 

IsAAK. Bernhard New York City 

Johnson, Archibald McNeal San Francisco, Calif. 

King, Warren Thomas, LL.B. Arkansas 1910 Little Rock, Ark. 

LiBERMAN, Joel B., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1901 New York City 

Louchery, Charles W., A.B. West Virginia 1911 Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Maby, Adelbert Conway Kittery, Me. 

Morbio, Carlo Sutro, B.L. California 1910 San Francisco, Calif. 

Peeples, Thornwell K Savannah, Ga. 

Phipps, Fitch Laurence, A.B. Whitworth 1908 Portland, Ore. 

Rubin, Maxwell, LL.B. St. Lawrence New York City 

Shaterian, William Siiadrach New York City 

Shipman, Bertram Francis Red Oak, la. 

Stallcup, Evan Shelby Tacoma. Wash. 

Vauchan, James Andrew, A.B. Elon 1908 Franklin, Va. 

Watkins, Arthur V ; Vernal, Utah 

Yates, James Atwood Jacksonville, Fla. 

ZiETLOw, Cassius FREDERICK Middletown, N. Y. 

Non-matriculated students 30 

SUMMARY 

Third Year — Class of 1912 109 

Second Year — Class of 1913 I4S 

First Year — Class of 1914 126 

Non-matriculated students 30 

410 
Seniors from Columbia College 43 

Total 453 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 
COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS 

The Faculty 

The President of the University. 

Dean Lambert. 

Professors Blake, Brewer, Cragin, Evans, Gies, Hiss, 'Holt, 'Hun- 
tington, James, Janeway, Lee, MacCallum, Painter, Schulte, Starr, 
Wood. 

Officers of the Faculty 

Professor Lambert Dean and ex-officio Member of the University 

Council 

Professor Huntington (Term expires 1913) Elected Delegate 

to the University Council 

Professor Starr (Term expires 1914) Elected Delegate to the University 

Council 

Professor Gies Secretary 

Standing Committees 

On Administration: The Dean (Chairman), Professors Cragin, Blake, 
Janeway and MacCallum 

On Admissions: The Dean (Chairman), Professors Wood and Gies 

On Scholarships: The Dean (Chairman), Professors Painter and 
Schulte 

On Students' Library: Professors Huntington (Chairman), Brewer, 
and Evans 

Emeritus Professors 

(See page 7) 

HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

King's College — the original foundation of Columbia University — 
organized a Medical Faculty in 1767 and was the first institution in the 
North American Colonies to confer the degree of Doctor of Medicine in 

' Absent on leave second half-year. 
230 



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BUILDINGS, GROUNDS, AND EQUIPMENT 23I 

course. The first individuals to graduate in medicine from the College 
were Robert Tucker and Samuel Kissam, who received the degree of 
Bachelor of Medicine in May, 1769, and that of Doctor of Medicine 
in May, 1770, and May, 1771, respectively. Instruction in medicine 
was given from this time on until the work of the College was broken 
up by the War of the Revolution. In 1784 an act was passed making 
Columbia College in the City of New York the successor of King's 
College, and instruction was resumed in the academic department. 
Eight years later the Medical Faculty was re-established, and was con- 
tinued until 181 4, when the Medical Faculty of Columbia College was 
merged in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, which had received 
an independent charter in 1807. In i860, by agreement between the 
Trustees of the two institutions, the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
became the medical department of Columbia College, and from that 
time on the diplomas of the graduates were signed by the President 
of Columbia College as well as by the President of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons. The connection was only a nominal one, 
however, until 1891, when the College was definitely merged in the 
University. 

Since 1769 the degree of Doctor of Medicine has been conferred by 
Columbia University on 7599 men, including many of the most eminent 
practitioners in the United States. 

BUILDINGS, GROUNDS, AND EQUIPMENT 

The College of Physicians and Surgeons was first situated at 18 
Robinson Street, from 1807 to 1809. From 1809 to 1813 it was at 12 
Magazine Street; from 1813 to 1837 at 3 Barclay Street; from 1837 to 
1856 at 67 Crosby Street; and from 1856 to 1887 at loi East Twenty- 
third Street. It now occupies a group of buildings given by the 
late William H. Vanderbilt, his sons Cornelius, WilHam K., Frederick 
W., and George W. Vanderbilt, and by William D. Sloane, which 
stands upon thirty contiguous lots of land, bounded on the south, 
west, and north by Fifty-ninth Street, Amsterdam Avenue, and 
Sixtieth Street, respectively, and lying immediately opposite to the 
Roosevelt Hospital. 

The Main Building 

The College Building proper has been designed to facilitate the 
combination of theoretical instruction with laboratory work, which is 
essential to a modern scientific training. In this building, which has a 
floor space of 100,000 square feet, are the lecture halls, the recitation 
rooms, and the different laboratories, under the supervision of their 
respective professors, all thoroughly equipped for the routine work of 
the regular classes and for the special original and research work of 



232 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

the advanced students, instructors, and professors of the several 
departments. 

In this building are the administrative offices, the laboratories of 
Physiology, Anatomy, General and Physiological Chemistry, Surgery, 
Pharmacology and Pharmaceutics, Pathology and CHnical Pathology, 
the Morphological Museums and Laboratory, a dissecting room ac- 
commodating 400 students, and two large amphitheatres. 

For a more detailed account of the equipment of each department, 
see the departmental statements. 

Alliance with the Presbyterian Hospital 

The question of a hospital 'aflfiliation for the Medical Department of 
Columbia University has been settled during the past winter of 1910-11. 
An alliance has been brought about by the mutual action of the two 
boards of trustees between the College of Physicians and Surgeons and 
the Presbyterian Hospital. 

This alliance will permit the scientific and clinical direction by the 
University of the medical, surgical, and pathological services of the 
hospital. A clinical service in medicine and in surgery has been organ- 
ized in the hospital and placed in the charge of the Professors of 
Medicine and of Surgery respectively. These services will contain 
about fifty beds each and will form an admirable beginning of a ward 
hospital service for the Departments of Medicine and of Surgery. 

The Presbyterian Hospital contemplates the building of a new plant, 
in which the present arrangements will be far surpassed, both in scientific 
facilities and in the number of beds, and the rebuilding of the Medical 
School is also under consideration. 

The exceptional advantages of bringing about such an alliance between 
the College and the Presbyterian Hospital cannot be overstated. The 
system of sending fourth-year students to the various hospitals as clinical 
clerks will be strengthened and made more efEective in consequence of 
this alliance. The students will be sent to the other hospitals, which 
have admitted clinical clerks, as heretofore, but the wards of the Presby- 
terian Hospital, in so far as they have been designated for university 
purposes, will offer a more thorough opportunity for the study of bed 
patients. The future development on these lines will place the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons in the envious position where its clinical 
facilities will be commensurate with the excellent laboratory development 
which has taken place during the last ten years. 

Vanderbilt Clinic 

The Vanderbilt Clinic is a fully equipped dispensary for the sick 
poor. It also affords ample material for extended practical clinical 



BUILDINGS^ GROUNDS, AND EQUIPMENT 233 

instruction in the various departments of ]\ledicine and Surgery, as the 
professors, with their cHnical assistants, have the entire charge of its 
practice. 

The building is so arranged that each department has a room for the 
practical instruction of students in small sections, in addition to the 
rooms devoted to the treatment of patients; besides, there is a large 
theatre for clinical lectures and a smaller lecture hall. 

All modern appliances for the treatment of diseases have been intro- 
duced, so that students can learn thoroughly the use of all methods in 
each of the special departments of medicine. 

During the year 1910, 42,161 patients were treated, making 155,857 
visits to the Clinic. 

For detailed information as to the clinical lectures held here, see the 
departmental statements in this volume, or the Announcement of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Sloane Hospital for Women 

The Sloane Hospital for Women is situated at the corner of Fifty- 
ninth Street and Amsterdam Avenue, and the service is under the 
exclusive direction of the Professor of Obstetrics in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, the Instructor in Obstetrics being the Resi- 
dent Physician. The wards of the Hospital furnish one hundred and 
twenty-two obstetrical beds and twenty-eight gynecological beds. In 
addition there are forty private-room beds and ample accommodations 
for the house stafT, students, and nurses. 

The service of the hospital is under the exclusive direction of the 
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, an Instructor in Obstetrics and an Instructor in Gyne- 
cology being Resident Officers. There are two large operating rooms, 
one for obstetrics and one for gynecology, each equipped with all 
modern appliances for dealing with these conditions, and here Professor 
Cragin holds weekly clinics throughout the year. 

The number of deliveries during 1910 numbered 1810. 

With the completion of the Gynecological Department of the Sloane 
Hospital, the operative material of the large gynecological service of 
the Vanderbilt Clinic is made available for teaching purposes, so that 
now students of the College of Physicians and Surgeons receive on 
the college grounds practical instruction, not only in normal and compli- 
cated obstetrics and the care of young babies, but in the treatment, 
operative and palliative, of aU diseases of the female pelvic organs. 

Clinics at the Hospitals 

The College is strongly represented on the staffs of most of the gen 
eral and special hospitals of New York. In them both required and 



234 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

optional practical instruction is given by clinical lectures, in the dis- 
pensaries and at the bedside, all of which are prominent features of 
the curriculum. These hospitals are as follows: Roosevelt, Bellevue, 
New York, Presbyterian, St. Luke's, French, German, Mt. Sinai, City, 
Lincoln, General Memorial, Hospital for the Ruptured and Crippled, 
St. Mary's Free Hospital for Children, Willard Parker, Scarlet Fever 
and Reception, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, Foundling, the 
Babies' Hospital, New York Ophthalmic and Aural Institute, the 
Manhattan Eye, Ear, and Throat Hospital, and the Woman's Hospital. 
For a detailed statement, see the Announcement of the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons. 

Lectures 

Cartwright Lectures of the Alumni Association — According to 
the provisions of the Cartwright Trust there is biennially given, under 
the auspices of the Alumni Association, a course of lectures more 
especially addressed to graduates in medicine. This course was de- 
livered in April, 1910, by Professor Adolf Magnus-Levy of the University 
of Berlin, 

GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 

The prescribed period of study for the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
is four years. The requirements for admission are given elsewhere, 
but too much stress cannot be laid upon the desirability of a student 
fulfilling the spirit as well as the mere letter of those requirements. 
Physics, general inorganic chemistry, and biology are now required for 
admission, and the student of medicine will grasp the advanced subjects 
forming the groundwork of the course the more easily and with the better 
understanding just in proportion to the breadth and completeness of his 
preliminary education. The attention of students is particularly called 
to the regulations of Columbia College (see page 194) which permit a 
student to obtain a thorough preliminary training and at the same time to 
complete the requirements for the degree of A.B. or B.S. and the degree 
of M.D. in six years. 

In the arrangement of the diflferent branches of the medical 
instruction a logical order of the main themes and a co-ordination in 
the work of each department have been sought after, enabling the 
student to concentrate his attention upon some one subject and to be 
so familiar with it that the allied subjects next to be taken up shall be 
readily understood. The salient features in the method of instruction 
are thorough laboratory training, frequent demonstrations, clinical 
teaching in the operating theatres and at the bedside as well as in the 
dispensaries, with recitations and didactic lectures to elucidate the 
many problems confronting the student. 



GENERAL PLAN OF INSTRUCTION 235 

Records of attendance and scholarship are kept, and before a stu- 
dent may advance with his class he must, besides passing a good exam- 
ination in a subject, present certificates of satisfactory practical work. 

In the first half of the first year the time of the student is devoted 
largely to anatomy. The instruction is carried on mainly by numer- 
ous demonstrations to sections and by long periods of uninterrupted 
work in the dissecting room. In this part of the year pharmacy 
laboratory work is begun, organic and physical chemistry is dealt 
with and taught by didactic lectures, recitations, and laboratory 
exercises, and histology is begun. In the second half of the first 
year the study of physiology is begun, for which the students have 
been prepared by courses in anatomy. Physiology is taught by didactic 
lectures, demonstrations, recitations, and practical work in the laboratory. 
Physiological chemistry is studied in the laboratory and by lectures, reci- 
tations, and demonstrations. Anatomy is continued and the course in 
histology and embryology is completed. 

In the second year anatomy and physiology are completed. The 
lectures in materia medica and medicine are begun and lectures, recita- 
tions, and laboratory courses in pharmacology and bacteriology are 
attended. As preliminary to the third and fourth years, recitations from 
text-books are held in obstetrics, materia medica, and surgery. For the 
second half of the second year the students are assigned to the laboratory 
for work in pathology and pathological anatomy, and are prepared for the 
study of medicine by an elementary clinic, and by instruction in the 
methods of physical diagnosis. 

During the third year recitations in medicine and surgery are con- 
tinued and those in gynecology, diseases of children, and therapeutics 
are begun. There are didactic as well as clinical lectures in medicine, 
surgery, pharmacology and therapeutics, obstetrics, gynecology, neu- 
rology, genito-urinary diseases, laryngology, otology, ophthalmology, 
dermatology, orthopedic surgery, and diseases of children. During the 
year the work in pathological anatomy and clinical pathology is com- 
pleted. The class is divided into small sections for instruction in physical 
and medical diagnosis, and in the special branches of medicine and surgery 
at the various dispensaries and hospitals. 

The student in the fourth year spends most of his time in the hos- 
pitals and dispensaries of the city. Consequently, although a few 
general and clinical lectures are still given, the work is alraost entirely 
practical and bedside instruction. Divided into small groups, the 
students continue to come into personal contact with patients, under 
the supervision of the instructor. In this way they have the oppor- 
tunity to become familiar with the history of a case, to make a com- 
plete physical examination, to form a diagnosis, to give a prognosis, 
to advise treatment, and to watch progress. 

In the course in surgery the witnessing of numerous major and 



236 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

minor operations is supplemented by an operative course in which the 
student himself performs on the cadaver many of the more common 
operations. For an obstetrical service, the unsurpassed facilities of 
the Sloane Maternity Hospital and out-patient obstetrical depart- 
ment in connection with the Nursery and Child's Hospital ofifer ex- 
cellent opportunities. Here the student is reqtiired to live for 
five weeks and personally attend a certain number of cases of 
labor. The course in diseases of children includes bedside instruction 
in the wards of the Babies' Hospital, where exceptional advantages 
are enjoyed by the students for studying all forms of acute disease in 
infants and young children. The course is rounded out by personal 
instruction in the more special branches of medicine. In these 
branches the student is taught how to use many instruments of pre- 
cision and to recognize and treat successftilly many of the rarer forms 
of disease. 

Clinical Clerkships in the Various Hospitals 

Courses in the wards of St. Luke's, Bellevue, the Mt. Sinai, the Presby- 
terian, the New York, the German, and the Lincoln Hospitals have been 
opened by those institutions to fourth-year medical students. These courses 
consist of work in the wards of the hospitals during which the students ad- 
mitted will serve as clinical clerks both in medicine and surgery and become 
for the time being members of the regular staff. The courses are open for 
periods of two months' duration both during the vacation and during the 
regular term. The students who can successfully pass such tests as may 
be required by these hospitals and be entered upon these courses will 
be excused from college work while on duty except on Thursday of each 
week. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

All candidates must present (i) the medical-student certificate of the 
Regents of the University of the State of New York, and (2) also one 
of the following qualifications: 

(o) The completion of not less than two full years of study, or the 
equivalent, in an approved college or scientific school, which 
course must have included instruction in the elements of physics, 
inorganic chemistry, and biology; or 

(&) In lieu of the above, candidates of mature years who meet the 
legal requirement may present such evidence as the Faculty may 
require, to prove exceptional fitness to undertake with advan- 
tage the study of medicine. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 237 

Advanced Standing 

Admission may be granted to advanced standing at the beginning of 
any year. At least one full year of attendance is required of every 
candidate for the degree. 

Candidates who have completed one or more years of study in an 
approved medical school, and apply for admission to advanced stand- 
ing at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, will be admitted to the 
standing to which their record in that medical school would admit 
them, and be given credit for all courses satisfactorily completed 
therein, on presentation of proper certificates to the Committee on 
Admissions covering the same; provided that the candidates before 
beginning the study of medicine have fulfilled the requirements for 
admission demanded by the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

In applying the above regulation for admission to advanced stand- 
ing, the Faculty have decided to discourage admission to the fourth- 
year class so far as undergraduate students from other colleges are con- 
cerned. The course in medical education divides itself logically into two 
parts, the first of which is scientific and consists of the first two years, and 
the second is clinical and consists of the last two years. It is found difficult 
to separate the work of the third and fourth years, and students who 
desire to obtain the advantages of the clinical opportunities offered in 
New York City (so far as they are represented by the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons) are recommended to transfer from their college of first study 
at the end of their second year in medicine, and to take both the third and 
fourth years at Columbia. It is essential that students offering themselves 
for admission should have all the work presented in the curriculum of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. This is especially true of the courses 
in general and microscopic pathology. It is impossible to organize the work 
of the third year so that a student may take at the same time the 
pathology courses offered by the College of Physicians and Surgeons in the 
second-year curriculum. Students who wish to enter the second year, and 
who have not had the work in physiological chemistry, may make up that 
deficiency by work in the Suminer Session at Columbia, but up to the pres- 
ent time such a procedure is not possible so far as the pathology of the 
second year is concerned. Students who have finished the combined course 
leading to a Bachelor's degree, of which the last two years have been taken 
in a regular medical school connected with their university, are eligible 
for admission, under this ruling, to the third year at the College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons, provided they have taken all the courses of the first 
two years' curriculum. The fourth year at the College is so eminently 
clinical, and is carried on in hospitals at a distance from the college building, 
in the course given under the heading of clinical clerks, that the admission 
to the fourth year will be largely limited to students who have already 
secured the degree of Doctor of Medicine. It is believed that the course 



238 SCHOOL OP MEDICINE 

as given at the College will be found to be a valuable post-graduate year 
for many graduates, and the College believes that admission to the fourth 
year should be limited to such students. 

Special Students 

Students desiring to do special work at the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons may register at any time during the year as special stu- 
dents. Such applicants, however, cannot subsequently become can- 
didates for graduation without full compliance with the terms of 
admission and graduation. 

Special students will be required to present to the Committee on 
Admission before entrance evidence of (a) an adequate preliminary 
education, and (6) special fitness for the particular work they desire 
to pursue, 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Every candidate in the four-year course will be required before 
admission to the degree of M.D. : 

1. To present satisfactory evidence, as required by law, of good 
moral character, and of having attained the age of twenty-one years. 

2. To present evidence of having complied with the requirements 
for admission, 

3. To have attained to satisfactory standing in the required studies 
of the four years of the curriculum. (See table, page 239.) 

4. A candidate who shall have been admitted to advanced standing 
will be required to have spent not less than four academic years at the 
studies referred to in the clause next preceding; and to have complied 
successfully with the requirements for admission to advanced standing. 

No two academic years which shall have begun during the same 
calendar year will be held to satisfy the requirements of the preced- 
ing clause. 

The Degree of Master of Arts 

The attention of students of Medicine is directed to Rule 10 of the 
Regulations for the Higher Degrees (page 188). 

SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND PRIZES 

(See page 432) 

EQUIPMENT AND COLLECTIONS 

Detailed information as to the laboratories, collections, and other 
facilities for study will be found in the statements of the various 
departments of instruction, pages 57-175, and more fully in the An- 
nouncement of the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 



COURSE OF STUDY 



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240 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR LICENSE TO PRACTISE MEDICINE IN 
NEW YORK STATE 

For information, see the Announcement of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons. 

SUMMER SESSION IN MEDICINE 

(See page 398) 

A general statement of the work offered will be found In connection 
with the statement of the Summer Session (see the Table of Contents, 
this volume), and a detailed announcement, showing the scope of each 
course, the conditions under which it is given, and the fee charged, will 
be sent upon application to the Secretary of Columbia University, New 
York City. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

School of Medicine 

FOURTH YEAR— CLASS OP 1912 

Agan, William Byron Troy, N. Y. 

Armstrong, Donald Budd, Ph.B. Lafayette College 1908 Easton, Pa. 

Aronowitz, Gregory Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Aschner, Paul William, A.B. 1910 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Baker, Elmer Wayne, A.B. Princeton 1908 Jamaica, N. Y. 

Barrett, Paul Sydney Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Beck, David New York City 

Bishop, Frank Warner, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Bleier, Edward, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1908 New York City 

BORTONE, Frank Newark, N. J. 

Brim, Charles Jacob New York City 

Career, Frank Hough Newton, N.J. 

Cassasa, Charles Stephen Bartholomew, A.B., Fordham 

1908 Long Island City, N. Y. 

Charlton, Claude Coulter, M.D. Univ. of Louisville 1908 Wingo, Ky. 

Chipman, Harry Edgar Harrison Toronto, Can. 

CoMSTOCK, Carl Rodney, A.B. Harvard 1908 Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Conkey, Ogden Fethers, A.B. St. Lawrence Univ. 1908 Canton, N. Y. 

Cooper, Frederick Sturges, A.B. 1910 Mount Vernon, Ohio 

Crane, Charles George, B.S. Wesleyan 1907 Newark, N. J. 

Crane, Walter Raymond, B.S. Occidental College 1908 Los Angeles, Cal. 

Cutler, Condict Walter, Jr., B.S. 1910 New York City 

Davin, Edward John, A.B. Yale 1910 New York City 

Douglass, Charles York, A.B. Leland Stanford 1908 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Duboff, William Samuel Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fisher, Leon Gabriel New York City 

Franklin, Isador Harold Jersey City, N. J. 

Gildersleeve, John Andrew, A.B. Amherst 1908 Mattituck, N. Y. 

GiTLOw, Samuel New York City 

Goldman, Samuel Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Halpern, Theodore, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1908 New York City 

Heagey, Francis Wenger, A.B. Princeton 1908 Cochranville, Pa. 

Henry, James Worrall, B.S. Univ. of Oklahoma 1910 Pawnee, Okla. 

Herring, Harold Mandeville New York City 

HiBBS, David Lacy, A.B. William Jewell 1907, A.M.Brown 1908. Murfreesboro, Tenn. 

Holcombe, Prank Mahlon, A.B. Univ. of Vermont 1907 Kees. ville, N. Y. 

Howe, Hubert Shattuck, A.M. Univ. of Denver 1909 Denver, Col. 

Irvin, John Shepherd, A.B. Harvard 1908 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Jennings, Francis Bates, A.B. Yale 1910 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Johnson, Henry Lincoln Brunswick, Me. 

Kantor, John Leonard, A.B. 1908 New York City 

Katz, Sydney Milton Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Keil, George William New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Keith, William Neely, A.B. Lafayette 1905 Newtown, Pa. 

241 



242 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

Kennedy, Robert Hayward, A.B. Amherst 1908 New York City 

Klaus, Henry West Hoboken, N. J. 

Knapp, Charles Whittemore, A.B. Yale 1908 New Haven, Conn. 

Kronman, David Edward, A.B. 1910 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lawsing, George CoNDg, A.B. Rutgers 1908 Kiskatom, N. Y. 

Lechenger, Gilbert Cecil Houston, Tex. 

Liss, Irving Edward New York City 

Lopez, Enrique Alonso, B.S. Salamanca University 1904 Valladolid, Spain 

McCuRDY, Uriah Fred, B.S. Univ. of Washington 1908 Seattle, Wash. 

McLean, Edward Huntington, A.B. Princeton 1908 Grant's Pass, Ore. 

McPheeters, Jas. Douglas Lawrence, A.B. Univ. of Colorado 1909. .rNatchez, Miss. 

Manheims, Perry Jefferson New York City 

Mendelson, Abraham New York City 

Mount, Frank Reid, A.B. Univ. of Oregon 1908 Olympia, Wash. 

Murray, Clay Ray New York City 

Murray, Harry Freeling Narrowsburg, N. Y. 

Nammack, Charles Halpin, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Nilson, Siegfried Johannes New York City 

O'Reilly, James Aloysius New York City 

O'Reilly, Vincent Lawrence, A.B. Fordham 1908 New York City 

Pearce, George Girdwood New Bedford, Mass. 

Pickhardt, Otto Carl, A.B. Yale 1908 New York City 

Ragan, William Eugene, Jr., A.B. Univ. of Ga. 1904 Atlanta, Ga. 

Rattner, Charles George New York City 

Ravich, Abraham, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1908 Aqueduct, L. I., N. Y. 

Riley, Henry Alsop, A.B. Yale 1908 New York City 

Rogers, Edward James, B.S. S.C. Military 1896 Greenwood, S. C. 

RosENZWEiG, Samuel Bernard , New York City 

Sawyer, Charles Robert, Ph.B.^Wesleyan 1906 Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Schwartz, Alfred Alexander New York City 

Seidler, Victor Bayard Newark, N. J. 

Shlimbaiim, Solomon New York City 

SiDBURY, James Buren, A.B. Trinity, N. C. 1908 Wilmington, N. C. 

SiEGEL, Morris Theodore, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1902 New York City 

Simon, Morris L Passaic, N. J. 

Smith, Martin DeForest, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Steinmetz, Frederick Charles, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Stout, Arthur Purdy, A.B. Yale 1907 New York City 

Thompson, Laurance Mills, B.S. Princeton 1908 New York City 

TovELL, Harold Murchison Toronto, Can. 

Unger, Abraham, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1908 New York City 

Van Kleeck, Euen, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Weeks, Webb William, A.B. 1910 Corry, Pa. 

White, Wm. Crawford, B.S. Wesleyan Univ. 1908 Hoboken, N. J. 

Whitman, Armitage, A.B. Harvard 1908 New York City 

Wildman, Henry Valentine, Jr., A.B. 1910 New York City 

Wylie, John Herman, A.B. Indiana 1910 Bloomington, Ind. 

YouNT, Carl Cossman Greensburg, Pa. 

Fourth Year — Class of 1912 91 

THIRD YEAR— CLASS OF 1913 

Adams, Leopold New York City 

Allen, Charles Insley, B.S. Wake Forest 1911 Wadesboro, N. C. 

Babcock, James Woods, Litt.B. Rutgers 1909 Jersey City, N. J. 

Beckwith, Edgar Williams, B.S. New York Univ. 1910 New York City 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 243 

Bender, William Frederick New York City 

Brancati, Charles New York City 

Bridge, Edgar Ralph, A.B. Bowdoin 1909 Brunswick, Me. 

Bruno, Alexander, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Carleton, Leland Francis Wachula, Fla. 

Carlisle, John Howe, A.B. Williams 1909 Passaic, N. J. 

Carr, Charles Edmund, A.B. Indiana 1908 Bayonne, N. J. 

Carr, Frank Clyde Bayonne, N. J. 

Casale, John Baptist Newark, N. J. 

Celano, Luigi Salerno, Italy 

Chandler, Charles Porter, A.B. Amherst 1909 Montpelier, Vt. 

Chaplin, Hugh, Litt.B. Princeton 1909 Ridgewood, N. J. 

Clark, Morris Holden Kansas City, Mo. 

Collica, Jeffrey Daniel Charles New York City 

Colton, Warren Alfred Vernal, Utah 

CoRRY, Robert Thomas New York City 

Coxn.TER, Calvin Brewster, A.B. Williams 1907, A.M. Princeton 1908. .Chicago, 111. 

Cox, Fountain Fulford, B.S. Wake Forest 191 1 Winterville, N. C. 

Davis, James Matheson, B.S. Wake Forest 1911 Hiddenite, N. C. 

Denniston, Harold Post Ovid, N. Y. 

Di Palma, Salvatore New York City 

DowD, Heman Lawrence, A.B. Princeton 1909 Orange, N. J. 

Dugdale, Allison Harold, B.S. Univ. of Nebraska Omaha, Neb. 

Eastman, Fred Ward, A.B. Univ. of Missouri 1907 Cameron, Mo. 

Effler, Louis Robert, A.B. St. John's Univ. 1909 Toledo, Ohio 

Eglee, Edward Percy, A.B. Univ. of Colorado 1909 Boulder, Colo. 

Estrin, Harry Joseph New York City 

Farnam, Tracy New Haven, Conn. 

Faulkner, Clarence Sanford, A.B. Oberlin 1909 Sherburne, N. Y. 

Feinberg, Moses Murray, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Fisher, Judson Cook, Ph.B. Syracuse Univ. 1909 Sunbury, Pa. 

Fruchtman, Frank, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1908 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gaul, William Henry, Ph.C. 1909 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Giliberti, Vincent Rutherford, N. J. 

Grattan, James Francis, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Griesemer, Zadoc Lawrence, A.B. Muhlenberg 1904 Roselle, N. J. 

Haake, Charles Henry Grube New York City 

Haller, David Alexander, A.B. Hampden Sidney 1908 Pocahontas, Va. 

Hamrick, James Yates, B.S. Wake Forest 1911 Shelby, N. C. 

Hays, Leslie St. Clair, A.B. Presbyterian (S. C.) 1906 Clinton, S. C. 

Hetzel, William Barr, A.B. Princeton 1909 Pittsburg, Pa. 

HoRNSTEiN, Mark Montreal, Can. 

Houghton, Guy Swinburne, A.B. Hobart 190s Albany, N. Y. 

loRio, Emile Filiberto Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jennings, Edward Allen, Ph.B. Wesleyan 1907 Short Hills, N. J. 

Jones, Bruce Leigh Raleigh, N. C. 

Kellogg, William Alvin, A.B. 1908 New York City 

Knight, William Allen, B.S. Drury 1907, B.D. Union Theol. Sem. 1911 . .Conway, Mo. 

Kunstler, Monroe Bradford, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Leiffer, John Henry New York City 

Lenz, Maurice New York City 

Le Seur, Horace Hutchins, A.B. Rochester 1910 Batavia, N. Y. 

Levine, Solomon Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Loggins, James A., A.B. Park 1909 Devine, Texas 

LouRiA, Alexander Leon, B.S. 1910 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lowens, Harry New York City 



244 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 

McWiLLiAMS, Norman Beattie, A.B. Princeton 1909 Ossining, N. Y. 

Mackenzie, George Miner, A.B. 1907 Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

Maffucci, Mauri, B.S., N. Y. University 1907 Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Mayer, Edgar, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Mebane, Tom Sperring Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

MiNERViNi, ViRGiNius New York City 

MiSTRETTA, Joseph New York City 

MoiTRiER, William, Jr., A.B. 1910 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Moore, Robert Booth Searcy, Ark. 

O'Leary, John George, A.B. Georgetown 1895 Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Paine, Edward Warren Winslow, Me. 

Paleg, Samuel New York City 

Peters, John Punnett, Jr., A.B. Yale 1908 New York City 

Phipps, William Giles Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Plotz, Harry Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Potter, Howard Wieland Elizabeth, N. J. 

Rhett, Wythe Mumford, B.S. Virginia Military Inst. 1909 Columbus, Miss. 

Rosenthal, Nathan Spotswood, N. J. 

Roth. Leo (Lipot) New York City 

Sagarino, John Francis, Ph.B. Yale 1909 Hartford, Conn. 

Sassulsky, Isidor Jesse Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Schwerd, Frederick M New York City 

Shane, Everett William, A.B. Oberlin 1902 Dayton, Ohio 

Shapiro, Louis Gerschon Paterson, N. J. 

Shattuck, Howard Francis, A.B. Yale 191 1 Columbus, Ohio 

Simmons, Edward Burnside, B.S. Colgate 1906 Worcester, Mass. 

Skeel, Henry Robertson, A.B. Wesleyan 1909 New York City 

Spencer, Henry James, A.B. Syracuse 1907, A.M. Williams 1908 Factoryville, Pa. 

Steffen, Walther Charles August College Point, N. Y. 

Stephens, Richmond, B.S. 191 1 New Brighton, N. Y. 

Stickles, Lloyd, A.B. 1911 Newark, N. J. 

Stillman, Ernest Goodrich, A.B. Harvard 1907 New York City 

Strauss, Spencer Goldsmith, A.B. Cornell 1909 New York City 

Street, Augustus Vicksburg, Miss. 

Street, George McQueen Vicksburg, Miss. 

Swift, Samuel, A.B. Yale 1908 New York City 

Taylor, Fenton, A.B. Harvard 1909 New York City 

Thorburn, Grant, A.B.Princeton 1909 Rockaway, N.J. 

Unger, Lester Jarecky, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Ward, Delancey Walton, Ph.B., Ph.D., Columbia 1894 Flushing, N. Y. 

Wiggers, August Frank Albert, Phar.D. 1899 New York City 

Williams, Jesse Feiring, A.B. Oberlin 1909 Kenton, Ohio 

Williams, John Edward Roselle Park, N. J. 

Winslow, Thomas Scudder, A.B. Williams 1909 Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Young, James Frederick Danbury, Conn. 

Third Year — Class of 1913 los 

SECOND YEAR— CLASS OF 1914 

Acker, George Nicholas, Jr., B.S. Pennsylvania College 1909 Washington, D. C. 

Adler, Herbert New York City 

Alexander, Harry Louis, A.B. Williams 1910 New York City 

Bender, Maurice Blocker, B.S. Pennsylvania 1909 Gettysburg, Pa. 

Benson, Arthur Wright, A.B. Cornell 1910 Troy, N. Y. 

Boas, Ernst Philip, B.S. Columbia 1910 Grantwood, N. J. 

Braddock, William Hallock, A.B. Princeton 1908 New York City 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 245 

Brasted, Howard Spencer, A.B.'Hamilton 1910 Hornell, N. Y. 

Brill, Isidor Cherniack (Senior Columbia College) Portland, Ore. 

Brothers, James H.. Jr. New Brighton, N. Y. 

BuRLiNGHAM, ROBERT, A.B. Harvard 1910 New York City 

Cady, Lyndon Bulkley, A.B. Williams 1910 New York City 

Caldwell. Guy Alvin Corinth, Miss. 

Crouze, Albert Pierre (Senior Columbia College) New York City 

DiNEEN, Paul Albinus Leo, A.B. St. Francis Xavier rgio New York City 

Ebeling, William Bruno (Senior Columbia College) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Edwards, Bryant Benjamin, B.S. Univ. of Alabama 1910 Union Springs, Ala. 

EicHHORN, Louis Maxime. B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1902 New York City 

Erpf-Lefkovics, Thuisco Arthur, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910, A.M. Col. 1910.. .N. Y. City 

Fadil, Iskander Elias Tripoli. Turkey 

Freund, Harold Herman New York City 

FuRNiss, Clinton Chollet New York City 

Gamrin. Elias New York City 

GiLLSON, Hugh Vincent. A.B. St. Peters 1910 Paterson, N. J. 

Halpern, Herman New York City 

Hand, Cortland Kiernan Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Hansen, Harry Beauvoir. Ph.C. 1910 Weehawken, N. J. 

Hutchison. Fred Rudy, B.S. Princeton 1908 Alexandria, Pa. 

Irish. Charles Gilbert. A.B. Hobart 1911 Lancaster, N. Y. 

Jacobson, Simon. B.S. College of Charieston 1910 New York City 

Johnson. John Loring. A.B. Bowdoin 1911 Houlton, Me. 

Kaplan. Ira I., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Katz. Elihu, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Kerley, James Hoyt (Senior Columbia College) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Koenig. Egmont Louis Francis (Senior Columbia College) New York City 

KoMiNZ, Jacob Samuel. B.S. Univ. of Rochester 1909 Rochester. N. Y. 

Krakow, Moses Hyman New York City 

KuHLMAN. Alvin Edgar, Ph.C. 1910 Union. N. J. 

Landy. Joseph'Aaron, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Larson. Henry Maxwell. Jr., A.B. Colorado College 1910 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lopez de Victoria, Cassius New York City 

Lubarsky, David Arthur New York City 

McCann, Daniel Francis. Jr.. A.B. Georgetown 1910 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Morrison, Whitelaw Reid, A.M. Oberlin 1910 Ohiopyle. Pa. 

Natanson. David Morris. B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

NiLES. Frank Lee. B.S. Univ. of Cal. 191 1 San Francisco. Cal. 

Paddock. Royce. A.B. 1910 New York City 

Fallen. Conde de Sales. A.B. Georgetown 1910 New Rochelle. N. Y. 

Parsons, William Barclay, Jr.. A.B. Harvard 1910 New York City 

Passover. Gregory Constantine New York City 

Peters. Andrew. Jr. (Senior Columbia College) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Philips, Herman Byrol New York City 

Ramsay, Alexander Dunn. Ph.C.&B.S. Vanderbilt Univ. I907&i909. . New York City 

Raynolds. Randolph. A.B. Yale 1909 New Haven, Conn. 

Rogers, Rupert Reed, A.B. Oberlin 1910 Wellington, O. 

RosenblOth, Milton Benjamin. A.B. 1911 New York City 

Rosenson. William. B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Runge. Otto Ernst (Senior Columbia College) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Scudder, Franic Dyckjman. A.B. Yale 1910 Tompkinsville. N. Y. 

Seibels, Robert Emmet. B.S. Univ. of S. C. 1910 Columbia, S. C. 

Shirley. Amos Reginald (Senior Columbia College) New York City 

Shulansky. Jacob, Ph.B. Yale 1910 Hartford, Conn. 

Sinclair. Donald Bunker. A.B. Princeton 1910 New York City 



246 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Smale, William P., Jr. (Senior Columbia College) New York City 

Smith, Thayer Adams, A.B. Dartmouth 1910 New York City 

Steinhauser, William New York City 

St. George, Armin Von, Ph.C. 1910 Jersey City, N. J. 

Sullivan, Timothy Francis Xavier, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1907 New York City 

Titus, Norman Edwin, Ph.B. Yale 1910 New York City 

Vermilye, Herbert Noble, A.B. Princeton 1910 Orange, N. J. 

Weiss, Adolph Abraham, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Young, Ralph Howard (Senior Columbia College) Newport, R. I. 

Second Year — Class of 1914 63 

Seniors from Columbia College 9 

72 



FIRST YEAR— CLASS OF 1915 

Allison, Benjamin Roy, B.S. Dartmouth 191 1 Malone, N. Y. 

Baker, Willis Power Cranford, N. J. 

Berman, Louis New York City 

Bidwell, Alfred Morrell, Ph.B. Yale 191 1 Jersey City, N. J. 

Binderman, Saul Arthur, B.A. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Brokaw, Raymond Voorhees Plainfield, N. J. 

Burke, Edgar South Orange, N.J. 

Callan, Edward Joseph, A.B. Holy Cross 1910 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Carp, Louis New York City 

Clarke, Philip Henry Holyoke, Mass. 

Cleveland, Mather, A.B. Yale 1911 Denver, Col. 

CoLP, Ralph (Junior Columbia College) New York City 

CoLViN, William Putnam New York City 

Conklin, Cornelius S Ansonia, Conn. 

Dingman, Norman McLeod (Senior Columbia College) Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Dodd, Raymond Canfield, A.B. Williams 1911 Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Dold, Douglas Meriwether Astoria, N. Y. 

Felsen, Joseph, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 191 1 New York City 

Friedman, William New York City 

Goldstone, Joseph, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

GoTTESMAN, JuLius, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 191 1 New York City 

Greenberger, Morris New York City 

GusMANO, ViTTORio New York City 

Halsted, Halcyon, Pd.B. Colo. State Teachers College 1910 Greeley, Col. 

Haughwout, Frank Goddard New York City 

HOLZMAN, Martin (Junior Columbia College) New York City 

Kurd, Ralph Abram Stony Point, N. Y. 

Hyman, Julius, A.B. C. C. N. Y New York City 

Iaason, Alfred H. (Senior Columbia College) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jacobs, Alexander W New York City 

Jerskey, Abraham, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jessup, Everett Colgate, B.S. Princeton 1911 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Johnson, Harold Foote, A.B. Hamilton 1911 Oxford, N. Y. 

Johnson, Redford Kohlsaat New York City 

Kenny, John J Prince Edward Is., Can. 

Klein, Eugene (Junior Columbia College) New York City 

Kramer, Bertram, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Ladd, William Sargent, B.S. Amherst igro Portland, Ore. 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 247 



Lasher, Willis W Germantown, N. Y. 

Levy, Jerome (Junior Columbia College) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lewis, Raymond Williams, A.B. Yale 1911 New Britain, Conn. 

LoNGO, Thomas Joseph, A.B. Univ. of Paris 1899 Newark, N. J. 

McElvare, George Gerard (Junior Columbia College) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

McPherson, Charles A. J., A.B. Clark Univ. 1909 Wedowee, Ala. 

Martinson, Herman, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Mayer, Max David (Senior Columbia College) New York City 

Meleney, Henry Edmujtd, A.B. Dartmouth 1909 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Merritt, Howard Butler, A.B. Wesleyan 1910 New York City 

Michaels, Leo New York City 

Miller, Milton Valentine, B.S. Gettysburg 1911 Columbia, Pa. 

Moore, Charles Allerton (Junior Columbia College) Binghamton, N. Y. 

Moses, Joseph, A.M. 1909 New York City 

Newfield, Lewis Alfred, Ph.B. Brown 1911 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Nichols, Charles Fay, A.B. Oberlin 1911 Watkins, N. Y. 

Overton, John Arthur New York City 

Pardee, Irving Hotchkiss (Junior Columbia College) New York City 

Price, Joseph (Junior Columbia College) New York City 

Pyle, Edwin Yonkers, N. Y. 

Reynolds, Robert Jesse (Senior Columbia College) Potsdam, N. Y. 

Robinson, Victor, Ph.C. Coll. of Phar. 1911 New York City 

Rudolphy, Jay Besson Hoboken, N. J. 

Sanders, Theodore Michael (Senior Columbia College) New York City 

Schram, Clare Fred Nesbitt Oberlin, O. 

Seiff, Harry Joseph, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Smith, Alan De Forest (Junior Columbia College) New York City 

Smith, Harold Ellsworth, A.B. Yale 1911 New York City 

Smith, Oliver Harrison, A.B. Yale 1911 Hartford, Conn, 

SoBiN, Julius, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 Bayonne, N. J. 

Stearns, William Watkins (Senior Columbia College) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Steel, James Alexander, A.B. 1911 Las Cruces, Now Mex. 

Stevens, Albert Mason, A.B. Yale 1905 Brooklyn, N.IY. 

Stevens, Neil Campbell, A.B. Yale 1910 Morristown, N. J. 

St. Lawrence, Arthur John, Ph.B. Yale 1909 West Haven, Conn, 

Strauss, Irwin Dernham (Junior Columbia College) Holyoke, Mass. 

SussMAN, Henry Alexander, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1911 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Tanzola, Vincent (Junior Columbia College) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Taylor, Harold Williams, A.B. Columbia 1909 New York City 

Thomas, Clarence Proctor, A.B. Yale 1911 New York City 

Tracy, Grover, A.B. Gettysburg 1909 Leneboro, Md. 

Traxler, James Ernest Greenville, S. C. 

Unger, Jonas J., B.A. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Valensi, Albert (Junior Columbia College) New York City 

Young, John Joseph, A.B. St. Francis 1911 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ZiON, Lewis, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

First Year — Class of 191S 66 

Seniors from Columbia College 6 

Juniors from Columbia College 12 

84 



NON-MATRICULATED (SPECIAL) STUDENTS 
Non-matricul3,ted. .,.,.,.,...,...,,,., , , , 34 



248 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



SUMMARY 

Fourth Year — Class of 1912 91 

Third Year — Class of 1913 105 

Second Year — Class of 1914 63 

First Year — Class of 1915 66 

Non-matriculated (Special Students) ?J4 

349 
Juniors and Seniors from Columbia College 27 

Total 376 



THE SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERmG, AND 
CHEMISTRY 

The Faculty 

The President of the University 

Dean Goetze 

Professors Arendt, Beans, Berkey, Black, Blanchard, Bogert, 
BuRNSiDE, Burr, Campbell, Crocker, ^ Curtis, Davis, Fiske, Fite, 
Freas, Grabau, Hall, Hallock, Hawkes, Howe, Jacoby, Jones, Kemp, 
Kern, Keyser, Kurtz, Lovell, Lucke, Luquer, Maclay, Mayer, 
Metzger, Meylan, Miller, Mitchell (S. A.), Morecroft, Morgan 
(J. L. R.), Moses, Munroe, Parr, Peele, Pegram, Pupin, Rauten- 
strauch, Sherman (H. C), Slighter, Smith (Alexander), Thomas, 
Tucker, Walker, Wendell, Whitaker, Williams, Wills 

Officers of the Faculty 

Mr. Goetze Dean and ex-officio Member of the University Council 

Professor Jones Secretary 

Professor Munroe . . (Term expires 19 13) . .Elected Delegate to the University 

Council 
Professor Alexander Smith. . (Term expires 1914). .Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 

Standing Committee 

Committee on Instruction: The Dean (Chairman), Professors 
Kemp, Lovell, Lucke, Walker, Wendell, and Whitaker. 

COURSES 

The Faculty of Applied Science has charge of the following schools: 

The School of Mines, with four-year courses leading to the degrees 
of Engineer of Mines and Metallurgical Engineer. 

The School of Engineering, with four-year courses in Civil 
Engineering, Sanitary Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and 
Mechanical Engineering, the first two leading to the degree of Civil 
Engineer, and the others to the degree of Electrical Engineer and 
Mechanical Engineer, respectively. 

The School of Chemistry, with four-year courses leading to the 
degrees of Chemist and Chemical Engineer. 

^ Absent on leave 1911-12. 
249 



250 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

These courses are intended to meet the requirements of the several 
professions indicated. Many of the courses permit a certain amount 
of specialization, particularly in the fourth year. 

Candidates for a professional degree who have some special end in 
view are sometimes permitted to vary the regular course by substituting 
for the courses ordinarily prescribed, courses for other degrees offered 
under this Faculty. Students holding an academic degree who become 
candidates for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy 
may offer work in one or more of these branches of technology either as 
a major or a minor subject under the Faculty of Pure Science and 
will be given opportunity for special study and investigation. 

(See page i88) 
ADMISSION 
Collegiate Preparation Recommended 

The liberal training offered by a preliminary Collegiate Course is 
quite as important to engineers, metallurgists, and chemists as to law- 
yers, physicians, or clergymen, and is strongly recommended by the 
Faculty of Applied Science. This, however, does not and should not 
involve a residence of eight years in college and technical school before 
a candidate receives the professional degree. 

A graduate of any good college who has selected his course with 
reference to future work in applied science is able to complete the 
requirements for a degree in the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and 
Chemistry in three years or less after receiving the Bachelor's degree. 
The opportunities for close articulation between Columbia College and 
these Schools are particularly good. 

Requirements for Admission for Students without Collegiate Preparation 

(See page 176) 

Advanced Standing 

The uniform first year in the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and 
Chemistry, and the efficient coSrdination of the subsequent years, make 
it possible for graduates of colleges and scientific schools to enter Colum- 
bia University with advanced standing and to complete the require- 
ments for a professional degree without undue delay through conflicts 
and other causes. It is very desirable, however, that students in 
other colleges who are planning to take professional work after gradua- 
tion should get into correspondence with the University as early as 
possible. If this is done they may receive advice with regard to the 



ADMISSION 251 

most advantageous collegiate subjects to elect, and also with regard 
to the summer courses of Columbia University. By taking certain 
summer work at the University in advance, a student sometimes may 
save six months or a year in entering upon his professional career. 

Candidates for admission to advanced standing should make applica- 
tion in writing to the Chairman of the Committee on Undergraduate 
Admissions in time to reach him before September 19, 191 1.» The 
application must be accompanied by properly certified official state- 
ments of his standing in the subjects which he offers. 

The Committee will notify the candidate at the address given in his 
letter, between September 10 and 14, 1912, what courses of those 
offered are accepted as equivalent to courses at Columbia University. 
In general, the Committee gi /es credit for complete courses only. In 
cases where the work previously done by the candidate has not been 
accepted by the Committee, the candidate should present himself at 
regular fall examinations during the two weeks immediately preceding 
the opening of the University (in 1 9 1 2 , September 1 6-23) . For courses 
in which no regular fall examination is held, the candidate should 
report at the office of the Dean. The schedule of fall examinations is to 
be obtained from the Registrar. A fee of $5 is charged for these ex- 
aminations, to all applicants who do not take them at the regular time. 

No applicant will be allowed to enter the fourth-year class as a 
candidate for a degree after October 15 th in any year. 

It is suggested that candidates deficient in one or more entrance 
subjects in June, or who desire to make up first- and second-year sub- 
jects, arrange to take courses in them in the Summer Session of 
Columbia University, beginning on July 8, 1912, the Announcement 
of which will be sent upon application to the Secretary of the 
University. 

Admission to Special Courses 

Graduates of the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry, 
and of other institutions of equal grade may pursue any subjects 
taught in the schools for which they are properly qualified. 

Persons of mature age who are not graduates, but who show special 
qualifications, are sometimes permitted to pursue special courses, but 
this permission is not given to others. 

Registration and Fees 
(See page 42, et seq.) 

Fellowships and Scholarships 

(See page 432) 

' When the candidate is at a considerable distance from the University, his applica- 
tion should be made as early as possible in order that he may receive the reply in 
time to present himself at the University on September 16, 191 2. 



252 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 
Rules Governing Students 

1. A student cannot be a candidate for more than one professional 
degree at the same time. 

2. A candidate for a degree must comply with all requirements in 
force at the time said degree is conferred. 

3. A student will be permitted to substitute one subject for another 
provided he obtains the consent of the Dean, the heads of departments 
concerned, and the head of the department giving the technical instruc- 
tion leading to the degree. 

4. A student absent from more than one-tenth of the required exer- 
cises will be debarred from examination in that subject. No student 
shall be exempt from this regulation except by action of the Committee 
on Instruction. 

5. After examinations have been held, officers shall send to the Registrar 
a list of all students who have attended their courses, indicating pro- 
ficiency by numbers on a scale of 10, a mark below 6 signifying a failure 
to pass. Reports of standing will be sent to First- and Second-year students 
every five weeks and to the Third- and Fourth-year students at the end 
of each term. Copies of all reports are at the same time sent to the Dean, 
to the Faculty Adviser, and, in the case of First- and Second-year students, 
the parent or guardian. They will be sent to the parent or guardian of 
Third- and Fourth-year students only on request. 

6. Regular examinations shall be held at the end of the first half-year 
and at the end of the second half-year in all subjects offered during those 
respective periods. An examination may be held at the completion of 
any subject which does not extend throughout the given half-year. 

7. Special examinations for students deficient at regular examinations 
shall be held during the two weeks in September preceding the opening 
of the next following academic year; and for members of the Fourth class 
in subjects belonging to that year only, during the first week in May. 

Students who have been debarred are excluded from such examinations 
in accordance with the terms of the following rule. 

Any student who shall have been debarred from any midyear or final 
examination in any subject shall not be allowed to take a deficiency or 
make-up examination in said subject until he shall have repeated said 
course in class. 

8. Failure to pass a Summer Session course, credit for which would 
be accepted as equivalent to a regular undergraduate course in the Schools 
of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry, shall be counted, in case a student 
registers for said course, as one of the three failures referred to in Rule 

ID. 

9. The fee for special examinations is $5 for each course, which must 
be paid when the application is made. For special examinations in the 
September series the maximum fee is $25. 



RULES GOVERNING STUDENTS 253 

10. A student failing to pass in any subject at the regular examina- 
tions must present himself for special examination as provided under 
Rule 7. 

Failing to pass the second examination, he must repeat the subject 
with the next class. Failing a third time to pass a satisfactory examina- 
tion he may be dropped from the roll of the School. 

11. Absence from any regular or special examination provided for in 
Rules 7 and 8 shall count as a failure unless excused by the Dean for 
reasons of weight. 

12. No student having an entrance deficiency shall be permitted to 
register for any subject of the second, third, or fourth year without the 
written consent of the Dean, and no student shall be permitted to register 
for any subject the prerequisites for which have not been satisfied by him 
unless the Dean, for reasons of weight, grants him special permission. 

13. Any student who shall have passed a satisfactory examination in 
Columbia College in any subject forming a part of one of the professional 
courses in the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry will not be 
required to pursue that subject a second time. 

14. During vacations following the close of each year, memoirs on 
assigned subjects must be prepared by the students in the courses of 
Mining, Metallurgy, Civil Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical 
Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Chemistry. The time specified 
for the completion and handing in of memoirs will be as stated in the re- 
spective departmental announcements. 

A student failing to hand in his memoir, drawings, or other summer 
work at the time specified by the department in which he is registered 
shall be considered to have failed; to have his work received later, he 
will be obliged to pay a fee of $5, as for a special examination. 

15. By permission of the Dean, and concurrence of the heads of depart- 
ments concerned, a student may attend subjects not required for his 
degree, provided such attendance does not interfere with his regular 
work. He must fulfil all the requirements exacted from regular students 
in such course. 

Application for each special examination, except as provided below, 
must be filed at the office of the Registrar at least one week before the 
examination is to be taken, and in September and May at least one week 
before the first day of the respective examination period (in 1911-12 not 
later than Monday, September 11, and Monday, April 22, respectively). 
For later application an additional fee of $5 for any examination or series 
of examinations will be charged. Applications must be made on blanks 
(one for each course) to be obtained from the Registrar. 

During the academic year students will be held responsible for the 
receipt of reports and other official communications sent to them at the 
coat room in Havemeyer Hall. During the summer vacation they will 
be held responsible for the receipt of such communications sent to their 



254 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

home address as given on their registration blank for the preceding 
year. 

Admission on Probation 

Every first-year student admitted conditionally will be held under 
probation during the first half-year of residence. So far as possible 
students on probation are given the opportunity in Columbia College 
or in the Department of Extension Teaching to make good their de- 
ficiencies. Not later than the end of this period, the Dean, on the 
basis of reports from the head of each department in which the student 
is registered, will decide whether he shall be admitted to full standing, 
have his period of probation extended, or be dropped from the roll. 
The mark of 7 or higher, obtained in any subject at the end of the first 
half-year of residence, will be regarded as removing an entrance con- 
dition in that subject, unless the condition was incurred in a part of the 
subject not directly involved in the work of the course. Any condition 
not so removed must be satisfied by formal examination. 

Equipment and Collections 

Detailed information as to the laboratories, museums, collections, 
libraries, and other facilities for study and research will be found in 
the departmental statements as follows: 

Chemistry, page 73. 

Civil and Sanitary Engineering, page 79. 

Electrical Engineering, page loi. 

Geology, page no. 

Mechanical Engineering, page 130. 

Metallurgy, page 132. 

Mineralogy, page 134 

Mining, page 135. 

Physics, page 157. 

SUMMARY OF PROFESSIONAL COURSES OF STUDY 

Note: Detailed tabular arrangements of each year of these courses 
will be found in the Announcement of the Schools of Mines, Engineering, 
and Chemistry. (See also Departmental Statements, pages 57-175) 

Uniform Curriculum for the First Year 

The curriculum for the first year of the four-year courses leading 
to the degrees of Engineer of Mines, Metallurgical, Civil, Electrical, 
Mechanical, and Chemical Engineer and Chemist is the same in every 
respect and the student entering the first-year class need not declare 



SUMMARY OF PROFESSIONAL COURSES OF STUDY 255 

which course he will follow until the end of the year, when he will 
have the advantage of the experience gained during the first year's 
work, where uncertainty exists respecting inclination or natural 
bent. 

As will be seen in the tabular statement given below this first year 
is mainly devoted to a thorough grounding in mathematics, physics, 
and chemistry, the three fundamental subjects which form the indis- 
pensable basis for all broad and successful engineering work, not only 
in the remaining years of the course, but throughout the entire pro- 
fessional career. Specialization begins to some extent in the second 
year and becomes more marked in the third and fourth years. 

The class is arranged in two divisions, Division B completing 
engineering drafting and descriptive geometry in the first term while 
Division A is completing general inorganic chemistry and qualitative 
analysis, the two divisions reversing the operation in the second term. 
This plan secures greater [concentration ^of work ; it facilitates the 
transfer of students to advanced standing from other institutions ; and 
it enables well prepared students entering in February and taking 
advantage of the University Summer Session to catch up with their 
class by the following autumn. 

To secure the most effective individual instruction the class is 
also divided for quizzes and recitations into six, eight, and twelve 
sections. 



First Half -Year 



Hours per week 



Class Lab'y 



Drafting i 
Drafting 3 
Mathematics i 
Mathematics 3 
Mechanics i 
Phys. Eduo. A 
Physics 3 



Engineering Drafting 

Descriptive Geometry 

Algebra 

Analytical Geometry 

Elementary Mechanics 

Gymnasium 

Mechanics, Wave Motion, and Heat 



Total.. 



16 



16 



Second Half -Year 



Civil Eng. a 
Chemistry 4 
Chemistry 02 
Mathematics 64 
Phys. Educ. A 
Physics 4 



Theory of Surveying 
General Inorganic Chemistry 
Qualitative Analysis 
DifiFerential Calculus 
Gymnasium 
Heat and Light 



Total. 



SuM.MER Work: Civil Eng. 155. Five weeks of surveying practice. 



13 



256 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

Leading to the Degree of Engineer of Mines 

The four-year course leading to the degree of Engineer of Mines 
is intended primarily to train men to undertake the development of 
mineral properties, the design and construction of mine plants, and 
to manage mines. The course includes training in metallurgy. It is 
necessarily a broad one, comprising a wide range of studies in pure and 
applied science, and for this reason is frequently taken by students 
desiring a general scientific training. 

The subjects most emphasized in this course are mining, metallurgy, 
geology, and engineering. 

Metallurgy requires knowledge of inorganic and applied chemistiy, 
qualitative and quantitative analysis, and assaying. 

Geology must carry with it preliminary training in crystallography, 
mineralogy, and petrography. 

Engineering in all its branches needs a fundamental knowledge 



' SECOND YEAR 




2 THIRD YEAR 




FOURTH YEAR 


First Half-Year 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Civil Eng. 23 
Drafting 7 
Geology 5 
Physics 5 
Mathematics 65 
Mineralogy i 
Phys. Educ. B 

Total hours 


2 

3 
S 
5 
3 


3 
3 

6 
2 


Civil Eng. 53 
Civil Eng. 53 
Metallurgy 69 
Geology 105 
Mech. Eng. 13 
Mech. Eng. 17 
Mining 51 


S 

2 
3 
3 
2 
3 


3 
3 
9 


Elect. Eng. 75 
Geology 201 
Metallurgy loi, 

III 
Metallurgy 131, 

141 
Mining 71 
Mining 73 
Mining 75 
Mining 81 
Mining 91 


I 
3 

3 

I 

4 
2 


3 

12 


18 


14 


18 


15 


16 


IS 


Second Half-Year 


Chemistry 66 
Chemistry 82 
Elect. Eng. 3 
Geology 6 
Mechanics 103 
Mineralogy 2 
Phys. Educ. B 

Total hours 


3 
3 
2 
3 
5 
3 


13 

2 


Civil Eng. 54 
Civil Eng. 64 
Elect. Eng. 7a 
Elect. Eng. 4 
Geology 4 
Geology 106 
Mech. Eng. 14 
Mech. Eng. 76 
Mineralogy 6 
Mining 52 
Mining 54 


I 
2 

3 

3 

I 

2 
3 


3 
3 
3 

3 

3 
3 


Civil Eng. 76 
Geology 16 
Geology no 
Mech. Eng. 74 
Metallurgy 72 
Metallurgy 122 
Mining 56 
Mining 72 
Mining 78 
Mining 80 
Mining 82 
Mining 94 


2 

2 
2 

3 
3 
3 

I 

2' 


2 

12 
3 

17 


19 


IS 


15 


18 


18 



For significance of course numbers see pages 57-175. 

1 Summer work: Civil Engineering 27s and 28s (eight weeks). 

» Summer work: Field work, Mining, Metallurgy, and Geology (eight weeks). 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



257 



of mathematics, physics, mechanics, and thermodynamics. The 
proper design and construction of mining plants involve the study of 
certain branches of civil engineering, and the many and increasing 
applications of machinery to mining make it necessary to give much 
time to the theory and practice of mechanical and electrical engineering. 

Leading to the Degree of Metallurgical Engineer 

This course, which covers four years, is intended for those who expect 
to follow metallurgical work and become trained metallurgists in any 
of the branches of the profession. For the first two years much atten- 
tion is paid to a thorough training in fundamental subjects, especially 
in mathematics, chemistry, physics, geology, mineralogy, and prelimi- 
nary courses in engineering. In the third year instruction in metal- 
lurgy begins both by lectures and in the laboratories, while courses in 



I SECOND YEAR 


2 THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


First Half-Year 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Civil Eng. 23 
Drafting 7 
Geology S 
Mathematics 65 
Mineralogy 7 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics s 
Physics 43 

Total hours 


2 
3 
S 

S 
3 


3 

3 

3 
2 
6 


Civil Eng. 53 
Metallurgy 69, 

181 
Geology 103 
Mech. Eng. 13 
Metallurgy loi 
Metallurgy iii 


5 

2 
3 
3 

I 
2 

16 


6 
9 

IS 


Chemistry 121 
Elect. Eng. 75 
Mech. Eng. 17 
Metallurgy 131 
Metallurgy 141 
Metallurgy 151 
Metallurgy 171 
Metallurgy 175 
Metallurgy 177 
Mining 73 
Mining 8l 
Mining 91 


3 

I 
2 
I 
I 
2 

I 

I 
4 
2 


9 
3 

12 


18 


17 


18 


Second Half-Year 


Chemistry 66 
Chemistry 82 
Elect. Eng. 2 
Geology 6 
Mechanics 102 
Mineralogy 8 
Phys. Educ. B 

Total hours 


3 
3 
2 

3 
5 


12 

2 
3 


Civil Eng. 64 
Civil Eng. 76 
Elect. Eng. 72 
Elect. Eng. 104 
Geology 4 
Geology 106 
Mech. Eng. 14 
Metallurgy 122 
Mineralogy 6 
Mining 54 


I 
2 
I 
2 

3 
3 
3 

3 


3 
3 
3 

3 
3 


Chemistry 122 
Mech. Eng. 72 
Mech. Eng. 76 
Metallurgy 118 
Metallurgy 128 
Metallurgy 138 
Metallurgy 148 
Metallurgy 172 
Mining 80 
Mining 82 
Mining 94 


3 
2 

I 
2 


3 
3 

6 
3 


16 


17 


18 


15 


13 


IS 



For significance of course numbers see pages S7-17S. 

1 Summer courses: Civil Engineering 37s (five weeks); Civil Engineering 28s (three 
weeks). 

' Summer courses: Metallurgy 66s (three weeks); Metallurgy 64s (three weeks); 
Geology iias (one week). 



258 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 



engineering, especially mechanical engineering, chemistry, and geology, 
are also provided for. The fourth year is devoted largely to advanced 
courses in metallurgy, and great stress is laid on giving, by laboratory 
work, familiarity with difficult high-temperature conditions of metal- 
lurgy, skill in miscroscopy and pyrometry, and training in execution and 
in the interpretation of the results developed. At the same time atten- 
tion is devotedtothe higherbranches of engineering and chemistry and to 
important courses in mining engineering which are considered necessary. 
In the summer schools, carefully arranged courses in general survey- 
ing, in railroad work, geological field work, and visits to metallurgical 
works are provided for. In the six weeks' summer courses at metal- 
lurgical works, the students are required to carefvdly study processes, 
make dimensioned sketches of furnaces and mills, and by observation 
and instruction are given a thorough understanding of metallurgical 
operations as conducted at the present time. 

Leading to the Degree of Civil Engineer 

The courses of study given in the Department of Civil Engineering 
are so formulated as to constitute broad educational training of a 



« SECOND YEAR 


2 THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


First Half-Year 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 

3 
3 

2 

2 

3 
3 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 

4 
2 
2 
3 
2 

I 


Lab'y 


Botany 7 
Drafting S 
Mathematics 65 
Mech. Eng. 13 
Mineralogy 5 
Mining S3 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics 5 
Physics 43 
Shopwork 15 

Total hours 


I 

S 
3 
2 
2 

S 


Astronomy ids 
Civil Eng. 21 
Civil Eng. 51 
Civil Eng. 53 
Civil Eng. 53 
Civil Eng. 59 
Civil Eng. 61 
Mech. Eng. 17 
Mech. Eng. 77 


3 

I 
2 
S 

2 
2 
2 

I 


I 
3 

3 

3 


Civil Eng. 75 
Civil Eng. 85 
Civil Eng. 87 
Civil Eng. 89 
Civil Eng. 97 
Civil Eng. 99 
Mech. Eng. 41 
Mech. Eng. 63 


3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 


18 


16 




18 


IS 


14 


18 


Second Half -Year 


Chemistry 82 
Drafting 6 
Drafting 8 
Elect. Eng. 2 
Geology 18 
Mech. Eng. 14 
Mechanics 102 
Metallurgy 134 
Phys. Educ B 
Physics 44 
Shopwork 16 

Total hours 


3 

2 
3 
3 
5 
2 


3 
6 

*3 

2 
3 
3 


Astronomy 106 
Civil Eng. 52 
Civil Eng. 54 
Civil Eng. 58 
Civil Eng. 62 
Elect. Eng. 72 
Elect. Eng. 4 
Mech. Eng. 18 
Mech. Eng. 78 


I 
3 

3 
2 
I 
2 
2 
3 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Civil Eng. 88 
Civil Eng. 90 
Civil Eng. 94 
Civil Eng. 100 
Elect. Eng. 76 
Elect. Eng. 112 
Law 2 
Mech. Eng. 46 


2 

3 

2 
3 

I 
2 
2 
3 

18 


3 
3 

6 
3 

IS 


17 


18 


18 


20 



For significance of course numbers see pages S7-I7S. 
* Saturday afternoon during April and May. 

1 Summer work: Civil Engineering 253 (five weeks). 

2 Summer work: Civil Engineering 26s, Astronomy 107S (five weeks); Civil En- 
gineering lois (four weeks). 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



259 



professional character for students intending to follow the practice of 
civil engineering or such other affiUated callings as may be based 
more or less upon the various branches of civil engineering. These 
courses of study can be taken more advantageously if the student has 
had a preliminary general training equivalent to that of an ordinary 
college course although that condition is not a requisite. Through 
these courses of study there is set forth a thorough grounding in the 
fundamental principles of engineering science as the first essential, 
supplemented, however, by constant exercises in the application of 
those fundamental principles to all the operations of the civil engineer, 
involving structures, machines, and processes connected with the 
adaptation and transmission of power for industrial and other purposes. 

Sanitary Engineering 
The course in Sanitary Engineering is a differentiation from the 
regular course in Civil Engineering and naturally leads, therefore, to 
the same degree. The first year is identical with the first year of other 
engineering courses, while the second year is almost identical with the 
regular second-year work of the course in Civil Engineering. The special 



> SECOND YEAR 2 THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


First Half -Year 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Botany 7 
Chemistry 65 
Drafting S 
Math. 6S 
Mech. Eng. 13 
Mineralogy S 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics S 

Total hours 


I 
2 

5 
3 
2 

S 


3 
6 

4 

2 
2 


Civil Eng. 21 
Zoology 7 1 
Bacteriology > 
lOI ) 
Chemistry 41 
Civil Eng. 51 
Civil Eng. S3 
Civil Eng. S3 
Civil Eng. 59 
Civil Eng. 61 


I 

2 

2 
2 
S 

2 

2 

16 


6 

3 
3 
3 

3 

18 


Civil Eng. 75 
CivU Eng. 8S 
CivU Eng. 87 
CivU Eng. 89 
CivU Eng. 97 
CivU Eng. 55 
CivU Eng. 57a 1 
CivU Eng. 57b f 
Mech. Eng. 17 
Mech. Eng. 63 


4 
2 
2 
3 
2 

2 
2 


3 
3 

6 
3 


18 


17 


17 


15 


Second Half -Year 1 


Chemistry 82 
Chemistry 92a 
Drafting 8 
Elect. Eng. 2 
Geology 18 
Mechanics 102 
Mech. Eng. 14 
Metallurgy 134 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics 44 
Shop work 16 

Total hours 


3 

2 
3 
5 
3 
2 


*2 
3 

*3 

2 
6 
3 


Chemistry 42 
Civil Eng. 52 
Civil Eng. 54 
Civil Eng. 58 
Civil Eng. 62 
Elect. Eng. 72 
Elect. Eng. 4 
Mech. Eng. 78 


2 
3 

3 

2 
I 
2 
3 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


Civil Eng. 90 
CivU Eng. 94 
Civil Eng. 96 
Civil Eng. 100 
Elect. Eng. 76 
Law 2 

Mech. Eng. 76 
Mech. Eng. 82 


3 

2 
3 

I 
2 

I 
3 


3 

6 
3 

3 


18 


19 


16 


IS 


IS 


IS 



For significance of course numbers see pages 57-175. 

* February and March — Microscopy; April and May — Geology. 

1 Summer work: CivU Engineering 2Ss (five weeks). 

2 Summer work: CivU Engineering a6s, Astronomy 107S (five weeks); Civil Engin- 
eering 71S (four weeks). 



260 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 



extensions in sanitary work are developed in the third and fourth 
years. It will be found that these sanitary subjects are set forth so 
as to cover in a thorough and comprehensive way those special fields 
occupied by the sanitary engineer of the present day. They include 
the sanitary treatment of water supplies and sewage with special work 
extended both by lectures and laboratory work into biology and bac- 
teriology, standard laboratory methods in the sanitary administration 
of public water supplies, drainage, heating, and ventilation and the 
general principles of sanitary science, public health, and hygiene. These 
sanitary specialties are of advanced character, covering the latest in- 
vestigations in such special work as daily bacterial tests of potable 
water for public purposes, the extermination of mosquitoes and other 
disease-carrying insects, the improvement of public health conditions 
fotmd in cities and towns, the drainage and sanitary treatment of lands 
and the sanitary administration of buildings and industrial establish- 
ments liable to create nuisances. A graduate, therefore, of this course 
is qualified to enter the advanced practice of sanitary engineering 
in all its special fields. 

Leading to the Degree of Electrical Engineer 
The objects for which the regular four-year course in Electrical 
Engineering is designed and the education which it is intended to give 
are fully set forth in the Announcement. 



» SECOND YEAR 


1 THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


First Half -Year 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 

6 
3 

2 
3 
3 


Courses 


1 
Class Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Chemistry 65 
Drafting 5 
Mathematics 65 
Mech. Eng. 13 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics 5 
Physics 43 
Physics 105 
Shopwork 13 

Total hours 


2 

S 
3 

5 

2 


Civil Eng. 53 
Civil Eng. 53 
Civil Eng. 77 
Elect. Eng. loi 
Elect. Eng. 173 
Mech. Eng. 17 
Mech. Eng. 41 
Mechanics 105 
Mechanics 107 


5 
2 

2 

I 
2 
2 


3 
3 

6 
3 


Chemistry 183 
Elect. Eng. 103 
Elect. Eng. 105 
Elect. Eng. 109 
Elect. Eng. 175 
Elect. Eng. 177 
Mech. Eng. 53 
Mech. Eng. 77 
Mechanics 109 


2 
3 
3 

I 
I 
I 
2 
I 
4 


3 

6 
6 

3 


17 


17 


17 IS 


18 


18 


Second Half -Year 


Chemistry 38 
Chemistry 83 
Drafting 6 
Drafting 8 
Elect. Eng. 2 
Mech. Eng. 14 
Mechanics 102 
Metallurgy 134 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics 44 
Shopwork 14 

Total hours 


2 
3 

I 

2 
3 
S 

3 


3 
6 

2 
3 
3 


Economics 2 
Elect. Eng. 52 
Elect. Eng. 104 
Elect. Eng. 174 
Mech. Eng. 18 
Mech. Eng. 36 
Mech. Eng. 76 
Mechanics 108 


3 
2 

3 

2 

I 
3 


3 

3 

6 
3 


Elect. Eng. 
Elect. Eng. 54 1 
Phy. 53 f 
Elect. Eng. 106 
Elect. Eng. 108 
Elect. Eng. no 
Elect. Eng. Ii3 
Elect. Eng. 176 
Mech. Eng. 56 
Mech. Eng. 60 
Mech. Eng. 73 
Mechanics no 


2 

2 

I 
2 
I 
I 

2 
2 


3 
3 

li 

8 

Ij 
3 


18 


17 


14 


IS 


13 


20 



For significance of course numbers see pages S7~i7S. 



1 Summer memoir. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



261 



The first two years of the course are devoted to the fundamental 
subjects, including mathematics, physics, chemistry, mechanics, draw- 
ing, and certain electrical and mechanical engineering subjects which 
are elementary or introductory in character. 

These fundamental and introductory subjects are intended to lay 
a broad and substantial foundation upon which the more specialized 
professional instruction of the third and fourth years is based. Even 
in these later years theoretical subjects, such as thermodynamics and 
electrical theory, are included and given most careful attention. 

Leading to the Degree of Mechanical Engineer 

The first two years of this course are devoted to essential prepara- 
tory and fundamental subjects, mathematics, chemistry, physics, 
anal3rtical mechanics, and drawing, which are co-ordinated with kine- 
matics, elementary design, shopwork, and the elements of electrical 
and steam engineering. In the third year there are developed the 
basic principles of thermodynamics, resistance of materials, and hy- 



« SECOND YEAR 


2 THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


First Half -Year 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Drafting 7 
Mathematics 65 
Mech. Eng. 11 
Mech. Eng. 35 
Mech. Eng. S9 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics 5 
Physics 43 
Shopwork i 

Total hours 


5 
3 

2 
S 


3 

3 
3 
2 

3 
6 


Civil Eng. 53 
Elect. Eng. 73 
Elect. Eng. loi 
Mech. Eng. 17 
Mech. Eng. 31 
Mech. Eng. 39 
Mechanics 105 
Shopwork n 


S 

2 

2 

I 
I 
2 


3 
3 

3 
6 

6 


Elect. Eng. 75 
Elect. Eng. 103 
Elect. Eng. 105 
Mech. Eng. 19 
Mech. Eng. 25 
Mech. Eng. 33 
Mech. Eng. 53 


I 
2 
2 
3 
3 
2 
2 


3 

6 
6 
3 


IS 


20 


13 


21 


IS 


18 


Second Half-Year 


Chemistry 82 
Elect. Eng. 2 
Mech. Eng. 12 
Mech. Eng. 36 
Mechanics 102 
Metallurgy 134 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics 44 
Shopwork 2 
Shopwork 12 

Total hours 


3 
2 
3 

S 
2 


3 
3 

2 

3 
3 
6 


Civil Eng. 54 
Civil Eng. 78 
Elect. Eng. 4 
Mech. Eng. 18 
Mech. Eng. 32 
Mech. Eng. 40 
Mech. Eng. 54 
Mech. Eng. 62 
Mech. Eng. 64 
Mech. Eng. 66 
Mech. Eng. 70 
Mech. Eng. 60 1 
Metallurgy 156 ( 


2 
2 
2 

I 
2 
2 

I 
2 

I 
2 

I 


3 

3 
6 

3 


Economics 2 
Law 2 
Mech. Eng. 20 
Mech. Eng. 22 
Mech. Eng. 46 
Mech. Eng. 52 
Mech. Eng. 68 


3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
2 

20 


6 
3 

3 
12 


IS 


20 


18 


IS 



For significance of course numbers see pages 57-175. 

• Summer work: Shopwork los, 125 hours in College shops; Mech. Eng. 94s, 
six weeks' practical work in shops and drafting rooms of manufacturing establish- 
ments, with report: a total of nine weeks. 

2 Summer work: Mech. Eng. g6s (six weeks' practical experience in power plant 
wltbAreport). 



262 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 



draulics, which are fixed in the mind of the student by drill in the 
drafting room by design courses, in the laboratory by experiments and 
tests, and in class by analysis of standard mechanical and electrical 
machinery. The fourth year is devoted to a detailed treatment of 
gas and steam engine design, standard water turbine characteristics, 
and the essential relations between units constituting power plants 
and factories. Special attention is here paid to the economics of 
mechanical engineering by courses in industrial law, economics, and 
works management. Throughout the course the aim is to develop 
clear conceptions of underlying principles, habits of independent 
thought and orderly mental procedure applicable to any sort of 
mechanical engineering problems rather than to the memorization of 
isolated facts. The training given not only fits the student to take up the 
design of machinery and the perfection of processes of doing things by 
mechanical means, but also to take ultimately a leading place in the man- 
agement of the manufacturing and transportation industries. 

Leading to the Degree of Chemical Engineer 

The course in chemical engineering, as will be seen, is designed 
to educate chemists with a sufficient amount of engineering to fit them 



» SECOND YEAR 


2 THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


First Half-Year 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Chemistry 41 
Chemistry 163 
Mathematics 65 
Mineralogy 15 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics S 
Physics 43 

Total hours 


2 

4 
5 

5 


9 

3 
2 

3 


Civil Eng. S3 
Chemistry 83 
Chemistry 171 
Mech. Eng. 13 
Mech. Eng. 59 
Metallurgy 131 
Metallurgy 141 


5 
3 

4 
3 
2 

I 
I 


3 
9 
3 


CivU Eng. 77 
Chemistry 89 
Chemistry 197 
Chemistry 121 
Mech. Eng. 17 
Mech. Eng. 37 
Mech. Eng. 77 
Metallurgy 101, 
III 


2 

3 
3 

2 

I 
I 

3 


3 

2 

6 
3 


16 


17 


19 


IS 


IS 


14 


Second Half -Year 


Chemistry 42 
Chemistry 82 
Chemistry 164 
Elect. Eng. 2 
Mechanics 102 
Mineralogy 16 
Phys. Educ. B 
Physics 44 

Total hours 


2 
3 

4 
2 
S 


12 

3 
2 
3 


Civil Eng. 54 
Chemistry 84 
Chemistry 150 
Elect. Eng. 72 
Elect. Eng. 4 
Law 2 

Mech. Eng. 14 
Mech. Eng. 70 


3 

2 

2 

3 
2 


3 

9 
3 

2 


Chemistry 198 
Chemistry 122 
Chemistry 184 
Mech. Eng. 18 
Mech. Eng. 52 
Mech. Eng. 76 
Metallurgy 172 
Metallurgy 122 
Thesis 


3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
I 

3 


3 

3 

2 

9 


16 


20 


12 


17 


16 


17 



For significance of course numbers see pages 57-175. 

' Summer work: Chemistry 80a, Chemistry 69s, Shopwork i8s (three weeks in June). 
Summer work: Chemistry Sob; Chemical factory work with memoir (six weeks). 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



263 



to take charge of chemical works which depend largely on the use of 
machinery. This requires a knowledge of mechanical engineering, 
electrical engineering, hydraulics, mechanical drawing, shopwork, etc., 
as well as a thorough knowledge of chemistry in all its branches. 

Leading to the Degree of Chetaist 

The regular four-year course of instruction is designed for the edu- 
cation of professional chemists who intend to devote their lives to the 
practice of this profession, either as teachers in colleges and scientific 
schools, after further preparation, or as chemists or research chemists 
in manufacturing and other industrial enterprises. 

The course in chemistry includes not only all branches of theoretical, 
analytical, and industrial chemistry, but also collateral sciences, such 
as mathematics, mechanics, physics, mineralogy, metallurgy, mechani- 
cal and electrical engineering, and drawing, which have been found by 



1 SECOND YEAR 


2 THIRD YEAR 


FOURTH YEAR 


First Half -Year 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Courses 


Class 


Lab'y 


Chemistry 21 


2 




Chemistry 83 


3 




Chemistry 7 ") 
Chemistry 23 






Chemistry 41 


2 




Chemistry loi 


2 








Chemistry 163 


4 


12 


Chemistry 171 


4 


IS 


Chemistry 93 






Mathematics 63 


5 




Chemistry 183 


I 




Chemistry 95 ■ 


2 




Mineralogy 15 




3 


Mech. Eng. 13 


3 : 




Chemistry 143 






Phys. Educ. B 




2 


Metallurgy 131 


I 




Chemistry 167 
Chemistry 173 . 






Physics 5 


5 




Metallurgy 141 


I 




















Chemistry 89 




3 














Chemistry 121 


3 


2 














Chemistry 141 


S 


12 














Metallurgy loi, 


















III 


3 




Total hours 


18 


17 




IS 


IS 




13 


17 






Second Ha 


If -Yea 


r 








Chemistry 22 


3 


2 


Chemistry 84 


3 




Chemistry 122 


3 




Chemistry 42 


2 




Chemistry 88 




6 


Chemistry 142 


5 




Chemistry 82 


3 




Chemistry 102 


2 




Metallurgy 122 


3 




Chemistry 164 


4 


12 


Chemistry 170 


2 


9 


Thesis — 


2 


15 


Elect. Eng. 2 


2 




Chemistry 184 


I 


3 


Chemistry 8 






Mechanics 102 


5 




Mech. Eng. 14 


3 




Chemistry 24 






Mineralogy 16 




3 








Chemistry 94 






Phys. Educ. B 




2 








Chemistry 96 
Chemistry 144 
Chemistry 168 
Chemistry 174 






Total hours 












Chemistry 176 






19 


19 


II 


18 


13 


IS 



For significance of course numbers see pages 57-175. 

' Summer Work: Chemistry 80a, memoir. *. Summer Work: Chemistry Sob, memoir. 



264 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

experience to be required by the professional chemist. It is the inten- 
tion to provide the graduate not only with a thorough knowledge of the 
principles and practice of chemistry in all its branches, but with such a 
broad and liberal education in the collateral sciences as will prepare him 
for every demand that will be likely to be made upon him in connection 
with his profession or in the pursuit of investigation. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry 

FOURTH YEAR— CLASS OF 1012 

Mining Engineering 

Beadle, John B Washington, D. C. 

Beam, John Cooke, B.S. Princeton ipog Bogota, N. J. 

Becker, Philip Frank, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1907 New York City 

Bell, James E New York City 

Brown, Thomas Ellis, .3d New York City 

Carney, Cyril T., B.Sc. Iowa 1910 Grinnell, Iowa 

Claghorn, James L New York City 

Cook, Edgar Hawley Albany, N. Y. 

Cornwall, Harry Forsyth Short Hills, N. J. 

Donaldson, Kenneth Hume New York City 

Dub, George David, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Hanke, Adolph G Cincinnati, Ohio 

Hazzard, Lynne Franklin Bisbee, Ariz. 

Heller, Milton White, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Hinman, Edward, Jr., A.B. 1910 New York City 

Hoyt, John Terrell Salt Lake City, Utah 

Kearney, George S Minneapolis, Minn. 

Kleinbaum, Elihu Nathan, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Kraft, Philip, Jr., B.S. 1910 New York City 

LovEjOY, John M New Rochelle, N. Y. 

McArdle, William Henry New York City 

McKeown, Samuel Anderson New York City 

Marquardt, Ernest New York City 

Moffett, James Henry Clyde Minneapolis, Minn. 

Moore, James Isaac, Jr New York City 

Mudd, Harvey Seeley Los Angeles, Calif. 

NoRRis, William M., Jr., A.B. Princeton 1910 Princeton, N. J. 

Patterson, Richard Cunningham, Jr Kansas City, Mo. 

Peters, William Frederick, Jr New York City 

Ruthardt, Rudolf Maximilian New York City 

Salsbury, Milton New York City 

Scheuch, William Allen New York City 

Semple, Robert Alexander Glasgow, Scotland 

Sethna, Nanabhoy Rustomji, L.C.E. Bombay 1905 Kalyan, India 

Shaw, George Augustus New York City 

SiLVERSTEiN, ISRAEL Philip Passaic, N. J. 

Skinner, Thomas Wayne Dunmore, Pa. 

Staiger, Bertram C Newark, N. J. 

Steindler, Eugene Lobner New York City 

SwARTZ, Milton D Baltimore, Md. 

Tarantous, Richard, B.S. C.C.N.Y 1908 New. York City 

265 



266 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

Tashof, Ivan Poppers "Washington, D. C. 

Trillich, Bertram Laurence New York City 

Wagner, Frank H Buffalo, N. Y. 

Wood, Jay Pendleton New York City 

[45] 

Civil Engineering 

Ananieff, Vladimir Moscow, Russia 

Barbero, George Rye, N. Y. 

BoLGER, Paul Samuel Louis, B.E. Cooper Union 1910 New York City 

Bradley, Seymour M., Ph.B. Yale 1909 New Haven, Conn. 

Broockmann, Oscar William Ernst New York City 

Burr, George Lindsley, A.B. Harvard 1910 New Canaan, Conn. 

Cocco, Miguel Angel Puerto Plato, Dominican Rep. 

Colas, Nicholas New York City 

Der Garabedian, Michael, B.S. 1910 Yonkers, N. Y. 

DoLOViriTZ, Alexander, B.S. Cooper Union 1909 New York City 

Golden. Theodore New York City 

Hadden, Gavin, A.B. Harvard 1910 New York City 

LoEWY, Jerome, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

McGiNLEY, John J., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Miller, Walter Reginald West Park, N. Y. 

NooRiAN, N. Z New York City 

Radigan, Francis Joseph Jersey City, N. J. 

Rose, Joseph New York City 

Samuels, Milton New York City 

Schlossman, William Mayer, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Smith, Jay Lee New York City 

Valentine, Claude Harry New York City 

Verplanck, Edward Fenno Fishkill-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Weiss, Benjamin ; New York City 

Welle, Eberhard Paterson, N. J. 

[2Sl 

Electrical Engineering 

Dickson, Walter Simmonds, B.E. Cooper Union 1908 Arlington, N. J. 

FiNLEY, Cecil Johnston New York City 

Haines, William Howard Englewood, N. J. 

Levy, Louis Edward New York City 

Loebenstein, Julian New York City 

Mellen, Henry Luther, A.B. 1910 Middlebury, Vt. 

Shakin, Victor New York City 

Stern, Kenneth Gibson, A.B. Princeton 1909 Westfield. N. J. 

Walter, Louis Maspeth, N. Y. 

White, William Comings Englewood, N. J. 

[10] 

Mechanical Engineering 

Baumeister, Paul A New York City 

Benson, CD New York City 

Butcher, Willard Ferris Bridgeport, Conn. 

Demorest, William J New York City 

Eddison, Willi.^m Barton Irvington, N. Y. 

Entelmann, John Henry New York City 

Evans, Herbert W New York City 



FOURTH YEAR CLASS 267 

Geiger, Herman Roland New York City 

Greene, Harry Talmage, Jr New York City 

Gref, William New York City 

Haaren, William Frederick New York City 

Haynes, James Leroy New York City 

Hendrickson. Niels Edwin New York City 

Hubbard, Edgar W New York City 

Lassman, Benjamin New York City 

Levy, Alfred K New York City 

MacDermott, Stewart Sinclair New York City 

McClelland, George Eraser Berlin, Germany 

McIver, Francis Fergus, Jr New York City 

McLeod, Robert Henry Passaic, N. J. 

Maguire, Cedric Ferris, B.S. rgii New York City 

Maynz, Theodore, A.B. Harvard 1910 New York City 

Montgomery, Graham Livingston New York City 

MosHER, Edgar Hemingway New York City 

Murphy, Eugene Allston Rochester, N. Y. 

Riley, Wells Littlefield New York City 

Rogowski, Bruno New York City 

Schede, Ferdinand Carl Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Tag, Walter New York City 

Wegener, Francis A New York City 

Wetjen, Henry W New York City 

[31] 

Chemical Engineering 

Hays, John E., B.E. Vanderbilt 1909 Nashville, Tenn. 

HocHBERGER, OscAR, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Huttlinger, Carl P., A.B. 1909 New York City 

Lamb, Karl Barr^ New York City 

Landolt, Percy William Edward New York City 

Maas, Lester Wallace New York City 

Norton, Arie Randolph, A.B. Colorado College 1909 Pueblo, Colo. 

Ormont, Bernard, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Pfeiffer, Burton Lawrence Parsons, Kan. 

Read, Henry Lewis, A.B. Yale 1909 New York City 

Rohn, Julius Montclair, N. J. 

Schultz, Louis Claude Florida, N. Y. 

Simon, Clarence New York City 

Struthers, Royden Titus New York City 

SuYDAM, John R., Jr., A.B. Harvard 1908 New York City 

[iSl 

Metallurgy 

Glassford, John, Phar.D. 1898, Grad. Chem. Cooper Union 1901 Jersey City, N. J. 

Levison, Stuart New York City 

Warner, Charles M., Jr., B.S. Rutgers 1908 Elizabeth, N. J. 

[3] 

Chemistry 

Seil, Gilbert Edward Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Thomas, Arthur W Palisades Park, N. J. 

Thorn, Frederick C New York City 

(3] 



268 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

Sanitary Engineering 

FossAS. Eduardo Josfi, C.E. 1909 San Juan, P. R. 

[I] 

FOURTH YEAR— CLASS OF 1912 

Mining Engineering 45 

Civil " 25 

Electrical " 10 

Mechanical " 31 

Chemical " IS 

Metallurgy 3 

Chemistry 3 

Sanitary Engineering I 

Total 133 

THIRD YEAR— CLASS OF 1913 
Mining Engineering 

Abrahams, Alexander Isidore, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Beehler, George R Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bonsib, Ray Myron, A.B. 1911, A.M. 1911 Indiana Vincennes. Ind. 

Bonsib, Roy Samuel, A.B. 1910, A.M. 1911 Indiana Vincennes, Ind. 

Browning, C. P Norwich, Conn. 

Burroughs, Ambrose Hammet, Jr New York City 

Caruthers, Anthony Wayne Irwin, Pa. 

Chow, Kai-Chi Shanghai, China 

Clancy, Edwin Menefee, B.S. Princeton 1911 Louisville, Ky. 

DuGAN, William Francis Minneapolis, Minn. 

EiSENBERG, Herbert Leopold New York City 

Federman, Samuel New York City 

FiCKETT, Harold L., B.S. Baylor 1910 Galveston, Texas 

Fielding, James Ridge Hackensack, N. J. 

Gatch, Nelson Burnes St. Louis, Mo. 

Goldstein, Davis Passaic, N. J. 

Grant, Wheadon Martin Birmingham, Ala. 

Greenberg, Frederick New York City 

Gross, Le Roy Maurice New York City 

Hess, Karl F New York City 

HiCKEY, Louis Walter, A.B. Harvard 1910 Dorchester, Mass. 

Hitchins, Owen Eaton Frostburg, Md. 

HoYT, Donald Chester, A.B. Michigan 1909 Chillicothe, Ohio 

Hubbard, Dwight Gerald New York City 

KuRZ, John B New York City 

Leiner, Joseph Baltimore, Md. 

LxmN, Robert, Jr Jersey City, N. J. 

Mahler, Charles Henry New York City 

Mampel, Charles J New York City 

MANfis, RENft Achilles Francis New York City 

Meissner, Clarence E New York City 

Moore, Dudley M New York City 

Morrill, Albert Harrison New York City 

Naravanb, Sankar Govind Poona, India 

O'Donnell, Robert C New York City 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 269 

Officer, Herbert George, B.S. 1911, A.M. 1911 South Carolina Eddy Lake, S. C. 

Patchell, Frederick James Washington, D. C. 

Pineda, Rosendo, Jr Mexico City, Mexico 

Pratt, John Wells Buffalo, N. Y. 

Prochazka, George Anthony, Jr New York City 

Pyne, Walter F New York City 

Rade, Henry Sigmund New York City 

Richter, Charles New York City 

Roberts, Edward Oliver New York City 

RuGEN, Otto N New York City 

Schattinger, George F Denver, Colo. 

Schmidt, William C, Jr New York City 

Schurman, George W New York City 

Sun, Hyien-way Hangchow, China 

Tackmann, Henry New York City 

Thomas, James Akin, Jr New York City 

Trischka, Carl New York City 

Ward, Norman B Montclair, N. J. 

Wise, Alfred Leo New York City 

[54] 

Civil Engineering 

Aronin, Isidor New York City 

Babcock, Harry S Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Begeman, Warren Kellogg, B.S. Washington 1909 Milford, Pa. 

Brady, John Caspar New York City 

Carmel, Willard New York City 

Garner, Samuel New York City 

Cassidy, James Clarke New York City 

Cheatham, James Leslie Henderson, Ky. 

Condit, Kenneth Hamilton, M.E.Stevens 1908 East Orange, N. J. 

Covey, Paul Bissell Yonkers, N. Y. 

Di Stasio, Joseph New York City 

DuFFiE, Archibald Duncan Bantam, Conn. 

Fairbairn, Robert Le Fevre, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Findlay, Edwin Harold New York City 

Fish. Gilbert Dudley New York City 

Genung, George Roy New York City 

Glock, Alfred R New York City 

Greacen, John Lyle New York City 

GuiBERT, John Claire Norris New York City 

Harris, Lee Hurdman Pittsburg, Pa. 

Hernandez, John Albert New York City 

Jackson, Walter Moores, Jr New York City 

Katzenberg, Samuel Kermit New York City 

Kirchgraber, Earle Hamlin Pine Bluff, Ark. 

KORN, Max Henry Hackensack, N. J. 

Laguardia, Giovanni B New York City 

Lathrop, John Earle Yonkers, N. Y. 

Lipari, Attilio Felix New York City 

LoMMEL, George L New York City 

McLoughlin, Frederic O. X. B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Maloy, John Patrick New York City 

Mandell, Solon Baron New York City 

Marx, Raymond M New York City 



270 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

Miller, Frederick New York City 

Neuman, David Leonard New York City 

Patterson, John E Kansas City, Mo. 

Peet, Gerald Dayton Cortland, N. Y. 

Phillips, Jacquin New York City 

Pinchook, Benjamin P., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Roberts, Elmer New York City 

Roemermann, Adolph New York City 

Smillie, Ralph, A.B. Yale 1909 New York City 

Spencer, Frederick Burr, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Steinberg, Max Julius New York City 

Steinbruch, Walter New York City 

Stevens, Herbert Chester Passaic, N. J. 

Strang, Reginald Bartlett New York City 

Sun, Man Canton, China 

Todd, Carlos N New York City 

Torborg, Gerard Rudolf New York City 

Weiss, Harry New York City 

[SO] 

Electrical Engineering 

Armstrong, Edwin Howard Yonkers, N. Y. 

BuRGi, Herman, Jr New York City 

Ernst, Montrose,' B.S. 1911 New York City 

FuLLERTON, Henry Suydam, Jr Plainfield, N. J. 

Haldeman, Harold Watson New York City 

Janson, Carl Alexander New York City 

Kaufman, Lewis Bernhard East Orange, N. J. 

Kroll, Cornelius New York City 

Langley, Ralph Herbert New York City 

Mapes, Leland R Spring Valley, N . Y. 

Mock, Frank Charles New York City 

Richter, Henry New York City 

Saalberg, Herman New York City 

Schneider, Louis Seymour New York City 

Sinclair, Charles Goodwin, Jr .Towaco, N. J. 

Vallely, Charles Cosgrove New York City 

Vogler, Peter Charles New York City 

Walsh, James Aloysius New York City 

Watters, Arthur C Taunton, Mass. 

Wheeler, Robert A New York City 

Wilson, Le Roy New York City 

[21] 

Mechanical Engineering 

Augustine, Addison E New York City 

Bissell, Albert West New York City 

Blanchard, Harold F New York City 

Brombacher, Max H. C, Jr New York City 

Cohen, Edgar Fabian New York City 

Conner, Benjamin Franklin, Jr New York City 

Cook, Henry P New York City 

Emmert, John Barrett Norfolk, Va. 

Gardner, Francis Saltus New York City 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 27I 

GiTHENS, Thomas P., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Grossbaum, Louis, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Hayden, Lloyd Fowler White Plains, N. Y, 

HiRT, Edward Louis Yonkers, N. Y. 

HoLTZMAN, Paul Jacobs Indianapolis, Ind. 

Israel, Albert Herman New York City 

KoHLBUSCH, Arthur Herman New York City 

Levkowits, Albert New York City 

MacCoull, Neil, Jr New York City 

McGiLL, Harry Earl Washington, D. C. 

Robinson, Charles R St. Louis, Mo. 

Ruprecht, Walter Ernst New York City 

Shaw, James J White Plains, N. Y. 

Stone, Edwin Wadsworth, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Swallow, Howard John New York City 

Syska, Adolph New York City 

[25] 

Chemical Engineering 

Basseches, Joseph Lazarus New York City 

Blumenthal, Alexander S Maywood, N. J. 

BuRKHARD, Walter Edwin Jersey City, N. J. 

Childs, Sterry Hunt, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Dickie, Frank Evans, A.B. Acadia 1909 Middleton, Nova Scotia 

Durkee, Morris Malan New York City 

Ginsberg, Ismar, B.S. 191 1 New York City 

Jabine, Thomas Yonkers, N. Y. 

Jung, Philip, Jr New York City 

MacLean, Gordon New York City 

McKnight, William Albert, B.S. Valparaiso 1910 New Kensington, Pa. 

Meyer, Abraham Paul St. Louis, Mo. 

Phillipson, Brainerd Fischer New York City 

Revson, Raphael Fr.4.nk, B.S. Georgia 1910 Atlanta, Ga. 

Schweizer, James Armstrong Watertown, N. Y. 

Shepard, Morris Goodwin Cortland, N. Y. 

Spalthoff, William D Forest Park, N. Y. 

Wilcox, Daniel Appleton Garden City, N. Y. 

[18] 

Metallurgy 

Bangser, William Lebanon, Pa. 

Blaut, Samuel Joseph New York City 

Blow. Allmand Matteson Ware Neck, Va. 

Hyde, Reed Warren Joliet, 111. 

Johnston, Roderick L New York City 

Koenig, Edward Harry New York City 

McLaughlin, Warner, A.B. Harvard 1909 New York City 

Newhouse, Edgar L., Jr New York City 

O'Donnell, Adrian V New York City 

Rinek, JohnO., E.M.Lafayette 1911 Easton, Pa. 

Woodworth, Selim E Berkeley, Calif. 

["] 

Chemistry 

BiLHUBER, Ernest August Maywood, N. J. 

Sachs, Albert Parsons New York City 



272 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

Sanitary Engineering 

Applebaum, Samuel5B.,5B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Jacobs, Harold H New York City 

[21 

THIRD YEAR— CLASS OF 1913 

Mining iingineering 54 

Civil " SO 

Electrical " 21 

Mechanical " 25 

Chemical " 18 

Metallurgy 11 

Chemistry 2 

Sanitary Engineering 2 

Total 183 

ECOND YEAR— CLASS OF 19x4 
Mining Engineering 

Barrett, Theodore Harvey New York City 

Bird, Henry Edgar, Jr Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

BisSELL, Karl Hauck New York City 

Brister, Charles Melville, Jr., B.S. Virginia Military Institute 1911 .Petersburg, Va. 

CoOPE, George Frederick Douglaston, N. Y. 

Cornelissen, John New York City 

Downing, George S Albany, N. Y. 

Eichrodt, Charles Wharton, A.B. Indiana 1911 Indianapolis, Ind. 

Foote, Frederick William Englewood, N. J. 

Fox, Walter Victor New York City 

George, Harry Leslie New York City 

Goldman, Paul New York City 

Hadsell, Irving W New York City 

Kupferstein, Joseph Thomas New York City 

Lee, Leland Monterey, Mexico 

LiPMAN, Leon New York City 

MacCarthy, Charles Franklin Des Moines, Iowa 

McGiNNis, Russell Castree Evanston, 111. 

Miller, James S Hoosick Falls, N. Y. 

Moss, Hugo Harry Mexico City, Mexico 

Patterson, George Schroter Denver, Colo. 

Robson-C, Thomas, Mng. Labourer, Potosi 1909 Potosi, Bolivia 

Schrader, Franz Annadale, N. Y. 

Sen, Jane-shi Tsoo En, B.S. Peking 1909 Kwei-chow, China 

Steffen, Gustave W New York City 

Stern, William Newark, N. J. 

Williams, Edward Ingham New York City 

Work, John Clinton, Naval Arch. Glasgow 1905 Oyster Bay, N. Y. 

Yablick, Max Newark, N. J. 

Zimmer, Siegfried H New York City 

[30] 

Civil Engineering 

Atkinson, Guy New York City 

Boyle, Cornelius A New York City 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 273 

BoYLSTON. Edward James, Jr New York City 

Brager, Benjamin New York City 

Braverman, Lewis New York City 

Brophy. Frank P Yonkers. N. Y. 

Carroll, John Joseph North Pelham, N. Y. 

Cleary, Charles Norman New York City 

Coursen, Wallace Melville Newark, N. J. 

Craft, La Verne R New York City 

Creamer, Wilcox Asten .' New York City 

Englebardt, Isadore J Jersey City, N. J . 

FiSHGRUND, Henry, B.E. Cooper Union 1911 New York City 

Friedman, William New York City 

Furstenwalde, Henry Curt, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Greenburg. Leonard New York City 

Gretsch, Herbert New York City 

Kannengieser. Max New York City 

Kaufman, William New York City 

Knopf, Samuel Hamilton New York City 

Krefeld, William John New York City 

Lapidus, Aron New York City 

Lichtenstein, Louis New York City 

Lucas, Anthony FitzGerald, Jr Washington, D. C. 

Lundborg, Herbert Clarence New York City 

Mason. Henry Hoelzle New York City 

Maze, Montgomery, Jr New York City 

Montgomery, Philip O'Bryan New York City 

Nacht, Victor New York City 

NosiTZER, George New York City 

Ohlssen, William C New York City 

OuATTLEBAUM, Selby, B.S. South Carolina 1909 Columbia, S. C. 

Renshaw, Alfred Noroton, Conn. 

Richardson, George Washington, Jr New York City 

Roberts, Richard Blevin, Jr New York City 

RoGOW, Sydney New York City 

Rosenzweig, Morris New York City 

Shapiro, Rubin New York City 

Siff, Lester New York City 

Simmonds, Frank Homer Yonkers, N. Y. 

Slade, Ernest Bewley New York City 

Ullrich, A. R New York City 

Ungarleider, Max Emanuel New York City 

Wallace, Otis Alexander New York City 

[44I 

Electrical Engineering 

Cobb, Francis C St. Paul, Minn. 

Fisher, Joel Ellis, Jr., A.B. Yale 1911 New York City 

Fisher, Sydney New York City 

Foster, Joseph Turner Jersey City, N. J. 

Goldstein, William Morris New York City 

Hazen, Conrad P., B.S. Dartmouth 1906 Norwich, Vt. 

KouKOL, Clement John New York City 

Kronheimer, Alfred S New York City 

Luhrs, Harry New York City 

NoLTE. Albrecht Charles New York City 

Rice, Isaac Leopold, Jr New York City 



274 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

Smith, Stanley Watson New York City 

Welch, Walter Scarsdale, N. Y. 

[13] 

Mechanical Engineering 

Baumeister, Philip New York City 

Doyle, William L. H Buffalo, N. Y. 

Harris, Robert W New York City 

Harvey, William John New York City 

Hine, Russell Curtis Cornwall, N. Y. 

Jareckie, Eugene Albert New York City 

Lathrop, Thomas Spencer Yonkers, N. Y. 

Petersen, Arthur E Monmouth Beach, N. J. 

Piperoux, RENfi Pierre Jersey City Heights, N. J. 

Rayens, Charles Erwin New York City 

Schmidt, Francis Bertram New York City 

Sengstaken, John Henry New York City 

Stewart, James Alexander New York City 

Waite, John, A.B. Harvard 1911 Boston, Mass. 

Wakefield, Gerald Ross Highland Falls, N. Y. 

Wilson, Walter J East Bradford, Pa. 

[16] 

Chemical Engineering 

Alexander, Joseph J., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Bacher, Holland Robert New York City 

Byron, Oscar Jersey City, N. J. 

Chun, Yen-Shon Changsha, China 

Cloud, Charles Blake Tyringham, Mass. 

Cohen, Mortimer J New York City 

Dittmer, Joseph Claudius New York City 

Drucker, Samuel New York City 

Gershon, Victor New York City 

Harrison, George I New York City 

KiEFER, Kenneth Hall Bridgeport, Conn. 

Kirschstein, Julius New York City 

Macdonald, Francis New York City 

Mandle, Henry Hayman New York City 

Masson, Henry J New York City 

O'Kane, Robert Guy New York City 

Olt, Henry New York City 

Person, Clarence Syracuse, N. Y. 

Roon, Leo, Ph.C. 1910 Port Washington, N. Y. 

ScHWARZ, Maurice New York City 

See, Milton, Jr Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Stein, Jerome David New York City 

Streeter, Harrison G Pattenburg, N. J. 

WURSTER, William Frederick New York City 

ZiA, Zau Chee Shanghai, China 

fasl 

Metallurgy 

Brimberg, Jacob New York City 

Colquhoun, William Wallace Tunbridge Wells, England 

Melitzer, Emanuel B New York City 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 275 

QuiNN, Herman Great Neck. N. Y. 

Sadtler, Chester Benjamin Denver, Colo. 

"Wood, Roy Udell New York City 

[6J 

Chemistry 

Bentkowski, Henry Casimir New York City 

Ehrlich, Jacob New York City 

Geiger, Jerome Charles New York City 

Gilbert, Frederick BoYfi New York City 

Harris, Clarence Peavy • New York City 

Hertz, Norman Cornelius Newark, N.J. 

Landman, Everett Solomon New York City 

Mann, Lewis T New York City 

SiEGLER, Louis New York City 

Tenney, Dwight Montclair, N. J. 

[10 

Sanitary Engineering 

Havens, William Westerfield New York City 

SECOND YEAR— CLASS OF 1914 

Mining Engineering 30 

Civil " 44 

Electrical " ^3 

Mechanical " ^^ 

Chemical " 25 

Metallurgy . . ^ 

Chemistry lO 

Sanitary Engineering i 

Total I4S 

FIRST YEAR— CLASS OF 1915 

Alden, John Woods Newark, N. J. 

Allen, Edwin Thomas Buffalo, N. Y. 

Allen, Harold Felton Washington, D. C. 

Altenberg, Leo New York City 

Arce, Josfi MARfA Santo Domingo, Costa Rica 

Armstrong, Joseph William New York City 

Baena, Louis Carlos New York City 

Balmford, J. Arthur New York City 

Banks, Reginald Marsh Boonton, N. J. 

Barnaby, Ralph Stanton New York City 

Barrett, Oliver Coolidge Ware, Mass. 

Bartlett, John Howard West Orange, N. J. 

Baxter, Channing Wheeler New York City 

Beatty, Russell Lawrence New York City 

Belknap, Benjamin Harold Leonia, N. J. 

Benson, Reynolds New York City 

Benton, William E Saratoga, N. Y. 

Berghorn, Walter Henry Jersey City, N. J. 

Berner, Frank New York City 



276 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

Blanchard, Donald New York City 

Blatt, Edward New York City 

Blauvelt, Howard G Nyack, N. Y. 

Bleecker, Anthony Lispenard Palisades, N. Y. 

Bodenheimer, Irving Henry New York City 

Bodziner, Joseph New York City 

BoHLiN, Howard Grenville Ridgefleld Park, N. J. 

BoRSUK, Robert New York City 

Bower, Settone Cabot New York City 

Bowers, Stewart Wilson New York City 

Bradford, Harrison Josiah Reading, Pa. 

Brandenburg, Harry New York City 

Brooks, Leverich Van Voorhees New York City 

Brophy, William Edward Yonkers, N. Y. 

Broughton, Harold Earle Hackensack, N. J. 

Buncke, Harry Jacob Whitestone, N. Y. 

Chan, Chun Young Honolulu, Hawaii 

Chazen, Rudolph, Equiv. A.B. Mitau 1910 New York City 

Claghorn, D. Montgomery Tacoma, Wash. 

CoBDEN, Philip Edward Larchmont, N. Y. 

Cohen, Harry Norwich, Conn. 

CoHN, Martin B., Jr New York City 

Colletti, Ignatius Michael New York City 

Costello, Christopher H., Jr., B.S. Spring Hill rgio Mobile, Ala. 

Coursen, Herbert Preston Newark, N. J. 

Cramp, Arnold P New York City 

Crawford, John Franklin New York City 

Danehy, Carl C New York City 

VON Deesten, Arthur Peter New York City 

Dennehy, John Joseph Rye, N. Y. 

Dickinson, Julian Allen New York City 

Donnelly, Richard New York City 

Edebohls, Frank Edward New York City 

Edwards, Joseph Ball New York City 

Eichenberg, Mark A New York City 

Elias, Nathan Mandel New York City 

Erhard, Zachary New York City 

Ernst, Herman East Orange, N. J. 

Esser, Alvah Ernest Yonkers, N. Y. 

Eynon, William New York City 

Fagan, James Francis New York City 

Failla, Gioacchino New York City 

Fishel, Jesse New York City 

Frankel, Samuel New York City 

French, Herbert James New York City 

Friedrich, Paul Ernest New York City 

Fuhrer, Oscar A New York City 

Fuller, Russell B Locust Valley, N. Y. 

Gardner, Edward Merrill New York City 

Garrison, Hyatt M Yonkers, N. Y. 

Gladstein, Joseph New York City 

GlimM; William Frederick, Jr Jersey City, N. J. 

Goldstein, Jacob New York City 

Gordon, William E New York City 

Grigg, James R. Jr New York City 

Gross, Paul Livingston New York City 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 277 

Hamdi, Abdih-lah Constantinople, Turkey 

Harding, John Phelps Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

Harris, Adriel New York City 

Harwood, Harold Robert Warren, Mass. 

Haurv, Anton Frederick L EHzabetii, N. J. 

Hawk, Karl Whittington Belvidere, N. J. 

Herman, Mark Robert New York City 

HiLDRETH, Charles Lewis, Jr Southampton, N. Y. 

Hirsch, Isador Newark, N. J. 

HoENNiNGER, Charles G New York City 

HoRTON, Allen J New York City 

Howard, James Edward Rye, N. Y. 

Howry, Hamilton Hubbard Denver, Colo. 

IvERSON, Martin^'Christian New York City 

Jakway, Paul Russell Durango, Colo. 

Jeanneret, AndrS East Rutherford, N. J. 

Johnson, James W Oswego, N. Y. 

Johnson, S. Taylor, Jr Croton-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

King, Harold Beckwith Sound Beach, Conn. 

Klein, Henry New York City 

Klein, Karl F New York City 

Kraus, Walter F New York City 

Krolman, Walter John New York City 

KuHN, Sally New York City 

Lauber, Herbert Crow Montclair, N. J. 

Levy, Julius New York City 

DE Lima, Marcello Francisco St. Paulo, Brazil 

VAN DER Linde, Victor Granville East Orange, N.J. 

LiNicus, Harry New York City 

Livingston, William S., Jr New York City 

LoMAX, Edward Lloyd, Jr San Francisco, Calif. 

LtJM, Samuel Clark, Jr Elizabeth, N. J. 

McKenna, John Arthur, Jr Westbury, N. Y. 

Margon, Solomon New York City 

Mechanic, Jacob New York City 

Miller, Harold James New York City 

Millman, Isidor Samuel New York City 

Morgan, William Fellowes, Jr., A. B. Harvard 1910 Short Hills, N. J. 

Mobsman, John Malcolm, Jr New York City 

Mueser, Emil New York City 

MOller, Charles Albert New York City 

Murray, Edward William New York City 

Nauss, Henry George New York City 

Navon, Sam New York City 

O'Connor, George Watson New York City 

Oleri, Frank New York City 

Olmsted, Clarence Edward Los Angeles. Calif. 

Ormsbee, Randall Holden El Paso, Texas 

Orthey, George Frederick New York City 

Palen, Henry Wood New York City 

Pechar, Richard Gustavus New York City 

Peck, John Sanford New York City 

Pell, Van Dyne New York City 

Peltz, Gordon Milligan Elmhurst, N. Y. 

PicciRiLLi, Pasquale JOSEPH New York City 

Pilnacbk, Edwako New York City 



278 SCHOOLS OF MINES, ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY 

Pressner, Samuel New York City 

Raabin, Herman David New York City 

Reid, William Eglinton , New York City 

Roche, Jean Alfred New York City 

Roland, Percy William New York City 

Sand, Harvey New York City 

Sandhusen, Louis Henry New York City 

Scales, Samuel B Jersey City, N. J, 

Schaciitel, Herbert Arthur New York City 

SCHRADER, Joseph H Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

Schumann, Charles Henry, Jr New York City 

Schwartz, Abraham New York City 

Shibuta, Ichiro Fukuoka, Japan 

SiLLiMAN, Halsey Ernest New York City 

Skarvan, Stanley Joseph New York City 

Sohon, Frederick Wyatt New York City 

von Sothen, Carl Earnest Herman New York City 

Spalding, Samuel Clyde New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Spooner, Ray Newhall New York City 

Springer, William Moore New York City 

Spurny, Emil New York City 

Stahlschmidt, William New York City 

Stehlby, Ernest Theodore New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Steindler, Leslie Lobner New York City 

Sterricker, John New York City 

Stevens, Clarence E Newark, N. J. 

Stone, Clarence George, Jr Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Strohmeyer, Henry Albert, Jr Montclair, N. J. 

Taylor, Theodore Clinton Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Tracy, Frederick S New York City 

Vail, Carl Waldemar Passaic, N. J. 

Valentine, Roy Hotchkiss New York City 

VoGEL, Oscar M Cerro de Pasco, Peru 

Washington, Bowden New York City 

Weeks, Hugh Arnoldia New York City 

Welling. Lindsay New York City 

Welsh, Francis De Sales South Amboy, N. J. 

Weyant, John Augustus Yorktown, N. Y. 

WiLLE, Valentine, Jr New York City 

Williamson, Robert Gordon Greenwich, Conn. 

Witzell, Paul New York City 

Wohlgemuth, Maurice W New York City 

Woodcock, Prank Willard New York City 

Wright, Frederick Sylvester Belt, Mont. 

Yang, Sui Chi China 

Youmans, Edward Livingston Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Zavedovich, Moses New York City 

ZxrajiGA, Ismael, Jr Chihuahua, Mexico 

[179] 

Non-Matriculated Students 

BiKLfi, Paul Fiery New York City 

Cleveland, Elmer Norcross New York City 

Cohen, Isaac T New York City 

Danziger, Charles S., B.S. C. C. N. Y. New YorklCity 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 



279 



Karrick, Sam N Salt Lake City, Utah 

McIntyre, Kenneth Arnon Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Malby, Seth Grant, M.E. Cornell Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

MiLLNER, James Adair Saltville, Va. 

Warren, George Henry, Jr., A.B. jpro New York City 

[9] 

SUMMARY 





Second 
Year 


Third 
Year 


Fourth 
Year 


Totals 


School OF Mines: 


30 
6 

10 

25 

44 
13 
16 

I 


54 
II 

2 
18 

SO 
21 

25 
2 


45 
3 

3 
15 

25 
10 
31 

I 


129 


Metallurgy 

School of Chemistry: 

Chemistry 


20 

IS 
S8 


School of Engineering: 

Civil Engineering 

Electrical Engineering 


44 


Mechanical Engineering 


72 
4 








14s 


183 


133 


461 



First-Year Class 179 

Non-Matriculated 9 

Students from Columbia College 13 

Total 662 



Ten matriculated in the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry, attended 
the Summer Session of 191 1, but did not register for the first term of 1911-12. 



FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The Faculty 

The President of the University 

Dean Burgess 

Associate Dean Carpenter 

Professors Beard, Botsford, Chaddock, ' Clark, Devine, Dunning, 
giddings, 'goodnow, guthrie, johnson, lindsay, moore (j. b.), 
Moore (H. L.), Mussey, Osgood, "Robinson, Seager, Seligman, 
Shepherd, 'Shotwell, Simkhovitch, Sloane, Smith (Munroe), Suz- 
ZALLO, Tenney 

Officers of the FaciUty 

Professor Burgess Dean and ex-officio Member of the University 

Council 
Professor Carpenter. ..^ woe jofe Dean and ex-officio Member of the Uni- 
versity Council 

Professor Shepherd Secretary 

Professor Munroe Smith (Term expires 1913). . . .Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 

Professor Goodnow (Term expires 1914) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 

Professor Seligman Chairman Standing Committee on Instruction 

and ex-officio Member of the University Council 

Standing Committee on Instruction: Professors Seligman (Chairman), 
Goodnow, Munroe Smith, Dunning, and Giddings 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Faculty of Political Science, established in 1880, has charge of the 
university courses of instruction and research in political and social science, 
including history, economics, public law, and comparative jurisprudence. 
Any duly matriculated university student is at liberty to combine courses 
of study and investigation under this Faculty with courses offered by other 
Faculties of the University. Women who hold a baccalaureate degree are 
admitted to the School of Political Science as students in history, economics, 
and social science and may become candidates for the higher degrees. 

* Absent on leave second half-year. ' Absent on leave first half-year. 

280 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 281 

Students are received either as candidates for the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy (see "Regulations for University- 
Degrees, " page 188 ei seq.), or as "non-matriculated students, " to pur- 
sue special or partial courses. 

It is the purpose of the School of Political Science to give a complete 
general view of all the subjects of public polity, both internal and ex- 
ternal, from the threefold point of view of history, law, and philosophy. 
The prime aim is, therefore, the development of all the branches of the 
political and social sciences. The secondary and practical objects are: 

(a) To fit young men for the public service. 

(b) To give an adequate economic and legal training to those who 
intend to make journalism their profession. 

(c) To supplement, by courses in public law and comparative juris- 
prudence, the instruction in private municipal law offered by the 
Faculty of Law. 

(d) To educate teachers of history, economics, social science, pub- 
ic law, and jurisprudence. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For information regarding the courses offered in 1911-12 see statement 
under groups of subjects, as follows: 

Economics and Social Science, page 92. 

History and Political Philosophy, page 118. 

Politics, Public Law, and Comparative Jurisprudence, page 125. 

For more detailed accounts of the courses and for the tender of 
1912-13, application should be made for the Announcement of the 
Division of History, Economics, and Public Law. 

Attention is also called to the separately printed pamphlet entitled 
Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, and Pure Science, which may 
be had upon application to the Secretary of the University. 

Yale-Columbia Courses in Preparation for Foreign Service 

A system of courses has been inaugurated by Yale University and 
Columbia University, to prepare students for work in foreign countries, 
either in the service of the United States Government, in business 
enterprises, or as missionaries or scientific investigators. 

The courses are intended to make the student familiar with the 
general subjects required for successful work in foreign countries and 
to enable him, by means of this knowledge, to gain quick mastery of 
special problems that present themselves in diverse occupations and 
regions. More special courses of instruction are intended to convey 
knowledge relating to particular regions in which the student intends to 
carry on his work. 

The successful completion of the courses offered, which will nonnally 



282 FACULTY OF POLITICAL SCIENCE 

occupy three years in the case of candidates for the consular service, 
and two years in the case of candidates for other foreign service in special 
fields, will entitle the student, on recommendation of the joint committee 
in charge of the course of studies, to an appropriate certificate signed by 
the Presidents of Yale University and Columbia University. Subject 
to the rules of the two cooperating institutions, candidates for certificates 
are admitted to candidacy for the regular academic degrees. 

The course of study is framed primarily for graduate students, but 
it is also open to specially qualified students who have not completed 
the full college course. Students are expected to have completed success- 
fully at least two years of undergraduate work at either Yale University or 
Columbia College, or to give proof of equivalent training. 

Candidates for a certificate must prove their ability to read French or 
German, and must have completed the regular college courses on the 
general principles of economics, American history, and European history 
of the nineteenth century. 

The program of studies includes seven divisions: (i) Languages, (2) 
Geography, (3) Ethnography, (4) History, (5) Religions, (6) Economics, 
(7) Law. 

For detailed information concerning these courses apply to the Dean 
of the Graduate School, Yale University, New Haven, Conn., or to the 
Secretary of Columbia University, New York City. 



FACULTY OF PHILOSOPHY 

The Faculty 

The President of the University 

Dean Burgess 

Associate Dean Carpenter 

Professors Adler, Ayres, Bagster-Collins, Baker, ' Boas, ' Brew- 
ster, Cattell, Cohn, => Dewey, Dutton, Egbert, Erskine, Farrand, 
Fletcher, ^Fullerton, Gerig, Gottheil, =Hervey, Hirth, Jackson, 
Knapp, Krapp, Lawrence, Livingston, Lodge, Loiseaux, McCrea, 
^McMuRRY, MacVannel, Matthews, ^Miller (D. S.), Monroe, Mon- 
tague, Moore (F. G.), 'Olcott, Perry, Prince, Remy, Russell, Sachs, 
Saville, Schick, 'Strong, Thomas, Thorndike (A. H.), Thorndike 
(E. L.), Todd, Tombo, Trent, Weeks, ^ Wheeler, Woodbridge, 
^Woodworth, Young 

Officers of the Faculty 

Professor Burgess Dean and ex-officio Member of the University 

Council 

Professor Carpenter Associate Dean and ex-officio Member of the 

University Council 

Professor Lawrence Secretary 

Professor A. H. Thorndike (Term expires 1913) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 
Professor Woodbridge (Term expires 19 14). ..Elected Delegate to the Uni- 
versity Council 

Professor McCrea Chairman Standing Committee on Instruction 

and ex-officio Member of the University Council 

Standing Committee on Instruction: Professors McCrea (CAairmaw) . 
Lodge, Prince, Dewey, and A. H. Thorndike. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Faculty of Philosophy, established in 1890, has charge of the uni- 
versity courses of instruction and research in philosophy, psychology, 
education, anthropology, philology, and letters. Any duly matriculated 
university student is at liberty to combine courses of study and investi- 

> Absent on leave 1911-12. 2 Absent on leave second half-year. 

t Absent on leave first half-year. 

283 



284 FACULTY OF PHILOSOPHY 

gation under this Faculty with courses oflfered by other Faculties of the 
University. 

Students are received either as candidates for the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy (see "Regulations for University De- 
grees," page 188 et seq.), or as "non-matriculated students," to pursue 
special or partial courses. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For information regarding the courses oflfered in 1911-12, see depart- 
mental statements as follows: 

Anthropology, page 60. Oriental Languages 
Classical Philology (including Chinese, page 142. 

Archaeology and Epi- Indo-Iranian, page 142. 

graphy), page 83 Semitic, page 144. 

Education, page 96. Philosophy and Psychology, 
English and Comparative Lit- page 150. 

erature, page 104. Romance Languages, page 165. 

Germanic Languages, page Science of Language, page 143. 
113- 

For more detailed accounts of the courses and for the tender of 1912-13, 
application should be made for the divisional Announcement of Ancient 
and Oriental Languages; Modern Languages and Literatures; Philosophy, 
Psychology, and Anthropology; and of Teachers College. 

Attention is also called to the separately printed pamphlet entitled 
Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, and Pure Science, which may 
be had upon application to the Secretary of the University. 



FACULTY OF PURE SCIENCE 

The Faculty 

The President of the University 

Dean Burgess 

Associate Dean Carpenter 

Professors Bogert, Brixton, Burton-Opitz, Burr, Calkins, Cole, 
Crampton, 'Crocker, Curtis, Davis, Dean, Dodge, Fiske, Gies, 
Grabau, Hallock, Harper, Hiss, Howe, ^^ Huntington, Jacoby, 
Kasner, Kemp, Keyser, Lee, Lucke, Luquer, MacCallum, Maclay, 
Marquette, Mitchell (H. B.), Mitchell (S. A.), Morgan (J. L. R.), 
Morgan (T. H.), Moses, Munroe, Osborn, Pegram, Pike, Poor, Pupin, 
Richards, Sherman (H. C), Smith (Alexander), Smith (D. E.), 
Stewart, Wills, * Wilson, Woodhull. 

Officers of the Faculty 

Professor Burgess Dean and ex-officio Member of the University 

Council 
Professor Carpenter . . . Associate Dean and ex-ofjicio Member of the 

University Council 

Professor Cole Secretary 

Professor Wilson (Term expires 1913) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 

Professor Kemp (Term expires 1914) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 

Professor Fiske Chairman Standing Committee on Instruction and 

ex-officio Member of the University Council 

Standing Committee on Instruction: Professors Fiske {Chairman), 
Pegram, Kemp, Wilson, and Bogert 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The Faculty of Pure Science, established in 1892, has charge of the 
imiversity courses of instruction and research in all branches of pure 
science. Any duly matriculated university student is at liberty to com- 
bine courses of study and investigation under this Faculty with courses 
offered by other Faculties of the University. 

» Absent on leave 1911-12, "Absent on leave second half-year. 

285 



286 



FACULTY OF PURE SCIENCE 



Students are received either as candidates for the degrees of Master 
of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy (see "Regulations for University De- 
grees," page i88 et seq.), or as "non-matriculated students," to pursue 
special or partial courses. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



For information regarding the courses offered in 191 1- 12, see depart- 
mental statements as follows; 



Anatomy, page 58. 

Astronomy, page 65. 

Bacteriology, page 66. 

Biological Chemistry, page 67. 

Botany, page 70. 

Chemistry, page 73. 

Civil Engineering, page 79. 

Electrical Engineering, page loi. 

Engineering Drafting, page 91. 

Geology, page no. 

Highway Engineering, page 8 1 

For more detailed accounts of the courses and for the tender of 1912- 
13, application should be made for the divisional Announcement of Biology; 
Chemistry, Geology, Geography, and Mineralogy; Mathematical and Physical 
Science; and of the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry. 

Attention is also called to the separately printed pamphlet entitled 
Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, and Pure Science, which may 
be had upon application to the Secretary of the University. 



Mathematics, page 127. 
Mechanical Engineering, page 130. 
Mechanics, see Physics. 
Metallurgy, page 132. 
Mineralogy, page 134. 
Mining, page 135. 
Pathology, page 146. 
Physics, page 157. 
Physiology, page 161. 
Zoology, page 172. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1911-12 

Under the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, 
and Pure Science • 

Abraham, Charlotte Rose Oesterlein, A.B. 1907, A.M. 1908 New York City 

Philosophy, Social Economy 
Abraham, Mathilde, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Philosophy, Italian 
Abrams, George Randall Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

English 
Adam, Robert M., A.B. Franklin and Marshall 1911 Temple, Pa. 

Sociology 
Adams, Anna Regina New York City 

Spanish 
Adams, Arthur Barto, A.B. South Carolina 1910 Union, S. C. 

Political Economy, Social Econo7ny, History 
Adams, Benjamin P., A.B. Wesleyan 1907 Rochester, N. Y. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Adams, Flora Dodson (Mrs.), A.M. 1909, Ph.B. Chicago 1907 Richmond, Va. 

German, English 
Adams, Jessie Blanche, A.B. 1904, A.M. 1906 New York City 

Philosophy, Psychology 
Adams, Numa P. G., A.B. Howard 1911 Steelton, Pa. 

Chemistry 
Aghnides, Nicholas P., LL.B. Ottoman Law School 1909. ...Constantinople, Turkey 

Economics, Sociology, Education 
Alden, Isabel, A.B. Wellesley 1908 Summit, N. J. 

Botany, Education 
Allen, George H., Jr., A.B. Hamilton 1908, A.M. 1911 Clinton, N. Y. 

Sociology 
Alles, Robert H., A.M. 1908, B.S. C.C.N. Y. 1906 Ridgewood, N. J. 

English, German 
Altshiller, Nathan, Sc.D. Ghent 1911 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics 
Amanda, Labarca H Santiago, Chile 

A.B. Liceo Le-Brun de Pinochet, Santiago, Chile, 1901, A.M. University of 
Chile, 1904 

French, Comparative Literature, Education 
Ammarell, Raymond R., A.B. Muhlenberg 1911 West Leesport, Pa. 

History, Sociology 
Amos, Flora Ross, A.B. Toronto, 1902 Aurora, Ontario, Can. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Andersen, Olaf, Cand. Real. Kristiania 191 1 New York City 

Geology, Metallurgy, Palaontology 
Aston, William, A.B. Lafayette 1911 Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Sociology, Philosophy 
Avery, Elizabeth, Ph.B. Cornell 1897 New York City 

English 

' Officers in the'University who are at the same time pursuing courses for the higher 
degrees are not included in this list. Wherever the name of a State is given after a 
degree, it signifies that the student has graduated from the given State University. 

287 



288 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Bach, Matthew Gruenberg, A.M. 1911, A.B. Trinity 1910 New York City 

German, French 
Bacon, Bertha Lilian, A.B. Vassar 1902 New York City 

History 
Bacon, Helen Estelle, Ph.B. Michigan 1892 New York City 

Comparative Literature, English 
Baillie, Charles Tupper, A.B. Dalhousie 1905, A.M. 1906 Teaneck, N.J. 

Semitics, Greek 
Baker, Edward Donald, A.B. Chicago 1903 New York City 

Political Economy, Social Economy, Administrative Law 
Bald, Maachah Bell, A.B. Toronto 1885 New York City 

Latin, Education 
Baldwin, Burton John, A.B. Yale 1903 New York City 

Sociology 
Barasch, Morris, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics 
Barbee, Connie Cazette, A.M. 1911, A.B. North Carolina 1910. .East Durham, N. C. 

Economics, Sociology, History 
Beach, Grace B., B.S. N. Y. Normal 1894, M.S. N. Y. Univ. 1898 Pelham, N. Y. 

Physics 
Beardshear, William M., Jr., B.S. Iowa State 1911 Ames, la. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Beatman, Augustus Samuel, A.B. Harvard 1903, A.M. 1904 Afton, N. Y. 

History, Sociology 
Beck, Edward John, A.B. Central Wesleyan 1906 Madison, N. J. 

Sociology, Economics, History 
Beeckman, Florence Louise, A.B. 1904, A.M. 1905 New York City 

History, Comparative Literature 
Belinkoff, Samuel, A.B. 1910 Bayonne, N. J. 

Psychology, Education 
Bell, Eric Temple, A.B. Stanford, 1904, A.M. Washington 1908. . .Aberdeen, Scotland 

Mathematics, English 
Bell, Francis Minta, A.B. Virginia 1909 Columbus, Miss. 

Mathematics, Psychology 
Bender, Andrew, A.B. Lebanon Valley 1906 Dillsburg, Pa. 

Chemistry, Physics 
Benedict, Anna New York City 

French 
Benedict, Laura Estelle Watson, A.B. Chicago 1900, A.M. 1904 New York City 

Anthropology, ZoQlogy 
Bennion, Adam Samuel, A.B. Utah 1908 Salt Lake City, Utah 

English, Comparative Literature 
Berge, Frederic Otto, A.M. 1910 Tampico, Ills. 

Constitutional Law 
Berman, Florence Julia, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1911 New York City 

Botany 
Bernkopf, Anna Elise New York City 

German, French, Education 
Best, Ethel Lombard Bronxville, N. Y. 

Sociology 
Bevans, George Esdras Pocoraoke City, Md. 

A.B. Western Maryland 1906, A.M. Yale 1910 

Sociology, Social Economy 
Beyer, Barnet Julius, A.M. 1910, A.B. Brooklyn Poyltechnic 1908. . . New York City 
English, Comparative Literature 

BiLDERSEE, Adele, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1903 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 



AND PURE SCIENCE 289 

BiRKHEAD, Leon Milton, A.B. McKendree 1910 Winfield, Mo. 

Philosophy, Psychology, Anthropology 
Bishop, Fanny Aurill, A.B. 1911 New York City 

History, Sociology, Social Economy 
Bishop, Merle L., A.B. Hamilton 1902 New York City 

Mathematics, Education 
Blachly, Frederick Frank, A.B. Oberlin 1911 New York City 

Public Law, Economics 
Black, Armanella, Ph.B. Drake 1910 Greenfield, Ind. 

English, French, Spanish 
Blain, Mary Willie, A.B. Toronto 1911 Toronto, Can. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Blakey, Roy Gillispie, Ph.B. Drake 1905, A.M. Colorado 1910 Boulder, Col. 

Economics, Sociology, Public Law 
Blanchard, Benjamin Frank, A.B. Michigan 1911 Shelbyville, Ind. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Blauvelt, Martin Emerson, A.B. 1905 Yonkers, N. Y. 

Latin, Education, Roman History 
Bliss, Walter Parks, A.B. Wesleyan 1909, A.M. 1910 Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Bacteriology, Physiology, Chemistry 
Blum, Vivienne Henriette, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

Romance Philology 
Boas, Ernst Philip, B.S. 1910 Grantwood, N. J. 

Chemistry, Physiology 
Boas, Helens Marie, A.B. 1909, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Botany, Anthropology 
DE Boer, Josephine Marie, B.S. 1907 Yonkers, N. Y. 

French, Romance Philology, English 
BojESEN, Johanne New York City 

Social Economy 
Bole, George Addison, A.M. 1911, B.S. Geneva 1906 New York City 

Chemistry, English 
BoLLER, Paul Franklin, A.B. Syracuse 1910 Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sociology, Social Economy, History 
BoNFOEY, Emma Comstock, A.B. Smith 1902 Centerbrook, Conn. 

English 
BooDY, Bertha M., A.B. Radcliffe 1899 Brookline, Mass. 

Latin, Greek ArchcBology 
BooKSTABER, Philip David, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Social Economy 
BORG, Edith Dulcie New York City 

Social Economy 
Bourne, Augustus N., Jr., LL.B. 1891, A.M. 1908 New York City 

Public Law 
Boutelle, Harriet Lang, A.B. Mt. Ho'yoke 1908 Chelsea, Mass. 

Social Economy 
Bowles, Frank Carroll, A.B. Central 1902, A.M. 1903 New York City 

Mathematics, History, English 
Boyce, W. Scott, A.B. Wake Forest 1903, A.M. Chicago 1907 Selwin, N C. 

Sociology, Economics 
BoYD, Herbert Alexander, A.M. 1911, A.B. Toronto 1909 Sistowel, Ont., Can. 

Chinese, English 
Bradley, Helen M., A.B. Cornell 1906, A.M. Pena. State 1908.. .. Southport, Conn. 

German, Latin 
Braum, Frieda Aline, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1907 New York Citv 

Gtrtitan 



290 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Bream, Edwin Stenart, A.B. Pennsylvania College 1904 Elizabeth, N. J. 

Botany 
Brehaut, Ernest, A.B. Harvard 1896, A.M. 1897 Colorado Springs, Colo. 

History 
Bressler, Helen B., A.B. Lebanon Valley 1905 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Brett, George Monroe, A.B. Bowdoin 1897 Auburn, Me- 

Mathematics, Physics, Astronomy 
Brewer, Margaret Dryden, B.S. 1909 New York City 

Sociology, History, Economics 
Brewster, Alice Dorothy, A.B. 1906, A.M. 1907 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Brewster, John A., A.B. Harvard 1896 Geanga Lake, Ohio 

Sociology, Economics 
Bristol, Warren Edwin, A.B. Middlebury 1907 Vergennes, Vt. 

Botany, Chemistry 
Broadley-East, Albert Madison, N. J. 

Sociology 
Brodie, Donald Melrose, A.B. Oberlin 1911 Watertown, N. Y. 

Sociology, Economics 
Brown, Homer Grant, A.B. Toronto 1906 Ontario, Can. 

Philosophy, Psychology, History 
Brown, Melford Losee, B.S. St. Lawrence 1908 New York City 

Philosophy, History 
Browne, Ethel Nicholson, A.M. 1908, A.B. Goucher 1906 Baltimore, Md. 

Zodlogy, Physiology, Botany 
Browne, Mabel Emma, A.B. 1906, A.M. 1908 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics 
Browne, Thomas Quincy, Jr., A.M. 1907, A.B. Harvard 1888 Morristown, N. J. 

Geology 
Brownlee, May, A.B. Wilson 1908 Indiana, Pa. 

English, Education 
BRuftRE, Henry, Ph.B. Chicago 1901 New York City 

Economics, Sociology, Administrative Law 
Bruno, John Rev New York City 

Philosophy, Psychology 
Brunton, James Stopford Lander, B.Sc. McGill 1910 Montreal, Can. 

Geology, Paleontology, Metallurgy 
BucHER, Chester Sarbin, A.B. Oberlin, 1910 Kansas City, Mo. 

Sociology 
BucKiscH, Walter Gerard Martin, A.B. 1910 Denver, Colo. 

English, German 
Buckley, Horace Mann, A.B. Northwestern 1908 Wilmington, Ohio 

Philosophy, History 
BxroiNGTON, Ernest Gunton, A.B. 1902, LL.B., A.M. 1905 New York City 

Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, History 
BuLSON, Margaret Theresa, A.B. RadcHffe 1905 Englewood, N. J. 

Latin 
BuRD, Charles Gillette, A.B. Amherst 1898 Patchogue, N. Y. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Burke, Agnes Madeleine, A.B. 191 1 Morristown, N. J. 

Sociology 
Burlingame, Anne Elizabeth, A.M. 1910, A.B. Syracuse 1900 New', York City 

History, Sociology 
Burnett, Marguerite Hill, A.B. Adelphi 1910 New York City 

History, Sociology 



AND PURE SCIENCE 29 1 



Burr, Emily Thorp, A.B. 1911 Greenwich, Conn. 

Psychology, Sociology, Social Economy 
Burt, Amy Maud, A.M. 1904, Ph.B. Vermont 1900 Swanton, Vt. 

History, Sociology 
BuSBEE, Christiana, A.B. Cornell 190s, A.M. 1908 New York City 

Mathematics 
Cameron, Walter S., A.M. 191 1, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1895 New York City 

Botany, Physics, Chemistry 
Campbell, Anna L., A.B. Washington 1906 Spokane, Wash. 

English, History 
Campbell, Florence Wilder, A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1901 New York City 

English 
Campion, John Leo New York City 

German, Sanskrit 
Canfield, Leon Hardy, A.B. Syracuse 1908 Syracuse, N. Y. 

History, Constitutional Law 
Caples, Edith Jesse (Mrs.), A.B. 1904 New York City 

French, German 
Carey, Ethel Gertrude, Ph.B. Alma 1911 Harbor Springs, Mich. 

English, Education 
Carlson, Margaret Wilhelmina, A.B. Texas 1909 New York City 

History, Sociology 
Carnes, Welcome D., A.B. So California 1907 New York City 

Social Economy 
Carpenter, Rhys, A.B. 1909, B.A. Oxford 1911 New York City 

Greek, Latin, Philosophy 
Carroll, Alice, A.B. Wellesley 1906 Nashville, Tenn. 

English, Comparative Literature, Philosophy 
Casamajor, Martha, A.B. Adelphi 1904 New York City 

History, Political Economy 
Case, Brayton Clarke, B.S. California 1910 South Acton, Mass. 

Botany 
Case, Lucy Ada, A.B. Wisconsin 191 1 New York City 

History, Social Economy 
Castritsy, George Peter, A.B. Evangelical School, Smyrna 1895 New York City 

Comparative Literature, English 
Cattell, Eleth Garrison-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Zoology 
Chamberlain, Albert Edward, A.B. Oberlin 1908 Oberlin, Ohio 

Social Economy, Economics 
Chang, Yu Jung, A.B. Wells 1911 New York City 

Sociology ' 
Chapman, Percy Addison, Litt.B. Princeton 1909, A.M. 1910 Plainfield, N. J. 

Romance Languages, History 
Chazal, Philip Maxwell, A.B. Charleston 1906 Charleston, S. C. 

Chemistry 
Chen, Shao-Kwan, A.M. 19x1, A.M. Chinese Imperial Univ. 1908. .Shanghai, China 

Economics, Public Law, Sociology 
Chen Wei Fau, A.M. 1909, A.B. Peking, China 1904 Peking, China 

M etallursy 
Chenoweth, Irving Shoemaker, A.B. Eureka 1905, A.M. 1907 . . Chambersburg, 111. 

Sociology 
Chidsey, Harold L., A.B. Lafayette 1909 Easton, Pa. 

Philosophy 
Cmow, Chushen, S.B. M. I. T. 1911 Shanghai, China 

Chemistry, Mathematics 



292 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Chrislip, Abram Elza, A.M. 1911, A.B. Nashville 1901 New York City 

Psychology, Philosophy, Education 
Christensen, Niels C, Jr., Salt Lake City, Utah 

B.S. Utah 1905, M.S. 1910, A.M. 1911 

Geology, Paleontology 
Christianson, Addie Olive, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1897 New York City 

English, Education 
Chu, Chao Hsin, A.m. 1911. B.S. N. Y. Univ. 1911. A.M. Pekin 1907.. .New York City 

Economics, Sociology, International Law 
Clancy, Agnes Williams, A.B. Smith 1908 South Egremont, Mass. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Clapp, Elsie Ripley, A.B. 1908, A.M. 1909 New York City 

English, Philosophy 
Clark, Anna May, A.M. 1904, Ph.B. Vermont 1898 Brookfield, Vt. 

Botany, Geology 
Clark, Chester Charles, A.B. Oklahoma 1910 Comanche, Okla. 

Geology 
Clark, Donald Lemen, A.B. De Pauw 1911 Boston, Mass. 

English, German 
Clark, Mary C. G. (Sister St. Francis), A.B. Adelphl 1910 New York City 

History 
Clarke, Edwin Leavitt, A.B. Clark 1909, A.M. 1911 Canon City, Col. 

Sociology, Political Economy 
Clarke, Marie-Agathe New York City 

French 
Clauss-Kirsten, Martha, B.S. 1906 New York City 

French 
Clifton, Walter Leonard New York City 

Ph.B. Mississippi 1896, A.B. Nashville 1900 

Economics, Sociology, Public Law 
Cloyd, Genevieve, A.B. Smith 1897 New York City 

Latin, Greek 
Cobb, Percival Bartlett, A.B. Dartmouth 1904 New York City 

English 
Cobb, Winifred V., A.B. Chicago 1909 Boston, Mass. 

History, English 
Coblenz, Adolph, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

German, English, Philosophy 
Cochran, Mildred Winans, B.S. George Washington 1907 Denver, Col. 

English, Zoology 
Coffin, Francis Joseph Howells New York City 

Sociology '•,, 

CoHEE, Ora Jason, A.B. Wabash 1909, New York City 

Sociology 
Cohen, Samuel Meir, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Psychology, Philosophy 
Cohn-McMaster, Albert Marian, A.B. 1910 New York City 

French, Romance Philology, German 
Coleman, Christopher Bush, A.B. Yale 1896, B.D. Chicago 1899. .Indianapolis, Ind. 

History 
Coleman, William, A.B. Valparaiso 1905 Woodside, N. Y. 

Physics, Mathematics, Education 
Collier, Elizabeth Brownell, A.B. Vassar 1906 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Conger, Mary Rutgers McCrae, A.B. Vassar 190s New York City 

Social Economy 



AND PURE SCIENCE 293 

CONKEY, Mary Vilura, A.B. St. Lawrence 1901 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Conway, Catherine Eugenia, A.B. Albany State Normal'ipii New York City 

History, Sociology 
Cook, Hazel Margaret, A.B. Smith 1906 New York City 

Latin, Roman Archmology, Education 
Cooper, Francis LeRoy, A.B. Baker 1910 Delphos, Kan. 

Sociology 
Cooper, Frank Briscoe, A.B.Randolph-Macon 1905, A.M. 1906 Buena Vista, Va. 

Physics, Mathematics, Astronomy 
CoPLiN, Mary, A.M. 1909, A.B. West Virginia 1906 Boothsville, W. Va. 

English, Education 
CoppocK, Grace L., A.B. Nebraska 1905 Shanghai, China 

SocialiEconomy 
CoRRiGAN, Margaret Stone, A.B. 1904 New York City 

English 
CouRSON, Della, A.B. Lebanon Valley 1907 New York City 

English, Philosophy 
CouRTiCE, William Norman, A.B. Victoria 1908 Sound Beach, Conn. 

Semilics, Church History 
Courtney, Arthur Wilson, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

English, Philosophy 
CovELLO, Leonard, B.S. 191 i New York City 

Romance Languages, English 
Cox, Alice Bacom, A.M. 1910, A.B. Cox 1907 College Park, Ga. 

English 
Cox, George Benson New York City 

A.M. 1911, A.B. Western Univ. (Can.) 1906, B.D. Trinity, (Toronto) 1910 

Sociology, Social Economy 
Creecraft, Earl Willis, Ph.B. Franklin 1907 Franklin, Ind. 

Public Law, History 
Crocker, Nellie Josephine, B.S. 1907 Tarrytown, N. Y. 

German 
Grossman, Peter Floyd, Litt.B. Princeton 1911 Newark, N. J, 

Chemistry 
Crosson, Lillian Walton New York City 

Sociology 
Crozier, William AndrewJ Shrewsbury, Pa. 

A.B., A.M. Dickinson 1909, B.D. Drew 1909 

History 
Cru, Robert Loyalty, Equiv. A.M. Paris 1909 New York City 

French, Romance Philology, Comparative Literature 
CuEVAS, Rosalia del Pilar, A.B. Adelphi 1909 New York City 

Romance, Economics 
CuLLEN, Rose Nicholls, A.B. Toronto 1903 Baltimore, Md. 

Sociology 
Culler, Arthur Jerome, A.B. Juniata 1908 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Psychology 
Culler, Elmer Austin, A.B. Juniata 1910 Hartville, Ohio 

Philosophy, Psychology 
Cunningham, Raymond, A.B. Trinity (Conn.) 1907 New York City 

Sociology 
Curtis, William Beecher, A.B. Univ. of South 1910 Columbus, Ga. 

Sociology 
Cushing, Max Pearson, A.B. Bowdoin 1909 New^ York City 

History, Comparative Literature 



294 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Cutler, Clara Sanford, A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1910 New York City 

History, Sociol'^gy 
Daggett, Windsor Pratt, Ph.B. Brown 1902 Auburn, Me. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Daniel, Willie Wellington Columbia College, S. C. 

A.B. Columbia, S. C. 1907, A.M. 1909 

English, History, French 
Dann, Harvey Montgomery, A.B. Syracuse 1898 East Orange, N. J. 

Latin, Greek, History 
Darden, William Arthur, A.B. North Carolina 1910 Freemont, N. C. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Dargon, Marion, Jr., A.B. WoSord 1909 Spartanburg, S. 0. 

Philosophy 
Darlington, Henry Vane Bearns, A.B. 1910 Harrisburg, Pa. 

Sociology, Economics 
Davidowitz, Harry Solomon, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Semitics, Ethics 
Davies, Thomas, A.B. Kings Coll., Can. 1899, A.M. 1902 New York City 

History 
Davis, Aida L New York City 

German, French 
Davis, Alice, Ph.B. Chicago 1909 New York City 

History, English 
Davis, Sarah Ellen, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1903 Salem, N. J. 

Zoology, Botany, Chemistry 
Deam, Thomas Marion, A.B. Indiana 1908 Bluffton, Ind. 

History 
Debon, AMfiDfiE Joseph, M.D. 1911 New York City 

Pathology 
Decker, Anna S., B.S. 1910 LowvlUe, N. Y. 

German 
De Con, Nellie Maude, B.S. 1907 Jersey City, N. J. 

English, Education 
Delany, M. Josephine, A.B. St. Lawrence 1904 New York City 

Physics, Mathematics 
De Leon, Solon, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1902 New York City 

Social Economy 
Dennis, Paul Gill, A.B. Wesleyan 1910 Madison, N, J. 

Sociology 
Dewey, Frederick Archibald, B.S. Mass. Inst. Tech. 1910 Huntington, N. Y. 

Sociology, Economics, History 
Deyo, Alfred Ludlum, A.B. Williams 1908 Kingston, N. Y. 

English, Comparative Lileraliire 
Dickinson, Lucy Dee, A.B. Washburn 1906, A.M. Kansas 1907 . .Los Angeles, Calif. 

English, Education 
Dickson, Arthur, A.M. 1911, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature, 
DiMMiCK, William Warren Margaretville, N. Y. 

A.M. 1911, LL.B. N. Y. Univ. 1906 

Roman Law, English 
Dodge, Bayard, A.B. Princeton 1909 Riverdale, N. Y. 

Sociology 
DoNNELL, John Christfield, A.B. Hobart 1910 New York City 

Sociology 
Draper, Caroline Wood, A.B. Randolph-Macon 1904 Oxford, Ala. 

Latin, English 



AND PURE SCIENCE 295 

Draper, Otis Herbert, A.M. 1911, A.B. Johns Hopkins 1910. . . Brooklandville, Md. 

History, Philosophy 
Driehaus, Irwin William, A.M. 1905, B.S. Cincinnati 1900 Cincinnati, Ohio 

Sociology, Social Economy 
Duncan, Mary Ellen, A.B. Adelphi, 1908 New York City 

Latin, Roman ArchcBology 
Duncan, William Young, A.B. Yale 1910 New York City 

A.B. Texas 1909, A.M. Stanford 1910 

Sociology 
Dunn, William Edward, A.B. Texas 1909, A.M. Stanford igro Austin, Tex. 

History, Economics 
DuNSEATH, Samuel Glover, A.M. 1911, A.B. Ursinus 1910 Pittsburg, Pa. 

Economics, Sociology, History 
DuRSTiNE, Florence Sarles, A.B. Wellesley 1901 New York City 

History, English 
DwiGHT, Marion, Edith A.B. Smith 1910 New York City 

Philosophy 
Eastman, Marjorie McClintock, A.B. 1908 New York City 

Comparative Literature, English 
Eastman, Samuel Mack, A.B. Toronto 1907 Meaford, Ont., Can. 

History, Economics 
Ebina, Kazuo, A.M. Imperial Univ. Tokyo Tokyo, Japan 

History, Public Law 
Eccles, Olive L., A.B. Albany State Normal 1911 New York City 

History, Sociology 
Eckstein, Moses, A.M. 1911 Philadelphia, Pa. 

History, Sociology 
Edwards, George William, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

History 
Egan, Rose F., A.M. 1911, A.B. Syracuse 1910 Syracuse, N. Y. 

Comparative Literature, English 
Egerton, Frank Nicholas, Jr., A.B. Trinity 1909, A.M. 1911 Louisburg, N. C. 

Physics, Mathematics 

Elder, John Clifton New York City 

LL.B. Georgia 1901, A.M. Harvard 1910 

Constitutional Law, Economics 
Eldridge, Seba, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Sociology 
Ellisson, Estelle James, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Psychology, English 
Elmendorf, Augustus, A.B. 1892 Jersey City, N. J. 

Sociology 
Elson, Charles, A.B. Bucknell 1909, A.M. Harvard 1910 Kane, Pa. 

German, French 
Emin, Ahmed Constantinople, Turkey 

Sociology, Public Law, Education 
Emmanuel, Mary, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1908 New York City 

English 
Enders, Henry Cornelius, B.L. Cooper Union 190s New York City 

Chemistry, Geology 
Epstein, Louis M., B.S. 1911 New York City 

Philosophy, Semitics, Sociology 
Erdofy, Frances Vera, A.B. N. Y. Normal 191 1 New York City 

German, English 
Ermin, Edward Jones, A.B. Davidson 1906, A.M. 1907 Morganton, N. C. 

English, Celtic 



296 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Erpf-Lefkorics, T. Arthur, A.M. 1910, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Chemistry, Anatomy 
Fairchild, Clarissa White, A.B. Oberlin 191 1 New York City 

Social Economy 
Fansler, Dean Spruill, A.M. 1907, A.B. Northwestern 1906 St. Davids, Pa. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Fansler, Harriott Ely, A.B. Northwestern 1902, A.M. 1906 St. Davids, Pa. 

English, Co7nparative Literature 
Farnsworth, William Oliver, A.B. Harvard 1893, A.M. 1894. .West Somerville, Mass. 

Romance Philology, Comparative Literature 
Feingold, Joseph, A.B. Clark 1911 Worcester, Mass. 

German, French 
Felton, Ralph Almon, Ph.B. Southwestern 1905 Hydro, Okla. 

Sociology 
Fernandez, Gracia Lilian, B.S. Maine 1898 North Dexter, Me. 

Romance Philology, French, Comparative Literature 
Fetterly, Clarence Aubrey, A.B. Hamilton 1897, A.M. 1900.. ..Rutherford, N. J. 

Latin, Education 
Fettke, Charles Reinhard, A.M. 1911, B.S. Washington 1910 Tacoma, Wash. 

Geology, Chemistry 
Fifield, Helen Annette, A.B. Carleton 1885 Los Angeles, Calif. 

History, Sociology, Economics 
Finlayson, John Duncan, A.B. Michigan 1911 Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. 

Sociology 
Fisher, Harry Linn, A.M. 1910, A.M. 1909 New York City 

Chemistry 
Fisher, Lizette Andrews New York City 

Comparative Literature, English, Italian 
FiSK, Daniel Moore, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Zodlogy, Geology 
Fitz-Gerald, Aaron Boylan, A.B. 191 1 Dover, N. J. 

Sociology, History 
Flanigen, Ruth, A.B. Vassar 1909 Woodbury, N. J. 

Zoology, Physiology 
Fleischer, Alexander, A.B. Pennsylvania 1908, A.M.Wisconsin 1911 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Social Economy, Sociology 
Fletcher, Katharine Ogden, A.B. Smith 1900 Amherst, Mass. 

English, Education 
Focht, Mildred, A.M. 1908, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1904 Plantsville, Conn. 

Psychology, Education, English 
Folwell, Ethel Anna, A.B. Nashville 1910 Nashville, Tenn. 

Latin, Greek, Sanskrit 
FooTE, Alice May, A.B. Oberlin 1908, A.M. Western Reserve 1910.. ..Oberlin, Ohio 

History, Philosophy 
FoOTE, John Paul, A.B. Adelphi 1908 New York City 

History 
Forsyth, Grace Holt, A.B. Stanford 1905 New York City 

Social Economy, Economics, English 
Forsyth, R. K New York City 

B.S. Rochester 1903, A.B. Indiana 1908, A.M. Stanford 1909 

Eco7ioinics, Sociology, History 
Forsythe, Robert Stanley, A.M. 1909, B.L. Lincoln 1908 Lincoln, 111. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Fort, Charles Henry Gould Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y. 

A.B. Cornell College, la. 1908, B.D. Drew 1911 

History, English 



AND PURE SCIENCE 297 

Foster, Sarah P., A.B, Wellesley 1898 New York City 

History 
Fox, Dixon Ryan, A.B. 1911 Potsdam, N. Y. 

Public Law, History, Economics 
Frank, Maude Morrison, A.M. 1911, A.B. N.Y. Normal 1907 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Franke, Clara E., B.S. 1907 New York City 

German 
Franklin, Alberta Mildred Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

A.M. 1909, A.B. Wellesley 1904 

Latin, Greek, History 
Franklin, Mae, A.B. Hamline igor Caldwell, Idaho 

Linguistics, Latin, English 
Fredman, Samuel, A.B. Johns Hopkins 1909 Roanoke, Va. 

Philosophy, Sociology 
Freeburg, Victor Oscar, A.B. Yale 190S. A.M. 1908 Lindsborg, Kan. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Freidenrich, Edyth, A.B. 1906 New York City 

German, Sociology 
French, Clayton T. A., LL.B. 1910. A.B. N. Y. Univ. 1907 New York City 

International Law, Roman Law, History 
Frerichs, Harrison, M.D., A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

History, Public Law 
Freygang, Gustav George, M.E. Stevens 1909 Union, N. J. 

Physics, Mathematics 
Friedmann, Henry, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1898, A.M. New York Univ. 1903 . . New York City 

Geology 
Fujioka, Yukichi New York City 

Economics 
Garabedian, Hovhannes Lazarus New York City 

A.B. Robert College, Turkey 1910 

Philosophy, Education, History 
Gavin. Helen, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

Physiology, Botany 
Geer, Helena. A.B. Cornell 1903 New York City 

German, French 
Gerrish, William Churchill, A.M. 1907, A.B. Harvard 1899. . . .New Canaan, Conn. 

History, Sociology 
Gettler. Alexander Oscar, A.M. 1909, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1904 New York City 

Chemistry, Metallurgy 
Gibbons, Wilhelmina Caroline, A.B. Wellesley 1909 Bird in Hand, Pa. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Gibson, Carl Chesney, B.S. Denison 191 1 Gibson, Ohio 

Chemistry, Education 
Gibson, Heber H., A.B. Denison 1909 New York City 

Philosophy, Psychology 
GiGNOUx, Elisb Messenger, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1902 Great Neck, N. Y. 

Chemistry, Botany 
Gilbert, Grace Russell, A.B. Cornell 1907 New York City 

History, Economics 
Gildersleeve, Nelson Burroughs, A.B. 1911 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Gillespie, James Edward, A.B. Cornell 1909, A.M. Harvard 1910 Ithaca, N. Y. 

History, Sociology 
Gilmore, Floy V., A.B. Washington 1910 Seattle, Wash. 

Social Economy, Sociology 



298 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Glass, Meta, A.M. Randolph-Macon 1899 Lynchburg, Va. 

Latin, Greek, History 
Goldman, Agnes, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1909 New York City 

Psychology 
Goldsmith, Beatrice, A.B. Adelphi 1906 New York City 

History, Economics 
Goodale, Grace Harriet, A.B. 1899 Potsdam, N. Y. 

Latin, Greek, Roman Archaology 
GoODHART, Helen, A.B. 1907 New York City 

Social Economy, Economics, History 
Goodrich, Hubert Baker, B.S. Amherst 1909 Auburndale, Mass. 

Zoology, Paleontology 
Goodspeed, Gertrude Cliff, A.B. Bates 1898 New York City 

Social Economy, English 
Goodwin, Ethel Lizzie, A.B. 1909, A.M. 1910 New York City 

Economics, Sociology, Mathematics 
GooLD, Edgar Hunt, A. '.Amherst 1904, B.D. General 1911 New York City 

Philosophy, Comparative Religion 
Gordiano, S. F., A.B. Inst. Cient. Literario (Mexico) 1901 New York City 

Sociology, Philosophy 
Gould, Annie Laura, A.B. Hiram 1898 Bedford, Ohio 

History, Sociology 
GowiN, Enoch Burton Litchfield, Nebr. 

M.D. Iowa State Teachers 1906, Ph.B. Wisconsin 1909, Ph.M. 1910 

Sociology, Economics, Anthropology 
Graham, Walter J., A.B. Bates 1911 Topsham, Me. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Graves, Virginia, A.B. Earlham 1911 Richmond, Ind. 

German, Education 
Green, Alexander, A.M. 1911, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

German, Latin 
Green, Gabriel Marcus, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics 
Green, Howard Charles, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1902 New York City 

History, Economics 
Greenfield, George Sidney, A.B. Harvard 1904 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature, Philosophy 
Griffin, Edward Gray, A.M. 1911, B.S. Dartmouth 1910 Albany, N. Y. 

Chemistry 
Grinfeld, Isaac New York City 

A.M. 1910, B.C.S. New York Univ. 1909 

Economics, Sociology, Constitutional Law 
Griswold, Chester Arthur, A.B. Wisconsin 1909 Waukesha, Wis. 

History, Philosophy 
Griswold, Virginia Antoinette, A.B. Adelphi 1909 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Gross, Beatrix Helen, A.B.|N. Y. Normal 1911 New York City 

Chemistry, Botany 
Gross, Henry Isaac, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Mathematics 
Gross, RenSe, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

History, German 
Groves, Joseph, A.B. Trinity 1910 Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Sociology 
GuBBiNS, Genevra, A.B. Smith 1909 New York City 

History, Economics 



AND PURE SCIENCE 299 

GuENTHER,''AuGUST ERNEST New York City 

B.Sc. Michigan 1898, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins 1905 

Physiology 
Gulliver, Eunice Henrietta, B.L. Smith 1891 Norwich, Conn. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Hackedorn, Marion, B.L. Wesleyan 1898 New York City 

German, French, English 
Haessler, Luise, A.B. Chicago 1906 New York City 

German, Comparative Philology 
Haeseler, Paul C, B.S. Chicago 191 1 New York City 

Ckemis'ry, Geology 
Hageman, George Russell, A.B. 190s Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Philosophy, History 
Haig, Robert Murray Columbus, Ohio 

A.B. Ohio Wesleyan 1908, A.M. I'linois 1909 

Economics, Sociology, Administrative Law 
Haight, Helen Ives, A.B. Vassar 1898, Pd.B. Albany Normal 1900 Auburn, N. Y. 

Latin 
Hale, Will Taliaferro, A.B., A.M. Vanderbilt 1902, B.D. Yale 1905 Mobile, Ala. 

English, Greek 
Hall, Caroline Dumont, A.B. 1906 New York City 

History 
Hall, Clifford Watson, A.B. Wesleyan 1904 New Canaan, Conn. 

English, Education 
Hall, John Oscar, A.B. Denver 190S. A.M. 1905 St. Paul, Minn. 

Sociology, Economics, Social Economy '^ 

Haller, Ralph Womelsdorf White Plains, N. Y. 

B.L. Bucknell 1908, A.M. Harvard 1909 

German, French 
Hallock, Frances Adelia, B.S. Mt. Holyoke 1899 Schenectady, N. Y. 

Botany 
Halpern, Morris, A.M. 1909 New York City 

Sociology, Economics 
Halsey, Katharine Caroline Lake Forest, 111. 

A.B. Lake Forest 1908, A.M. Illinois 1909 

Social Economy 
Hamburger, Nannette F., A.B. 1910 New York City 

English, Celtic 
Hamlin, Marston Lovell, A.M. 1911, A.B. Amhsrst 1908 New York City 

Chemistry 
Hammond, Anna Bingham, B.S. 1910 New York City 

History, English 
Hannan, Walter Sherlock, B.S. New York Univ. 1910 New York City 

Physics, Mathematics 
Harada, Tamezo, B.D. Drew 1910 New York City 

Philosophy, History 
Hardy, Edward Rochie, Ph.B. Boston New York City 

Economics 
Hardy, Sarah Drowne Belcher New York City 

A.B. Boston 1887, M.D. Woman's Medical 1891, A.M. New York Univ. 1900 

LL.B. 1901 

Social Economy 
Harkey, Tula Lake, A.B. Colorado 1909 New York City 

Chemistry, Physiology 
Harlow, Samuel Ralph, A.B. Harvard 1908 Grafton, Mass. 

Sociology 



300 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Harris, Harry Cleveland, A.B. Pennsylvania 1908 New York City 

Semitics, Sociology 
Harris, William H., B.D. Yale 1907. A.M. 1909 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature, Ethics 
Harrold, Lidie, B.Ph. Oberlin 1900 Damascus, Ohio 

German, History 
Hart, George Wilmot, Litt.B. Rutgers 1909 New Brunswick, N. J. 

Chemistry, Physics 
Hartung, Ernest William, A.B. 1910 New York City 

German 
Haseman, John Diederich, A.B. Indiana 1905, A.M. 1907 Linton, Ind. 

Zoology, Physiology, Chemistry 
Hayashi, K Kumamoto, Japan 

Economics 
Hayden, Joel Babcock, A.B. Oberlin 1909 Brentwood, N. J. 

Sociology, History, Psychology 
Hayden, Ralph Henry, A.B. Bishop's College 1910 New York City 

English 
Hayes, Cary Walker, A.B. Washburn 1909 New York City 

Social Economy 
Heady, John Henry, A.B. Hobart 1901, A.M. Indiana, 1907 New York City 

Sociology, Economics, Philosophy 
Healy, John Robert, A.B. Harvard 1897, B.S. 1899 New York City 

Geology 
Heathcote, George Milton New York City 

A.B. Harvard 1903, LL.B. N. Y. Law 1908 

Social Economy 
Hecker, Julius Friedrich, A.B. German Wallace 1910 New York City 

Sociology, Economics, Psychology 
Heiden, Irma Fanny, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Social Economy, Sociology 
Heidenis, Miriam B., A.B. N. Y. Normal 1911 New York City 

History, Sociology 
Heilbrunn, Lewis Victor, A.B. Cornell 191 1 New York City 

Zoology, Botany, Chemistry 
Heintze, Richard Wilhelm Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

German, History 
Hellman, Milo New York City 

Zoology 
Henderson, Harold Gould, Jr., A.B. 1910 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry 
Hendricks, Ethel, A.B. 1905, A.M. 1907 New York City 

Economics 
HfiNiN, Benjamin Louis Antoine New York City 

A.B. Paris 1892, LL.B. 1895, A.M. Brown 1910 

French 
Herreshoff, Anna Francis, A.B. 191 1 New York City 

Mathematics, Astronomy 
Herring, Hubert Clinton, Jr., A.B. Oberlin 19H New York City 

Philosophy 
Herrmann, May, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Comparative Literature, Philosophy 
Herzberg, Max J., A.B. 1906 Newark, N. J. 

English, Comparative Literature, Education 
Hesse, George Ernest, A.B. Ohio State 1910 Columbus, Ohio 

English, jComparative Literature, Education 



AND PURE SCIENCE 30I 



Heuermann, Helena F., A.M. 1911, A.B. Adelphi 1902 New York City 

German, History 
Hickman, Josiah Edwin, A.M. 1907, B.S. Michigan 1895 Provo, Utah 

Psychology, Education 
Hicks, Frederick C New York City 

Economics, Public Law 
Higginson, James Jackson, Jr., A.B. Harvard 1907. A.M. 1908 New York City 

Comparative Literature, English 
Hildreth, Philo Carpenter, A.B. Oberlin 1889 Fairfield, Iowa 

History, Social Economy 
Hill, Antoinette Dyett, A.B. 1910, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Mathematics, Education, Physics 
Hill, Lester Sanders, A.B. 1911 Cleveland, Ohio 

Mathematics, Physics 
Hillerman, Ida, A.B. Mississippi State 1904 Kosciusko, Miss. 

English, Comparative Literature, Education 
Hines, Albert Barker, A.B. Allegheny 1910 New York City 

Sociology, Social Economy 
Hirschensohn, Nima, A.m. 1907 Hoboken, N. J. 

Philosophy, French 
HoAGLAND, Henry Elmer, A.B. Illinois 1910, A.M. 1910 Prairie City, 111. 

Economics, Sociology, History 
Hoffman, Max New York City 

Semitics, Philosophy 
HoGE, Mildred Albro, A.B. Goucher 1908 Baltimore, Md. 

Zoology, Physiology 
Hollingshead, George Given Newark, N. J. 

Ph.B. Franklin 1907. Ph.M. 1910, B.D. Drew 1911 

Sociology, Economics, English 
HoLLiNGWORTH, Leta Stetter (Mrs. H. L.), A.B. Nebraska 1906 New York City 

History 
HoLLOWAY, Linda, A.B. Vassar 1905 Danbury, Conn. 

English, Comparative Literature, Education 
HoLLYMAN, JoHNATHAN CLEVELAND, A.B. Missouri 1911 Atlanta, Mo. 

Sociology, Economics 
Holt, Sarah Adaline, A.B. 1903 Hingham, Mass. 

Economics, History 
Honigman, Helen, A.B. Smith 1911 New York City 



Hooker, Berta Hamilton, B.L. Converse 1906 Memphis, Tenn. 

English, Education 
Hooper, Alice Howard, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

Botany, Geology 
Hooper, M. T., A.B. Univ. of Bishops College 1908 Toronto, Can. 

English 
Hoover, Merle Montgomery Chambersburg, Pa. 

A.M. 1911. A.B. Lebanon Valley 1906 

English, Education 
Hopkins, Mary Delia, A.B., A.M. Bryn Mawr 1893 Clinton, N. Y. 

Latin, German 
Hopper, Ernest Jasper, A.B. St. Stephens 1910 Hannibal, N. Y 

Sociology, Philosophy 
Hopson, Elizabeth Fuller, A.M. 1911, A.B. Vassar 1905 Bridgeport, Conn. 

History, Social Economy 
Horowitz, Benjamin, B.S. ipii New York Qty 

Chemistry, Education 



302 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

HoRTON, Blanche Wyatt (Mrs.)i A.B. Greenville 1910 Hermon, Calif. 

English, Education 
HoRTON, Lydiard H., A.m. 1911, A.B. Williams 1901 New York City 

Psychology, Physiology 
Howes, Emily H., A.B. Wesleyan (Georgia) 1898 New York City 

English, Education 
Huang, Chen Sheng, B.S. 1911 Tientsin, China 

Economics, Social Economy, History 
HuBER, John Greenleef,. A.B. Otterbein 1888, A.M. 1892 Dayton, Ohio 

Economics 
Hubert, James Henry, A.B. Atlanta Baptist, 1910 White Plains, Ga. 

Sociology 
Huene, Amelia Hermine, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1908 New York City 

Latin, Roman ArchcBology, Education 
Hughes, Harvey Hatcher, A.B., A.M. North Carolina 1909 Yorkville, S. C. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Hull, Arthur Stanley, A.B. Princeton 1903, E.E. 1906 Scranton, Pa. 

Hydraulics 
Hull, Blanche Wyckoff, B.S. Smith 1902 Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Social Economy 
Hurie, Wiley Lin, A.B. Illinois 1906 Petersburg, 111. 

Sociology 
HuRWiTZ, Solomon Theodore HALfivY New York City 

A.M. 1910, A.B. New York Univ. 1909 

Semitics, Arabic, Indo-Iranian 
HuTTON, Sarah E., A.B. N. Y. Normal 1905 New York City 

Botany 
Hyde, Isabella, A.B. Mt. Holyoke, 1901 New York City 

Philosophy, French 
Hyde, Roscoe Raymond, A.B. Indiana 1909, A.M. 1909 Terre Haute, Ind. 

Zodlogy 
Hyman, Joseph Charlap, A.B. 1911 New York City 

History, Sociology 
Ikeda, Minoru, A.B. Osaka 1904, A.M. Wisconsin 1911 Osaka, Japan 

Economics, Sociology 
Isham, Robert Melyne Lincoln, Neb. 

A.B. Nebraska Wesleyan 1909, A.M. Nebraska 1911 

Chemistry, Geology 
IztTMi, Akira, A.B. Lake Forest, 1907, A.M. Wisconsin 1908 Hakkaido, Japan 

International and Constitutional Law, History 
Jaeger, Heinrich Schalksmahle w, Germany 

History, Econonics, Sociology 
Jenkins, Hester Donaldson, Ph.B. Chicago 1898, Ph.M. 1899 Oshkosh, Wis. 

History, Turkish 
Jennings, Corinne Marie, A.B. St. Elizabeth 1905 New York City 

English, Mathematics, Education 
Jewell, Marjorie, A.B. Adelphi 1911 New York City 

English, German 
Jochinsen, John Peter, A.B. Laurence 1911 Appleton, Wis. 

Sociology, History 
Johnson, Lambert Dunning, A.B. Cornell 1911 Jersey City, N. J. 

Chemistry 
Johnson, Mary Hooker, B.L. Smith 1897 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Johnston, Herbert Bain, A.B. Toronto 1908 Weston, Ont., Can. 

Philosophy 



AND PURE SCIENCE 303 

Jones, Herschel Hildreth, A.B. DsPauw 1911 Lebanon, Ind. 

Sociology 
Jones, Hubert Darrell West Orange, N. J. 

History, German 
Jones, Lester Martin, A.B. Baker 1909 New York City 

Sociology 
Jones, Nellie Lucretia, A.B. Wellesley 1908 Merrimac, N. H. 

Botany, Geology, Education 
Jones, Olin Clarke, A.B. Allegheny 1907 Youngstown, Ohio 

Sociology 
Jones, Richard Foster, A.B. Texas 1907 Salado, Texas 

English, Greek 
Jones, Susie Markham Waco, Texas 

Sociology 
Jones, Walter Royal, S.B. Chicago 1909 Chicago, 111. 

Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry 
Jordan, John Clark, A.M. 191 1, A.B. Knox 1908 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Joseph, Samuel, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1902 New York City 

Sociology, Economics, Anthropology 
Junge, Elsa Wilhelmina Theresa, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

Latin, Education 
Kahn, Lina, A.m. 1909, Equiv. A.B. Gymnasium, Libau 1903 New York City 

Philosophy, German 
Kahn, Max, A.M. 1911. M.D. Cornell 1910 New York City 

Chemistry 
Kaine, Joseph M., B.S. New York Univ. 1910 New York City 

Botany 
Kalaidjian, Mihran Tatios Nyack, N. Y. 

A.B. St. Paul's (Tarsus) 1900, B.D. Yale 1905, A.M. 1908 

Philosophy, Psychology 
Kalmbach, Agnes Marie, A.B. Cornell 1911 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Romance Latin 
Kamiya Seyi, A.B. Waseda 1907 Shizuoka-Ken, Japan 

Public Law 
Kapp, Katharine Susanna, A.B. Minnesota 1905 New York City 

German, English 
Kaufman, Reuben, A.B. Clark 1911 Worcester, Mass. 

Sociology, Semitics, Philosophy 
Kavanagh, Edward J., A.B. St. Peters 1898 New York City 

Latin, Education 
Keagey, Esther, A.B.^igoo New York City 

Physical Education 
Keeler, Stephen Edwards, Jr., A.B. Yale 1910 New Canaan, Conn. 

English 
Keeley, Emma Matteson, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1906 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Keleher, Michael Joseph New York City 

A.B. Georgetown 1904, A.M. St. Francis Xavier 1906 

English, Comparative Literature 
Kellogg, Sara Lawrence, A.B. Wellesley 1907 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Kells, Lyman Morse, A.B. Minnesota 1910 Sauk Center, Minn. 

Mathematics, Education 
Kelly, Elizabeth Loretto, A.B. Adelphi 1898 New York City 

History, Sociology 



304 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Kelly, James Peter, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Botany, Zoology 
Kemp, William Cullen Bryant, A.B. 1900, A.M. 1901, LL.M. 1901 New York City 

International and Constitutional Law, History 
Kennedy, Melville Talbot, A.B. Illinois 1904 New York City 

Indo-Iranian 
KiDD, Howard C, A.M. 191 1, A.B. Geneva 1908 New York City 

Economics, Sociology, Public Law 
Kidder, Frank Howard, A.B. Wesleyan 1909 New York City 

German, Education 
King, Anna V., A.B. California 1907 Berkeley, Calif. 

History 
King, Elizabeth Edwards, A.B. Wellesley 1897 Trumansburg, N. Y. 

Comparative Literature, English 
King, Guy Beaver, A.B. Gettysburg 1908, A.M. 1911 Fairfield, Pa. 

English 
King, Howard Langdon, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1908 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics, Sociology 
KiRBY, Russell Thorp, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Electromechanics 
Kirchwey, Dorothy Browning, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Economics 
Kirk, Charles Townsend Yonkers, N. Y. 

B.S. Oklahoma 1904, A.M. 190S, Ph.D. Wisconsin 1910 

Geology 
Kivlen, Maude D., A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

Social Economy, History 
Klein, Arthur J., A.M. 1909, A.B. Wabash 1906 Elkhart, Ind. 

History, Philosophy 
Kling, Joseph, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

French, Italian, English 
Knapp, Annie May, Ph.B. Syracuse 1892 Binghamton, N. Y. 

History, Economics, Education 
Knauth, Oswald Whitman, A.B. Harvard 1909 New York City 

Economics, Sociology, Public Law 
Koblitz, Albert Edward, A.B. Harvard 1911 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature, Sociology 
Koo, Vi Kyuin, Wellington A.B. 1908, A.M. 1909 Shanghai, China 

International and Constitutional Law, Jurisprudence 
Kramer, Benjamin Joseph, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Chemistry, Physics 
Krenning, Edna Amelia, B.S. 1907, A.M. 1909, A.B. Weston 1900. . . Ft. Recovery, Ohio 

English 
KOhn, Arthur K., A.B. 189s, A.M. 1896, LL.B. 1897 New York City 

Roman Law 
Kuper, Gertrude Mary, A.B. Notre Dame 1909 Baltimore, Md. 

Psychology 
KuRZ, Harry, A.M. 1911, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

French, German 
Lacey, Thomas James, A.B. Griswold 1893 New York City 

History, Economics 
Laidler, Harry Wellington New York City 

A.B. Wesleyan 1907, LL.B. St. Lawrence 1910 

Economics, Public Law, Sociology 
Laird, Sara Grant, A.B. Oberlin 1904 Ashtabula, Ohio 

English, Comparative Literature 



AND PURE SCIENCE 305 

Lamont, Florence, A.M. 1898, B.S. Smith 1893 Englewood, N. J. 

Philosophy 
Lane, Edwin Selden, Ph.B. Yale 1908 Germantown, Pa. 

Sociology 
Langton, Willard S., B.S. Utah Agricultural i8g6 Logan, Utah 

Mathematics 
Lanz, Ida B., A.B. Cincinnati, 1910 New York City 

French 
Lanz, Jeanne Marie New York City 

French 
Lasher, William Reuben, Ph.B. St. Lawrence 1899 New York City 

Mathematics, Education 
Latham, Minor White, A.B. Mississippi State 1901 Hernando, Miss. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Lau, Robert Frederick, A.B. 1908, A.M. 1910 New York City 

Semitics 
Laubach, Frank Charles Benton, Pa. 

A.M. 1911, A.B. Princeton 1909 

Sociology, Social Economy 
Lauber, Almon Wheeler, Ph.M. Syracuse 1905 New York City 

History 
Laucks, Samuel Simon, A.B. Ursinus 1910 Springvale, Pa. 

Conslituiional and Administrative Law, History 
Law, Frederick Houk, A.M. 1896, A.B. Amherst 1895 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

English 
Law, Marion Fox, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

German, English 
Lawton, Maxwell Francis, A.B. 1904 New York City 

History, Latin 
Lee, Marguerite Thouron New York City 

B.S. Cornell 1894. A.M. N. Y. Univ. 1905 

Chemistry, Zodlogy, Education 
Lee, Otis Shue Orn, B.S. California 1911 Oakland, Calif. 

Engineering, Mining 
Leeds, John Bacon Moorestown, N. J. 

B.S. Haverford 1895, A.M. Pennsylvania 1910 

Social Economy, Sociology, Household Arts 
Lehman, Ezra New York City 

B.S. Penn. State Normal 1892, Ph.B. Bucknell 1899, Ph.D. Pennsylvania 1903 

English 
Lesselbaum, Samuel, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1901 New York City 

History, Education 
Levensohn, Rose, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1908 New York City 

German, Romance Philology 
Levine, Maurice, A.B. 19 11 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics, Education 
Levine, Michael, A.M. 1910, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Botany 
Levine, Victor Emanuel, A.M. 1911, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Chemistry 

Lewinsohn, Maurice Manfred New York City 

Economics, Sociology, Philosophy 

Lewis, Albion, A.B. Bates 1906 New York City 

Mathematics, Education 

Lewis, Edward Rust, A.B. Ohio State 1907, A.M. 1908 New York City 

Psychology, Philosophy, History 



306 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Lewis, Leicester Crosby, A.B. 1910, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Philosophy 
Lewis, Mamie Jay, A.B. Smith 1911 Charlotte, N. C. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Lewis, M. Smyser, B.S. Pennsylvania College 1911 York, Pa, 

Chemistry, Education 
LiBBiN, Thomas Justin, A.B. Stanford, 1909 New York City 

Psychology, Education, Philosophy 
LiEBOViTZ, Sidney, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Chemistry 
LiEBOWiTZ, Benjamin, E.E. 1911 New York City 

Mathematical, Physics, Mathematics 
Lindemann, Elizabeth, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

History, Sociology 
Lindsay, Frederic Nye, A.B. Yale 1889, B.D. 1894, A.M. 1903 New York City 

Semitics 
Linehan, Paul Henry, A.B. tiarvard 1902 New York City 

Mathematics, Education 
Lipari, Angelo, A.B. 1911 New York City 

French, Sociology 
Lipscomb, Anne, A.B. Converse 1911 Spartanburg, S. C. 

Economics, History, Sociology 
Lloyd, Llewellyn, A.B. 191 1 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Long, Doris, A.B. 1910, A.M. 1911 New York City 

English, Economics 
Long, Emilie Olivia, B.S. N. Y. Normal 1902 New York City 

P almonlolo gy. Botany 
Long, Shirley Virginia, A.B. Florida State 1907, A.M. 1908 Memphis, Tenn. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Lord, Mary Elizabeth, A.B. 1907 Hackensack, N. J. 

Botany, Zoology 
Lorentz, Daniel Emerson, A.B. Marietta 1909 Madison, N. J. 

Sociology 
LowY, Alexander, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Chemistry, Education 
LuBARSKY, Louis Henry, A.M. 1911, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1904 New York City 

Social Economy, Mathematics 
LuTH, Emilie Helen, B.S. 1909, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1904 New York City 

Sociology, Economics, Anthropology 
Lynch, Clara Julia, B.L. Smith 1903 Mansfield, Ohio 

Zoology, Physiology 
Lynde, Edward Dudley Barry, Ph.B. Syracuse 191 1 Antwerp, N. Y. 

Sociology 
Lyon, Darwin Oliver, A.M. 1908 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Psychology, ZoSlogy 
Lyon, Lorenzo Grenville, A.M. 1910, A.B. Princeton 1892, A.M. 1895 N. Y. City 

Classical Archceology, Latin, Greek 
Lyons, John Rambo, A.B. James Milliken 1910 New York City 

Philosophy 
McCain, James Ross, A.B. Erskine 1900, A.M. Chicago 1911 Rome, Ga. 

History 
McChesney, John, A.B. Amherst 1908 Montclair, N. J. 

Philosophy, Psychology 
McClees, Helen, A.B. Ohio State 1910 Columbus, Ohio 

Latin, Greek 



AND PURE SCIENCE 307 

McClelland, George Hamilton New York City 

A.B. Westminster 1903, B.D. Union Seminary 1909 

Sociology, Economics, Anthropology 
McClenon, Walter Holbrook Los Angeles, Calif. 

A.B. Grinnell 1907, Litt.B. Southern California 1910 

Economics, Public Law, Social Economy 
McClure, Matthew Thompson Spottswood, Va. 

A.B. Washington and Lee 1904, A.M. Virginia 1910 

Philosophy, Psychology 
McCoRKLE, Daniel Spencer, A.B. Missouri Valley 1909 New York City 

Sociology, Economics 
McCracken, Robert F. , A.M. i9io,B. 8. South Carolina Mil. Acad. 1903. .Langley, S.C. 

Chemistry 
McCuRRY, D. Ernest, A.B. MissouriJValley, 1909 New York City 

Sociology 
McGinley, Stephen Essex,"A.B. Trinity 1909. New London, Conn. 

Sociology 
McKiLLip, Rebecca, A.B. Goucher 1909 HoUidaysburg, Pa. 

Social Economy 
McKiRAHAN, Walter Wilbert, A.B. Muskingum 1905 New Concord, Ohio 

Chemistry, Education 
McLean, C. V., A.B. Toronto 1909, A.M. 1910 Port Perry, Can. 

Semitics 
McLkmore, Elizabeth Baxter, A.B. Indiana 1905, A.M. 1909 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
McNally, Marie, A.B. Trinity (Washington, D. C.) 1910 New York City 

English, Mathematics 
McSorley, Joseph New York City 

A.B. St. John's 1891, A.M. 1895, S.T.L. Catholic (Washington, D. C.) 1897 

Economics 
M'Tavish, Douglas Craig, A.B. Toronto 1906 New York City 

Sociology, Education 
Ma, Yin Ch'u, A.B. Yale 1910 Shaoshing, Chehlsiang, China 

Economics, Sociology, Public Law 
Macklin, Egbert Chalmer, A.B. Indiana 1911 Bryant, Ind. 

Philosophy 
Mackzum, Henrietta Marie, A.B. Cincinnati 1909, A.M. 1910 New York City 

History, Education 
Maclachlan, Catherine Fisher, A.B. Toronto 1904, A.M. 1905 Toronto, Can. 

English, Comparative Literature 
MacRossie, William, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Public Law 
Magary, Alvin Edwin South Orange, N. J. 

Sociology, Philosophy 
Maghetta, Francesco, Dottore in Lettere, Rome, 1906 New York City 

French, English 
Mahler, Louise, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

French, Education 
Mahnken, Anna Henriette New York City 

English 
Manges, Edmund L., A.B. Pennsylvania College 1908, A.M. 1911 Oakland, Md. 

Sociology 
Manheimer, Wallace A New York City 

Zg6logy, Physiology 
Margolis, Elias, A.B. Cincinnati 1900 New York City 

Semiiics 



308 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Margoshes, Samuel, A.M. 1910 Equiv. A.B. Jarnow 1905 New York City 

History, Economics, Philosophy 
Markham, Reuben Henry, A.B. Washburn 1908, B.D. Union Sena. 1911 . .Onaga, Kan. 

Philosophy 
Marrs, Leola Ethel, A.M. 1911, A.B. West Virginia 1905 Huntington, W. Va. 

Chemistry 
Mary, Beatrix K., A.B. Olivet 1903, A.M. Michigan 1904 Lansing, Mich. 

English, Latin 
Mason, Gabriel R New York City 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1903. Ph.D. N. Y. Univ. 1911 

Philosophy 
Mason, Thomas Augustus Northfield, Mass. 

A.B. Dartmouth 1901, A.M. Harvard 1908 

Romance Languages, Comparative Literature 
Mather, William Arnot, A.B. Princeton 1896, B.D. Hartford 1899. . .New York City 

Chinese 
Mathewson, Chester Arthur, B.S. 1905, A.M. 1906 Cincinnati, Ohio 

Chemistry, Physiology, Education 
Mayer, Mathilde Louise Bloomfield, N. J. 

History 
Mayer, Theresa, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Comparative Literature, English, History 
Messenger, Helen Althea, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1905 New York City 

Physics, Chemistry, Mechanics 
Meyer, Anna, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

Latin, Greek 
Meyer, Carl Ludwig Wilhelm, A.B. Michigan 1910 Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Roman Law, Public Law, Philosophy 
MiDDLETON, Florence, B.S 1910 New York City 

Biology 
Miller, Herbert Rinehart Seattle, Wash. 

Sociology 
Miller, May Irene, A.B. Smith 1907 Stamford, Conn. 

History, Sociology 
MiLMORE, Oscar Longfellow, A.B. George Washington 1910 Washington, D. C- 

History, Public Law 
Miner, Maude E., A.B. Smith 1901 Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

Sociology 
Miner, Roy Waldo, A.B. Williams 1897 New York City 

Zodlogy, Geology 
MiRSKY, Israel, A.M. 1909, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1908 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics 
MIzutani, Kiichi, A.B. Waseda 1907 Shizuoka, Japan 

Economics 
AlONTGOMERY, Sarah Louise, B.S. 1910 Jefifersonville, Ind. 

Psychology, Philosophy 
Montgomery, William Randolph, A.B. Wesleyan 1911 Stamford, Conn. 

Economics, Social Economy, History 
Moody, Julia Eleanor, B.S. Mt. Holyoke 1894, A.M. 1909 South Hadley, Mass. 

Zodlogy, Bacteriology 
Moon, Evangeline Ada, A.M. 1910, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1906 New York City 

Geology, Paleontology, Botany 
Moore, Jessie Archibald, A.B. Stanford 190X Los Angeles, Calif. 

Chemistry 
Morgan, Albert Rufus, A.B. North Carolina 1910 Murphy, N. C. 

Sociology 



AND PURE SCIENCE 309 

MoRREY, William Thomas New York City 

A.B. Ohio State 1888, A.M. N. Y. Univ. 1893 

History, Economics 
Morris, Edith Matilda, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Mathematics, Physics, Education 
Morris, Sarah, A.B. Vassar 1906, A.M. 1908 Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Greek, Latin, Greek Archaology 
Morse, Hermann N., A.B. Alma 1908 Ludington, Mich. 

Social Economy, History, Education 
Morton, Ira Abbott New York City 

A.B. Mt. Union 1903, B.D. Drew 1905 

Psychology, Philosophy 
Moses, Sophia, A.B. Wellesley 1909 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

German, Romance Philology 
Moss, Arthur Bruce, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Philosophy, Semitics, English 
Moss, Elizabeth Jackson, LL.B., N.Y. Univ. 190s New York City 

English 
MoTTLEY, Frank Wilbur, A.B. Minnesota 1908 Red Wing, Minn. 

Sociology, Education 
Mountsier, Robert, A.M. 1910, A.B. Michigan 1909 iVew Ygrk City 

English, German 
Mowatt, Acton James Wilton Madison, N. J. 

Sociology 
Muravchik, Rachel Belkin New York City 

Sociology, Economics, English 
Murdock, Lucy Marvelle, A.B. Ohio Wesleyan 1899 Delaware, Ohio 

English, Education 
Murphy, William Hunt, B.Sc. McGill 19S8 Rochester, N. Y. 

Physics, Mathematics 
Murray, Robert Cornelius, A.B. Amherst 1910 Herkimer, N. Y. 

History, Roman Law and Comparative Jurisprudence 
Myers, Alfred Stuart, A.B. 1907 New York City 

English, Education 
Myers, Garry Cleveland, A.B. Ursinus 1909 New York City 

Psychology, Education, Social Economy 
Nahon, Zarita, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

French, Romance Philology 
Naito, Yukichi, B.D. Drew 1910, L.B. Meigigaguin 1901 New York City 

Sociology 
Naecano, Ikuo, Equiv. A.B. Nippon Law 1901 Tsu City, Japan 

Economics, Sociology, International Law 
Nammack, Elizabeth Frances, A.B. 1895, A.M. 1896 New York City 

Latin, Roman Archceology, Greek 
Nanes, Philip, Ph.B. Brown 1905 New York City 

History, Education 
Neal, Gertrude, A.B. DePauw 1896 Charleston, 111. 

Latin, Education 
Nealon, Kathleen Elizabeth, A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1909 Paterson, N. J. 

English, Social Economy 
Neel, Henri Charles, A.M. 1911, A.B. Paris 1910 New York City 

Romance Languages, Arabic 
Neff, Clarence Alvin, Ph.B. Wooster 1907 Bucyrus, Ohio 

Sociology 
Neidle, Marks, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1911 New York City 

Chemistry, Physics 



310 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Neuman, Abraham, B.S. 1909 New York City 

History, Philosophy 
Newhall, Albert Hitchings, A.B. Harvard 1S98, A.M. 1899 New York City 

Social Economy 
Nickel, Albert R New York City 

German, French 
NiGRiN, Jaroslav Victor, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Chemistry, Physics, Mineralogy 
NiLES, Ella Capers Jones New York City 

Psychology, Sociology, Philosophy 
Noll, Walter Leroy, B.S. Bucknell 1908 Newark, N. J. 

Botany 
North, Eric M., A.M. 1910, A.B. Wesleyan 1909, A.M. 1910 New York City 

History, Philosophy 
Northrop, Omanda Carolyn New York City 

Sociology 
Notman, Winifred, A.B. Smith 1911 New York City 

History, Economics 
Nowak, Abraham, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

Sociology, Anthropology, Philosophy 

NuDD, Howard Webster, B.S. Temple 1907 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Social Economy, Sociology, Education 
Nye, Berthold Hintz, A.B. 1909 Yonkers, N. Y. 

History 
Oberndorfer, Marian, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Social Economy, Sociology 
O'Brien, Charlotte Elizabeth, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

Mathematics 
O'Byrne, Michael Aloysius, Ph.B. St. Francis 1893 New York City 

Celtic 
O'Connell, Marjorie, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Paleeontology, Geology 
Ogino, Taisuke, LL.B. Chuo (Tokio)"i903 New York City 

Economics, International Law, Sociology 
Okuntsoff, Elaine, A.M. 1909, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1908 New York City 

Social Economy, Sociology 
Oldfield, Harry Lees, A.B. Brown 1910 New York City 

Philosophy 
Olinger, Henri CfisAR, B.S. 1908 New York City 

French, English 
Olson, Oscar Thomas, A.B. Albion 1911 New York City 

Philosophy, Economics 
Oni, Kaname, Equiv. A.B. Nippon Law 1905 Tokushima City, Japan 

Economics, Sociology, International Law 
Ongley, Lucy Evelyn, A.M. 1911, A.B. Smith 1908 New York City 

French, Romance Philology 
Ornstein, Martha, A.B. 1899, A.M. 1900 New York City 

History, Mathematics 
OsBORN, Algernon Ashburner, A.B. Harvard 1905 Newark, N. J. 

Economics, Sociology, History 
OsTER, John Edward, LL.B. Ohio Northern 1907 Toledo, Ohio 

Constitutional Law, Internatiotial Law, Economics 
Owens, Rosemary, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

Botany, ZoGlogy 
Palmer, Edna Adeline, A.B. 1910 New York City 

History, German 



AND PURE SCIENCE 3II 

Palmer, Erik Schjotte, Ph.B. Yale 1906 New Brunswick, N. J. 

Mathematics 
Palmer, Mary Learned, A.B. Smith 1909 Winterton, N. Y. 

Psychology, Comparative Literature, Sociology 
Pangborne, Katharine, Ph.B. Syracuse 1906 Dundee, N. Y. 

History, Sociology 
Parker, Carl William, A.B. Cornell 1908, A.M. Indiana 1909 Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Economics, Social Economy 
Parker, Robert Allerton, B.L. California 1909 Alameda, Calif. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Parsons, Alice Tullis Lord, B.L. Smith 1897 New York City 

English 
Parsons, Llewellyn S New York City 

Philosophy 
Paslay, Miriam Greene, A.M. 1911, A.B. Mississippi State 1889. . . .Columbus, Miss. 

Latin, Greek, Roman Archceology 
Paxjl, Winston, A.B. 1909 Jersey City, N. J. 

Sociology 
Pearl, Joseph, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Latin, Greek, Greek Archceology ^ 
Pearson, Philip Coombs, B.S. M.I.T. 1902, B.D. General 1908 Ridgewood, N. J. 

Philosophy 
Peck, Emily Seymour, A.B. Adelphi 1909 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Peckham, George Williams, Jr., A.B. Wisconsin 1906 Milwaukee, Wis. 

Philosophy, French 
Pedersen, Frederick Malling New York City 

E.E. 1893, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1889, Sc.D. N. Y. Univ. 1905 

Mathematics, Physics 
Pedrick, Franklin Burche. A.B. Johns Hopkins 1909 Washington, D. C. 

Psychology 
Pendleton, Venita, B.S. 1906 Bryn Athyn, Pa. 

Sociology, A nthropology 
Pennock, Leila, B.S. Earlham 1903 Zanesfield, Ohio 

Comparative Literature, English 
Percival, Mary, A.M. 1902, A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1898 New York City 

Sociology 
Perlman, David H., A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910 New York City 

English, Education 
Perry, Edward Owen, A.B. Hamilton 1903 Sanquoit, N. Y. 

Romance Languages, German 
Perry, William Henry New York City 

A.B. Syracuse 1908, B.D. Union Sem. 1911 

Philosophy 
Peterson, Arthur Everett, A.B. Tufts 1892, A.M. 1892. . . . South Coventry, Conn. 

History, Education 
Pfeiffer, Peter A., B.S. Wesleyan 1910 Hoboken, N. J. 

Chemistry 
Phillips, Walter Clarke, Ph.B. Brown 1902, A.M. 1903 Lafayette, R. I. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Philson, Samuel, B.S. Pennsylvania College, 1909 Berlin, Pa. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Pick, Thekla, A.M. 1910 New York City 

German, French 
Pierce, Alice Reeve, A.B. Smith 1896, A.M. Brown 1901 New York City 

English 



312 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

PiERSON, William Whatley, Jr., A.B. Alabama rgio, A.M. 1911.. ..River Falls, Ala. 

History, Sociology 
PiFER, Claude Albert, A.B. Wabash 1907, A.M. 1908, B.A. Oxford 1911 . . Carlisle, Ind. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Planer, Clara Helene, B.S. 1910 Hoboken, N. J. 

German, Education 
Plaut, Elsie, A.B. 1910 New York City 

English, History 
Poffenberger, Albert Theodore, Jr., A.M. 1910, A.B. Bucknell 1909. ..Sunbury, Pa. 

Psychology, Phys ology 
Polley, Britton, A.B. C. C. N.^Y. 1911 Slate Hill, N. Y. 

English, Education 
PoMEROY, Ralph Branwer, A.B. 1898, B.D. General 1902 Princeton, N. J. 

History 
Porter, Alexander Murray,JA.B. Dalhousie.1909 Alma, Nova Scotia 

Social Economy 
PowEL, AiLSiE Kyle Asbeville, N. C. 

A.B. Synodical College (Rogersville, Tenn.) 1891, B.S. Tennessee 1902 

English, Education 
Powell, Chilton Latham, A.M. 1911, A.B. Amherst 1907, A.M. 190S. . Baltimore, Md. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Powell, H. Wheeler, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1883 New York City 

Mathematics 
Prentis, Edmund Astley,"Jr New York City 

Geology 
Price, Julius Joseph, A.M. 1911, A.B. Pennsylvania 1908 New York City 

Semitics, History 
Price, Willard DeMille, A.B. Western Reserve 1909 Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Social Economy 
PULVERMACHER, WiLLiAM Dean New York City 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1900, LL.B. New York Law 1908 

Biology 
Punnett, Percy Withers, B.S. Rochester 191 1 Rochester, N. Y. 

Chemistry 
PuoRRA, Michael, B.S. 1909, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Chemistry 
Putnam, Mary Chastina, B.L. Cornell 1881 Conerdango Valley, N. Y. 

English, Comparative Literature 
QUACKENBOS, George Payn, A.B. 1900, A.M. 1901 New York City 

Indo-Iranian, Latin 
Quackenbush, Leopold Schuyler, A.M. 1901, Ph.B. Yale 1899 New York City 

Zoology, Botany, Physiology 
QuiN, Barbara Story, A.B. Smith 1911 New York City 

Social Economy 
Rabe, Louis Henry William, A.B. Concordia 1907 New York City 

Latin, Greek, German 
Raucher, Joachim, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1905 New York City 

German, English 
Rawls, Ann Elizabeth, A.B. Smith 1910 New York City 

Zo6logy, Physiology, Botany 
Ray, Frederick Short Hills, N. J. 

Physics, Mathematics 
Ray, Jackson Harvelle Randolph, A.B. Emery and Henry 1905 New York City 

Sociology 
Raymond, Andrew Van Vranken, Jr., A.B. Union 1908 Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sociology 



AND PURE SCIENCE 313 

Redding. Helen Edmunds, A.M. 1907, A.B. Adelphi 1901 New York City 

History, Sociology 
Reed, Helen Jean, A.B. Converse 1898 Waynesville, N. C. 

English 
Reed, Joanna AsHTON, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1893, A.M. N. Y. Univ. 1901.. .Leonia, N. J. 

Latin 
Reeves, Earle Clarence, A.B. Indiana 1911 Anderson, Ind. 

Sociology, Economics, English 
Reitlinger, Blanche Hortense, A.B. 1905, A.M. 1906 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature, Economics 
Renshaw, David Frederick, B.S. Rochester 1911 Rochester, N. Y. 

Chemistry 
Rich, Harry S., A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1908 New York City 

English, Education 
Richardson, Arthur H., A.B. Beloit 1908 Ripon, Wis. 

Sociology, Education, Economics 
RicKETTS, Bertha Louise, A.M. 1910, B.S. Millsaps 1909 Jackson, Miss. 

English, Education 
Riddell, Walter Alexander, A.M. 190S, A.B. Manitoba 1907 . Mintz, Manitoba, Can. 

Sociology, History, Economics 
Riley, Morgan Thomas, A.B. Yale 1907 New York City 

Sociology,*_Economics, History 
Robinson, Alice.M., A.B. Mt. Holyoke 189s, A.M. 1901 New York City 

Mathematics 
Robinson, Aaron G., A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Semitics, Sociology, Philosophy 
Roche, Josephine Aspinwall, A.M. 1910, A.B. Vassar 1908 Denver, Colo. 

Social Economy, History, Economics 
ROEDER, Emilie v.Walz, Ph.B. Oberlin 1899 New York City 

German, Mathematics 
Roelkey, David Ernest, A.B. Fordham 1905 New York City 

Bacteriology 
Rogers, Muriel Ward, A.B. Vassar 1911 New York City 

History, Economics 
Roll, Rose, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

Mathematics, German 
Rosenberg, Joseph, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 191 1 New York City 

Romance Languages, German 
Rosenthal, George Jacob, A.B. 1910, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Chemistry 
Rosenthal, Jerome New York City 

German, English, Philosophy 
Ross, Frank Alexander, Ph.B. Yale 1908 North Woodbury, Conn. 

Sociology, Economics, History 
Ross, William Neely, A.B. 191 1 Troy, N. Y. 

History, Economics 
Rothschild, Helene W., 1910 New York City 

Social Economy 
Rounds, Dora M., A.M. 1910, A.B. Wellesley 1896 Calais, Me. 

English, Education 
Rushmore, Elsie Mitchell, A.B. Vassar 1906 New York City 

History, Sociology 
Rusk, Ralph Leslie, A.B. Illinois 1909 Windsor, Mo. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Russell, Elmer Beecher, A.M. 1911, Ph.B. Vermont 1906 Burlington. Vt. 

History, Constitutional La-vj 



314 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Ruth, Una Gertrude, A.B. Denver 1908 Des Moines. la. 

Chemistry, Education 
Rydene, Alma P., B.S. 1908 New York City 

English, Psychology 
Ryerson, Margery Austen, A.B. Vassar 1909 Morristown, N. J. 

English, Education 
Saeger, Lovina Belle, A.B. Allegheny 191 1 Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Latin, Education, German 
Saidla, Leo Erval, A.B. Wabash 1909 New York City 

Sociology, History, Philosophy 
Sait, Una Bernard, A.B. 1909, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Philosophy, Education 
Salant, Henry, Ph.B. N. Y. Univ. 1895 New York City 

Economics 
Salas, Luis Emlynn, A.M. 1911, B.Sc. London 1904 New York City 

Assaying, Chemistry 
Salomon, Mrs. H. R. A.B. 1908 New York City 

History 
S.vlutsky, Jacob B., Equiv. A.B. Pernau 1904 New York City 

Economics, Public Law, Sociology 
Sampson, George Gordon, A.B. Bates 190s, A.M. Clark 1911 Worcester, Mass. 

Public Law, Economics 
Sanford, Ferdinand Doan, A.B. Princeton 1909 New York City 

Social Economy 
Schatzman, Albert George, A.B. Ohio Wesleyan 1908 Linden, N. J. 

Philosophy, Psychology, Sociology 
Schick, Philippine Munich, Germany 

Chinese 
Schlesinger, Arthur Meier, A.M. 1911, A.B. Ohio State 1910 Xenia, Ohio 

History, Constitutional Law 
Schliffer, William Henry, Jr., A.B. Adelphi 1911 New York City 

Chemistry, Botany 
ScHMALHAUSEN, Samuel Daniel, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Economics, Sociology, Anthropology 
ScHOLZ, Frederick William, A.B. 1911 New York City 

German, Psychology 
Schramm, Edward, Chem.E. 1909, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Physics, Chemistry 
Schreiter, Harriett Augusta New York City 

Philosophy 
' Scott, George Gilmore, A.B. Williams 1898, A.M. 1S99 Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Physiology, Zoology, Botany 
Scott, Reginald H., B.D. Berkeley Divinity School 1904 New York City 

Philosophy, Sociology, History 
Scott, Wilford H., A.B. Christian 1905 Columbia, Mo. 

Sociology, Economics, History 
Seel, William Moore, A.B. Temple 1909 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Philosophy 
Seely, Caroline Eustis, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Mathematics, Astronomy 
Seidenberg, Armin New York City 

Chemistry 
Seipt, Howard Anders, A.B. Harvard 1906, A.M. 1910 West Point, Pa. 

Philosophy, Psychology, Education 
Selleck, Anne, B.S. 1910, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1904 Westport, Conn 

German, Comparative^Literature 



AND PURE SCIENCE 315 

Selwyn-Brown, Arthur Australia 

C.E. London 1893, A.M. N. Y. Univ. 1904, Ph.D. 1909 

Administrative and Constitutional Law, Psychology 
Shaw, Agnes Morton, A.B. Wellesley 1892 West Newton, Mass. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Shenton, Herbert N Pottstown, Pa. 

Ph.B. Dickinson 1906, A.M. 1907, B.D. Drew 1910 

Sociology, Economics, History 
Shimidzu, Matsuo, A.B. Waseda 1909 Sendai, Japan 

Economics 
Shissler, Rey M., B.S. N. Y. Univ. 191 1 New York City 

English 
Shukri, Ahmed, Equiv. A.B. Cyprus 1910 Nicosia, Cyprus 

Sociology, Geography, Economics 
Shultz, Birl Earl, A.M. 191 1, A.B. Do Pauw 1908 Union City, Ind. 

Public Law, History 
SiGAFUS, Anna Emily, A.B. Smith 1910 Stroudsburg, Pa. 

History 
Sills, Louis Edmund McCakendale, A.B. Toronto 1910 Stephensport, Ky. 

English 
Simeral, Isabel, A.M. 1911, Ph.B. Chicago 1905 Bloomington, IlL 

History, Economics 
Simmonds, Lionel J., A.M. 1910, A.B. C. C. N. Y.ri903 New York City 

English , 
Simonton, Catherine M., A.M. 1907, A.B. Wesleyan 1900 Weehawken, N. J. 

Latin 
Sims, Newell LeRoy, A.M. 1910, A.B. Tri-State 1901 Angola, Ind. 

Sociology, Economics 
Skipp, Henry John, A.M. 1910, A.B. Denison 1904 New York City 

German, English 
Smith, Bertram Garner,- A.B. Michigan 1909 Youngsville, Pa. 

Embryology, ZoQlogy 
Smith, Catherine B., B.S. N. Y. Univ. 191 1 New York City 

Latin, Roman Archaeology, English 
Smith, Clarence Jack, A.B. Cornell College 1909 Blanket, Texas 

English, Comparative Literature 
Smith, Florence Mary, A.M. 1908, A.B. Illinois 1899 New York City 

English, Education 
Smith, Prank Drake, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Physiology, Chemistry, Education 
Smith, Geddes, A.B. 1910 New York City 

English, History 
Smith, Janet Maud, Ph.B. Wisconsin 1901 Wanwatosa, Wis. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Smith, Lois Bulkley Montclair, N. J. 

Philosophy 
Smith, Nellie May, A.M. 1911, A.B. Vassar 1898 New York City 

Social Economy, Education 
Smith, Robert Metcalf, A.M. 1909, A.B. Amherst 1908 Bancroft, Mass. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Sommerville, Selina Emily, A.B. Wellesley 1911 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Souder, Edmund Lloyd, A.B. Harvard 19 10 Philadelphia, Pa. 

Sociology 
Sowers, Don Conger, A.B. Baker 1904 Spring Hill, Kan. 

Eco7wmics, Sociology, Public Law 



3l6 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Spare, Bernice Y., A.B. Lafayette 191 r Royersford, Pa. 

Sociology, Philosophy 
Spearman, Charles, B.Sc. Queens ipro New York City 

Geology, Mineralogy, Paleontology 
Spier, Doris Jeanette, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

Botany, Physiology 
Spining, Harriet Monfort, B.S. 191 i South Orange, N. J. 

Philosophy, Education 
Sprung, Sabina, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1907 New York City 

Philosophy, English 
Stair, Bird Williams, B.S. Purdue 1899, M.S. 1901 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Standewick, Harry Fisher, Jr., A.B. 1911 „ New York City 

Latin, Greek, Education 
Stanton, Frederick Lester New York City 

Zodlogy 
Staub, Albert William Titusville, Pa. 

A.M. 1907, A.B. Oberlin 1904, B.D. Union Seminary 1907 

Oriental Languages 
Stauffer, Vernon, A.B. Hiram 1901 Angola, Ind. 

Philosophy, Psychology, Education 
Stebbins, Homer Adolph Syracuse, N. Y. 

Ph. B. Syracuse 1906, Ph. M. 1907. LL.B. 1908. 1 

History, Philosophy, International and Constitutional Law 
Stein, Nadine, A.M. 1911, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1910 New York City 

Sociology 
Steubing, William Colson, E.M. Michigan 1904 New York City 

Geology, Metallurgy, Palmontology 
Stevens, Junius Woods, Ph.B. Syracuse 1895 Bloomfield, N. J. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Stevens, Mary Sydney, A.B. Adelphi 1909 Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Latin, Roman Archeology, History 
Stewart, Bryce Morrison, A.M. Queens Univ. 191 1 Lyn, Ont., Canada 

History, Social Economy 
Stockdale, George Machin, A.B. Wesleyan 1910 Asbury Park, N. J. 

Sociology, History, Psychology 
Stone, Edward Collins, A.B. Yale 1904, A.M. Trinity 1905 Hartford, Conn. 

Chemistry, Education 
Stowell, Jay Samuel, A.B. Oberlin 1909 Orwell, N. Y. 

Sociology 
Stratford, Aline Croquet, A.B. 1897, A.M. 1899 New York City 

English, French 
Streeter, Daniel Denison, B.S. 1909 New York City 

Zodlogy, Anthropology 
Streeter, Stella Georgiana, A.M. 1903, B.L. Smith 1898 Jersey City, N. J. 

Botany 
Streightoff, Frank Hatch, A.B. Wesleyan 1909, A.M. 1910 New York City 

Economics, Sociology, Constitutional Law 
Stribling, Alice, A.B. Converse 1894 Spartansburg, S. C. 

History, Sociology 
Stridsberg, Carl Alexander Herbert, A.B. Bishop's College 1909. .New York City 

Sociology, History, Philosophy 
St. Stanoyevich, Milivay, A.M. Belgrade 1907 New York City 

Sociology, Politics, Economics 
Stuntz, Clyde Bronson, A.B. Wesleyan 1910 Madison, N. J. 

Sanskrit, History 



AND PURE SCIENCE ^I'J 

SuFFERN, Arthur Elliott, B.S. 1910, A.M. 1811 Corning, N. Y. 

Economics, Sociology, History 
SuGERMAN, Sara Caroline, A.B. Smith 1911 New York City 

English 
SxjN, To-Tan, B.S. M.I.T. 1911 Shoachow, China 

Metallurgy, Mining 
Surrey, Nancy Maria Miller New York City 

B.S. Chicago 1903. A.M. Wisconsin 1909 

History, Sociology 
Tanner, Agenor Henry, B.C.L. McGill 1906 Montreal, Can. 

Sociology, Economics, History 
Tattershall, Louise May, A.B. 1908 White Haven, Pa, 

History, Education 
Taylor, Albert Ernest, A.B. Toronto rpio Peterboro, Ont., Can. 

Sociology 
Taylor, Elbert B., A.B. Trinity 1873 Bayonne, N. J. 

Sociology 
Taylor, Henry Barman.'^E.M. 1906 Kansas City, Mo. 

Geology, Mining 
Thackeray, Mary Josephine, A.B. Adelphi 1901 New York City 

Comparative Literature 
Thomas, J. Franklin, A.B. Beloit 1904 New York City 

Sociology, Economics, Public Law 
Thompson, Arthur Perry, B.S. Arizona 1909 Jerome.fAriz. 

Geology, Mining, Metallurgy 
Thompson, Charles Dederer, Jr., A.B. Princeton 1905 Jersey City, N. J, 

Economics, Sociology, Psychology 
Thompson, Ralph Schofield, A.B. Wesleyan 1911 New York City 

Social Economy 
Thomson, Myrtle E., A.B. Syracuse 1894 New York City 

History, Economics 
Thomson, Sears, A.B. Minnesota 1909 Minneapolis, Minn. 

Social Economy 
Thurber, Candace, B.S. Smith 1904 New York City 

English 
TiCE, Sabra Colby (Mrs. W. A.), A.B. 1907 New York City 

Zoology 
TiLNEY, Frederick New York City 

A.B. Yale 1897, M.D. Long Island College Hospital 1903 

Histology, Anatomy, Embryology 
Timberlake, Edith, Staunton, Va. 

A.B. Woman's College (Baltimore) 1908 

History, Sociology 
Todd, John Robinson New York City 

B.D. Drew 1887, A.B. Dickinson 1887, A.M. 1890 

History, International Law 
Tompkins, Nanna M., A.B. Vassar 1894 Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

History, Sociology 
Topp, Emily, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

Botany, Zodlogy 
TowART, William George, A.B. Colgate' 1909 New York City 

Sociology 
Townsend, Mary Evelyn, A.B. Wellesley 190s Elizabeth, N. J. 

History, English 
Townsend. Schuyler Mallory, A.B. Syracuse 1908 Jersey City, N. J. 

English, French 



3l8 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Travis, Grace, A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1910 New York City 

History, Economics 
Tressler, Jacob Cloyd, A.B. Syracuse ipo6 Newport, Pa. 

English, Education 
Trottier, THfioPHiLE, B.S. ipio New York City 

French, Education 
Truesdell, Waldo Bromley, A.B. Harvard 1897 New York City 

Mathematics 
Trukada. Shiuji, B.C.S. N. Y. Univ. 1911 New York City 

Economics, Sociology, Public Law 
TsAi, Yuan Tze, B.S. M.I.T. 1910 Huchow, China 

Mining 
Tsu, Andrew YuYue, A.M. 1910, A.B. St. John's (Shanghai) 1907 New York City 

Sociology, A nthropology 
TuER, John Archibald, A.B. Toronto 1909, A.M. 1910 Mitchell, Ont., Can. 

Semitics 
Txnrxs, Anne Blanchard, A.B. Radcliffe 1907 New York City 

English, History, Education 
Twinem, James Leonard, A.B. Wooster 1911 Wooster, Ohio 

Philosophy 
Tyson, Levering, A.M. 1911, A.B. Pennsylvania College 1910 Reading, Pa. 

Economics, Social Economy, Public Law 
Ulrich, Frederick, A.B.Washbum 1910 New York City 

Sociology 
Ulrich, Olive Ermina, A.B. Vassar 1911 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Umaceny, Lillie a., A.B. N. Y. Normal 1907 New York City 

Botany, Physiology 
Underhill, Ruth M., A.B. Vassar 1905 Ossining, N. Y. 

Comparative Literature, English 
Unwerth, Frida von, Ph.B. Chicago 1903 New York City 

German, English 
Upton, Edwin Carleton Annandale-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

A.M. 1902, B.S. Maine 1897 

English, Comparative Literature 
Vaeth, Joseph Anthony, A.B. Missouri 1903 Ste. Genevieve, Mo, 

Romance Languages, German 
Vander, Meulen, John M., A.B. Hope 1891 New York City 

Philosophy, Psychology 
Vann, William Harvey, A.M. 1909, A.B. Wake Forest 1907 Raleigh, N. C. 

English, Education 
Van Wert, Susan Evens, A.B. Cornell 1898 New York City 

Greek, Latin, Greek Archeology 
Vaughan, William Eugene, A.M. 1911, A.B. Nashville 1900 Memphis, Tenn. 

English 
Veeder, Lyman Bradt, A.B. Princeton 1910 Peekskill, N. Y. 

Economics, Social Economy, Constitutional Law 
Ver Planck, Judith Crommelin, B.S. 1904 New York City 

History 
Verhoeff, Carolyn, A.B. Vassar 1897 Louisville, Ky. 

History, English 
ViCKERS, Leslie Tenafly, N. J. 

A.B. Sydney 1908, A.M. Glasgow 1910, B.D. Union Seminary 1911 

Economics, Sociology 
Viking, Irving E New York City 

Sociology, History 



AND PURE SCIENCE 319 

VoiGHT, Walter W., A.B. Meridian 1910 Easley, S. C. 

Philoso-phy, Psychology 
VosE, Caroline Eliza, A.M. 1911, A.B. Wellesley 1910 Portland, Me. 

English, German 
Wade, Edwin Charles, A.M. 1911, A.B. Hampden Sidney 1907 . . . .Farmville, Va. 

History, Economics 
Waite, Elizabeth Rich.ardson, A.B. Wellesley 1895 Passaic, N. J, 

Cerma7Z, English 
Wakatsuki, Peter Masumi, A.B. St. Paul's (Tokyo) 1900 New York City 

Philosophy 
Wakefield, Arthur, A.B. Brown 1900, A.M. 1901 Newark, N. J. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Walker, Byrd, A.B. Mississippi State 1905 Carthage, Miss. 

Latin, Educatio7i, Roman Archceology 
Walls, Ellie Alma, A.B. Fisk 1911 Houston, Texas 

Social Econo7Hy 
Walton, Joseph Barnard George School, Pa. 

A.M. 1908, A.B. Pennsylvania 1905 

Social Economy, Sociology 
Wang, Cheng-Fu, Equiv. A.B. Imperial Univ. China 1910 Tientsin, China 

Metallurgy, Mining 
Wang, ChOn Hag, Equiv. A.B. Imperial Univ. China 1910 Tientsin, China 

Metallurgy, Geology 
Wang, Yinchang Tsenshan, B.S. Chicag© 1910 Shanghai, China 

Chemistry, Metallurgy, Geology 
Wann, Louis, A.B. Wabash 1908 Warsaw, Ind. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Ward, Cornelia Carhart New York City 

Ph.B. Syracuse 1902, Ph.M. 1902, A.M. Radcliffe 1907 

English 
Warren, Arletta L., Ph.B. Wooster 1889, Ph.D. Michigan 1S98 Wooster, Ohio 

English, Latin 
Warwick, Veni A., A.B. Adelphi 1911 New York City 

English, Education 
Washburn, Elizabeth Merrow, A.B. Swarthmore 1911. . .Farm School, Bucks Co., Pa. 

Mathematics, Mechanics, Chemistry 
Watkins, Croyzette, A.B. Nashville 1902 Nashville, Tenn. 

English, Education 
Watson, Frank Dekker, B.S. Pennsylvania 1908 New York City 

Sociology 
Watters, Florence Ada, A.B. Smith 191 1 New York City 

Zodlogy, Botany 
Waxman, Meyer, A.B. N. Y. Univ. 1911 New York City 

Philosophy, Semitics, Sociology 
Weagle, James Albert, A.B. King's 1905 Norwood, N. J. 

Philosophy 
Weeks, Estella T., B.S. 1906 New York City 

Sociology 
Weeks, Frank Milton, A.B. Wittenberg 1883 Omaha, Nebr. 

History 
Wei, Wen Pin, A.B. Peking 1908, A.B. Amherst 1910, A.M. 1911 Peking, China 

Economics, Sociology, International Law 
Weikert, Thekla Elizabeth, A.B. Vassar 1910 Englewood, N. J. 

History, Economics 
Weil, Berenice, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1911 New York City 

English 



320 POLITICAL SCIENCE, PHILOSOPHY 

Weisman, Charles, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1900, M.S. N. Y. Univ. 1902 New York City 

Cheinistry 
Weiss, Carrie Stix New York City 

English 
Weiss, Nina Henriette, A.B. Wellesley 1911 New York City 

English 
Weisz, Nandor New York City 

Economics, Philosophy 
Welles, Kenneth Brakeley, A.B. Yale 1908 Scranton , Pa. 

Philosophy 
Wellington, Elizabeth Elliott, A.B. Vassar 1901 Bronxville, N. Y. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Wells, Clara, A.M. 1911, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

Physics 
Weston, Arthur James, A.B. Lehigh 1904, A.M. Yale 1905 East Orange, N.J. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Whicher, George Frisbie, A.M. 1911, A.B. Amherst 1910 ..Middle Haddam, Conn. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Whitelaw, William Menzies, A.B. Toronto 1910 Toronto, Can. 

Philosophy 
Whitford, Edward Everett, A.B. Colgate 1886, A.M. 1890 New York City 

Mathematics 
Whitmore, Brewer Goddard, A.B. Harvard 1910 Maiden, Mass. 

English 
Whitson, Walter Wilkin, A.B. Haverford 1908, A.M. 1909 Orange, N. J. 

Social Economy, Sociology 
WiCKWiRE, Ethel W., A.B. Tri-State 1909 Angola, Ind. 

Chemistry 
WiGGAM, Augusta, A.B. Emporia 1908, A.M. Clark 1909 Emporia, Kan. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Wiggins, Robert Lemuel, Jr Spartanburg, S. C. 

A.B. Emory 1903, A.M. Vanderbilt 1907 

English, Comparative Literature 
Wilcox, Clara Louise, A.B. Cornell 1902 Covert, N. Y. 

Botany 

WiLFORD, Herbert Edwin New York City 

^/.i Latin 

Willard, Helen Caroline, A.B. Knox 1898 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Williams, Blanche Colton, A.M. 1908, A.B. Mississippi State 1898. New York City 

English, Education 
Williams, Elizabeth Augusta, B.S. Middlebury 1903 Poultney, Vt. 

Botany 
Wilmot, Mabel E., A.B. Cornell 1908 New York City 

History 
Wilson, Martha McIntire, Ph.B. Oberlin 1894 New York City 

English, Education 
Wischkaemper, Henry New York City 

A.B. Wartburg 1906, B.D. Union Seminary 1910 

Sociology, History, Economics 
Womack, Mary Douglas, B.S. Adelphi 1899 New York City 

Botany 
Wood, Charles Morgan, Ph.B. Yale 1891 New York City 

Sociology, Social Economy, Economics 
Wood, Mary Morton, A.B. Chicago 1905, A.M. Radcliffe 1906 Eastport, Me. 

English, Comparative Literature 



AND PURE SCIENCE 32 1 



Woodbury, Walter Bligh, A.B. 1908, A.M. 1909 Oneida, N. Y. 

Romance Languages, Latin 
Woods, Clara Avery New York City 

Sociology, Zoology 
Woodward, Harold Edward, A.B. Amherst 1910 Worcester, Mass. 

Chemistry 
WoRTMANN, Johanna Caroline, A.B. Adelphi 1910 New York City 

German 
Wright, Margaret Choate, A.M. 1910, A.B. Vassar 1908 New York City 

History, Economics 
Wygal, Winnifred Crane, A.B. Drury 1906 Springfield, Mo. 

Social Economy 
Yamakawa, Yoshihiro, Equiv. A.B. Kwansen 1908 Osaka, Japan 

Economics, Sociology, Public Law 
Yanagisawa, Taiji, A.M. 1910, A.B. Waseda 1900 Shigeno, Japan 

Sociology, Anthropology, Economics 
Yang, Cho, A.B. Imperial Univ. China Shanghai, China 

Metallurgy, Mechanical Engineering 
Yang, Ying-yueh Wusih, China 

A.B. Imperial Polytechnic (Shanghai) 1907, A.M. Wisconsin 1910 

Economics, Sociology, International Law 
Yarborough, Minnie Clare, A.B. South Carolina 1909 Columbia, S. C. 

English, Comparative Literature 
Young, Esther Victoria, A.B. N. Y. Normal 1909 New York City 

English 
Zellen, Olga Olive von, A.B. Michigan 1905 New York City 

English, Comparative Literature 
Zeller, Gustav Oscar, Jr., A.B. Cornell 1911 New York City 

Chemistry, Education 
Zigrosser, Carl Daniel, A.B. 1911 Newark, N. J. 

Comparative Literature, English 

Zinsser, Rudolph, A.B. Princeton 1910 New York City 

J. Chemistry, Education 

In addition to the 987 candidates for the degree of Master of Arts or Doctor of 
Philosophy 252 are registered under the Faculty of Philosophy with education as 
their major subject. The names of these candidates appear in the list of graduate 
students under Teachers College. (See page 362.) 

SUMMARY* 

Students Primarily Registered under these Faculties 1239 

Students from other Faculties of the University, Candidates 
for the Degree of A.M., LL.M., or Ph.D.: 

From the School of Law 57 

From the Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry.. . 6 

From the School of Medicine 14 

Grand Total 1316 

387 students matriculated under the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, or 
Pure Science attended the Summer Session of 1911, but did not register for the first 
term of the academic year 1911-12. 



FACULTY OF FINE ARTS 

Schools of Architecture, Music, and Design 

The Faculty 

The President of the University 

Dean Burgess 

Associate Dean Carpenter 

Mr. Alexander, Professors =Cox, Dow, Farnsworth, Fletcher, 
French, Hamlin, Harriman, Hastings, Hirth, Mason, ^ Olcott, Robin- 
son, Rubner, Sherman (F. D.), ^Shotwell, Smith (E. R.), Warren, 
3 Wheeler, Young. 

Officers of the Faculty 

Professor Burgess Dean and ex-officio Member of the Council 

Professor Carpenter Associate Dean and ex-officio Member 

of the Council 

Professor Shotwell Secretary 

Professor Hamlin (Term expires 1914) Elected Delegate 

to the University Council 

Standing Committees 

On Education: The Dean (Chairman), Professors Hamlin, Mason, 
Dow, Sherman, Warren, Harriman. 

On Scholarships: The Dean (Chairman), Professors Sherman and 
Rubner 

General Statement 

The Faculty of Fine Arts, estabUshed March 5, 1906, comprises the three 
separately organized schools of Architecture, of Music, and of Design. 
Work in Architecture and in Music has long been carried on at the Univer- 
sity, in the former subject about thirty and in the latter about fifteen 
years. On the other hand, until 1906 there had been no attempt to make 
any systematic provision for the needs of university students who seek 
opportunities in the study of painting, sculpture, and decoration, and 
it is by the creation of a School of Design in co-operation with the National 
Academy of Design that the University hopes in time to afford such 

' A-bsent on leave 1911-12. ^ Absent on leave first half-year. 

Absent on leave second half-year. 
322 



GENERAL STATEMENT ^2^ 

opportunities. The establishment of this new School, as yet tentative 
in its organization, has been made possible by an agreement between the 
Academy and the University on January 12, 1906. By such agreement 
the Art Schools of the Academy became closely associated with the Uni- 
versity. They remain, however, entirely under the direction of the Acad- 
emy, which preserves the independence secured to it by its own separate 
corporate existence. 

Neither the University nor the Academy has at present at its dis- 
posal adequate resources to develop a complete system of instruction 
in the School of Design. A beginning, however, as set forth below 
(p. 330), has been made, and the University looks forward to the 
possibility of an adequate equipment for the new School. 

For details as to the advantages which the city of New York 
offers outside of the University and the Academy for the study of 
the fine arts, and as to the public lectures, exhibitions, and recitals 
maintained by the University in addition to the regular academic 
program, the separately printed Announcement of the Faculty of 
Fine Arts should be consulted. 

Admission 

Except by special action of the Committee on Admissions, students 
under eighteen are not admitted. For regulations for admission for 
the certificate of proficiency see page 176, and for the regulations for the 
course for the Bachelor's degree in Architecture, see page 325; for that 
of Bachelor in Music, see page 329. 

To Advanced Standing 

Students desiring credit for courses pursued elsewhere must make appli- 
cation in writing to the Chairman of the Committee on Admissions on or 
before September 8, 1912, to reach him at least sixteen days before the 
University opens. The general regulations as to documents to be sub- 
mitted and as to the acceptance of certificates are the same as for the 
Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry (see page 250). 

Non-matriculated Students 

The Committee on Admissions may admit students of mature age 
who are not candidates for a degree or certificate to such courses as they 
may be qualified td pursue. The qualifications necessary for admission 
as a non-matriculated student are: 

In Architecture, in addition to three or more years of office-experience 
or its equivalent, a practical knowledge of architectural drawing of 
the five orders, and of shades and shadows, is required for the course 
in Architectural Design, and mathematics through plane trigonometry 
for the Mathematical and Architectural Engineering branches. 



324 FACULTY OF FINE ARTS 

In Music, proficiency is determined by personal conference with 
some officer of the School. 

In Design, students in the National Academy of Design and such 
other persons as have had adequate training and experience either 
in the history and theory or in the practice of the fine arts are ad- 
mitted under this provision. 

Non-matriculated students will be permitted to matriculate at any 
time upon fulfilling the stated entrance requirements, or they may be 
excused from these requirements by vote of the Faculty, if their work 
has shown marked excellence. 

Fees 
(See page 43) 

Fellowships and Scholarships 
(See page 432) 

Examinations 

Regular examinations in each course are held at the end of each 
half-year. All other examinations, except examinations for admission 
to advanced standing, are special examinations, for which the statutory 
fee of $5 is charged (see page 43). The dates of such examinations 
for students debarred or deficient at the regular examinations will be 
found in the academic calendar. Absence from any regular or delin- 
quent examination for which a student is registered is regarded as a 
failure. 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

General Statement 

The School of Architecture of Columbia University is a professional 
school for men and women designed to train its graduates for the active 
practice of architecture. Founded in 188 1, under the direction of Profes- 
sor William R. Ware, as a department of the School of Mines (now the 
Faculty of Applied Science), it was in 1902 made an independent School, 
and in 1906 placed under the Faculty of Fine Arts. It offers two regular 
courses in Architecture, one leading to the degree of Bachelor of Archi- 
tecture, and the other leading to a Professional Certificate in Architec- 
ture. These courses are both of indeterminable duration, though they 
nominally cover four years. 

Equipment 

The equipment of the School consists of about 18,000 photographs 
and 800 books, chiefly the gift of Mr, F. A. Schermerhom; a classified 
library of many thousands of prints and plates; a collection of manuscript 
drawings from the Ecole des Beaux- Arts and other soiurces; about 9000 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 325 

lantern-slides of architectural subjects; a collection of casts of architec- 
tural details, including a large number from ancient and modern Roman 
buildings, the gift of the late Mr. Charles Follen McKim; and an archi- 
tectural museum containing a collection of models, building stones, tools, 
and materials. 

The Avery Architectural Library of 25,000 volumes is the richest col- 
lection of works on architecture and allied arts in the country. It is 
open to the public from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., and from 7 to 11 p.m. 

There is in process of construction a new building to house the Avery 
Architectural Library, which wiU also provide new and adequate quarters 
or the School of Architecture. The building is the gift of Mr. Samuel P. 
Avery. 

Lectures to students of architecture on scientific subjects allied to 
architecture are given to students of architecture in the Department of 
Physics, and the laboratories of the Schools of Engineering offer unexcelled 
opportunities to advanced students in architectural engineering. 

The Willard collection of architectural casts and models in the Metro- 
politan Museum of Art is open to students every day and two evenings 
in the week. Btiildings and building operations of the greatest value 
and interest to the student are always within reach, and visits and excur- 
sions to these during the second half of each year are made under the 
direction of an officer of the School. 

Admission 
(For general regulations see page 176) 
To the Course for the Bachelor's Degree 

Candidates must have completed the equivalent of two years of non- 
architectural studies in a recognized college or scientific school including 
elementary French. Some time may be saved by the anticipation of courses 
in mathematics; but professional courses in architecture may not be 
counted a part of such study. 

Candidates must also show a practical knowledge of the orders of 
architecture, of the elements of architectural rendering, and of free- 
hand drawing. 

To the Course for the Certificate 

(See page 176) 

Students from Other Institutions 

Male students of any incorporated school of art in New York City and 
duly accredited students from the ateliers of the Society of Beaux-Arts 
Architects of this city may be admitted to certain courses upon payment 
of the prescribed fees. 



326 FACULTY OF FINE ARTS 

Program of Studies 
For the Degree of Bachelor of Architecture 

The course outlined below is of indeterminate duration. Students 
of fair ability and thorough preparation should be able to complete it in 
four years. 

For a short statement of the scope of the following courses see pages 
57-175. 

POINTS 

1 History of Architecture (A. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26) 12 

History of Ornament (A. 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36) 6 

'Archaeology in French and German (A. 41-42, 43-44) 8 

Research (24a, 260) 4 

2 Mathematics (Math. 2, 3-4, 5 or 6) 10 

Mechanics (Math. Physics 2 or 21) 3 

Architectural Engineering (A. 17-18) 9 

3 Specifications (A. 11-12) 9 

Building Materials (A. 13-14) 4 

4 Shades and Shadows (A. 5) 4 

Perspective (A. 7) 3 

Descriptive Geometry (A. 8) 7 

Stereotomy (A. 10) 2 

5 Architectural Drawing (A. 3) 2 

Elementary Drawing (A. 71-72) 3 

Modelling, Water Colors (A. 73-74) 3 

Drawing from the Cast (A. 75-76) 3 

Advanced Drawing (A. 177-178) 4 

6 Theory of Design (A. 51, 52, 53, 54, 55) 7 

Elements of Architecture (A. 1-2) 4 

Elementary and Intermediate Design (A. 61-62, 63-64).. . iS 

Advanced Design (A. 161-162) 15 

Thesis (A. 164) 4 

Advanced Research (A. 1280) 2 

Summer Work (A. 74, 74a, 76a) 6 



Total points required 152 

The mathematical subjects and the three grades of Design must be taken 
in the prescribed sequence, and Advanced Drawing presupposes the more 
elementary branches. No student may take Advanced Design until he has 
completed 58 specified points (for details see the Announcement). 

' Students desiring to substitute a course in Greek Archaeology for one of these courses 
may elect Greek S1-S2. or, if qualified therefor, Greek 149-150. J . 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES 327 

For the Certificate in Architecture 

This course is intended to qualify the holder for general practice, 
and for registry under the Architects' License Laws of Illinois, New 
Jersey, and California. It omits the greater part of the mathematical 
studies and applied mechanics required of candidates for the degree, 
but includes simplified courses in Graphical Statics and Elementary 
Engineering in their stead, and optional courses in Analytical Geome- 
try and the Calculus, with special reference to graphical methods and 
their usefulness in mechanics and engineering. 

POINTS 

1 History of Mediaeval and Modern Architecture (A. 23, 24, 

25, 26) 8 

History of Ornament (,A. 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36) 6 

Research (A. 24a, 26a) 4 

2 Elementary Structural Design (A. 15-16). 7 

3 Specifications (A. 1 1-12) 9 

BuUding Materials (A. 13-14) 4 

4 Shades and Shadows (A. 5) 4 

Perspective (A. 7) 3 

Descriptive Geometry (A. 8) 7 

Stereotomy (A. 10) 2 

5 Architectural Drawing (A. 3) 2 

Elementary Drawing (A. 71-72) 3 

Modelling, Water Colors (A. 73, 74) 3 

Drawing from the Cast (A. 75-76) 3 

Advanced Drawing (A. 177-178) 4 

6 Theory of Design (A. 51, 52, 53, 54, 55) 7 

Elements of Architecture (A. 1-2) 4 

Elementary and Intermediate Design (A. 61-62, 63-64) ... 18 

Advanced Design (A. 161-162) 18 

Thesis (A. 164) 4 

Advanced Research (A. 128a) 2 

Summer Work (A. 72a, 74a) 4 

And in addition, to be selected from the following: 

Ancient Architectural History (A. 21, 22) ^ 

Archaeology in French and German (A. 41-42, 43-44) . 
Design (additional) ' 



Drawing (additional) 

Total points required 130 

The regulations as to the order and combination are the same as for 
the candidates for the degree, except that only 52 points are required 
as prerequisite to Advanced Design. 



328 FACULTY OF FINE ARTS 

Architectural Engineering 

In view of the increasing importance of engineering training in 
certain classes of architectural work, adequate courses of instruction 
are provided for those who desire to specialize in this direction. 

Such a group of courses is scheduled below, and may be pursued by 
any student who has completed the prerequisites for each course, and has 
acquired not less than 6 points in Intermediate Design (except for courses 
a and b under A. 113-114, and / under A. 117-118 which may be taken 
upon the completion of Elementary Design). The entire curriculum for 
the degree for students electing this group is as follows: 

POINTS 

1 History of Mediaeval and Modern Architecture (A. 23, 24, 

25, 26) 8 

History of Ornament (A. 31, 32, 33i 34f 35i 36) 6 

2 Mathematics (Math. 2, 3-4, 64-65) 15 

Mechanics (Math. Physics 2) 3 

Architectural Engineering (A. 17-18) 9 

3 Specifications (A. 11-12) 9 

Biiilding Materials (A. 13-14) 4 

4 Shades and Shadows (A. 5) 4 

Perspective (A. 6) 3 

Descriptive Geometry (A. 7-8) 7 

Stereotomy (A. 10) 2 

5 Architectural Drawing (A. 3) 2 

Elementary Drawing (A. 71-72) 3 

Modelling, Water Colors (A. 73, 74) 3 

6 Theory of Design (A. 51, 52) 2 

Elements of Architecture (A. 12) 4 

Elementary and Intermediate Design (A. 61-62, 63-64) 15 

7 Advanced Practice and Architectural Engineering (A. iii- 

112, 113-114, 117-118) 44 

Summer Work (A. 72c, 74a, 76a) 6 

Thesis (A. 164) 4 

Total points required 153 

Cotirses in Landscape Architecture 

The Faculty of Fine Arts has established a professional course in Land- 
scape Design, under the School of Architecture, to lead to a Professional 
Certificate. A part of the instruction, including that in the elements 
of design, architectural history and theory, and architectural graphics and 
drawing, will be given in the School of Architecture; the more distinctly 
engineering instruction, with the mathematics, botany, dendrology, etc., 



SCHOOL OF MUSIC 329 

will be given in the departments of mathematics and civil engineering; 
and the history, theory, and design of landscape art will be taught by 
experts under the auspices and by the co-operation of the American 
Society of Landscape Architects. 

Graduate Courses 

The courses in Advanced Design in combination with Advanced Draw- 
ing, in Graduate Design, in Advanced Engineering and Practice, in Grad- 
uate Engineering and Practice and in Graduate Research are accepted 
in fulfilment of the requirements for the degrees of Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. In all cases, however, one of the two minor sub- 
jects required for a higher degree must be taken under one of the graduate 
Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, or Pure Science. For infor- 
mation regarding the regulations governing these degrees and the selection 
of courses under these faculties, application should be made to the Secretary 
of the University. 

Graduates of this School, and of other schools of architecture of like 
standing, who have had not less than one year of resident study in 
Columbia University, may pursue their studies in Advanced Design and 
Research in foreign schools of architecture, as candidates for the higher 
degrees in Columbia University, upon programs issued by this School. 

SCHOOL OF MUSIC 
General Statement 

The Department of Music was established May 4, 1896, by means of 
the Robert Center Fund for Instruction in Music, an endowment presented 
to the University by Mrs. E. Mary Ludlow in memory of her son, the late 
Robert Center. 

In 1906 the School of Music was established including both the depart- 
ment above mentioned and the department which had been developed 
independently in Teachers College. 

The aim of the instruction is to treat music historically and sstheti- 
cally, as an element of liberal culture; to teach it scientifically and tech- 
nically, with a view to training musicians who shall be competent to teach 
and to compose; and to provide practical training in orchestral music. 
The several courses have reference to the needs of the undergraduate, to 
those of the university student wishing to specialize in music, and to those 
of students who are candidates neither for a degree nor for a Certificate 
of Proficiency. Performances by the University Chorus and Orchestra 
are provided from time to time, for the members and friends of the Uni- 
versity. There is, also, an annual concert of original compositions by 
students in the school. In addition, many public lectures, recitals, and 
concerts of various kinds are held. 



330 FACULTY OF FINE ARTS 

Equipment 
(See p. 139) 

Admission 

For the general regulations governing all students under the Fac- 
ulty of Fine Arts see page 323. 

Candidates for the Degree of Master of Arts 

(See page 188) 

Candidates for the Degree of Bachelor of Music 

The requirements for admission to the course leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Music are: (i) The completion of courses of study in 
Columbia College or Barnard College, amounting to a credit of 62 
points (substantially, two years' undergraduate study), or of their 
equivalent elsewhere; (2) the ability to play, on the pianoforte, the 
Two-Part Inventions of Bach. 

Candidates for the Certificate of Proficiency 
(See page 176) 

Program of Studies 

The candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Music is expected to pur- 
sue courses of study aggregating, at least, 75 points, as follows: 

a (prescribed). All the courses in composition and criticism of- 
fered by the School of Music ; a year's course in each of the following : 
language, literature, history, and the fine arts other than Music. 

b (elective). Other courses offered in the University, for which 
the student has the necessary prerequisite, especially courses in 
musical performance, aesthetics, physics, or psychology. 

The candidate is further required to produce a satisfactory origi- 
nal composition for orchestra or with orchestral accompaniment, and 
to submit an essay on a musical subject. 

The candidate for the Certificate of Proficiency is expected to fulfil 
the same requirements as in the course leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Music (see above), except that only fifty points of credit are required. 
The same requirement is made with regard to the original composition and 
the thesis as in the case of a candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Music. 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

The School of Design offers opportunities for the practical and for 
the historical study of painting, sculpture, and decoration. The prac- 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 33 1 

tical work may be taken in connection with courses offered by the National 
Academy of Design and by Teachers College. Certain courses in the 
School of Architecture are also available. The historical study of art, 
which is not yet fully organized, may be had in connection with reading 
courses in the Avery Library and with certain courses offered by different 
departments under the Faculty of Philosophy. No degree is at present 
awarded by the University in the School of Design, but students may 
receive a certificate upon the completion of a satisfactory course of study. 
This course should normally occupy the student for about three years 
and will be adjusted to his individual needs. 

Admission 

For the general regulations as to admission, see page 323. 

Program of Studies for the Certificate of Proficiency 

This course is intended to give the student, first, a broad outlook 
upon the whole field of the fine arts, by an outline study of the theory, 
criticism, and history of the arts in general; secondly, a more detailed 
acquaintance with the history and principles of the particular branch 
of the fine arts in which the student elects to specialize ; and, thirdly, 
a sufficient amount and variety of technical training to qualify him 
to pursue with success the particular branch of art which he has elected, 
besides giving him some experience and understanding of the technical 
processes and methods of expression of other forms of art. It should be pos- 
sible to complete the work for the certificate in about three years. One 
hundred and fifteen points are required for the certificate. Of these, 47 are 
assigned to prescribed courses, from 10 to 25 to elective courses, and the 
balance to work in the studio. Courses whose numbers are prefixed with 
the initials N. A. are given by the National Academy of Design; T. C. indi- 
cates that the course is given in Teachers College. Detailed information 
as to these courses will be found in the separately printed Announcement 
of the Faculty of Fine Arts. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

School of Architecture 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE 

Allen, George Marcus, B.S., E.M., Utah 1908 Salt Lake City, Utah 

Barnwell, Clermont Livingston, A.B., Harvard 1910 Tuxedo Park, 'N. Y. 

Boyd.'Byron Bennett, A. B., Colorado 1910 Denver, Colo. 

Brainerd, Harry Beardslee, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Branner, John Kennedy Stanford Univ., Calif. 

Fisher, Edward Eugene Aurora, 111. 

FoGARTY, James, B.S. Charleston 1908 Charleston, S. C. 

Fore, James Albert, Jr., A.B. North Carolina 1908 Charlotte, N. C. 

Frendberg, Ira Charles, A.B. North Dakota 1910 Hillsboro, N. D. 

Goldman, Harold New York City 

Greene, GilesPollard, A.B. Yale 1911 Honesdale, Pa. 

Griffith, Edwin St. John Harper's Ferry, W. Va. 

Hamlin, Talbot Faulkner, A.B. Amherst 1910 New York City 

Hildebrand, Arthur Sturgess, A.B. Yale 1910 Hartford, Conn. 

Hopkins, Henry Powell Annapolis, Md. 

Hughes, Talmage CoATES, B.S. Alabama Polytechnic 1910, M.S. 1911... Gadsden, Ala. 

Koechl, Otto Rudolph, LL.B. 1907, A.B. Harvard 1904 New York City 

Latenser, John P., Jr Omaha, Neb. 

Le6n, Tomas Carlos New York City 

Lippmann, Herbert Marks, A.B. 1908 New York City 

McDonnell, Joe Hunter Little Rock, Ark. 

Mackenzie, James Cameron, Jr., A.B. 1909 Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

Murphy, John Frederic Des Moines, Iowa 

Nauheim, Melville, A.B. 1910 New York City 

Page, William Enoch Haverhill, N. H. 

Reh, Isadore, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Salomonsky, Edgar Allan, B.S. Washington and Lee 1911 Norfolk, Va. 

Schulz, Paul, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 New York City 

Simmons, Williamson Norfolk, Va. 

Stanley-Brown, Rudolph, Ph.B. Yale 1909 Cold Spring Harbor, N. Y. 

Thiesen, John Henry Pensacola, Fla. 

Walsh, Harold Vandervoort Yonkers, N. Y. 

Ward, Walter Lester, Litt. B. Princeton 1910 Newark, N. J. 

Zetsche, Robert Gunther New York City 

[34] 

CANDIDATES FOR CERTIFICATE 

Agne, Harry George New York City 

Agnew, William Chalmers, Jr Duluth, Minn. 

Bartos, Elmer E New York City 

Bendernagel, Charles Edward New York City 

Berlenbach, Charles Francis New York City 

BowDSN. Reuben Hbnry Willimantlc, Conn 

332 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 333 

Brown, Bache Hamilton New York City 

Candela, Rosario New York City 

Casale, James Emanuel New York City 

Child, Henry T New York City 

Clinch, Howard Todd New York City 

Close, Bernard Wells New York City 

Clough, Arthur Norman New York City 

Cromwell, William Allen, Jr Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Davis, William Henry , New York City 

Dick, D. Edward Charleston, W. Va. 

DiTMAN, Marion, A.B. Smith 191 1 Englewoocl, N. J. 

DoRFMANN, David Waldemar New York City 

Egan, John Taylor Flushing, N. Y. 

Fanning, Edward Francis New York City 

Foster, Daniel Pritchard East Orange, N. J. 

Freehof, Mortimer Edgar New York City 

Frees, Harry John New York City 

Freudenfels, Emil New York City 

GiROUX, Leon Maxwell New York City 

Granger, Harold Story New York City 

Greenberg, Julius Rudolf New York City 

Gross, Harold New York City 

Haff, Kenneth G Islip, N. Y. 

Haire, Thomas C Helena, Mont. 

Hesse, Walter New York City 

Hilder, John Chapman New York City 

Hirschfeld, Leonard New York City 

Howitt, Louis Romer White Plains, N. Y. 

Huesmann, Louis B Hoboken, N. J. 

Ide, John Jay New York City 

Joseph, Leonard New York City 

Knappe, Adolph Herman Milwaukee, Wis. 

Lacy, Philip Sawyer New York City 

La Pierre, Lester Storms New York City 

Larson, George Bernard Fargo, N. D. 

Lashkowitz, Benjamin David Newark, N. J. 

Latenser, Frank Joseph Omaha, Neb. 

Lindsley, Girard Orange, N. J. 

Lyon, Leland Hubbell Danbury, Conn. 

Mead, Marcia J Youngsville, Pa. 

Montanaro, Frank Biaggio New York City 

Morris, Raymond Montrose New York City 

Muller, Richard Theodore New York City 

Nienburg, Frederick John New York City 

Park, Edwin Avery New Haven, Conn. 

Paterson, Stuart New York City 

Polhemus, Henry Martin Englewood, N. J. 

Ponsford, Henry Jordan El Paso, Texas 

RiSLEY, Winchton Leamon Lima, Ohio 

Robin, Edwin Jerome New York City 

Ruffier, Gaston New York City 

Schene, Louis Henry Herman New York City 

VON Schwanenfluegel, Hugo _. New York City 

Seidenberg, Roderick New York City 

Shenfield, Lawrence Lewis New York City 

Smith, Stephen Ernest White Plains, N. Y. 



334 FACULTY OF FINE ARTS 

Squires, Lawrence Wendell Good Ground, N. Y. 

Stead, Manning Force Washington, D. C. 

Thompson, William Stuart New York City 

Tracey, John Albany, N. Y. 

Vassar, Harold Worth Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

Wood, William Halsey Kent, Conn. 

Worthington, Addison Foard Relay, Md. 

[69] 

NON-MATRICULATED STUDENTS 

Andree, Frank Milwaukee, Wis. 

Baum, Harvey Andrew New York City 

Brigham, Norman Reed Columbus, Ohio 

Butler, Harold Hampton New York City 

Christianson, Elna Sigrid New York City 

CoRDNER, George Francis Jersey City, N. J. 

Dibble, Wallace Edwin Springfield, Mass. 

Genscher, Charles. Jr New York City 

GoDDARD, Rowland Gardner Bristol, R. I. 

Goodwin, Philip Lippincott, A.B. Yale 1907 New York City 

Hall, Bernice Kingston Puyallup, Wash. 

Hice, Harry Indianapolis, Ind. 

Jones, Earnest Earl Los Angeles, Calif. 

King, Frederic Rhinelander, A.B. Harvard 1908 Newport, R. I. 

LoEB, Laurence Moritz New York City 

Lydecker, Chester Alan Maywood, N. J. 

Morgan, Lloyd Jersey City Heights, N. J. 

Peacock, Urban Frederick Milwaukee, Wis. 

Pond, De Witt Clinton, B.S. Trinity 1908 Hartford, Conn. 

Purcell, Burgo Los Angeles, Calif. 

Sedgwick, Henly Renwick New York City 

Shawhan, Romer New York City 

Thayer, Edgar Randolph Yonkers, N. Y. 

[23] 

CANDIDATES FOR THE HIGHER DEGREES 

Bach, Richard Franz, A.B. 1908 New York City 

Pitt, Gerard New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Reb, Isadore, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Stork, Edward John, B.S. 1907 Jersey City, N. J. 

[4] 

School of Music 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

KiLENYi, Edward, Equiv. A.B. Gymnasium Hungary 1904 New York City 

Powell, Alma Webster, A.M. i9ii,LL.B. N. Y. Univ. 1900 New York City 

[2] 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREE 

Balsam, James, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 19P9 New York City 

Essig, Frank Theodore East Orange, N.J. 

Tallman, Gladys Griffith New York City 

[3] 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



NON-MATRICULATED STUDENTS 



335 



Blink, Benjamin Z New York City 

Dye,' Harold Bricken Newark, N. J. 

HoFHEiMER, Grace Mary New York City 

James, Jto-ia Bell, A.B. Baylor 1897 Belton, Texas 

McCrery, Gertrude Calvert, Texas 

Pritt, Ada A New York City 

Roberts, George H.,( A.B. Dartmouth 1891 Boston, Mass. 

Robinson, Maria M., M.D. N. Y. Medical 1883 New York City 

Schleicher, Eugene M Annandale, N. Y. 

Schmidt, Eloise Price New York City 

Silver, Meyer New York City 

Taussig, Ruth B New York City 

ToOKER, Mrs. Maito W Larchmont, N. Y. 

TooKER, Mildred Durand Larchmont, N. Y. 

Young, Mrs. Aline B New York City 

[15] 

SUMMARY— FINE ARTS 

Architecture 

Students candidates for degrees 34 

Students candidates for certificates 69 

Non-matriculated students 23 

Candidates for the higher degrees 4 

Students frora Columbia College 9 

Total Architecture 139 

Music 20 

Grand Total 159 



BARNARD COLLEGE 

TRUSTEES 

Silas B. Brownell, LL.D., Chairman 

Mrs. A. A. Anderson, Vice-Chairman 

Frederic B. Jennings, Clerk 

George A. Plimpton, Treasurer 
Silas B. Brownell, LL.D. President Butler 

Mrs. Joseph H. Choate Albert G. Milbank 

Mrs. Alfred Meyer Miss Clara B. Spence 

George A. Plimpton Howard Townsend 

Mrs. James Talcott Mrs. Gino C. Speranza 

Mrs. Henry Fairfield Osborn John G. Milburn 

Mrs. A. A. Anderson George L. Rives 

Edward W. Sheldon Miss Charlotte S. Baker 

Rev. William M. Grosvenor, D.D. Horace W. Carpentier 

Seth Low, LL.D. Pierre Jay 

Frederic B. Jennings Mrs. Charles Cary Rumsey 

Mrs. Henry N. Munn Mrs. Herbert Parsons 



Standing Committees 
1911 

Executive Committee: Dr. Brownell {Chairman), Mrs. Ander- 
son {Vice- Chairman) , Mr. Jennings {Clerk), Mr. Milbank, Mr. Milburn, 
Mrs, Spence, Mrs. Osborn, Mr. Sheldon, the President, and the 
Treasurer {ex-officio). 

On Finance: Mr. Milbank {Chairman), President Butler, Mr. 
Plimpton and the Chairman of the Board of Trustees {ex-officio). 

On Buildings and Grounds: Miss Baker {Chairman), Mr. Town- 
send, Mrs. Munn, the President, and the Chairman of the Board 
OF Trustees {ex-officio). 

On Education: Mr. Rives {Chairman), Miss Spence, Mrs. Speranza, 
THE President and the Chairman of the Board of Trustees {ex- 
officio), 

336 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 337 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

The Faculty 

The President of the University 
Dean Gildersleeve 
' Provost Brewster 

Professors Baldwin, Botsford, Braun, Chaddock, 'Clark, Cole, 
Crampton, Farrand, Gerig, Giddings, Hazen, Hubbard, Jacoby, 
Jones, Kasner, Knapp, Loiseaux, Lord, McCrea, Maltby, Montague, 
Moore (H. L.), Mussey, Osburn, Osgood, Perry, Reimer, Richards, 
3 Robinson, Seligman, 3 Shotwell, Thomas, Trent, Van Hook, Weeks 
(M. F.), Weeks (R.), ^ Wheeler. 

Officers of the Faculty 

Professor Gildersleeve Dean and ex-officio Member of the 

University Council 
^ Professor Brewster Provost and ex-officio Member of the 

University Council 
Professor Trent Acting Provost and ex-officio Member of the 

University Council 
Professor Crampton (Term expires 1911) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 
Professor Robinson (Term expires 19 12) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 
Miss Meyer .^ Secretary 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 

Barnard Members of the University Committee on Undergradu- 
ate Admissions: Professors Jones, Chairman, Cole, Brewster, and 
Van Hook. 

Committee on Instruction: The Provost, Chairman, Professors 
Robinson, Knapp, Richards, Montague, Reimer, Crampton, and 
Mussey, and the Dean {ex-officio). 

Committee on Scholarships: The Dean, Chairman, Professor Hub- 
bard and Dr. Hirst and the Provost {ex-officio). 

Committee on Honors: Professors Trent, Chairman, Maltet, and 
Kasner and the Dean and the Provost {ex-officio). 

Committee on Student Organizations: The Dean, Chairman, 
Miss Weeks, and Professor Braun, and the Provost {ex-officio). 

For the other officers who may give instruction to students of Barnard 
College, consult the several departmental statements. 

^ Absent on leave 1911-12 

3 Absent on leave second half-year 



338 BARNARD COLLEGE 

Officers of Administration 

(See page 5) 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

In 1883 the Trustees of Columbia College offered degrees to women 
who should be able to pass the necessary examinations, without, how- 
ever, providing instruction for them. The resvdting system, called 
The Collegiate Course for Women, proved unsatisfactory to both par- 
ties. Therefore Barnard College was organized in 1889 to provide 
instruction for women which should be identical with or equivalent to 
that provided by Columbia for men. 

For eleven years it duplicated for women as far as possible the cur- 
riculum of Columbia College, and also registered for graduate work 
under the University Faculties women who held the bachelor's degree 
from institutions of good standing. Its instructors were members 
of the University staff. Examinations for entrance, those given in 
course, and those for degrees, were conducted by Coltimbia University. 
During the first three undergraduate years separate instruction was 
given to women; in the senior year they were admitted to certain 
courses in the University. Graduate students attended many courses 
at the University under the Faculties of Philosophy, Political Science, 
and Pure Science, the laboratory work in science being done at Bar- 
nard College. 

However, Barnard's numerical growth made inappropriate the 
informal arrangement for instruction which was the natural method 
at the outset, and it became necessary to recognize formally the 
status which had gradually come into existence. Accordingly, an 
agreement was entered into in January, 1900, by which Barnard 
was included in the University system. Barnard is now an indepen- 
dent college for women with a corporation and a faculty of its own 
vested with all the powers commonly belonging to such bodies. At 
the same time, it shares the library, the instruction, and the degrees 
of Columbia University. 

A more exact idea of the relations between Barnard College and 
Columbia University and also of the relations between Barnard 
College and Teachers College is given in the resumi of the agreement 
above mentioned to be found in the current edition of the Announce- 
ment of Barnard College. This may be obtained without charge upon 
application to the Secretary of Barnard College. 

ADMISSION 

(See page 176) 

Admission on Probation 

A candidate for admission who has not secured the prescribed 14^ units 
may be admitted to the freshman class with conditions, if in the judg- 



GENERAL STATEMENT 339 

ment of the Committee on Admissions she is qualified to undertake the 
work of the class. General deficiency in any prescribed subject will 
disqualify for admission. Except for reasons of weight, a student who has 
failed to complete a course in a good high school or preparatory school will 
not be admitted with conditions. 

A student admitted conditionally or by certificate will be held under 
probation during the first half-year of residence. For a detailed state- 
ment regarding the conditions of probation, see the Announcement of 
Barnard College, which can be obtained without charge from the Secretary 
of Barnard College. 

To Advanced Standing 

See the "Requirements for Admission to Advanced Standing in 
Columbia College," page 194. 

In addition, the credits granted in any subject to a student ad- 
mitted with advanced standing may be withdrawn or diminished in 
amount, if, in pursuing such subject after admission to Barnard Col- 
lege, the student proves that the granting of the credits was wholly 
or in part unwarranted by her previous work. 

No student may receive a degree who has resided less than two full 
half-years at Barnard College. 

No applicant will be allowed to enter the senior class as a candidate 
for a degree after October 15 in any year. 

As Special Students 

Candidates for admission as special students must make application 
in writing at least one week before the first day of the entrance exami- 
nations in September or in January. Proper blanks for this purpose 
may be obtained from the Secretary. 

Special students in Barnard College are of two classes: non- 
matriculated and matriculated. 

Non-matriculated special students must be women of mature age 
who wish to pursue chiefly advanced courses of special study. They 
may be admitted at the discretion of the Committee on Admissions 
without passing formal entrance examinations. They must furnish 
proof that they have at some time pursued the studies included in the 
matriculation examinations and must satisfy the requirements of the 
department that they desire to enter. Candidates desiring to pursue 
merely elementary courses, as in languages, etc., will not be admitted 
as non-matriculated special students. 

No courses taken by non-matriculated special students can at any 
time be counted by them toward a degree. 

Matriculated special students are women who wish, without taking 
a degree, to make a serious study of some subject or group of subjects. 



340 BARNARD COLLEGE 

They must pass the regular examinations for admission to the fresh- 
man class and have full credit for fourteen and one half (14H) units of the 
entrance requirements. (See p. 176.) They may, therefore, in event of a 
change of plan be credited with such of their courses as may coincide 
with the courses leading to a degree. 

Information regarding the regulations governing the election of 
studies, amount of work, attendance, examinations, etc., of special 
students is contained in the Announcement of Barnard College, which can 
be obtained without charge from the Secretary of Barnard College. 

MATRICULATION, REGISTRATION, FEES 

Detailed information regarding matriculation, registration, and fees 
will be found in the current Announcement of Barnard College, which 
can be obtained without charge on application to the Secretary of 
Barnard College. 

DORMITORY 
(See page 54) 

THE PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

Upon completion of a curriculum arranged on one of the plans to be 
described below, the student is recommended by the Faculty of 
Barnard College for the degree of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of 
Science. 

I THE PROGRAM OF STUDIES FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Unless the equivalents are offered for admission, the following 
courses are prescribed: 

English A and B 12 points 

French A and German A 12 " 

History A 6 

Latin A or B and Latin 19-20 or Latin 11-12 6 

Mathematics A 6 " 

Philosophy A 6 " 

Physical Education A and B 4 " 

Economics A 6 " 

Chemistry 5-6 or Physics 1 1-12 6 " 

Botany, Chemistry, Geology, Physics, Psychology 
(Experimental), or Zoology: two half-year 
courses in addition to Physics 11-12 or Chemis- 
try 5-6 or any course in science that may have 

been offered for admission 6 " 

Major subject 18 

Free electives to complete the total of 124 " 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES 34I 

II THE PROGRAM OF STUDIES FOR THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Unless the equivalents are oflfered for admission, the following 
courses are prescribed: 

English A and B 12 points 

French A and German A 12 

History A 6 

Mathematics A , 6 

Philosophy A 6 

Physical Education A and B , 4 

Grouped work in astronomy, botany, chemistry, 
geography, geology, mineralogy, physics, ex- 
perimental psychology, and zoology, amounting 

to a total of at least 70 " 

(Of these 70 points at least 28 points shall be taken 
in a major subject, at least 12 points in an allied 
minor subject, and at least 12 points in a diverse 
minor.) 
Free electives to complete the total of 124 " 

m GENERAL TWO YEARS' COURSE, NOT LEADING TO A DEGREE 

This general course is specially arranged to furnish the collegiate 
foundation for professional work at Teachers College. It comprises 
64 points of work and includes the following prescribed courses unless 
their equivalents have been oflfered for admission: 

English A or a more advanced course in rhetoric 6 points 

English Literature: two half-year courses 6 " 

French, German, Italian, Spanish: two half-year courses 
in each of two modem languages, preferably French 

and German la " 

History A or a more advanced course in history 6 " 

Physical Education A and B 4 " 

Botany, chemistry, geology, physics, or zoology: two 
half-year courses in each of two natural sciences that 

have not been oflfered for entrance, at least 12 " 

Elective courses to complete the total of 64 " 

In regard to the choice of elective courses a student 
should seek the advice of the professor in charge of 
her prospective major subject in Teachers College. 
With the consent of the Dean of Barnard College and the Dean of 
Teachers College a student who has satisfactorily completed 64 points of 
work in Barnard College, including the courses listed above, may transfer, 
without examination, to the professional curriculum of Teachers College 



342 BARNARD COLLEGE 

and become a candidate for a Teachers College diploma and the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Education. 

IV OPTIONS m THE PROFESSIONAL SCHOOLS FOR CANDIDATES 
FOR A BARNARD COLLEGE DEGREE 

A student may plan her work in such a way as to earn a professional 
diploma from Teachers College at the same time as her academic degree 
from Barnard College. With the permission of the Dean of Barnard 
CoUege and the Dean of Teachers College she may transfer to Teachers 
College at the end of her junior year under the following provisions. 
A candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Arts must have completed 94 
points of work in Barnard College, comprising all of the required courses, 
including a major subject of at least 18 points and Education A. A 
candidate for the degree of Bachelor of Science must have completed 94 
points of work at Barnard College, comprising all of the specifically pre. 
scribed courses and of the grouped work a major subject of at least 28 
points with an allied minor subject of 12 points and Education A. 

On receipt of a statement from the Faculty of Teachers College that 
a student so transferred has satisfactorily completed the requirements 
for the bachelor's diploma in Teachers College, the student will be recom- 
mended by the Faculty of Barnard College for the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts or Bachelor of Science, provided she shall have fulfilled the require- 
ments for either of those degrees as laid down in the Announcement of 
Barnard College. 

For full details regarding the major subjects in teaching, their require- 
ments and prerequisites in collegiate work, and the most advantageous 
division of work in education, the student is referred to the current 
Announcement of Teachers College. 

Scholarships, Prizes, and Honors 

(See page 432). 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 
BARNARD COLLEGE 

SENIORS— CLASS OF 1912 
Candidates for the A.B. Degree 

Augur, Margaret Avery New York City 

Barrett, Mabel Springfield, O. 

Berrian, Georgina New York City 

*Blumgarten, Sarah Lillian Bayonne, N. J. 

BoRCHARDT, GERTRUDE Saraphine New York City 

BuNZEL, Bessie ; New York City 

BuRKHOLDER, Hazel New York City 

Cerow, Georgia Angela New York City 

Clark, Agnes Young Livingston, Ala. 

CoYLE, Molly Brooke Temple New York City 

CusACK, Gertrude Cecilia New York City 

Deacon, Edith May New York City 

*DoDGE, Mildred New York City 

Doty, Eleanor Mandeville New York City 

Evans, Alice Belton New York City 

Pelch, Ethel Louise New York City 

FiTZ, Louise Peconic, N. Y. 

Green, Grace Barrington Louisville, Ky. 

Griffin, Agnes Dorothy Cresskill, N.JJ. 

Hallock, Anna Cobb New York City 

Hamburger, Mildred Valentine New York City 

Hardy, Edith Frances New York City 

Hazel, Florence Louise White Plains, N. Y . 

Heilprin, Marion Washington, D. C. 

Hodges, Mildred Livingston New York City 

Hoffman, Phebe Edith New York City 

Jones,'Elizabeth Tompkins White Plains, N. Y. 

*Kahn, Caroline New York City 

Keenan, Irene Dolores New York City 

Kempton, Ethel May Yonkers, N. Y. 

Kutner, Margaret New York City 

Lambert, Paula Claire New York City 

Landru, LucyIEmilie Paterson, N. J. 

London, Irene Eleanor New York City 

*Loughren, Amanda Elizabeth, N. J. 

McKenzie, Isabel East Orange, N. J. 

MacDonald, Lillian Alma Newark, N. J. 

Mahon, Dorothea Helen New York City 

Marks, Rosa Crawford, Tex. 

Martin, Alice Craige Jersey City, N. J. 

Mathews, Eleanor Allison New York City 

Mehler, Elsa Sauter New York City 

343 



344 BARNARD COLLEGE 

Minor, Susan Brown Freehold, N. J. 

MiscH, Alma Ida New York City 

MoRDECAi, LuciLE New York City 

Morrison, Isabelle Drummond New York City 

Myers. Eleanore New York City 

Nyitray, Louise New York City 

O'RouRKE, Margaret , White Plains, N. Y. 

Obllrich, Paula Frieda East Orange, N. J. 

Reardon, Elizabeth , Yonkers, N. Y. 

Rees, Florence duBois New York City 

Rees, Vera Marguerite Westernville, N. Y. 

Reese, Claire Hildegarde New York City 

Rogers, Frances E Babylon, N. Y. 

ScHWEis, Etta May New York City 

Scully, May Agnes Pyne New York City 

Sharpe, Philadelphia Masters Moorhead, Minn. 

Shaw, Mary Braman New York City 

Shelley, Doris Marguerite New York City 

Sherin, Lila Marjorie New York City 

Smith, Virginia Babylon, N. Y. 

Southerton, Margaret New York City 

Spear, Dorothy Alice New York City 

Stack, Elizabeth Myres Utica, N. Y. 

Stegman, Beatrice Clara Hoboken, N.J. 

Thees, Cora Rohde New York City 

♦Thompson, Ruberta New York City 

Valet, Edith Moore New York City 

Van Vranken, Florence '. . New York City 

von Wahl, Constance William New York City 

*Walther, Catherine Margaretta Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Weaver, Amy New York City 

Wilson, Annie Stavely Newark, N. J. 

Wunderlich, Elsa Pauline Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Ziegler, Edna Eberly New York City 

Candidates for the B.S. Degree 

JuD, Frieda Catharine Jersey City, N, J. 

Lewontin, Esther New York City 

Seniors — Class of 1912 78 

* Candidates for Teachers College Diploma in Education. 

JUNIORS— CLASS OP 1913 
Candidates for the A.B. Degree 

Anderson, Florence De Noyelles Haverstraw, N. Y. 

Armstrong, Nathalie Victoria Upper Montclair, N. J. 

AuERBACH, Jennie Gabriel New York City 

Ballot, Marthe Rosalie Laure New York City 

Balmford, Edith Frances New York City 

Barrett, Alice Adeline New York City 

Bishop, Beulah Irene Delphos, Kan. 

*Booth, Edna Lillian New York City 

Brown, Alice Gundesen Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Brown, Grace D New York City 



JUNIOR CLASS 345 

BuNZL, Madelainb Emily New York City 

Burgess, Esther! Leonore New York City 

BUTTENWIESER, Clara New York City 

Cagliostro, Concetta Louise New York City 

Callan, Marion Elisabeth New York City 

Case, Rosalind Corwin Peconic, N. Y. 

Cheesman, Dorothy Howland New York City 

Clarke, Rosemary Lake Mahopac, N. Y. 

Comes, Louise Hackensack, N. J. 

Craddock, Catherine Ethel New York City 

Crosby, Helen Margaret Centerville, Mass. 

Crowell, Gladys Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Dana, Helen Manley Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Davis, Ruth Miriam New York City 

Dessar, Amy Grace New York City 

DiEHL, Mary Victoria West New York, N. J. 

DoENHOFF, Dorothea von New York City 

Douglas, Isabella Preston New York City 

Downs, Bessie Jersey City, N. J. 

DuYN, Marguerite Elizabeth van New York City 

Edell, Alberta Caroline Blossvale, N. Y. 

Emerson, Nannie Mell Demarest, N. J. 

Emmons, Martha New York City 

Feeley, Vera Elizabeth New York City 

Fischel, Rebecca Viola New York City 

Fischer, Grace Marion New York City 

Fitzgerald, Henrine Brown Middletown, N. Y. 

Fleischman, Doris Elsa New York City 

Fleming, Edith Josephine New' York City 

Foland, Helen Augusta New York City 

Franklin, Elinor New York City 

Franklin, Marjorie Lorne New York City 

Frear, Irene Louise New York City 

Freudenthal, Rhoda Florence New York City 

Gans, Pauline Baltimore, Md. 

GiRDNER, Penelope Morgan New York City 

Glahn, Irma von Red Bank, N. J. 

Gleason, Shirley New York City 

Glenn, Irene Louise New York City 

Goldman, Harriet Lois New York City 

Goldstein, Rebecca New York City 

Gottlieb, Saida Elsa New York City 

Gough, Zella Mary Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Gray, Elizabeth Ferine New York City 

Gray, Kathleen Frances New York City 

Greenwold, May Suneva New York City 

Crenelle, Miriam Bathsheba Haworth, N. J. 

Guy, Ruth Alline New York City 

Halfpenny, Edith Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Harris, Naomi New York City 

Hasberg, Gladys Stella New York City 

Hawkey, Ethel May Hackensack, N. J. 

Heller, Elsa Marion New York City 

Hendricks, Rowena Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Hessberg, May Sylvia New York City 

Hildebrand, Mary Anna New York City 



346 



BARNARD COLLEGE 



HiLLAS, Marv West Hoboken, N. J. 

HoLLOWAY, Marie Edna New York City 

Hoover, Elva Dawson (Mrs. M. M. Hoover) Chambersburg, Pa. 

HoRKHEiMER, PAULINE Wheeling, W. Va. 

Hough, Virginia Augusta, Ga. 

Houghton, Eleanor Gregory Denver, Colo. 

Hubert, Emma Sophia Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

HuBERTY, Mary Agnes New York City 

Ireland, Imogens Belle Yonkers, N. Y. 

Isabel, Ernestine Charlotte New York City 

*JOHNSON, Irene Grace Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Jones, Edith Lydia New York City 

Junghans, Bertha New York City 

Katz, Mollie New York City 

Kelley, Margaret Frances Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Kinch, Dorothy New York City 

Koss, Isabel Glen New York City 

Lacey, Olga Veronica ; New York City 

Latzke, Frances Renshaw New York City 

Latzke, Pauline New York City 

Leland, Margarita Emily Mechanicville, N. Y. 

LiNGG, Sophie Claire New York City 

Lockwood, Priscilla New York City 

LowTHER, Florence de Loiselle (Mrs. H. Lowther) New York City 

McGivney, Virginia Isabelle New York City 

MacDonald, Bessie Nelson New York City 

Magid, Augusta New York City 

Morris, Gertrude Elizabeth New York City 

Mulqueen, Mary New York City 

Mumford, Amelia Robinson Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Murphy, Irene Cecilia Weehawken, N. J. 

Naumburg, Margaret Jeannette New York City 

Neacy, Anna Milwaukee, Wis. 

Neugass, Marguerite Minnie New York City 

Newman, Marion Rose New York City 

Newmark, Sophia New York City 

Noble, Katharine New York City 

NoYES, Isabelle Fleming Port Chester, N. Y. 

Oerzen, Eleanor Marguerite New York City 

Osterberg, Ruth Anna New York City 

Otten, Edna May New York City 

Parks, Eddie Thomas New York City 

Pawley, Annabelle New York City 

Pearson, Grace Madeleine New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Pero, Sallie New York City 

Plummer, Helen Cook Cranford, N. J. 

Poor, Pamela New York City 

Powell, Lucy Reed Portland, Ore. 

Ready, Elizabeth Perkins Jersey City, N. J. 

Reilly, Lillie New York City 

Reynolds, Beatrice Isle la Motte, Vt. 

Richey, Margaret Cecelia New York City 

Robinson, Marjorie Jersey City, N. J. 

Rogers, Grace Josephine New York City 

Rosenblatt, Edith Gertrude New York City 

Rusk, Hester Mary St. Joseph, Mo. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 347 

Salzman, Anna Beatrice New'York City 

Savage, Jane Mary Blake Rutherford, N. J. 

Segee, Gladys Renshaw New York City 

Seibert, Harriet New York City 

Shannon, Regina Leonore New York City 

Shaw, Jean MacLean Rockland Lake, N. Y. 

Shook, Constance Greencastle, Pa. 

Smith, Abbie New York City 

Sperling, Joan Louise ; . . New York City 

Stewart, Mary Wotherspoon New York City 

Stobo, Jeannette Russell New York City 

Straiton, Chrystene New York City 

TuRCK, Viola New York City 

Tyndall, Ruth Mitchell New York City 

Unti, Irma New York City 

ViLLAL villa, Maria Diaz de New York City 

VooRHis, Sarah Graham New York City 

VoYSE, Mary Yonkers, N. Y. 

Watson, Margaret Wickham New York City 

Weaver, Bertha New York City 

Webb, Ethel Willard Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Weil, Lucille New York City 

Whelan, Mary Elizabeth Mondovi, Wis. 

White, Varian Hackensack, N. J. 

Wilmot, Harriet Elvira New York City 

Wolff, Marion New York City 

Wood, Margaret Eloise Macdonald New York City 

Wood, Rose Belle Danville, Ky. 

Woodruff, Jennie Estelle Passaic, N. J. 

Woolworth, Anna Belle New York City 

Candidates for the B.S. Degree 

Cohen, Lena Bayonne, N. J. 

Melsha, Josephine Cecile New York City 

Rapelye, Emma Louise New York City 

Richardson, Ethel Scarlett New York City 

Juniors — Class of 1913 156 

•Candidates for Teachers College Diploma in Education. 

SOPHOMORES— CLASS OF 1914 

Candidates for the^A.B.'Degree 

Adams, Louise Elizabeth New York City 

Adler, Bessie^Menone New York City 

Allen, Marguerite New York City 

Andrews, Sophie Townsend New York City 

Badanes, Bertha New York City 

Baldwin, Mabel Bayonne, N.J. 

Barber, Marion Jeanette New York City 

Barrick, Jean Sutton Jersey City, N. J. 

Bartling, Louise Helene New York City 

Bateman, Gladys New York City 

Baum, Minnie New York City 

Bernays, Hella Feucitas New York City 

Boegehold, Winifred Dorothy Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Bolger, Julia Virginia New York City 



348 



BARNARD COLLEGE 



Brittain, Margaret Yonkers, N. Y. 

Brittain, Virginia Irene Yonkers, N. Y. 

Brooks, Rosalie Whitehead Harrison, N. Y. 

BuNZL, Lucille Caroline New York City 

Burgevin, Caroline Louise Port Chester, N. Y. 

Campion, Gertrude Neuse New York City 

Carman, Margaret Isabel New York City 

Carroll, Julia Elise New York City 

Cherry, Ethel Newton New York City 

Child, Dorothy Kennedy New York City 

Clark, Mildred Senior Yonkers, N. Y. 

Clinch, Marie Louise Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Clingen, Alice Van Dorn New York City 

CoHN, Caroline Orange, N.J. 

Curtice, Eunice Mallory New York City 

Dale, Jane Elizabeth New York City 

Dalgleish, Irene Louise Stamford, Conn . 

Davis, Sarah Caroline Oak Grove, Ala. 

DowNES, Helen Rupert Yonkers, N. Y. 

DwYER, Helen New York City 

Elmendorf, Katharine New York City 

Ferguson, Jeannette New York City 

Fox, Etta Belle New York City 

Frieder, Emma Jane Carbondale, Pa. 

Friend, Etta Violet New York City 

Gardner, Eleanor Adelaide Nyack, N. Y. 

Gates, Frances Willard New York City 

Gless, Mariette Louise Newark, N.J. 

Goede, Ethel Belle Burlington, la. 

Greenwald, Gertrude Victoria Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Grof, Christine Ossining, N. Y. 

Guernsey, Ruth Estelle New York City 

Ha WES, Esther Ware New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Heinemann, Beatrice Danzig New York City 

HiLBORN, Rita New York City 

Hoey, Marion Alice Fort Edward, N. Y. 

Jeffrey, Laura MacLean New York City 

Kenny, Mary Elizabeth New York City 

Lawler, Mary Helen New York City 

Lint, Theresa New York City 

Lowndes, Emily Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

McCrodden, Ella New York City 

McLaughlin, Grace New York City 

McVickar, Helen Isabel Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Macauley, Elizabeth Irene New York City 

MacLean, Daisy Agnew New York City 

Manser, Ruth Baldock Summit, N. J. 

Martin, Claire Hazel New York City 

Mason, Mabel Helen New York City 

Mayer, Eleanor Theresa New York City 

Meyer, Lillian Melanie Monroe, La. 

Mills, Frances Alice Bristol, Conn. 

Miner, Sidney Louise New York City 

Mount, Helen Emma Hoboken, N. J. 

Mumford, Mary Battle Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Nicola, Lulu Cedar Grove, N. J. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 349 

O'Sullivan.'Regina New York City 

Ord, Alta Ashmead New York City 

Palmer, Florence New York City 

Peck, Margaret Pomfret Centre, Conn. 

PiERPONT, Julia Holbert White Plains, N. Y. 

PooRE, Harriet Winship Georgetown, Mass. 

Raff, Gertrude New York City 

Randolph, Isabel Fitz New York City 

Reid, Margaret Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Reinheimer, Edith New York City 

Rhoades, Florence Martha Omaha, Neb. 

Roever, Frances Lucille New York City 

Ros, LuiSA New York City 

Roth, Goldye Gladys New York City 

Sage, Leontine Orange, N. J. 

Schorr, Marguerite Louise New York City 

Schubert, Elsa Anna Dorothea Henrietta Three Bridges, N. J. 

ScHULMAN,^ Jeannette New York City 

Schwartzman, Fanny New York City 

Schwarzwaelder, Florence Ossining, N. Y. 

Seldner, Gladys Yonkers, N. Y. 

Seligman, Cecile Rose New York City 

Shackleton, Clara Everett New York City 

Shannon, Angela New York City 

Slade, MuRiEt Gladys New York City 

Sondheim, Hattie New York City 

Stebbins, Mabel Clara New York City 

Stephens, Gertrude Emily New York City 

Stern, Al^ne New York City 

Sturges, Sarah Elvina Delano New York City 

Talmage, Ruth Whittier Oyster Bay, N. Y. 

Thomas, Edith Maddock Savannah, Ga. 

Track, Irene Paula New York City 

TuLLY, Marion New York City 

Unger, Jeannette New York City 

Upham, Fannie Williamson New York City 

Van Raalte, Jeannette New York City 

Vorhaus, Amy Rose New York City 

Walton, Lillian Susie New York City 

Waring, Lillian Adele New York City 

Wells, Charlotte Adeline Mount Vernon, N. Y. 

Wigand, Eleanor Emma New York City 

Williams, Edith Gardner New York City 

Wise, Rose Marie New York City 

Candidates for the B.S. Degree 

Beall, Annie Cuyler Yonkers, N. Y. 

Bevier. Marguerite New York City 

Blumenberg, Clara New York City 

Fink, Aline Anna New York City 

M athison, Elizabeth New York City 

Maxwell, Celestine Lea New York City 

MuLHALL, Edith Frances New York City 

Owens, Ella Adelaide New York City 

Petri, Lucie Anna New York City 



350 BARNARD COLLEGE 

Candidates for Transfer'at the End of Two Years to the Professional 
Schools of the University 

Kelly, Edythe Grace New York City 

OCHS, Iphigene New York City 

Robinson, Lola New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Sophomores — Class of 1914 126 

FRESHMEN— CLASS OF 191S 

Candidates for the A.B. Degree 

Adikes, Anna May New York City 

Adler, Beulah Frances New York City 

AsKAM, Lucy Eliza Great Neck, N. Y. 

AsTRUCK, Edna Frances New York City 

AucHENPAUGH, Edith Augusta HyndsviUe, N. Y. 

Bain, Gertrude Beach New York City 

Banker, Grace Derby Passaic, N. J- 

Barnet, Constance Isabel New York City 

Bauhan, LinnSa Henrietta Jersey City, N. J. 

Becker, Elsa Gertrude New York City 

Beers, Esther Eunice New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Belknap, Almira Fredericka New York City 

Berger, Edith Bayonne, N. J. 

Bernheim, Sara Anna New York City 

Bernstein, Judith Semyra Portland, Ore. 

Blake, Myra Juliet New York City 

Bleet, Helen Marjorie New York City 

Blount, Ida May Atlanta, Ga. 

Blumenthal, Helen B New York City 

Borden, Marion Allen Grantwood, N.J. 

Bradley, Dorothea Chatham New Haven, Conn. 

Brett, Alice Marie-Louise New York City 

BuDD, Margaret PeeksMU, N. Y. 

BtiLow, Sophie Ida New York City 

Butler, Sarah Schuyler New York City 

Carothers, Florence Edith New York City 

Carr, Margaret New York City 

Caulfield, Gertrude New York City 

CoGAN, Lucy Grace Paterson, N.J. 

Conklin, Agnes Maria New York City 

Coryell, Nancy Gillmore New York City 

Cramer, Ethelyn Blanche Portland, Conn. 

Cranch, Alice Ruth New York City 

Cunniffe, Elisabeth Waldron New York City 

Davis, Edith Rebecca New York City 

Dean, Dorothy New York City 

Dearden, Edwina Mary New York City 

DeYoung, Estelle New York City 

Doody, Marie Frances New York City 

Dunnet, Christina New York City 

Earle, Dorothy Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Engel, Sadie New York City 

Engler, Marguerite Louise New York City 

Erskine, Rhoda New York City 



FRESHMAN'^CLASS 35I 

Evans, Mary Nash Yonkers, N. Y. 

Evans, Ruth Doris New York City 

Fink, Bertha White Plains, N. Y. 

Fischer, Edith Linden New York City 

Fitch, Dorothy Morgan New York City 

Fleer, Frieda Anna Wilhelmina Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Flint, Mary Buckelew Rowayton, Conn. 

Foley, Margaret Mary Great Neck, N. Y. 

Fox, Katharine Neal New York City 

Fox, Louise Plainfield, N. J. 

Friedman, Hortense New York City 

Fries, Catharine Carrie New York City 

Fuller, Annie Jersey City, N. J. 

Gaukrodger, Edith New York City 

Gilleaudeau, Helen Mamaroneck, N. Y. 

Graae, Ruth Perth Amboy, N.J. 

Gray, Mary New York City 

Greenbaum, Grace Rachel New York City 

Grof, Jessie Ossining, N. Y. 

Gross, Ruth Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Grossman, Gladys New York City 

Hardwick, Edith Gertrude New York City 

Harper, Joan New York City 

Harrer, Harriet Briarcliff Manor, N. Y . 

Hedley, Phyllis New York City 

Henry, Edna Mary New York City 

Herod, Dorothy Eraser New York City 

Herzfeld, Alma Josephine New York City 

Hess, Edna New York City 

HocHSCHiLD, Gertrude New York City 

Horowitz, Ruth Nanette New York City 

Howell, Frances Marie Paterson, N. J. 

Hubbard, Grace Louise New York City 

Hunley, Ethel Virginia New York City 

Huntington, Josephine Yonkers, N. Y. 

Jackson, Lillian Marguerite New York City 

Jacobsen, Beatrice Mathilde Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Jamison, Alma Charlotte New York City 

Jenkins, Helen Hartley New York City 

Jordan, Anna Elizabeth New York City 

Journeay, Helen Highwood, N. J. 

Kelley, Annie Elizabeth New York City 

Kelley, Emma Cornelia Randolph, Mass. 

Kelly, Louise Frances Scranton, Pa. 

Kempton, Iva Tompkins Yonkers, N. Y. 

Kerby, Catharine Edith New York City 

Kirchwey, Freda New York City 

Krier, Dorothy Augusta New York City 

Krinsky, Henrietta Jessie Pollak Yonkers, N. Y. 

Lachmann, Helen Rose New York City 

Lambert, Emily Gordon Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Levi, Ray Elliot New York City 

Levinson, Elsa Freudenheim Yonkers, N. Y. 

Levy, Edith Lilian New York City 

LiCHTENSTEiN, HELENA New York City 

Louria, Eleanora Grace New York City 



352 BARNARD COLLEGE 

Lull, Sara Rowland Yonkers, N. Y. 

MacDonald, Helen Edith New York City 

Malleson, Alice Darlington New York City 

Marks, Ruth Orange, N. J. 

Marley, Ruth Jackson Newark, N. J. 

Martin, Lois Whitney New York City 

Mayer, Clara New York City 

Mertz, Helen Edna Port Chester, N. Y. 

Meyer, Ethel Sophie New York City 

Meyer, Margaret Nathan New York City 

Millar, Margaret Elizabeth Westwood, N. J. 

Monroe, Margaret Montague New York City 

Morgan, Dorothy Tattersall New York City 

Morgan, Margaret Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Morgenthau, Lucy Rose New York City 

Moritz, Caroline Claudia Montgomery, Ala. 

Moses, Mildred New York City 

Moynahan, Rosalie Mary New York City 

Muller, Emily Keen Clifton, N. J. 

Murnane, Regina Catherine New York City 

Murphy,*Helen Annette New York City 

Nathan, Rosalie Gomez New York City 

Nelson, Svea Anna Christine Dalton, Mass. 

Nichols, Elizabeth Williams New York City 

O'Brien,' Estelle New York City 

O'DoNNELL Frances Anna Elizabeth New York City 

Oerzen, Elsie May New York City 

Oppenheimer, Louise Marion New York City 

Ormsbee, Hazel Grant Matteawan, N. Y. 

Paddock, Anna Marguerite New York City 

Palmer, Elizabeth New York City 

Perlman, Grace Helen New York City 

Piper, Florence New York City 

PoLLiTZER, Margaret New York City 

Prankard, Florence Port Washington, N. Y. 

PuLLEYN, Virginia New York City 

Randolph, Mildred Fitz Newark, N. J. 

Reigart, Katharine Mifflin Yonkers, N. Y. 

Reinheimer, Corinne New York City 

Rich, Eleanor Maria Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Robinson, Anna Kathleen Sea Cliff, N. Y. 

Rogers, Hazel May New York City 

Roome, Sarena Valentine Freehold, N. J. 

Rosenthal, Juliette Clara New York City 

Ross, Mary Goldsborough Essex, N. Y. 

Sayre, Emma Bertholf Warwick, N. Y. 

Schechter, Amy Esther New York City 

Schmidt, Elisabeth Mary Notburger Agnes West Hoboken, N. J. 

ScoviL, Elizabeth Adeline New York City 

Senner, Cora New York City 

Sexton, Caroline Graham New York City 

Shaw, Bessie New York City 

Sherline, Anna'Esther New York City 

Skinker, Dorothy Anne White Post, Va. 

SosKiN, Lillian New York City 

Stanbrough, Dorothy New York City 



FRESHMAN CLASS 353 

Stern, Edna Louise New York City 

Stiles, Edith New York City 

Stirn. Edith Eva New York City 

Stokes. Viola Matilda. Freehold, N. J. 

Terriberry, Margaret New York City 

Tieleke. Gertrude Emma Helen New York City 

Totten. Isabel New York City 

ToussAiNT. Edna Ruth New York City 

Treadwell, Bertha Holt New York City 

Van Doren, LfioNiE Gertrude Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 

Van Dusen, Ivy Clare New York City 

Walker. Emmelina de Thierry New York City 

Walker, Louise New York City 

Walker. Lydia Ellene New York City 

Waller, Alice Page Nelson Stafford, Va. 

Wasserman, Estelle New York City 

Watson. Martha Nyack. N.Y. 

Weingreen. Gladys Estelle New York City 

Weldon, Beulah New Rochelle, N. Y. 

WiLBER, Ruby Bird Sound Beach, Conn. 

Williams, Katharine New York City 

Wood. Natalie Francisca Englewood, N. J. 

Wright, Jessie Agneta New York City 

Wyckoff. Martha Glen Ridge. N. J. 

Zagat. Helen New York City 

Candidates for the B.S. Degree 

Allison, Caroline New York City 

Ansorge, Fannie Rich New York City 

Decker, Ruth K Stony Point, N.Y. 

Froelich. Clara Lillian New York City 

Gaither, Jessie New York City 

GoLDSTONE. Edith Helen New York City 

Greenburg. Isabel New York City 

Grimes, Frances Wellington New York City 

Hotson. Vera Dorothy Pelham, N. Y. 

Jacobson, Fanny Rose Shreveport, La. 

James. Mae New York City 

Krause. Estelle New York City 

MOhle. Jean Earl New York City 

Rabinowitz. Chissay New York City 

Silliman. Frances New York City 

Teden. Rose Marie New York City 

TOBIN. Elise New York City 

Candidates for Transfer at the End of Two Years to the Professional 
Schools of the University 

Hadsell, Eleanor Gertrude New York City 

Lincoln, Louise East Cleveland. Ohio 

Markwtell. Fannie Pereless New York City 

Meyer. Irma Dorothy New York City 

Peterson, Hattie Bernera New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Reynolds. Helen Douglas New Rochelle. N. Y. 

Seigel, Florence Tupper Lake. N. Y. 

Freshmen — Class of 191S 205 



354 BARNARD COLLEGE 



SPECIAL STUDENTS, MATRICULATED 

Cahn, Pauline New York City 

CoHN, Ruth Price (Mrs. A. E. Cohn) New York City 

Everett, Amy King Washington, D. C. 

Guggenheim, Grace Bernheimer (Mrs. R. M. Guggenheim)] New York City 

Harris, Florence Montclair, N. J* 

Hearn, Gertrude Leah New York City 

Holder, Julia New York City 

Jacoby, Dorothy New York City 

Kalt, Marguerite Jeannette New York City 

King, Virginia Kent New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Morgan, Edith Percy New York City 

Rice, Irma Bertha Montgomery, Ala. 

Roberts, Eva Marie New York City 

Robinson, Ellen Hortense New York City 

Stein, Lillie Emily New York City 

Warren, Belle Reed Pleasantville, N. Y. 

■Weiner, Mildred Felicia New York City 

White, Martha Root New York City 

Wood, Hilda New York City 

Matriculated Special Students 19 

SPECIAL STUDENTS, NON-MATRICULATED 

Baker, Stella Maxto (Mrs. E. D. Baker) New York City 

Brooks, Gwendolen New York City 

Cameron, Evelyn Newark, N. J. 

Cantor, Marguerite Helene New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Clark, Mary Frances Plainfield, N. J, 

Damrosch, Alice Blaine New York City 

Du Bois, Mildred New York City 

EcKERT, Jeannette Newark, N. J. 

Ellinger, Grace Jane New York City 

Emerson, Margaret Genevieve New York City 

Feuchtw ANGER, LouiSE A New York City 

FuGETTE, Gladys New York City 

Gilder, Rosamond de Kay New York City 

Gordon-Smith, Gladys Montclair, N. J. 

GOSTENHOFER, ADELAIDE CAROLINA New York City 

Hinkle, Stella May Little Falls, Minn. 

Irving, Ethel Herendeen Westfield, N. J. 

Morgan, Camilla Leonard New York City 

Newcombe, Mary Hilton (Mrs. Isaac B. Newcombe) New York City 

Nichols, Marjorie Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Osborn, Aileen New York City 

Pake, Rita Edith Mobile, Ala. 

Peck, Gertrxtoe Boyce Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Raphael, Alice Pearl New York City 

Sachs, Ella New York City 

Schafer, Fanny May (Mrs. Myron Shafer) New York City 

Sidenberg, Claire Lucille New York City 

Silverman, Louise Block New York City 

Staats, Marion Great Barrington, Mass. 

Stein, Mabel Bonner (Mrs. Alexis W. Stein) Nev/ York City 



SUMMARY 



355 



Studer, Ethel Mae Ellsworth, Me. 

TuTHiLL, Isabel Hawkins Rocky Point, N. Y. 

Wilson, Florence New York City 

Young, Marion Coulthard New York City 

Non-matriculated Special Students 34 



SUMMARY 

Seniors — Class of 1912 : 

Candidates for the Barnard College A.B. degree alone 70 
Candidates for Barnard College A.B. degree and 

Teachers College diploma in education 6 

Candidates for the Barnard College B.S. degree alone 2 

Juniors — Class of 1913: 

Candidates for the A.B. degree iSO 

Candidates for Barnard College A.B. degree and 

Teachers College diploma in education 2 

Candidates for the B.S. degree 4 

Sophomores — Class of 1914: 

Candidates for the A.B. degree 114 

Candidates for the B.S. degree 9 

Students in General Two-Year Course 3 

Freshmen — Class of 1915: 

Candidates for the A.B. degree 181 

Candidates for the B.S. degree I7 

Students in General Two-Year Course 7 



78 



156 



126 



Special Students: 

Matriculated I9 

Non-matriculated 34 

University Students 43 

Teachers College Students I3S 

Grand Total 



56s 



180 
798 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 

TRUSTEES 

V. EvERiT Macy, Chairman 
Frank R. Chambers, Vice- Chairman 
Newbold Morris, Secretary 
Clark Williams, Treasurer 
Arthur Turnbull, Assistant Treasurer 
Miss Grace H. Dodge Nicholas Murray Butler 

Peter B. Olney Robert C. Ogden, LL.D. 

B. Talbot B. Hyde Walter H. Page, LL.D, 

Joseph Milbank Mrs. Helen Hartley Jenkins 

Seth Low, LL.D. Arthur Iselin 

James Speyer Jordan J. Rollins 

James E. Russell, LL.D. Horace E. Andrews 

Mrs. Frederick F. Thompson Felix M. Warburg 

William B. Osgood Field 

The Faculty 

The President of the University 

Dean Russell 

Professors Bagster-Collins, Baker, Bement, Bigelow, Bonser, 
Cattell,Coe, Cohn, Cooley, Cornell, 'Dewey, Dodge, ^Dow, Dut- 
ton, Fales, Farnsworth, Farrington, Fulmer, Gies, Goodsell, Hill, 
Hillegas, Johnson, Kilpatrick, Kinne, Latham, Lodge, Lucke, 
McCastline, McFarlane, 'McMurry, MacVannel, Meylan, Monroe, 
Norsworthy, Noyes, Nutting, ^ Pearson, Prettyman, Rose, Ruger, 
Sachs, Sherman (H. C), Smith (D. E.), Strayer, Suzzallo, Sykes, 
Thorndike (E. L.), Upton, Van Arsdale, ^Vulte:, Warner, Wood, 
Woodbridge, WooDHin^L, Woolman. 

Officers of the Faculty 

Professor Russell Dean and ex-officio Member of the 

University Council 

Professor Upton Secretary 

Professor E. L. Thorndike (Term expires 1914) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 

Professor Lodge (Term expires 1913) Elected Delegate to the 

University Council 
^ Absent on leave first half-year. ' Absoat on leave second half-year. 

3S6 



INSTRUCTORS 357 

Other Officers of Instruction 

Benjamin R. Andrews, Ph.D., Secretary, Household and Industrial 
Arts; Mary K. Simkhovitch, A.B., Associate in Social Economy; Charles 
Conrad Sleffel, Instructor in Industrial Arts; Charles William Weick, 
B.S., Instructor in Industrial Arts; Maud March, Instructor in Physical 
Education; Clara Barbara Kirchwey, Instructor in Geography; Jean 
Broadhurst, A.m., Instructor in Biology; Anna Barrows, Instructor in 
Household Arts; Sallie B. Tannahill, Instructor in Fine Arts; Margaret 
Maud Zerbe, Instructor in Music; Edward J. Thatcher, Instructor in 
Industrial Art; Romiett Stevens, A.M., Instructor in Secondary Education; 
Helen Latham, Instructor in Music; Charlotte A. Francis, Instructor 
in Physical Science; Lydia Southard, B.S., Instructor in Household Arts; 
Anna Woods Ballard, A.B., Instructor in French; Mary Theodora 
Whitley, A.M., Instructor in Educational Psychology; Louise Christine 
Sutherland, Instructor in Kindergarten; Julia Wade Abbott, Instructor 
in Kindergarten; Mary Bull Hanckel, Instructor in Fine Arts; Caroline 
Stackpole, M.A., Instructor in Biology; Cora M. Winchell, B.S., Instruc- 
tor in Household Arts; Florence E. Winchell, B.S., Instructor in Household 
Arts; Emily C. Seaman, M.A., Instructor in Household Arts; Edna Skinner, 
B.S., Instructor in Household Arts; Evelyn C. Tobey, B.S., Instructor in 
Household Arts; Lydia Ray Balderston, B.S., Instructor in Household 
Arts; Mary H. Peacock, Ph.B., Instructor in Household Arts; Florence 
R. Corbett, M.S., Instructor in Household Arts; Grace L. Hitchings, 
B.S., Instructor in Household Arts; Sadie B. Vanderbilt, B.S., Instructor 
in Household Arts; Mrs. Malinda I. Manchester, B.S., Instructor in 
Household Arts; Lucile G. French, Instructor in Household Arts; Isabel 
M. Stewart, B.S., Instructor in Household Arts; Ella P. Crandall, 
Instructor in Household Arts; Ruth P. Sill, Instructor in Household Arts; 
Charles Martin, Instructor in Fine Arts; Mary McCormick, A.M., 
Instructor in Household Arts; Bertha Shapleigh, Instructor in Household 
Arts; Helen Donovan, B.S., Instructor in Household Arts; Mary Reesor, 
B.S., Instructor in Physical Education; Annie E. Moore, B.S., Instructor 
in Kindergarten Education; Julia P. Mitchell, A.M., Instructor in English; 
Ethelwyn C. Bradish, Instructor in Fine Arts; William E. Brecken- 
bridge, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics; Jesse F. Williams, B.A., 
Instructor in Physical Education; Anna C. Thornton, Instructor in Physi- 
cal Education; Mary Porter Beegle, B.S., Instructor in Physical Educa- 
tion; Lois Coffey, B.S., Instructor in Industrial Arts; Leon Volkmar, 
Instructor in Industrial Arts; Lillian Drew, Instructor in Physical Edu- 
cation; George T. Holm, Instructor in Physical Education; Mary F. 
Morris, B.S., Instructor in Physical Science; Jeannette Rowland Sei- 
BERT, A.M., Recorder, Department of Physical Education; Cecil F. Lavell, 
Lecturer in History of Education; Grace Marie Daschbach, Lecturer in 
Music; Mary Louise Furst, Lecturer in Household Arts; Annie M. Good- 



358 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

RICH, Lecturer in Household Arts; S. Josephine Baker, M.D., Lecturer in 
Household Arts; Calvin B. Cody, Lecturer in Music; Katherine Mac- 
don ald, Lecturer in Music; Walter H. Hall, Lecturer in Music; R. 
Norman Joliffe, Lecturer in Music; Felix Lamond, Lecturer in Music; 
Edgar S. Stowell, Lecturer in Music; Teunis Vander Bent, Lecturer in 
Household Arts; Lillian D. Wald, Lecturer in Household Arts; Clara 
D. NoYES, Lecturer in Household Arts; C. E. A. Winslow, Lecturer in 
Household Arts; Mary Wroe Curtis, Assistant in Household Arts; Theo- 
dora E. Wye, B.S., Assistant in Latin and Greek; Mary Reesor, B.S., 
Assistant in Physical Education; John Jay Walsh, Assistant in Indus- 
trial Arts; Laura Baldt, B.S., Assistant in Household Arts; Ellen A. B. 
McGowan, B.S., Assistant in Household Arts; Robert Gray, Assistant in 
Household Arts; Amy Logan, Assistant in Household Arts; Matilda Mc- 
Keown, B.S., Assistant in Household Arts; John Ross, Assistant in Indus- 
trial Arts; Augusta Bronner, A.M., Assistant in Educational Psychology; 
Rose F. Egan, Assistant in English; Matthew G. Bach, A.M., Assistant 
in German; Marcel H. Vigneron, Assistant in French; Lois Plimpton, 
Assistant in Household Arts; E. G. Miller, Assistant in Household Arts; 
Emma H. Gunther, Assistant in Household Arts; Lillian M. B. Gunn, 
Assistant in Household Arts; Cornelia H. Stone, A.B., Assistant in 
Household Arts. 

Officers of Administration 

(See page 5) 

TEACHERS COLLEGE SCHOOLS 

Officers of Administration 

Professor Russell, Dean 

" Button, Superintendent 

Horace Mann School 

Virgil Prettyman, Pd.D., Principal of High School; Henry Carr 
Pearson, A.B., Principal of Elementary School; Charlotte Gang Gar- 
rison, Principal of Kindergarten; Marion Root Pratt, Executive Secretary; 
Marion Thornton Beals, Secretary to Superintendent; Elizabeth Iver- 
SON Toms, Secretary to Principal of High School; Cora Geer Totten, 
Secretary to Principal of Elementary School; Ethel Ellen Rockwell, 
Custodian of Library. 

Instructors and Assistants in Horace Mann Schools 

'Allan Abbott, English; Kate Stuart Anthony, Domestic Art; 
Walter Whipple Arnold, Latin; Otto A. Bailey, Mathematics; Charles 
McCoy Baker, Latin; Helen Bartlett Baker, English; Anna Woods 
Ballard, French; Elizabeth Briggs, History; Frank Elbert Brooks, 

'Absent on leave. 



INSTRUCTORS 359 

English; Marie Karcher Brooks, French; Joseph Clifton Brown, 
Mathematics; Glenn V. Brown, Chemistry and Physics; Mary Edwards 
Calhoun, English; Hugh H. Caldwell, English; Laura B. Crandon, 
German; Joseph A. Davis, Latin and Greek; Maria Louise Dowd, Physi- 
cal Training; John B. Eyster, German; Charlotte Joy Farnsworth, 
Practical Arts; Arthur Tapley French, Mathematics; Mary Brownson 
Gillmore, History; William Helmuth Gohdes, Germa7z; George Thomas 
Holm, Swimming; P. Joseph Kersey, Physical Training; Ernst A. Kior- 
BOE, French; Clara Barbara Kirchwey, Geography; Robert Josselyn 
Leonard, Industrial Arts; Amy Logan, Domestic Science; Emma Lenore 
MacAlarney, English; Harry Wheeler Martin, History; Raymond 
Modesitt, Mathematics; Mary F. Morris, Chemistry and Physics; 
William J. Nagle, Latin and Greek; John Duele Neitz, Special Teacher 
for Delinquent Pupils; Lilla Anne Nourse, Drawing; Charles Conrad 
Sleffel, Forging; Florence Stuart, Physical Training; Thomas F. 
Taylor, Substitute; John Van Sant, Mathematics; Florence Louise 
Weeks, Mathematics; Charles William Weick, Wood-Working; Eliza- 
beth Marian Wheelock, Latin; Roland Hugh Williams, Chemistry 
and Physics; Grey H. Wyman, Latin and Greek. 

Horace Mann Elementary School 

Clara Mabel Wheeler, First Grade; Florence Mabel McVey, First 
Grade; Mildred Ione Batchelder, Second Grade; Evelyn Batchelder, 
Second Grade; Elizabeth Cleasby, Primary Grades; Mary Hammett 
Lewis, Open Air Class; Alice Elizabeth Phelps, Third Grade; Theo. R. 
Stone, Third Grade; Ida Elizabeth P^obbins, Fourth Grade; Florence 
May Marshall, Fourth Grade; Maud Vivian Keyes, Fifth Grade; Mar- 
garet Condry, Fifth Grade; Lura Parker Fitch, Fifth Grade; Mary 
Frederika Kirchwey, Sixth Grade; Mary Gertrude Peabody, Sixth 
Grade; Siegried Hansen Upton, Sixth Grade; Caroline Woodbridge 
Hotchkiss, Seventh Grade; Lillian Emily Rogers, Seventh Grade; Georgia 
Farrand Bacon, Seventh Grade; Lucia W. Dement, Drawing; Helen 
Latham, Music; Lucy Hess Weiser, Manual Training; Mary Perle 
Anderson, Nature Study; Florence Mary Healy, Physical Training; 
Flora May Greenough, Grammar Assistant; Elizabeth Lee Tucker, 
Primary Assistant. 

Horace Mann Kindergarten 

Louise Christine Sutherland, Teacher; Grace Lillian Brown, 
Assistant; Ethel M. Robinson, Assistant. 

Speyer School 

Amy Schussler, Principal; Bertha Bentley, First Grade, Critic 
Teacher; Iza Edith Andrix, Second Grade; Ida Bennett, Third Grade; 



360 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Bertha Gath, Fourth Grade; Helen B. Gover, Fifth Grade, Critic Teacher; 
Blanche Edna Campbell, Sixth Grade; May McClane, Seventh Grade; 
Florence V. Watkins, Eighth Grade, Critic Teacher; Julia Wade Abbot, 
Kindergarten Critic; Bessie Gordon Smith, Assistant in Kindergarten; 
Laura Valentine, Social Worker and Assistant Librarian; Isabel Ste- 
phens, Physical Education; Helen Latham, Music; Robert Josselyn 
Leonard, Industrial Arts; Ethelwyn Coventry Bradish, Art Critic 
Teacher; Cora Marguerite Winchell, Domestic Science, Critic Teacher; 
Florence Ella Winchell, Domestic Arts, Critic Teacher. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Teachers College, founded in 1888, and chartered by the Regents of 
the University of the State of New York in 1889, became, in 1898, a 
part of the educational system of Columbia University. The President 
of Columbia University is President, ex-officio, of Teachers College and 
the College is represented in the University Council by its Dean and 
representatives elected from its Faculty. The College meanwhile main- 
tains its separate corporate organization, and its Board of Trustees con- 
tinues to assume entire financial responsibility for its maintenance. 

Teachers College is thus the school of Columbia University for the 
study of education and the training of teachers, taking academic rank 
with the Schools of Law, Medicine, and Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry. 
It affords opportunity for the advanced study of educational psychology 
and sociology, the history and philosophy of education, educational 
administration, and the various aspects of secondary, technical, elementary, 
and kindergarten education. It also provides professional training, both 
theoretical and practical, for teachers of both sexes for secondary, gram- 
mar, and primary schools, and kindergartens; for special teachers of such 
technical subjects as household arts, industrial arts, fine arts, music, and 
physical education; and the preparation of advanced students for work 
as principals, supervisors, and superintendents of schools; as heads of aca- 
demic or educational departments in normal and teachers' training schools, 
and of educational departments in colleges and universities. 

The following curricula are offered by the College: 

1. A two-years' professional curriculum, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Education and the Bachelor's Diploma in 
teaching, requiring for entrance the previous completion, at Columbia 
University or elsewhere, of two years of academic or technical train- 
ing in advance of the usual requirements for college entrance. The 
work of the curriculum presents certain fundamental courses in edu- 
cational psychology and the history and principles of education, a 
major subject of professional and academic work, in any department 
of the College, and a proportion of elective courses chosen at will. 

2. Graduate curricula for advanced students leading to the Master's 



GENERAL STATEMENT 36I 

and Doctor's diplomas in teaching and to the degrees of Master of Arts 
and Doctor of Philosophy with a major subject in education. Such 
curricula provide work in educational psychology, the history and the 
philosophy of education, educational administration, secondary educa- 
tion, elementary education, and in research in the methods of teaching 
the various academic and technical subjects, supplemented by courses 
in other parts of the University. Courses in education may also be counted 
as minor subjects toward the advanced degrees, by students primarily 
registered in some other part of the University. 

The professional curriculum is so arranged that undergraduate students 
of Columbia College and of Barnard College, and students who are pre- 
pared to enter the junior class of either of these colleges, may, if they 
desire, obtain the diploma of Teachers College at the time of receiving 
their degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

Teachers who wish to supplement previous professional training are 
entered into these curricula with advanced standing, or into courses 
grouped especially for their needs. 

The Horace Mann School and the Speyer School, maintained by Teachers 
College as schools of observation and experiment, include kindergarten, 
elementary, and secondary classes and neighborhood work, and offer 
exceptional advantages for the study of the practical work of teaching 
and for the investigation of educational problems. These schools have 
now an attendance of some thirteen hundred pupils. 

Buildings and Equipment 

The buildings of Teachers College, representing an investment of more 
than three million dollars, occupy the block directly north of the University 
Campus, bounded by 120th and 121st streets, Amsterdan Avenue, and 
Broadway. 

The Main Building, containing equipment for administration and 
instruction, the Bryson Library — the educational library of the Uni- 
versity, — and the Educational Museum, is adjoined by the Milbank 
Memorial Building, housing a number of academic and technical depart- 
ments and containing the Memorial Chapel; by the Macy Manual Arts 
Building, with its exceptional equipment for work in Fine Arts and Indus- 
trial Arts; and by the new Household Arts Building. The Frederick 
Ferris Thompson Memorial Building for the department of Physical 
Education connects the Milbank Building on the west with the building 
of the Horace Mann School. On the east of it is Whittier Hall, the resi- 
dence for the women students of the College. The building of the Speyer 
School is a short distance north of the College, on Lawrence Street, near 
Amsterdam Avenue. 

Scholarships, Prizes, and Honors 
(See page 443) 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS, 1911-12 

Teachers College 

Graduate Students 
Candidates for the Doctor's Degree and Diploma 

The following students are also registered under the Faculty of Philosophy and are 
pursuing a major' course in Education in Teachers College. Minor courses not in Edu- 
cation are given in italics below 

AcKEN, Eva Adeline, B.S. 1906, A.M. 1907, English Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Adams, Matthew Prior, B.S. Harvard 1904 Old Orchard, Me. 

Alexander, Thomas, A.B. 1909 Kirksville, Mo. 

Briggs, Thomas Henry, A.B. Wake Forest 1896, English Raleigh, N. C. 

Brim, Orville Gilbert, A.M. 1911, B.S. Valparaiso 1907, Philosophy . .Latchie, Ohio 

Burnham.JReuben Wesley, A.R. Amherst 1895, Physics Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Calvin, Margaret Jean, Ph.B. Chicago 1900, English Transfer, Pa. 

Carse, Elizabeth, A.M. igii, A.B. N. Y. N. C. 180,?, English New York City 

Chen, Tsai Hsin, A.B. Peking 1901, A.M. 1909, Mathematics Peking, China 

Chien, Hu Ting, A.M. 1911, A.B. Harvard 1910, History Public Law China 

Childs, Hubert Guy, B.S. Minnesota 1897, A.M. Leland Stanford, Jr. 

1911, Psychology Mankato, Minn. 

Clark, Howard Ernest.'A.B. Toronto 1909, A.M. 1911, 

Philosophy W. Toronto, Canada 

Cook,!Edmund Curley, A.B. Dartmouth 1892, A.M. 1899. A.B. 

Harvard 1894, Mathematics New York City 

Cuthbert, Herman Girvin, A.B. Pennsylvania 1902, B.D. Rochester 

Theological 1906, A.M. Chicago 1911, Psychology Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dotey, Aaron I., A.B. De Pauw 1890, A.M. 1893 New York City 

Dushkin, Alexander M., A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911, Sociology, History New York City 

Everson, George, A.B. Oberlin 1908, Sociology Wellington, Ohio 

Fay, Harrison Gilbert, A.B. Harvard 1893, A.M. 1909, History, 

Economics New York City 

Fichandler, Alexander, A.B. N. Y. U. 1905 New York City 

Giltner, Emmett E., A.M. 1907, A.B. Indiana 1904, Social Economy . . . New York City 
Graves, Frank Pierrepont, A.B. 1890, A.M. 1891, Ph.D. 1892, Litt.D. 

Heidelberg (Ohio) 1897, LL.D. Hanover 1897, Psychology Columbus, Ohio 

Haefehn, Fanny Josephine, B.S. 1905, A.M. 1908, Romance 

Languages Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Hahn.JHenry H., A.B. Northwestern 1890, A.M. Nebraska 1911, 

Psychology, Sociology Wayne, Neb. 

Hance, William, A.B. Yale 1902, Mathematics New York City 

Hancock, William Jerome, B.S. Maine 1888, M.S. 1892 Hollis Court, N. Y. 

Hartshorne, Hugh, A.B. Amherst 1907, A.M. Yale 1910, B.D. Yale 

Divinity 1911 Methuen, Mass. 

Heck, William Harry, A.B. Wake Forest 1897, A.M. 1899 University, Va. 

Hedges, Anna Charlotte, B.S. 1905, A.M. 1906, Economics Brooklyn, N. Y. 

362 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 363 

Heglanb. Martin, A.B. St. Olaf 1904, A.M. Minnesota 1908, Sociology . New York City 
Henderson, Joseph Lindsay, A.M. 1906, A.B. West Virginia 1894, 

Psychology Austin, Texas 

Hopkins, Prince Charles, A.M. 1910, Ph.B. Yale 1906, 

Psychology Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Howe, Lyman, A.M. 1911, A.B. Leiand Stanford, Jr. 1906 East Orange, N. J. 

Hutchinson, J. Howard, A.M. 1909, A.B. Colgate 1905, Social 

Economy Pocantico Hills, N. Y. 

Ireland, Elizur Ward, B.S. 1908, Social Economy Unadilla, N. Y. 

Jaqua, Ernest James, A.M. 1910, Ph.B. Grinnell 1907 Tokio, N. D . 

Kemp, William Webb, A.B. Leiand Stanford, Jr., 1898 Palo Alto, Calif. 

KiRBY, Thomas Joseph, A.B. Indiana 1902, Psychology Indianapolis, Ind . 

Kleinman, Philip, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911, Sociology, History New York City 

Knight, Edgar Wallace, A.B. Trinity (N. C.) 1909, A.M. 1911, 

Psychology Durham, N. C . 

Kuhn, Adelina, A.m. 1908, A.B. Vassar 1904, Sociology New York City 

Kuo, PiNGWEN, B.S. Wooster 1911, Psychology Shanghai, China 

Labarca-Hubertson, Guillermo, A.B. Institute Nacional, Santiago, 

1904, A.M. Institute Pedagojico, 1909, History Santiago, Chile, S. A. 

Lewis, Ervin Eugene, A.B. Leiand Stanford, Jr. 1907. A.M. 1909, 

Psychology Watertown, N. Y. 

Locke, Leslie Leland, A.B. Grove City 1896, A.M. 1900, Mathematics Brooklyn, N. Y, 
McConaughy, James L., A.B. Yale 1909, A.M. Bowdoin 191I1 

English Brunswick, Me. 

McConnel, David Rose, A.M. Edinburgh 1878, Psychology Palo Alto, Calif, 

McIntosh, Christopher Ferguson, A.B. Toronto 1907. A.M. 1908, 

Philosophy, Church History Hanlon, Ont., Can. 

McLane, Fannie Moulton, A.B. 1507, A.M. 1908, Psychology, English . New York City 

Margoshes, Samuel, A.M. 1910, Sociology Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Mead, Cyrus DeWitt, Ph.B. De Pauw 1898, Psychology Spencer, Ind. 

Merriam, Bert Emery, A.B. Oberlin 1894, Pd. M. N. Y. U. 1911,1 

Economics Elmore, Vt. 

Meyer, Henry Hermann, A.B. German Wallace 1901, A.M. 1903, B.D. 

Drew Theological Seminary 1903, Psychology New York City 

Miller, Eleanora Tibbets, A.B. Nebraska 1900, A.M. Chicago 1902, 

Mathematics Lincoln, Neb. 

Miller, James Collins, A.M. 1910, B.S. Throop Polytechnic 1907. 

Psychology Calgary, Alberta, Can. 

Myers, Alexander John William, A.B. Dalhousie 1903, A.M. 1904, B.D. 

Presbyterian 1907, Church History. . . . Lake View, Prince Edward Island, Can. 

Nagourney, Isaac, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Osterhus, Peter Olai, A.M. 1911, A.B. Augsburg 1903, B.Pd. Val- 
paraiso 190S, B.S. 1906 Ossian, la. 

Pandya, Thakorlal Ranchhodlal, A.m. 1910, B.S. Baroda, India, 

1905, Sociology Baroda, India 

Pinkham, George Ripley, A.B. Brown 1887, A.M. 1890, Public Law Newark, N. J. 

Rapeer, Louis William, A.B. Chicago 1904, A.M. Minnesota 1907, 

Economics, Sociology New York City 

RoBBiNS, Charles Leonidas, A.B. Kansas 1902, A.M. 1903. History. . . Russell, Kan. 
Robinson, Lewis Archibald, A.B. Illinois 1898, A.M. 1901, Pd.D. 

N. Y. U. 1911, Biological Chemistry White Post, Va. 

Rusk, Elizabeth, A.B. 1907, A.M. 1908, Psychology St. Joseph, Mo. 

Seybolt, Robert Francis, Ph.B. Brown 1910, A.M. 1911, 

History Port Richmond, N. Y. 

Silberstein, Nathan, A.B. 1905, A.M. 1906, Mathematics New York City 

Smith, Edward Ehrlich, A.B. Randolph-Macon, Sociology Norfolk, Va. 



364 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Stone, Lulu Mabel, Ph.B. Cornell 1895 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SwANSON, Oscar Emmanuel, B.S. Valparaiso 1901, B.S Northwestern 

1911, Economics Potomac, 111. 

Taft.'Leanora Ellen, A.B. Maine 1910, Psychology New York City 

Tarney, Joseph Byron, A.M. 1911, A.B. Indiana 1902, Philosophy of 

Religion, History Auburn, Ind . 

Tatem, Benjamin Thomas, A.B. Randolph-Macon 1910, A.M. Harvard 

191 1 Norfolk, Va. 

Thorpe, Edward Ole, A.M. 1911, A.B. Williams 1903 Concord, Mass. 

Welch, Alberta Maud, A.M. 1908, A.B. Wellesley 1895, 

Mathematics New York City 

Wheat, Frank Merrill, A.M. 1909, B.S. Kentucky 1908, Botany Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Candidates for Master's Degree and Diploma 

The following students are'also registered under the Faculty of Philosophy and are 
pursuing a major course in Education in Teachers College. The minor courses not in 
Education are given in italics below. 

Allen, Andrew Jackson, Physics East Orange, N. J. 

Allen, Russell H., A.B. De Pauw 1906 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Arnold, Katherine Sabin, A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1906, Mathematics Portland, Ore. 

AsHCROFT, Carrie Van Rensselaer, B.S. 1906, History New York City 

Attner, Bernice Madeleine, A.B. Radclifife 1910, History Cambridge, Mass. 

Atwell, Robert King, A.B. Bowdoin 1909, Psychology New York City 

Barr, Lois Elta, B.S. 1909, English Koldrege, Neb. 

Barranco. Manuel, B.S. 1911, Sociology Mexico City 

Bartlett, Glenn, B.S. 1911, English Wauseon, Ohio 

Beeman, Ray, A.B. Indiana 1907 Woodside, N. Y. 

Behr, Elsa, B.S. 1902 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bennett, Agnes Leonard, A.B. 1900 Hackensack, N. J. 

Bennett, George Lionel, A.B. Colgate 1900 Hackensack, N. J. 

Blend, Arva Erastus, B.S. 1907 Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Bowman, Leon Cross, A.B. Colgate 1909 Hempstead, N. Y. 

Boyd, Ida Estelle, B.S. 1911 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brov/n, Herbert Austin, A.B. Valparaiso 1908, Psychology Huntington, Ind. 

BuRKHARD, Samuel, A.B. Goshen 1911, Church History Roseland, Neb. 

Carris, Lewis Herbert, B.L. Hobart 1898 Newark, N. J. 

Chase, Lawrence Seward, B.S. Colgate 1909 Montclair, N. J. 

Chatfield, George Herbert, B.S. 1911, Social Economy Spuyten DuyvH, N. Y. 

Child, Alice May, B.S. Minnesota 1901, Chemistry, Geology Glencoe, Minn. 

Chilson, Wallace Streeter, A.B. Clark 1911, Psychology Northampton, Mass. 

Cirino, Antonio, B.S. 1911 Providence, R. I, 

Cole, Ruth Fitch, A.B. Minnesota 1902, Mathematics Minneapolis, Minn, 

Coleman, David Fleming, Litt.B. Rutgers 1910, Physical Science, 

Chemistry Tottenville. N. Y. 

Cook,'Katherine Margaret, A.B. Colorado Teachers College 1911, 

English Denver, Colo. 

Cornish, Hubert Ray.'B.S. 1910 Paterson, N. J. 

Covert, William S., A.B. Princeton 1898 Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Crane, Henrietta Mead, A.B. Wellesley 190s, Mathematics Montclair, N. J. 

Crane, Jesse Ernest, Ph.B. Dickinson 1911 Branchville, N. J. 

Custer, Horace Luther, A.B. Ursinus 1909, Psychology Norristown, Pa. 

Davis, Winifred Lloyd, A.B. Emporia 1911, English Emporia, Kan. 

Deutsch, Julia, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Douglas, Walter Bernard, B.S. Franklin 1908, Psychology Flat Rock, Ind. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 365 



Eayrs, Ellen Knowles, A.B. Vassar 1911, Mathematics New York City 

Egan, Hannah Mary.IA.B. N. Y. N.;C. 1911 New York City 

Eklund, Edwin Gustave, A.B. Minnesota 1908, Philosophy Moorhead, Minn. 

Enteman, Willard Finley, A.B. Indiana 1907, Mathematics Jersey City, N. J. 

Ernst, Frederic, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1902 New York City 

Ervin, Walter Evan, Ph.B. De^Pauw 189s, Sociology Indianapolis, Ind. 

Finlayson, Alma Jessie, B.S. 1910, Household Arts Charlottetown, Prince Edward 

Island, Canada 

Fisher, Hope, A.B. Vassar 1908, Psychology Marion, Ohio 

Fleishcher, Emanuel Mayer, A.B. 1911, English Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Frank, Julius, B.S., C. C. N. Y. 1898 New York City 

Frazee, John Clifford, A.B. Coe 1904, Chemistry New York City 

Funk, John Calvin, A.B. Kansas State 1910, Psychology Hillsboro, Kan. 

Gilbert, Terence Ward, B.S. 1911, Psychology Mannsville, N. Y. 

Hagaman, Fred B., B.S. 1907. History Mt. Vernon, Ohio 

Hale, Harriet Florence, A.B. 191 1, Psychology Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hall, Delbert Eugene, A.B. Grove City 1905, A.M. 1907, P^j'/oso^/iji. .. Mills, Pa. 

Halsey, Katherine Treman, A.B. Vassar 1908, Philosophy Bronxville, N. Y. 

Hambright, John B., A.B. Lebanon Valley 1906 Englishtown, N. J. 

Hanna, Hovi^ARD John, A.B. Kansas State igii.f Philosophy Waverly, Kan. 

Harada, Kichi, Equivalent A.B. Meiji Women's Seminary 1S99. 

Sociology Tochigiken, Japan 

Harris, Leon Francis, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1904 New York City 

Harvey, Louise Eugenie, A.B. N. Y. N. C. 1911, Mathematics New York City 

Hasslock, Clara Whorley, A.B. University of Nashville 190S. 

Biological Chemistry Nashville, Tenn. 

Head, Walter Button, A.B. Harvard 1902, Romance Languages W. Somerville, Mass. 

Henry, David Watters, A.B. Kansas State Normal 191 1 Norwalk, Conn. 

Higgins, Edna Dee, B.L. University of California 191 1, English, 

History Berkeley, Calif. 

Hinchliff, Grace Plorine, A.B. Knox 1910, Biological Chemistry Galesburg, 111. 

Holmes, Sarah Marcia, A.B. Park 1909, Biology Alamogordo, N. M. 

Horn, Jacob Henry, A.B. Muhlenberg 1910 Hagersville, Pa. 

Hunter, James Robert, A.B. Vanderbilt 189s, Psychology Emory, Va. 

Johnston, Sarah Helen, A.B. Cornell 1899, Mathematics Ovid, N. Y. 

Keeler, Ralph Welles, A.B. Wesleyan 1904, A.M. 1909, B.D. Drew 

Theological 1907 New York City 

King, Lewis Cass, B .S. C. C. N. Y. 1908 New York City 

KissELL, Mary Lois, B.S. 1911, Sociology New York City 

Lake, Sidney, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906 New York City 

Leake, Emma Gertrude (Mrs.), Ph.B. Colorado 1897, M.Pd. 

N. Y. U. 1898, Psychology Maryville, Mo. 

Lee, Charlotte Emmeline, B.S. 1907, A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1907 Huntington, N. Y. 

Leete, William Rockwell, A.B. Yale 1908 New Haven, Conn. 

Leman, George Washington, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Levene, Harry, B.S. 1908 New York City 

Leventhal, Murray Jacob, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1911. Mathematics New York City 

LeVitt, Clarence Hervey, A.B. Chicago 1902 Belvidere, 111. 

Loughran, George Andrew, B.S. N. Y. U. 1907, Public Law Nc-w York City 

Lustgarten, Augusta, A.B. 1911 New York City 

McDanell, Louise, B.S. Nashville 1902, A.B. Leland, Stanford, Jr. 1906, 

Biological Chemistry New York City 

MacDonald, David James, A.B. Leander Clark 1905, A.M. Iowa 1906, 

m Psychology Ohio, 111. 

McFarlane, Jessie, B.S. 1907, History New Berlin, N. Y. 

McGowin, Margaret Odell, B.S. 1910 New York City 



366 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



MacKay, Jennie King, A.B. 1911, Latin, Romance Languages New York City 

McKeever, Edna Josephine, A.B. 1911, Social Economy New York City 

Magginis, Willis D., A.B. Tri-State 1911, Economics St. Joe, Ind. 

Mertz. Paul Allen, A.B. Ursinus 1910, English Plainfield, N. J. 

MiL*ER, Emily Ottilie, A.B. Wellesley 191 1, History New York City 

Miller, Alvin J., A.B. Goshen 1911 Grantsville, Md. 

Miller, Edward Patterson, Jr., A.B. Princeton 1908, English Elizabeth, N. J. 

Miller, Isidore, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Minahan, Mary Elizabeth (Mrs.), B.S. 1911, Social Economy.. . Calumetville, Wis. 

MoDESiTT, Raymond Lyons, A.M. Indiana 1909, Mathematics Atherton, Ind. 

MoRisON, Margaret Baker, A.B. Bryn Mawr igoy ^English New York City 

AIorrison, William John, B.S. Swarthmore 1896, History Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MuiR, James Nicol, B.S. Pennsylvania 1904, Psychology Johnstown, Pa. 

Murrill, Pitt Samuel, B.S. Virginia Polytechnic 1902, M.S. 1904, 

Economics Blacksburg, Va. 

Newman, Minnie May, A.B. Nebraska 1910, English Lincoln, Neb. 

NosKA, Elliot Valentine, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906, Social Economy New York City 

Olin, Charlotta Harriet, Ph.B. Buchtel 1904, Psychology Akron, Ohio 

Page, Donald Taylor, A.B. Dartmouth 1901, Mathematics Haverhill, N. H. 

Parsons, Edith Ferris, A.B. Leland Stanford, Jr., 1903 Saratoga, Calif. 

Pendleton, Eo., B.S. 19x1, Anthropology Bryn Athyn, Pa. 

Phillips, Helen S., A.B. 1909, English New York City 

Porter, Harry Primrose, A.B. Washington 1905, English Snow Hill, Md. 

Reback, Herman William, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906, English New York City 

Reese, Amos Philip, B.S. Lafayette 1898, M.S. 1901, Mathematics Mansfield, Pa. 

Reynolds, Jessie May, A.B. Michigan 1901, Mathematics Grand Haven, Mich. 

Roantree, William Fox, A.B. Colgate 1904, Mathematics New York City 

Robinson, Eva A., A.B. Toronto 1902, A.M. 1905, German.. . .Owen Sound, Ontario, 

Canada 
Rochester, Mary Muriel, A.B. N. Y. N. C. 1908, Roman 

Archceology New York City 

Rodewig, Florence Hilda, A.B. Wooster 1911, English, History Bellaire, Ohio 

Rowell, Elizabeth, Ph.B. Colorado 1895, History Seattle, Wash. 

Sameth, Elsie, B.S. 1911, A.B. N. Y. N. C. 1904, A.B. Cornell 1911 New York City 

Schoettle, George H., B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1908 New York City 

Scovel, Christine Merle, B.S. N. Y. U. 1910, English New York City 

Seager, Anna Luella, B.S. 1909. English Brockport, N. Y. 

Selkin. Frances B., A.B. N. Y. N. C. 1911, Mathematics New York City 

Sibley, Winifred, Pd.B. Cole 1886, A.B. 1911, Psychology Greeley, Colo. 

Simons, Lao Genevra, B.S. 1908, Mathematics New York City 

Simpson, Homer Nelson, A.B. Cornell 1909, Geology Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Simpson, Katherine Aby, B.S. 1911, Mathematics JeSerson City, Tenn. 

Smith, Charlotte, A.B. Minnesota 1910, Household Arts Montevideo, Minn. 

Smith, Cilda Langfitt, A.B. West Virginia 1908, Mathematics. . . .Fairmont, West Va. 

Smith, Leslie Brewster, A.B. 1905 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Smith, William Alexander, A.B. Williams 1890, Philosophy Hackensack, N. J. 

Smith, William Thomas, A.B. St. Francis Xavier 1899, A.M. 1900 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Snow, Ella Marion, B.S. 1906, Romance Languages Brockton, Mass. 

Snow, Minnie Rose, Ph.B. Wesleyan 1897, Mathematics East Hampton, Conn. 

Stewart, Hugh Henry, B.S. 1911 New York City 

Stillman, Dorothea, A.B. Vassar 1910 Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Strachan, Agnes, A.B. California 1910, Latin San Francisco, Calif. 

Strader, William Weller, B.S. 1910, Mathematics Weehawken Hts., N. J. 

Stryker, Russell Foote, A.B. Rutgers 1910 .Bound Brook, N. J. 

Sweeny, Mary E., A.B. Transylvania 1899, M.S. Kentucky State i9o6,| 

Biological Chemistry Lexington, Ky. 



GRADUATE STUDENTS 367 

Taylor, Chester Edwin, A.B. Boston 1908, Psychology New York City 

Terrell, Hubert Nelson, A.B. Wesleyan 1902 Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

Thompson, Fred Loring, B.S. Amherst 1904 New York City 

Thomson, Andrew Samuel, Ph.B. Brown 1898, Psychology . . .Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 

ToTAH, Khalil Abdullah, A.B. Clark 1911, Psychology Ramallati, Palestine 

Tyndall, Gertrude VanAuken, B.S. 1910, Physical Science ...... .Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Tyner, Bunyan Yates, A.B. Wake Forest 1908, English Wingate, N. C. 

Usry, Eldon Leonard, B.M.E. Iowa State 1904, Psychology Des Moines, Iowa 

Van Buskirk, Annie Schmelzel, A.B. 1911, Greek Archeology New York City 

Van Sant, John Thomas, A.B. DePauw 1904, Mathematics Greencastle, Ind. 

Van Schaick, Lemuel W., A.B. Colgate 1904 Scarsdale, N, Y. 

Van Wagenen, Marion J., B.S. 1911, Psychology, Sociology Ohioville, N. Y. 

ViERLiNG, Clara, A.B. Indiana 1903, History Princeton, Ind. 

Villelli, Joseph Anthony, B.D. Union Theological 1910, French Bayonne, N. J. 

Wagner, Thomas Jefferson, A.B. Franklin and Marshall 1910. .Tomkins Cove, N. Y. 

Webster, Edward Harlan, A.B. Bowdoin 1910 Washington, D. C. 

Welsh, John Cleveland, B.S. Carson and Newman 1887, M.S. George 

Washington 1905, English New York City 

West. Miriam Esther, A.B. Milton 1908, Mathematics Milton Junction, Wis. 

Wettlin, Emma Louise, B.S. 1902 Westfield, N. J. 

Whisenhunt, Columbus Calloway, A.B. Indiana 1911. Psychology New York City 

Wilcox, Winifred, B.S. 1908 Pelham, N. Y. 

Wiley, William H., B.S. 1909 N. Tarrytown, N. Y. 

Williams, Myron Lawson, A.B. Texas 1908, Psychology Denton, Tex. 

Wilson, William H., B.S. 1909 Paterson, N. J. 

Woodland, Manford, A.B. Otterbein 1901, Psychology New York City 

YoAKLEY, Ina, B.S. 1911, B.S. Milligan 189s, Zoology, Physiology Johnson City, Tenn. 

Yost, John Wycliffe, A.B. Dickinson 1903. Chinese Stewartstown, Pa. 

ZiEGLER, Carl William, B.S. Colgate 1910 Scranton, Pa. 

UNCLASSIFIED GRADUATES 

Barnett, I. Irving, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1903, Pd.M. N. Y. U. 1909 New York City 

BosTWiCK, Sara Wells, B.S. 1910 Montclair, N, J. 

CoLviN, Stephen Sheldon, Ph.D. Strassburg 1897 Urbana, 111. 

Dressel, Herman, Jr., L.B. Norwich 1890, A.M. 189s Arlington, N. J, 

Eggleston, Charlotte, A.B. 1900 Tomkinsville, N. Y. 

Ellis, Charles Calvert, A.B. Juniata 1898, Ph.D. Pennsylvania 1907 Huntingdon, Pa. 

EusTis, Mary, A.B. Wells 190S New York City 

Fairchild, Edith Miriam, A.M. 1902 Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Fisher, Louise Marion, B.S. 1906 New York City 

Forest, Katherine, A.B. Smith 190s New York City 

Freeman, Sara H. M., A.B. Vassar 1903 Englewood, N. J. 

FuESLEiN, Vera Amanda, A.B. 1911 New York City 

Goldsmith, Evelyn, B.S. 1910 Binghamton, N. Y. 

Haney, John Dearling, Ph.D. 1910 New York City 

Harrington, Grace Aileen, B.S. 1906, A.M. 1910 Montpelier, Vt. 

Hegland, Mrs. Georgina Dieson, A.B. St. Olaf 1904 New York City 

Hubbard, Hugh Wells, A.B. Amherst 1908 White Plains, N. Y. 

Hummel, Francis Martin, A.B. Rutgers 1901, A.M. 1904, Pd.B, 

Albany Normal 1902 Bloomfield. N. J. 

Ingalls, Edith May, A.B. 1902 New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Keeler, Mrs. E. C, A.B. Wellesley 1902 New York City 

Kemma, Charlotte, B.S. 1910 New York City 

Levin, Mary, A.B. Colorado 1909 Hawthorne, N. Y. 

Lyon, Lois, A.B. Wooster^igoi Madison, N. J. 



368 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

McCreary, Herbert J., B.S. Michigan 1899 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MacLeod, Grace, B.S. Mass. Institute of Technology 1901 Springfield, Mass. 

MiNNiCK, John D., A.B. Butler 1893, A.M. George Washington 1898 New York City 

Moser.Regina Virginia, A.B.Vassar 1899 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Oppenheim, Ella, A.B. 1909 New York City 

Racoubian, Roufen, B.S. 1910, A.M. 1911 Sivas, Turkey 

Rogers, James Clarkson Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sailer, Thomas H. P., A.B.Princeton 1889, Ph.D. Princeton 1895 Englewood, N. J. 

Sanderson, Mary Logan, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Schneider, Emilie, B.S. 191 1 Meriden, Conn. 

Sheppard, Charles, B.S. N. Y. U. 1907 Paterson, N. J. 

True, Carrie Mabel, A.B. Colby 1895, A.M. Radcliffe 1901 Schenectady, N. Y. 

Updyke, Austin Hiel, Pd.M. N. Y. U. 1911 Guttenberg, N. J. 

Woll, Frederic Albert, B.S. 1910, A.M. 1911 New York City 

Professional Students Candidates for tlie Bachelor's Degree and Diploma 

SENIORS 

Albert, Amanda Anna {Fine Arts) Espanola, Wash. 

Alfke, Ethel V. {History) New York City 

Allan, Agnes Cecilia {Music) New York City 

Allen, Bessie May {Household Arts) Postville, Iowa 

Allen, Sara Thomas {Household Arts) Dartmouth, Mass. 

Arms, Miranda Ray {Household Arts) Calistoga, Calif. 

Atkinson, Louise Sibley {Kindergarten Supervision) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Austin, Charles L., Jr., {Industrial Arts).. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Avent, John McDonough {English) New York City 

Ballou, Willard Alger, {Mathematics) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bardenheuer, Clara E. {German) College Point, N. Y. 

Barrett, Mary Louise {Elementary Supervision) Rochester, N Y. 

Beck, Alga May {Physical Education) New Brighton, N. Y. 

Bell, Mabel Be.4.trice Valentine {Mathematics) West New Brighton, N. Y. 

Benedict, Mabel Irene {Household Arts) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Bennett, Ross Vernon {English) New York City 

Bentley, Jean Eliza {Household Arts) Cripple Creek, Colo. 

Bernkopf, Charlotte Sophia {German) New York City 

Bidstrup, Gerda {Elementary Supervision) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Binkley. Lelia Tyler {Biology) Gainesville, Texas 

Binkley, Ralston (History) New York City 

Blair, Effie Florence {Music) Keithsburg, 111. 

Blake, Anna Seymour {Kindergarten Supervision) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Blankenstein, Margaret {German) New York City 

Boegehold, Hilda {Household Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Bonney, Louise Emily {English) Hackensack, N. J. 

Booth, Edna {Mathematics) New York City 

Bosworth, M. Blanche {Kindergarten Supervision) New York City 

Bower, Sarah Elizabeth {Household Arts) No. Adams, Mass. 

Brady, Katharine Rogers {English) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brady, William Edward {History) Austin, Pa. 

Brandon, Maude Anna {Household Arts) New York City 

Bray, Corinne Beatrice {Physical Science) Detroit, Mich. 

Bridge, Elizabeth (Household Arts) Mill Valley, Calif. 

Briggs, Annie Bennett (Kindergarten) East Orange, N. J. 

Brookmyer, Ivan Lutz {Physical Science) NeSsville, Pa. 

Brown, Alex., M. D. {Physical Science) New York City 



SENIOR CLASS 369 

Brundage, Howard Drake {Industrial Arts) New York City 

Bryan, Edward H. {Elementary Supervision) Cresskill, N. J. 

Bullock, Charlotte Mary {Household Arts) Honesdale, Pa. 

BuQUO, Helen {Household Arts) Knoxville, Tenn. 

Burgess, Elizabeth Chamberlain {Household Arts) New Haven, Conn. 

Burnite, Mary A. {Household Arts) Nevir York City 

Bushnell, Edna Jean {Household Arts) Brookings, S. D. 

Busick, Mathilda {Kindergarten Supervision) New York City 

Campbell, Margaret {Elementary Supervision) Danville, 111. 

Campbell, Viola Hortense {Household Arts) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Carpenter, Frances Ruth {Fine Arts) Elberton, Ga. 

Cawley, Anna Gertrude {Industrial Arts) East Providence, R. I. 

Chaffee, Catherine E. {English) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Chaim, Henry Isador {History) Oroville, Calif. 

Chandler, Helen {Household Arts) Cleveland, Ohio 

Childs, Emma Lucena {Household Arts) Ypsilanti, Mich. 

CiLLEY, Lucia Hubbard {Elementary Supervision) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

** Clark, Anna Mansfield Salisbury, Conn. 

Clune, Mary Catherine {Geography) Springfield, Mass. 

Cohen, Abraham {Physical Science) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cohen, Philip {History) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

CoLBURN, Elizabeth Vanderpoel {Fine Arts) Albany, N. Y. 

Condon, Jeanette {Physical Education) New York City 

Connolly, James Francis {Elementary Education) Cornwall-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

1 1 Conway, Joseph {Latin) New York City 

Coonrod, Marietta {Household Arts) Port Jervis, N. Y. 

Cooper, Isabel Sutherland {Physical Education) New York City 

Cornbrooks, Marian Edith {Household Arts) Moline, 111. 

Coy, Georgia Valentine {Biology) Los Angeles, Calif. 

Cronan, Frances Jessie {Elementary Supervision) New York City 

Dalton, Anna Theresa {Household Arts) Tracy, Minn. 

Davidson, Mary E. S. {Biology) Weehawken, N. J. 

Davis, Kate Pauline {Household Arts) Lincoln, Neb. 

Davis, Maud Alice {Elementary Supervision) Tacoma, Wash. 

Day, Abbie Louise {Elementary Supervision) Minneapolis, Minn. 

DeLima, Edith Abinum {Household Arts) New York City 

Dempsey, Florence {Primary Supervision) Milwaukee, Wis. 

Denniston, Mary {Primary Teaching) Washington ville, N. Y. 

Deshel, Morris {History) New York City 

Des Voignes, Minnie Evans (Mrs.) {Elementary Supervision) Decatur, 111. 

Dewey, Robert Merrill {English) Northampton, Mass. 

Dickey, Frances M. {Music) Cedar Falls, Iowa 

Dobbin, Benjamin Harrison {Elementary Supervision) Port Chester, N. Y. 

Donnelly, Alice Margaret {Household Arts) Cincinnati, Ohio 

Dougall, John Bernard {Elementary Supervision) Freeport, N. Y. 

DuBois, Solomon E. {English) New Paltz, N. Y. 

Dunne, Florence {Household Arts) New York City 

EiLBECK, Winona Maude {Household Arts) Newcastle, Ontario, Can. 

English, Warren {Industrial Arts) Mays Landing, N. J. 

Epstein, Morris Louis {French) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Fern, Irving William {German) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

FiERO, Maude Louise {History) Round Top, N. Y. 

Fox, Jennie Hazel {Household Arts) Loyalsock, Pa. 

Franklin, Walter George {Industrial Arts) Fredonia, N. Y. 

1 1 Candidate for the A.B. degree. ** Degree only. 



370 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Gaunt, John Leonard {German) Huntingdon, Pa. 

Genin, Mary Jane {Mathematics) Atlantic Highlands, N.J. 

GiDEN, Abraham {History) New York City 

Glasser, Henry Galen {Mathematics) Dunellen, N. J- 

Gleich, Morris {Physical Education) New York City 

Godfrey, Edna Belle (Mrs.) {Household Arts) New York City 

Godfrey, Vera May {Household Arts) New York City 

GoLDFiNGER, Leo {Fine Arts) New York City 

Gomez, Galacion {Biology) Tehuetldn, Hid., Mexico 

Goodwin, Theresa" Agnes {Elementary Education) New York City 

Gordon, Louis {Mathematics) Washington, D. C. 

Gottlieb, George Joseph {Elementary Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gray, Juliet Guyer {English) Stormstown, Pa. 

Gray, Lillian {English) Fort Plain, N. Y. 

Gray, Maude {Elementary Supervision) New York City 

Gregory, Henrietta {Household Arts) Long Branch, N. J. 

Griffith, Gertrude Auer {Household Arts) Brewster, N. Y. 

GuNN, Mary Wilder {Elementary Supervision) Honolulu, T. H. 

Hall, Cora Eliza {Household Arts) New York City 

Hall, Marie Aline {Fine Arts) San Jose, Calif. 

Hamel, Georgiana {Geography) Newark, N. J. 

Hamilton, Ruth Gail {Household Arts) Two Rivers, Wis. 

Hanson, Daisy Evelyn {History and English) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Harding, Katherine Anna {Household Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Harper, Annie Eliza {Elementary Supervision) Milledgeville, Ga. 

Harris, Jessie Wootten {Household Arts) Texarkana, Texas 

Hastings, Elsie Mary {Fine Arts) New York City 

Hathaway, Maude Caroline {Household Arts) Blissfield, Mich. 

Hay, Mabel Martin {Household Arts) Seattle, Wash. 

Herman, Henrietta Rena {English) Danville, Va. 

Hess, Elizabeth May {Household Arts) Bethlehem, Pa. 

HiGGiNS, Frances Caldwell {English) Montevallo, Ala. 

Higgins, Mary E. {English) Sturgeon Bay, W-'s. 

Hill, Helen Grant {Household Arts) New York City 

Hill, Jessica Mateer {English) New York City 

Hinckley, Alice Cornelia (Elementary Education) Washington, La. 

HoLMAN, Bessie Frances {HouseholdiArts) Indianapolis, Ind. 

Hood, Grace Gordon {Household Arts) Chicago, 111. 

HopsoN, Dorothy Slade {Kindergarten Supervision) Bridgeport, Conn. 

HoTALiNG, Ethel Marie {English) Albany, N. Y. 

Hourihan, Daniel Bernard {History) Winthrop, N. Y . 

HuNAEUS, Paula {German) Hanover, Germany 

Hunt, Mary Bates (Mrs.) {Elementary Supervision) Brockton, Mass. 

Hunter, Elsie Margaret {Primary Peaching) New York City 

Hunter, F. Beatrice {Household Arts) New York City 

Hutchinson, Harriet Eliza {French) Boston, Mass. 

Huyssoon, Magdalena Provoost {Elementary Supervision) Paterson, N. J. 

Hyde, Lillian Seraphine {Household Arts) Palo Alto, Calif. 

Ingr.\m, Violet {Physical Science) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Irving, Sylvia {Elementary Supervision) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Jacobson, Harriet H. Chase {Household Arts) Portland, Me. 

** James, Marguerite Gardiner Bloomfield, N.J. 

Jarrett, Bertha Alma {History) New York City 

Jeffery, Emma {Household Arts) New York City 

**Degree only. 



SENIOR CLASS 37 1 

Kahn, Caroline {French) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kaplan, Peter George (History) New York City 

Kaufman, Benjamin {M athemaiics) New York City 

Kelsey, Frances Martin (Mrs.) {Elementary Education) New York City 

Kelsey, Lucile Florence (English) Clinton, Conn. 

Kelton, Mary Elizabeth (Elementary Education) Potsdam, N. Y. 

King, Hazel Wildonier (English) Bay Shore, N. Y. 

Knight, Grace (Household Arts) New York City 

Kurtz, Edward (Industrial Arts) Olney, 111. 

Landes, Sarah Windle (Household Arts) Philadelphia, Pa. 

Landman, Sara (Household Arts) Cincinnati, Ohio 

Langford, John Effern (History) New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Leonard, Caroline Wiltse (History) Bayonne, N. J. 

LeRoy, Walter Irving (Industrial Arts) Highland, N. Y. 

Levin, Isaac Harris (Physical Science) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Levy, Joseph (Latin) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LiBBiN, Mabel Nichols (Mrs.) (Grammar Grades) New York City 

Little, Mabel Collette (Household Arts) Norwalk, Ohio 

LOTZ, Elsa (German) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Luce, Ernest Burt (Elementary Supervision) Ridgefield Park, N. J. 

Lyon, Henrietta Baldy (Household Arts) Williamsport, Pa. 

McCrae, Annie (Fine Arts) New York City 

McFarland, David Stephen (Industrial Arts) Camillas, N. Y. 

McGavack, Mary Bell (English) Max Meadows, Va. 

Mac Gregor, Kate Miller (Elementary Education) Hillburn, N. Y. 

McKechnie, Mary M. (Household Arts) Montreal, Canada 

McLaury, Harriet E.H. (Mrs.) (Elementary Education) Deposit, N. Y. 

McLemore, William Dennis (Industrial Arts) New York City 

Macpherson, Lydia Bleu (Household Arts) Trenton, N. J. 

March, Lucy Bissell (English) Pottstown, Pa. 

Martin, Nancy Layton (English) Sussex, N. J. 

Mathes, Fannie Pendexter (English) Dover, N. H. 

Mayo, Lisa Caroline (Household Arts) Southwest Harbor, Me. 

Merritt, Alta Hepzabeth (English) Duluth, Minn. 

Meseroll, Sarah (Primary Supervision) Trenton, N. J. 

Mignon, Helen Leonie (Household Arts) San Jos6, Calif. 

Miles, Sara (History) Kingston, Pa. 

Mitchell, Ruth Blackstone (Music) Springfield, Mass. 

Mix, Grace Eldridge (Kindergarten Supervision) Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Morse, Louis Theodore (English) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

MosKOWiTz, David Ezekiel (Industrial Arts) New York City 

Murdoch, Katherine (Educational Psychology) Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Nabersberg, Berta (Fine Arts) St. Paul, Minn. 

Needham, Harriet (Elementary Supervision) Honolulu, T. H. 

NeSmith, Mary Ethel (English and Latin) Lake City, S. C. 

Neville, Eleanor S. (English) Lindenhurst, L. I. 

Newbury, Maud Christine (English and Elementary Supervision).. . .Wooliord, Md. 

North, Samuel Maith (Education) Baltimore, Md. 

O'Geran, Annie Susan (Elementary Education) Oswego, N. Y. 

O'Keefe, Louise Langley (Elementary Supervision) White Plains, N. Y. 

Old, Anna Valerie (Kindergarten) Montclair, N. J. 

Oliver, Mary Pauline (History) Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Olsen, Anna Margrethe (Household Arts) Herscher, 111. 

Olson, Ida Victoria (Household Arts) Escanaba, Mich. 

Ostroff, Rose (French) New York City 

Owen, Irine Beltz (Mrs.) (English) Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. 



372 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Palmer, Alice Frances {History) New York City 

Parcel, Elizabeth Ebbert {Elementary Education) Westfield, 111. 

Parker, Clara Mabel {Household Arts) Grinnell. la. 

Parker, Linette Althana {Household Arts) West Peabody, Mass. 

Parrott, Edith Lander {Household Arts) Darlington, S. C. 

Patterson, Helena May {English) Windham, N. Y. 

Phillips, Edna {Household Arts) New York City 

PiCKEN, Mae Evangeline {Primary Supervision) Caledonia, 111. 

PoMEROY, Gladys {Biology) Rahway, N. J. 

Porter, Dorothy {Industrial Arts) Huntington, W. Va. 

Prats, Elena Rafaela {Biology) Mayaquez, P. R. 

Price, Margaret Lightfoot {Kindergarten) Moylan, Pa. 

Prince, Florence May {Elementary Education) New Haven, Conn. 

Quaw, Lucile {Household Arts) Bozeman, Mont. 

Radebaugh, Ella Marie {Household Arts) Columbus, Ohio 

**Raitt, Effie Isabel Andes, N. Y. 

Rankin, Carl Seib {Mathematics) Scranton, Pa. 

Reichard, Samuel {Industrial Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Relyea, George Lorenzo {Industrial Arts) New Paltz, N. Y. 

Reynolds, Ernest George {Industrial Arts) South Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Richardson, Charlotte {Music) New York City 

Robbins, Sophie {Mathematics) Phoenix, Ariz. 

RoBBiNS, Susan {Household Arts) Lexington, N. C. 

Robertson, Isabel {English) Paterson, N. J. 

Robson, Ethel Hedley {Elementary Supervision) i ...... . Middleport, N. Y. 

Rosenberg, Lucille {Kindergarten) New York City 

Ross, May Davina {Biology) Flushing, N. Y. 

Schachter, Frank M. {Biology) New York City 

ScHEiNBACH, Max Henry {History) New York City 

ScHERMERHORN, Grace {Household Arts) Springfield, 111, 

Schwarte, Virginia Marie {German) Saratoga Springs, N. Y. 

Schwarting, Louise Elfride {Household Arts) Reinauk, la. 

Seymour, Lurene {Household Arts) Decatur, 111. 

Shelton, Alta {History) Florence, Ala. 

Sheridan, Joseph A. {Mathematics) New York City 

Shimer,'Mary Blanche {Primary Supervision) Easton, Pa. 

Siegrist, Mary {English) Lebanon, Pa. 

Simmons, Kate Cameron {Fine Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Simpson, Cora Fronia {Household Arts) Pomona, Calif. 

Skinner, Gertrude Eliza {Kindergarten Supervision) Barton, Vt. 

Skolnick, Isidore {Mathematics) New York City 

Smeeton, Mary Alice {Household Arts) Newark, Eng. 

Smith, Hilda {Household Arts) Los Angeles, Calif. 

Smith, Laura Gooding {Household Arts) Naples, N. Y. 

Smith, Meredith {Kindergarten Supervision) Omaha, Neb. 

Smith, Stephen V. {History) Port Washington, N. Y. 

Speece, Harold Eugene {Industrial Arts) New York City 

Spencer, Mary {Fine Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Sperling, Harry {Physical Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Spurr, E. Euphema {History) Buffalo, N. Y. 

Stadler, Blanche Fannie {Kindergarten Supervision) New York City 

Stage, Jennie May {French) Middletown, N. Y. 

Stanton, William Henry {Elementary Supervision) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Steele, Roxana Aler {Elementary Supervision) Baltimore, Md. 

** Degree only. 



SENIOR CLASS 373 

Stevens," Amy' Jane (English) Goldsboro, N. C. 

Stone, Ala {Primary Supervision) Atlegan, Mich. 

Stone, Grace Agusta {Biology) New York City 

Stone, Louis {Mathematics) New York City 

SxoTZER, Clarice Rachel {Household Arts) Wauseon, Ohio 

Stowell, Willard Allen {Biology) Trenton, N.J. 

Strang, Benjamin Bergen {Mathematics) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Swords, Sarah Lillian {Geography) New York City 

Taylor, Laura {Physical Education and Elementary Supervisioii) Tacoma, Wash. 

Thomas, Martha Ellen {Household Arts) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Thompson, Alice {Elementary Supervision) Plainfield, N. J. 

Thompson, John Grant {History) New York City 

Thompson, Roberta {Mathematics) Port Richmond, N. Y. 

TowLER, May Belle {Household Arts) Minneapolis, Minn. 

**Treat, Dorothy Hastings New York City 

**Treat, Marjorie Kent New York City 

Tsen, Archie Tsung-Liang {Elementary Education) Wuchang, China 

Tucker, Elizabeth Lee {Elementary Education) Buffalo, N. Y. 

TUPPER, Katharine {Household Arts) Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Turner, Clara Gretha {Household Arts) East Florenceville, N. B., Canada 

TuTHiLL, Charles Scott {Elementary Supervision) Jamaica, N. Y. 

Vance, Julia {Household Arts) Milford, Neb. 

Van Liew, Marion SydduIiI {Household Arts) Los Angeles, Calif. 

Vigneron, Marcel Henri {French) Limoges, France 

Walsh, John Joseph {History) New York City 

Walther, Catherine Margarett.\ {German) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Ward, Mary Anna {Household Arts) Provo, Utah 

Wardell, Samuel Edward {Industrial Arts) Orange, N. J. 

Waterbury, Arthur E. {Elementary Supervision) East Schodack, N. Y. 

Waters, Christine {Household Arts) Goodlettsville, Tenn. 

Watson, Susan Augusta {Household Arts) Winchendon, Mass. 

Weckmann, Luise {German and French) New York City 

Weintrob, Joseph {Elementary Supervision) Atlantic City, N. J. 

Weiss, Pauline Marie {History) Newark, N. J. 

Wessa, Alice {Geography) New York City 

West, Mabel Louise {Elementary Supervision) Milton Junction, Wis. 

Whitney, Jennie {Household Arts) Wheaton, 111. 

Whittemore, Alzuma Farquhar {English) Adams, N. Y. 

Whitten, Alice Ann {Household Arts) Wilmington, Del. 

WiLFORD, Mary Gertrude {Latin) New York City 

Wilson, John Reid {Elementary Supervision) Paterson, N. J. 

Wilson, Joseph {Elementary Supervision) Paterson, N. J. 

Wilson, Madele {Kindergarten) New York City 

Winchell, Jessie Agnes {Household Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

WiNSLOW, Leon Loyal {Industrial Arts) Brockport, N. Y. 

Winward, Leonora Eugene {Fine Arts) Tiverton, R. I. 

Wohlfeil, Leo Bayard {English) New York City 

Wong, Kai Ming {Mathematics) Canton, China 

*WooD, Caroline Conklin {Fine Arts) New York City 

WoODELTON, Jennie {Physical Education) Astoria, N. Y. 

Wright, Eleanor {Music) Baltimore, Md. 

Wright, Mary Alma {Household Arts) Minneapolis, Minn. 

YuNCK, Bernacline Meyer {Physical Education) Orange, N. J. 

Zimbal, Samuel {English) New York City 

*Diploma only. **Degree only. 



374 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

JUNIORS 

AcHESON, Maude Amanda {History) Brockport, N. Y. 

Alexander, Harriet {Physical Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Allbee, Elsie Helen {Household Arts) Arlington, N. J. 

Allen, Grace Amelia {Kindergarten) Oswego, N. Y. 

Apgar, Nellie {Fine Arts) Somerville, N. J. 

Arner, Lucy Marjorie {Kindergarten) • Traverse [City, Mich. 

Arnold, Helen Hunt {Fine Arts) Dayton, Ohio 

Bache, Elizabeth DuBois {Household Arts) "Washington, D. C. 

Bailey, Clara {Physical Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Ballou, Mildred {Kindergarten) New York City 

Barnes, Harriet Hunter {Household Arts) Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Barnum, Gertrude Elizabeth {Household Arts) Jericho Center, Vt. 

Barske, Carrie May {Elementary Supervision) Bridgeport, Conn. 

Batchelor, Gertrude H. {Household Arts) Vernon, Ind. 

Bennett, Earl Ward {Mathematics) Jamaica, N. Y. 

Bieber, Isadore {History) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bigelow, Alice {Elementary Education) New York City 

Blum, Gustave {English) New York City 

BoGGS, Mary Harvey {Physical Education) Marlborough, Mass. 

Bond, Hazel May {English) V/aterloo, Iowa 

BoUTON, Henrietta Perdee {Fine Arts) Elizabeth, N. J. 

Brokaw, Esther {German) Kearny, N. J. 

Brooks, Lillian Mary {History) New York City 

Brown, Alice Katherine {Fine Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Brown, Grace L. {Kindergarten Supervision) New York City 

Brown, Helen A. {Elementary Supervision) Roulette, Pa. 

Brown, Katherine {Elementary Supervision) Roulette, Pa. 

Brown, Mabel Edna {Elejnentary Supervision) Torrington, Conn. 

Brown, Nellie (Mrs.) {Household Arts) Mt. Etna, Ind. 

Brown, Sarah Ingersoll {Elementary Supervision) Boonton, N. J. 

BuERMEYER, Meta DOROTHEA {Music) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bultman, Charlotte Grace {Household Arts) Cleveland Hts., Ohio 

BuNCE, Edgar F. {Elementary Education) Lodi, N. J. 

Burke, Agnes {Kindergarten Supervision) New York City 

Byerly, Ethel {Household Arts) Lancaster, Pa. 

Cain, Mabel Florence {Biology) Knoxville, Tenn. 

Campbell, Harriett Zelena {Elementary Supervision) New York City 

Campbell, Vincent Aloysius {Industrial Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Chapel, Ivy Howe {Household Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Child, Marguerite Beatrice {English) Ridgefield Park, N. J. 

Chilton, Orabel {Household Arts) Los Angeles, Calif. 

Cleaves, Naomi Elizabeth {Music) Princess Bay, N. Y. 

Clemens, Maynard Arthur {English) New York City 

Coe, Miriam Storrs {Hotisehold Arts) New York City 

Coffee, Catherine Sadie {Household Arts) Washington, D. C. 

Cohen, David Benjamin {Mathematics) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Colla, Clara {French) New York City 

Combes, Abbott Low {Industrial Arts) Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

CoNGDON, MiRA Jane {Household Arts) Stevens Point, Wis. 

Cook, Frieda Hermina {Mathematics) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cooley, Marguerite Elise {Household Arts) Berkeley, Calif. 

Cooper, Irma Jane {History) Rutherford, N. J. 

Cox, Leonora {Latin) Mayflower, Bermuda 

Coy, Genevieve Lenore {Educational Psychology) Sandwich, 111. 



JUNIOR CLASS 375 

Crosby, Priscilla {Kindergarten) New York City 

CtJMMiNS, May Frances {Household Arts) New York City 

Cutler, Catherine {Household Arts) Huntington, N. Y. 

Davis, Guy Pratt {History) Potsdam, N. Y. 

Deecke, Wilhemina {German) Utica, N. Y. 

Dickey, Grace Lena {Household Arts) Iroquois, S. D. 

Dodge, Mildred {English) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DoNOHUE, John Joseph {English) New York City 

Ebeling, Elsa Anna {German) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Edgerton, Alanson Harrison {Indtisirial Arts) Elba, N. Y. 

EiFORT, LuciLE M . {Household Arts) Ashland, Ky . 

English, Lillie {Biology) Hastings-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Evans, William Bacon {French) Moorestown, N. J. 

Farrell, Charlotte Daly {English) Rahway, N. J. 

Fennelly, Eleanor {Household Arts) Derby, Conn. 

FiSBECK, Frances C. {Mathematics) Ridgefield Park, N. J. 

FiSK, Sarah Ellen {Grammar Grades) St. Paul, Minn. 

FiSKE, Faith {Physical Education) Huntington, Mass. 

Fitzgerald, Irene R. {History) Clarion, Pa. 

Flarida, Edna May {Fine Arts) Reed City, Mich. 

Fried, Henry Benjamin {German) New York City 

Fulton, Jane {Kindergarten Supervision) Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Gaffney, Fanny Honora {Elementary Supervision) Williamson, N. Y. 

Gage, Louise Rockwell {Household Arts) Saginaw, Mich. 

Galvin, Kathryn Margaret {English) North Java, N. Y. 

Gaylord, Almyra M. {Kindergarten Supervision) Westfield, Mass. 

Gelvin, Mary Leeida {Household Arts) Meadville, Pa. 

Ghering, Emma {Kindergarten Supervision) Larimore, N. D. 

Gibbs, Laura Gladys {History) Fredonia, N. Y. 

Gillette, Elizabeth Ives {Kindergarten Supervision) Des Moines, la. 

Gilliland, Frances Katherine {Household Arts) Terrace Park, Ohio 

Glover, Harriet Mae {History) Dundee, N. Y. 

GODDARD, Naomi {Household Arts) Kingston, N. Y. 

Goldsmith, Harry {Biology) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

GoLDSTONE, Marion C. {English) New York City 

Goll, Bertha Clemence {English) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Gordon, Inez Louise {Kindergarten Supervision) Patchogue, N. Y. 

Grant, Emma Blakely {Elementary Supervision) Springfield, 111. 

Gray, Helen Ide {Household Arts) St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Greene, Evelyn Thomason {Household Arts) Anniston, Ala. 

Greenfield, Sol {Fine Arts) New York City 

Greenhalgh, Lucy R. {Household Arts) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Gregory, Frances May {Household Arts) Dayton, Ohio 

Gyger, John Thomas {Mathematics) Kimberton, Pa. 

Hahn, Magdalene Hahn {Household Arts) Wayne, Neb. 

Hale, Alfaretta May {Household Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hallock, Estelle Marcy {English) Tunkhannock, Pa. 

Harris, James Edward {English) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Haviland, Elsie {Household Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Herman, Margery L. {Household Arts) New Kingston, Pa. 

Herrmann, Hattie {Mathematics) New York City 

Hesselbach, Henry Valentine {Physical Science) New York City 

HiESEL, Josephine {History) White Plains, N. Y. 

Hoffman, Grace Louise {Fine Arts) New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Hoffmann, Thurlow Weed {Education) Athenia, N. J. 

Howard, Alice Louise {Fine Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 



376 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Howell, Edith Louise (^Household Arts) Elmira, N. Y. 

Hull, Mary Redfield {^Primary Teaching) Durham, Conn. 

Irwin, Ethel Chaddock {Household Arts) Quincy, 111. 

Jacob, Louisa Mary {Elementary Supervision) Jamaica, N. Y. 

Jacobsen, Helen Amalie {Elementary Education) West Hoboken, N. J. 

Jenkins, Alibion Urban {English) Austin, Pa. 

Johnson, Andrew Garfield {Geography) Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

Johnson, Grace May {Industrial Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Johnson, Henrietta {Household Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Johnson, Irene Grace {Mathematics) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Kahn, Samuel {Latin) New York City 

Kearney, Leo I. {Elementary Supervision) ; New York City 

Kennedy, Florence Agnes {Kindergarten) Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Kennedy, Paul Alfred {Elementary Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kerbeck, Jerry Leonard {English) Long Island City, N. Y. 

Kessel, Therese {Fiize Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Keune, Emma {German) New York City 

Kinoy, Abraham {Physical Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Knapp, William Cushman {Mathetnatics) York, Pa. 

Kurz, Pearl W. (Mrs.) {Household Arts) Cleveland, Ohio 

Langensiepen, John Fred {German) New York City 

Lauterbach, Bettie {German) New York City 

Lee, Edwin Augustus {Industrial Arts) Chico, Calif. 

Lhe, Evelyn {History) Waynesville, N. C. 

Leftwich, Bessie Chambers {Household Arts) Staunton, Va. 

Leftwich, Mabel Wharton {Latin) Staunton, Va. 

Leist, Stella Grace {^Household Arts) Norwood, Ohio 

Le Normand de Brettville, Maud {Biology) Lihue, Kanai, T. H. 

Leo, Juliette {English) Buffalo, N. Y. 

Levy, David Mordecai {German) New York City 

London, Edith Wolbarst {Household Arts) New York City 

Long, Raymond Victor {Industrial Arts) Hagerstown, Md. 

LouGHREN, Amanda {Mathematics) Elizabeth, N. J. 

LuRiA, Max Aaron {French) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lynch, Katherine Cecelia {Household Arts) Naugatuck, Conn. 

Lyons, Emanuel {Industrial Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y, 

McClure, Helen {Physical Science) New York City 

MacDowell, Lucy Shepard {Household Arts) Addison, N. Y. 

McKinney, Alice Hannah {Household Arts) Fonda, la. 

Mackay, Isabel {English) Addison, N. Y. 

Magaw, Grace {Household Arts) Franklin, Ind. 

Mann, Harriet Edythe {Elementary Supervision) Salina, Kan. 

Martin, Mildred Grace {Household Arts) Oakfield, N. Y. 

Meyer, Florence {Physical Education) New York City 

Meyer, Helen {Elementary Education) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Miller, Mary Clara {Household Arts) Pottstown, Pa. 

Moffett, Mary Ledger {Household Arts) Manassas, Va. 

Montgomery, Edith E. {Physical Education) .Yonkers, N. Y. 

Montgomery, Esther {Primary Teaching) Williamsport, Pa. 

Moore, Jessie Eleanor {Kindergarten Supervision) Bloomfield, N. J. 

Moore, Madeleine May {Household Arts) Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Morris, Alexander {Industrial Arts) New York City 

MoscowiTZ, Herman Heinrich {German) New York City 

Moses, Florence {Household Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Muehleck, Lucy Elizabeth {German) Hoboken, N. J. 

MuNRO, Evelyn {Household Arts) Jordan, N. Y. 



JUNIOR CLASS 377 

Nadler, Charles (Latin and Mathematics) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Newbold, Elizabeth Geist {Religious Education) Sendai, Japan 

NORMANDEAN, RosE Marie (French) Plattsburg, N. Y. 

O'Brien, Margaret (History) New York City 

O'Keefe, Marian Taylor (English) New York City 

O'Keefe, Mary Agnes (Elementary Supervision) Oshkosh, Wis. 

Orliansky, Joseph B. (Latin) New York City 

Paashaus, Louise F. (German) Elizabeth, N. J. 

Paine, Marion Duncan (Primary Supervision) New York City 

Pearson, Leo Earl (Fine Arts) Los Angeles, Calif. 

Pillsbury, Mary Elizabeth (Physical Science) Catskill, N. Y, 

Post, Sara|M. (English) Asbury Park, N. J. 

Prankard, Alice (Physical Education) Port Washington, N. Y. 

Pray, Mary Irene (Physical Education) Toledo, Ohio 

Pritchett, Katherine Aquith (Household Arts) New York City 

Ragon, Ollie Eldora (Mrs.) (Fine Arts) Meriden, Conn. 

Rapoport, Philip (Industrial Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Rauscher, Anna Marion (Mathematics) Vernon, N. Y. 

Reed, Lula Adeline (Elementary Education) Ypsilanti, Mich. 

Resnik, Joseph (Mathematics) New York City 

Richter, Anna C. (German) Bayonne, N. J. 

Robinson, Ethel Maria (Kindergarten Supervision) Orange, N. J. 

Root, Theodora Submit (Household Arts) Albany, N. Y. 

RosENDORF, Juanita Sadie (Household Arts) Corvallis, Ore. 

kothermel, Elizabeth (Household Arts) Berkeley, Calif. 

RouiLLOT, Marie Elizabeth (Household Arts) San Jos6, Calif. 

RowE, Lucy Jane (Household Arts) Chicago, 111. 

Roy, Marion Snowdon (Household Arts) Irvington-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Runnels, Ross Owen (Elementary Education) Eau Claire, Mich. 

Sandercock, Helen (Household Arts) Lake Ariel, Pa. 

Sandford, Helen (Fine Arts) Dansville, N. Y. 

Scarborough, Paul Claypoole (Elementary Education) Demarest, N. J. 

Schilling, Elizabeth (Mrs.) (Fine Arts) Oswego, N. Y. 

Schneider, Elizabeth T. (Elementary Education) Hoboken, N. J. 

Schoenfeld, Alvina (Household Arts) New York City 

Schoonover, Katharine Hardindorf (Household Arts) Matteawan, N. Y. 

Scott, Clara Agnes (Latin) Marietta, Ohio • 

Seals, Laura Seldon (Mathematics) Cedar Falls, Iowa 

Selden, Elizabeth (Household Arts) New York City 

Shannon, Anna M. (Elementary Supervision) Hollis, N. Y. 

Sheppard, Emma E. (Fine Arts) Hackensack, N. J. 

Sheridan, Marion Campbell (English) New Haven, Conn. 

Shropshire, Olive (Household Arts) San Antonio, Texas 

Skinner, Jennie Lois (Geography) New York City 

Smallheiser, Albert Lee (History) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Smart, Ruth (Household Arts) Winchester, Mass. 

Smith, Cora Dell (Household Arts) Passaic, N. J. 

Smith, Elsie Waldron (Primary Teaching) Lee, Mass. 

Smith, Josephine Alice (English) New York City 

Snell, Helen Beatrice (Household Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Snow, Rose (Physical Education) New York City 

Snowden, Flora Belle (Household Arts) New York City 

Sokohl, Jacob Nathaniel (Latin) New York City 

Spalding, Ruth Aurelia (Household Arts) Towanda, Pa. 

Springer, Ione (Mrs.) (History) Rockville Center, N. Y. 

Stauffer, Frances (Fine Arts) , , , Plainfield, N. J, 



378 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Stephenson, Mabel Leigh {Household Arts) Port Deposit, Md. 

Stinson, Susan W. {Elementary Supervision) Surry, Me. 

Strutz, Rose {Household Arts) Rolling Prairie, Ind. 

SuRUT, Anna {Household Arts) New York City 

Sutherland, Laura Ephalia {Household Arts) Greenwich, Conn. 

Sutton, Clara Nettie {Household Arts) Bloomfield, N. J. 

Sweet, Margaret {Household Arts) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Talbot, Gertrude K. {Household Arts) New York City 

Terrell, Ethel Florence {Fine Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ToLER, Mamie {Household Arts) Goldsboro, N. C. 

Tollerton, Edith Ray {Elementary Education) Glen Cove, N. Y. 

Tremper, Clara Louise {Mathematics) Rhinebeck, N. Y. 

Utley, Grace Harriet {Educational Psychology) Knobnoster, Mo. 

Vail, Edna {History) Hamden, N. Y. 

Vanstrum, Jessie Isabel {Household Arts) Minneapolis, Minn. 

Van Syckle, Grace Lucille {Music) Hackettstown, N. J. 

VoLK, Frank {German) New York City 

Walls, Charlotte {Physical Education) Lake Mills, Wis. 

Walther, Theda H. {Fine Arts) New York City 

Watson, Grace {Household Arts) Mooretown, Ontario, Can. 

Webster, Grace Taylor {Hotisehold Arts) New York City 

Weed, Bertha Elaine {Mathematics) Wolcott, N. Y. 

Wehle, Hanna {German) New York City 

Werts, Mary Evelyn {Household Arts) Jersey City, N. J. 

Westervelt, Alice Eddy {Kindergarten Supervision) New York City 

Westfall, Martha {Household Arts) Delaware, Ohio 

Weston, Florence Helen {English) Port Henry, N. Y. 

Whalen, Edwin Anthony {History) New York City 

Wicks, Helen Ethel {Household Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wild, Theresa Flora {Music) Cedar Falls, Iowa 

WiLDRicK, Charles David {Mathematics) Moosic, Pa. 

Williams, Edgar John {English) Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Willyoung, Mildred M. {Household Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Wiseltier, Joseph {Fine Arts) New York City 

Woodruff, Mary St. Clair {Educational Psychology) Anniston, Ala. 

Woodward, May Belle {Kindergarten Supervision) Mishawaka, Ind. 

Wray, Margaret Salome {Elementary Supervision) Byron, 111. 

Wrigley, Margaretta {Music) Macon, Ga. 

Yackey, L. Millicent {Household Arts) St. Louis, Mo. 

Zimmerman, Roy Raymond {History) Ringtown, Pa. 

Candidates for Special Diploma or Certificate 

SECOND YEAR 

Adams, Marian Kyle {Physical Education) Webster Groves, Mo. 

Allen, Josephine {Household Arts) Passaic, N. J. 

Allgeier, Amelia Walburga {Household Arts) Elmira, N. Y. 

Armstrong, Charlotte Morgan {Primary Supervision) Nashville, Tenn. 

Arthur, Lennie B. {Household Arts) Liverpool, Nova Scotia 

Barrows, Frances Weed {Household Arts) Columbus, Ohio 

Bason, Cecilia Hatrick {Kindergarten) Burlington, N. C. 

Becker, Albert Alexander {German) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bellows, Mary Lawton {Household Arts) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Berg, Ida Blanche {Household Arts) Missoula, Mont. 

Betts, Agnes Farrar {Household Arts) Elmira, N. Y. 

Beveridge, Helen Sara {Household Arts) Paterson, N. J. 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 379 

Blodgett, Elizabeth (Elementary Supervision) New York City 

Blumgurten, Sarah Lillian (Latin and German) Bayonne, N. J. 

BoYER, Helen Dorothy (Fine Arts) Nashua, Iowa 

Brenneman, Leo Leslie (Elementary Supervision) Pottstown, Pa. 

Brickner, Barnett (Elementary Supervision) New York City 

Brookes, Daisy (Household Arts) Winston-Salem, N. C, 

Brown, Edna Jane (Household Arts) New Haven, Conn. 

Brown, Juanita (Household Arts) White Plains, N. Y. 

Buckley, Mary Margaret (Household Arts) South Bend, Ind. 

Capron, Edith Littlefield (Household Arts) New York City 

Carney, Sarah Mildred (Household Arts) Hamilton, Md. 

Clark, Mary Howarth (Elementary Education) Westfield, N. J. 

Clark, William Ebert (Music) Richmond Hill, N. Y. 

Cochran, Margaret Studdiford (Household Arts) Lambertville, N. J. 

Colby, Gertrude Kline (Physical Education) Philadelphia, Pa. 

Conger, Theodora (Music) Newark, N. J. 

Connell, Mina (Physical Education) Morristown, N. Y. 

Cook, Theresa Mabel (Industrial Arts) Northampton, Mass. 

Cornell, Louise Elizabeth (Fine Arts) Greenwich, N. Y. 

CoRWiN, Margaret Elizabeth (Fine Arts) Pasadena, Calif. 

Cranor, Katherine Taylor (Household Arts) N. Wilkesboro, N. C. 

Cristy, Elizabeth (Industrial Arts) New York City 

Crosby, Evelyn (Kindergarten) New York City 

Cruden, Gertrude (Household Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Curtis, Clara Louise Kellog (Household Arts) So. Bethlehem, Pa. 

Dahlgren, Lillie Henrietta (Household Arts) Oleander, Calif. 

Dampman, Sara Bunn (Household Arts) Point Pleasant, N. J. 

Dana, Irene Brockway (Household Arts) Muskegon, Mich. 

Davenport, Florence Agnes (Physical Education) Sturgis, S. D. 

Davis, Harriet Ella (Fi7ie Arts) Waterloo, Iowa 

Doty, Frances (Household Arts) Detroit, Mich. 

Drevenstedt, Amy (Fine Arts) Buffalo, N. Y. 

Dudley, Anne Josephine (Household Arts) Marlboro, Mass. 

Dudley, Marguerite Aldrich (Household Arts) Ticonderoga, N.Y. 

Edwards, Faith M. (Fine Arts) Washington, D. C. 

Emerson, Faye (Physical Education) East Orange, N. J. 

Evans, Ida (Elementary Supervision) Coffeyville, Kan. 

Evans, Marion Elizabeth (Household Arts) Gaylordsville, Conn. 

Farmer, Phoebe Elizabeth (Household Arts) Athens, Pa. 

Farmer, Ruth Lucile (Household Arts) Gouverneur, N. Y. 

Feeley, Clara (Household Arts) Rochester, N. Y. 

Ferris, Evelyn Marguerite (Household Arts) Hudson Falls, N. Y. 

Fleming, Isabel Milne (Household Arts) Carnegie, Pa. 

Fox, Virginia Lloyd (Fine Arts) Plainfield, N. J. 

Franklin, Veta (Household Arts) Lawton, Okla. 

Freeman, Helen Whitney (Household Arts) Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Freer, Florence Helen (Household Arts) Gilbertsville, N. Y. 

Gaddis, Caroline Josephine (Elementary Supervision) New York City 

Gainsborg, M. Maria Paz (Music) New York City 

Garrett, Clara Louise (Fine Arts) Ithaca, N. Y. 

Geary, Helen (Kindergarten) Lock Haven, Pa. 

Geer, Elene Ellsworth (Household Arts) Windsor, Conn . 

Gilbert, Katharine (Physical Education) Burlington, Iowa 

Glass, Elizabeth Irene (Music) E. Stroudsburg, Pa. 

Greenlaw, Vera (Household Arts) Flagstaff, Ariz. 

Greenwood, Margaret (Eletnentary Supervision) Rochester, N. Y. 



38o 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Hahn, Clara Anna {Household Arts) Louisville, Ky . 

Hallock, Katharine Rose (Household Arts) Jersey City, N. J. 

Hammond, Josephine {Elementary Supervision) Boston, Mass. 

Handley, Marie-Louise {Fine Arts) New York City 

Hansen, Mabel Charlotte {Kindergarten) Weehawken Hts., N. J. 

Harris, Blanche Ronne {Household Arts) Aylesford, Nova Scotia, Canada 

Hart, Constance Corinne {Household Arts) New York City 

Hemion, Russell {Industrial Arts) Paterson, N. J. 

Herbst, Margaret Wilhelmina {Music) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Heuser, Miriam Anna {Physical Education) Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Hofflin, Elizabeth {Household Arts) Hopkins, Minn. 

Honey, Laura Gough {Household Arts) New York City 

Houston, Florence Marguerite {Household Arts) Goshen, N. Y. 

Howarth, Marion Law {Household Arts) Scranton, Pa. 

Huff, Malcolm {Fitie Arts) Abingdon, 111.. 

Jackson, Anna Carlyle {Physical Education) Glen Ridge, N. J. 

Jessup, Helen Harris {Household Arts) Troy, N. Y. 

Johnson, Julia May {Household Arts) Albert Lea, Minn. 

Johnson, Lilah Irene {Music) Albert Lea, Minn. 

Jones, Ada Evelyn {Primary Supervision) Auburn, N. Y. 

Jones, Emma Bronson {Household Arts) Oshkosh, Wis. 

Kaufhold, Rose Marion {Household Arts) Scranton, Pa. 

Kelley, Florence Agnes {Household Arts) Jersey City, N. J. 

Kennedy, Lillian {Household Arts) Hornell, N. Y. 

Ketcham, Eleanor {Household Arts) , Indianapolis, Ind. 

Knight, Grace {Household Arts) New York City 

Kyd, Susan Elizabeth {Music) Green Ridge, Mo. 

Laitem, Louise {Household Arts) Hartford City, Ind. 

Lawrence, Ethel Primrose {Kindergarten) South Portsmouth, R. I. 

Lee, Amy Grace {Household Arts) New York City 

Lewis, Sarah Louise {Household Arts) Pomona, Calif. 

Lippincott, Rose Harriet {Household Arts) Los Angeles, Calif. 

LiTTELL, Elizabeth Duval {Physical Science) New York City 

Logan, Lucie Loring {Kindergarten) Scranton, Pa. 

Louis, Marie {Household Arts) New York City 

Low, Helen {Physical Education) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Lynn, Gertrude {Household Arts) Winfield, Kan. 

McClure, Ella Greene {Household Arts) Marietta, Ohio 

McClure, Emily (Physical Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

McCluskey, William (Elementary Supervision) Hilo, T. H. 

McCoRMicK, Elizabeth T. {Fine Arts) Hartwood, N. Y. 

McDonald, Laura Louise (Household Arts) Jacksonville, 111. 

McKean, Lulu S. (Household Arts) Beaver Falls, Pa. 

McLaughlin, Genevieve Miriam (Music) New York City 

Maclagan, Florence (Household Arts) Passaic, N. J. 

Malone, May Agnes (Physical Education) New York City 

March, Mary Blanche (Physical Education) Spring City, Pa. 

Marcy, Emily (Household Arts) Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Martin, Kathleen Isabel (Household Arts) Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Matzner, Paula Augusta (Physical Education) New York City 

Mayer, Viola (Music) New York City 

Miller, Anna Mary (Music) Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Mills, Marian Emily (Household Arts) Port Byron, N. Y. 

Mitchell, Bertha May (Fine Arts) Monticello, N. Y. 

Moncure, Elizabeth Cabell (Fine Arts) Ruther Glen, Va. 

Moore, Cecilie Marie Georgy (Fine Arts) New York City 



SECOND YEAR CLASS 38I 

Moore, Norma Antoinette {Kindergarten) Bloomfield, N. J. 

Murphy, Ellen Jane {Elementary Supervision) Bamberg, S. C. 

Neagle, Grace May {Household Arts) Lubec, Me. 

O'Donnell, Agnes Marie {Fine Arts) Newark, N. J- 

Ogden, Helen {Physical Education) Orange, N. J. 

Orr, Flora {Household Arts) Akron, Ohio 

Parker, Marie Antoinette {Household Arts) Goshen, N. Y. 

Parlett, Matilda Elizabeth {Household Arts) Norfolk, Va. 

Parramore, Juliette Bryan Fisher {Household Arts) Accomac, Va. 

Patten, Mary Isabel {Physical Education) Binghamton, N. Y. 

Pearson, Mary Ethel (Mrs.) {Music) New York City 

Peters, Alonzo G. {Industrial Arts) Elizabeth, N. J. 

Pfau, Augusta Louise {Household Arts) Hamilton, Ohio 

Phillips, Georgiana {Household Arts) > Greenport, N. Y. 

Pierce, Madeline {Household Arts) Westfield, N. J. 

Pope, Amy Elizabeth {Household Arts) New York City 

Porter, Evelyn {Household Arts) Louisville, Ky. 

Reid, Eliza Priscilla {Household Arts) Wallaceburg, Ontario, Canada 

RowE, Emma L. H. (Mrs.) {Household Arts) New York City 

RowELL, Dorothy Chase {Industrial Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Russell, Marion Fitch {Household Arts) Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Saville, Fannie Eugenie {Household Arts) Mineville, N. Y. 

Schroeder, Matilda {Household Arts) New York City 

Seeger, Mary Louise {Kindergarten Supervision) Michigan City, Ind. 

Seymour, Ruth {Household Arts) New York City 

Shack, Edna Sara {Household Arts) New York City 

Sheldon, Mary Amelia {Fine Arts) New York City 

Shuman, Anna Mullin {Fine Arts) Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Siepert, Albert F. {Industrial Arts) Montclair, N. J. 

Sill, Mary Elizabeth {Household Arts) Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Simar, Eva Therese {Household Arts) New York City 

Simpson, Ruth Virginia {Household Arts) LeRoy, 111. 

Smith, Helen Marguerite {Household Arts) Nyack, N. Y. 

SouNDSTROM, Margaret (Mrs.) {Household Arts) New York City 

Stevens, Elizabeth Mary {Household Arts) Eau Claire, Wis. 

Stockton, Helen Marie {Fine Arts) Englewood, N.J. 

Stringer, Elizabeth {Household Arts) New York City 

Stuck, Sarah Louise {Elementary Supervision) South Bend, Ind. 

Sullivan, John Joseph {Elementary Education) New York City 

Tracy, Suzanne {Household Arts) Minneapolis, Minn. 

TUPPER, Martha {Household Arts) Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Turner, Ruth Mitchell {Kindergarten) Hampton, Va. 

Van Deusen, Myrtie Clark {Household Arts) Great Barrington, Mass. 

Vaughan, Roy Benjamin {Industrial Arts) Sheffield Mills, Nova Scotia 

von Lengerke, Ida {Household Arts) Orange, N. J. 

Wagstaff, Marion B. {Household Arts) Cranford, N. J. 

Walker, Lula Virginia {Household Arts) Baltimore, Md. 

Walton, Jessie Steele {Household Arts) Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Westervelt, Martha {Physical Education) Tenafly, N. J. 

Wheeler, Dorothy Winifred {Physical Education) Woodcliff-on-Hudson, N. J. 

White, Bessie Scott {Household Arts) Boston, Mass. 

Williams, Letitia Evelyn {Fine Arts) New York City 

Wilson, Priscilla Orr {Physical Education) Binghamton, N. Y. 

Winslow, Emma Annie {Household Arts) New York City 

Wood, Ethel Louise {Household Arts) Southampton, N. Y. 

Wood, Marjorie Gary (Mrs.) {Household Arts) Thetford, Vt. 



382 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



FIRST YEAR 



Adler, Ruth {Kinder gar le^i) New York City 

Allen, Elizabeth R. {Household Arts) Fredericton, N. B., Canada 

Allen, Neta {Kindergarten) New York City 

Angell, Rena May {Fine Arts) Belding, Mich. 

Babcock, Edith Florence {Fine Arts) New York City 

Baldwin, Bessie Hayes {Household Arts) Wichita, Kan. 

Baldwin,- Maude Elizabeth {Fine Arts) Niles, Mich. 

Ball, Dorothy Washburn {Household Arts) East Orange, N. J. 

Barrett, Georgia May {Elementary Education) Athens, Ga. 

Bear, Jennie Rees {Household Arts) Baton Rouge, La. 

Bear, Kate Lutie {Household Arts) New York City 

Bell, Jessie Lillian (Mrs.) {Fine Arts) New York City 

Berry, Adelaide B. {Household Arts) New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Bevan, Alice Elizabeth {Fine Arts) Port Chester, N. Y. 

Beyer, Lillian Frieda {Household Arts) New York City 

BiRKHOLZ, Grace Beatrice {Household Arts) Orange, N. J. 

Boas, Belle {Fine Arts) Providence, R. I. 

BoTTg, Richard Andrew {Industrial Arts) Bayonne, N. J. 

Bowden,;Muriel Amanda {Elementary Education) Yonkers, N. Y. 

Brayton, Juliette {Fine Arts) New York City 

Bridge, Helen Lillian {Household Arts) Franklin, Ohio 

Brown, Katherine {Fi?ie Arts) Indianapolis, Ind. 

Brown, M. Ruth {Kindergarten) South Orange, N. J. 

Buchanan, Mildred Claiborne {Fine Arts) Louisville, Ky. 

Buck, LeRoy Langdon {Music) Plattsburg, N. Y. 

Burke, Annie Frances {Household Arts) Cleveland, Ohio 

Burkhart, Stella {Household Arts) Kansas City, Kan. 

Buschmann, Alma {Household Arts) Indianapolis, Ind. 

Carpenter, Laura {Elementary Edtication) New York City 

Carter, Emma Downs {Household Arts) Plainfield, N.J. 

Chamberlin, Alice A. {Household Arts) Webster Groves, Mo. 

Chamberlain, Nina Lenita {Household Arts) Sparkill, N. Y. 

Chandler, Gertrude E. {Physical Education) New York City 

Cole, Marion {Household Arts) Cambridge, Mass. 

Coleman, Constance Lamb {Kindergarten) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Condon, Kathleen Frances {Fine Arts) New York City 

Cook, Margaret Melinda {Kindergarten Supervision) Hiroshima, Japan 

Cooke, Margaret Montague {Music) Honolulu, T. H. 

Cooper, Isabel {Household Arts) New York City 

CoRWiN, F. Marie {Household Arts) E. Cleveland, Ohio 

CousLEY, Ethel Townsend (Mrs.) {Household A.rts) Bolivar, Mo. 

Covvey, Albert Kingaby {Industrial Arts) Philadelphia, Pa. 

CowLiN, Gertrude {Household Arts) Bristol, England 

Crane, Adelaide Edith {Household Arts) Mt. Sterling, 111. 

Crane, Mabel Roe {Physical Education) Jamaica, N. Y. 

De Luce, Olive S. {Fine Arts) New York City 

Demarest, Bessie {Household Arts) Spring Valley, N. Y. 

Demarest, Theodora Frelinghuysen {Fine Arts) Passaic, N. J. 

Doherty, Mary {Elementary Education) Ovid, N. Y. 

Donnocker, Della May {Household Arts) Northport, N. Y. 

Doty, Gladys {Household Arts) Wyoming, N. J. 

Dunn, Helen Adelia {Household Arts) Passaic, N. J. 

Eilbeck, Frances {Household Arts) New Castle, Ont., Canada 

Evans, Eva Stokey (Mrs.) {Household Arts) New York City 



FIRST YEAR CLASS 383 

Evans, Isabel Lount {Household Arts) Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada 

Evans, May Elsie {Household Arts) Wilkes-Barre, Pa . 

EvERLY, Harold Ernest {Industrial Arts) Vandalia, Mo. 

Ferrie, Margaret {Kindergarten) Lead, S. D. 

Pewell, Louise {Household Arts) Rock Hill, S. C. 

Field, Helen Atwater {Kindergarten Supervision) New York City 

Forbes, Ina Belle {Household Arts) Northampton, Mass. 

Forbes, Ruth Carver {Primary Supervision) Torrington, Conn. 

Frank, Enid Henriette {Kindergarten) New York City 

Garrison, Myrtle -(BiemeM^ary Education) Philadelphia, Pa. 

Garvey, Louise {Household Arts) New York City 

Gibbons, Martha Eleanor {Fine Arts) Hudson Falls, N. Y. 

Gomprecht, Evelyn {Household Arts) New York City 

Greene, Marie Holt {Music) Anniston, Ala. 

Hallock, Natalie A. {Household Arts) New York City 

Harder, Laura Mary {Kindergarten) Philmont, N. Y. 

Hart, Francis Bigelow {Kindergarten Supervision) Ballston Spa, N. Y. 

Henley, Faye {Primary Supervisio?t) Wabash, Ind. 

Holt, Edith Pollitt {Physical Education) Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Horner, Edna E. {Household Arts) Burkeville, Va. 

Horwitz, Adele Winkler {Household Arts) New York City 

HussAKOF, Eva {Physical Education) New York City 

Jackson, Elizabeth McCulloch {Industrial Arts) Tuscumbia, Ala. 

Jellerson, Marjorie Dwight {Physical Education) Montclair, N. J. 

Johnson, Kathleen {Household Arts) Marcy, N. Y. 

Johnson, Louise {Music) Spokane, Wash. 

Johnson, Ruth Allyne {Household Arts) St. Paul, Minn. 

Johnston, Edith {Elementary Supervision) Anniston, Ala. 

Johnston, Helen {Household Arts) Montclair, N. J. 

Jonas, Esther Heine {Household A.rts) Baltimore, Md. 

Jones, Helen {Physical Education) Philadelphia, Pa. 

Jones, Mary Edith {Primary Supervision) Kalamazoo, Mich. 

Jones, Mary Elizabeth {Primary Supervision) Luverne, Minn. 

Kay, Helen Boak {Household Arts) New York City 

Kennedy, Mary Alacoque {Household Arts) New York City 

Ketcham, Margaret Elizabeth {Household Arts) Passaic, N. J. 

Kirk, Dorothy Woodruff {Household Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Kluge, Anita Catherine {Fine Arts) Elmira, N. Y. 

Kranz, Sidney {Physical Education) New York City 

Kurlander. Alice Anna {Physical Education) Brighton Beach, N. Y. 

Langfeld, Claudia {Household Arts) Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Lathrop, Dorothy Pulis {Fine Arts) Albany, N. Y. 

Lee, Willa Marie {Hotisehold Arts) Sayler Park, Ohio 

Leeper, Aline Palmer {Physical Education) Rutherford, N. J. 

Le Lacheur, Bessie Serena {Household Arts) AUston, Mass. 

Lemcke, Herbert Franklin {Fine Arts) New York City 

Livingston, Caroline {Fine Arts) La Crosse, Wis. 

LuccocK, Natalie {Primary Supervision) Kansas City, Mo. 

Lyall, Olive Charlotte {Household Arts) New York City 

Lyman, Florence {Household Arts) Augusta, Me. 

Lyman, Lois {Household Arts) Manasquan, N. J. 

Lyon, Augusta Thorn {Household Arts) New York City 

McCoLLiSTER, Alice {Household Arts) Holyoke, Mass. 

McCoRMACK, Jane Rutledge {Household Arts) New York City 

McCoRMiCE, Elizabeth Katherine {Physical Education) Monticello, N. Y. 

McDuFFiH, Pearle {Industrial Arts) Marion, S. C. 



384 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



MacGuidwin, Anna {Music) .Lima, N. Y. 

McQueen, Katherine {Fine Arts) Fayetteville, N. C. 

Marvin, Eleanor Sands {Fine Arts) New York City 

Mathews, Mary E. {Grammar Grades) New York City 

Mead, Wilhemina {Fine Arts) Greeley, Colo. 

Meeker, Charles Henry {Industrial Arts) New York City 

Melvin, Helen Marguerite {Elementary Education) Forestville, N. Y. 

Menhennick, Carl Jerome {Industrial Arts) .Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Metz, Lillian Elizabeth {Physical Education) East Falls Church, Va. 

Miller, Mildred Mayes {Kindergarten Supervision) Sumner, Mo. 

Mitchell, Lucille Morgan {'M.-R.s.)l{Music) NewfYork City 

Moss, Louise Beach {Household Arts) Cheshire, Conn. 

Nicholson, Ethel Emma {Industrial Arts) Marlette, Mich. 

Osterholm, C. Adolph {Household Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Panuska, Frank Charles {Industrial Arts) New York City 

Patrick, Sara Lyman {Industrial Arts) Chicopee, Mass. 

Patteson, Louise {Household Arts) Penn Yan, N. Y. 

Pelton, Clair Walker {Elementary Supervision) Paterson, N. J. 

Pickett, Ethel Blanche {Household Arts) Carthage, Mo. 

Pinney, Mabel Mellissa {Fine Arts) Arlington, N. J. 

Pitfield, Florence Beatrice {Fine Arts) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PoNTZ, Bess {Household Arts) Lancaster, Pa. 

Porter, Helen Barbara {Household Arts) Montclair, N. J. 

Pratt, Margaret Akerman {Household Arts) Orange, N. J. 

Preston, Mabel Peck {Household Arts) New York City 

Queal, Lucy Mary {Household Arts) Kansas City, Mo. 

Raynor, Bessie Eleanor {Household Arts) Caldwell, N. J. 

Raynor, Mary Austin (Mrs.) {Household Arts) Toledo, Ohio 

Rhodes, Lily Bell {Fine Arts) Bergerville, Quebec, Canada 

Richards, Marguerite {Household Arts) New London, Conn. 

Riddle, Carolyn Capner {Household Arts) Asbury, N. J. 

Rodgers, Carolyn Isabelle {Primary Supervision) Hartsville, Tenn. 

RoDicK, Eugenia {Household Arts) Bar Harbor, Me. 

Rogers, Rachel W. {Household Arts) Paterson, N. J. 

Romaine, Lily Augusta {Music) Peekskill, N. Y. 

Rosendale, Christina {Elementary Supervision) Cawker City, Kan. 

RuNKEL, LuRA Emily {Household Arts) , Superior, Wis. 

Schick, Morris {Physical Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Scholes, Beatrice {Physical Education) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Scott, Jessie May {Household Arts) Dravosburg, Pa. 

Sexton, Ethel {Elementary Education) New York City 

Siegel, Fred {Industrial Arts) Tottenville, N. Y. 

Simpson, Cornelia {Household Arts) Huntsville, Ala. 

Smeaton, Edna Marian {Household Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Smith, Flora Elizabeth {Fine Arts) Havana, Cuba 

Smith, Laura Emily {Household Arts) Louisville, Ky . 

Smith, S. Jessie {Elementary Supervision) Rochester, N. Y. 

Sterling, Lois Noble {Industrial Arts) Virginia Beach, Va. 

Storer, Helen Maye {Industrial Arts) Susquehanna, Pa. 

Strassburger, Helen {Household Arts) East Orange, N. J. 

Strathy, Marguerite Frances {Household Arts) Montreal, Canada 

Stringer, Lucinda Nelson {Household Arts) Philadelphia, Pa. 

Strong, Helen Thomas {Primary Teaching) Rock Hall, Md. 

Tendler, Alexander Romanoff {Music) New York City 

Thorn, Alice Green {Kindergarten Supervision) Trenton, N. J. 

Tibbits, Ruth Wiley {Household Arts) Athens, Ga. 



UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 385 

TiLTON, Charlotte Sewell {Fine Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Tracy, Helen Ruth {Physical Education) Shelburne. Vt. 

Trotter, Clara Augusta {Elementary Supervision) Springfield, 111. 

TuiTE, Anna Kathleen {Household Arts) New York City 

Upton, Esther L. {Household Arts) Flint, Mich. 

Van Arsdale, Fannie A. {Household Arts) Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Vine, Edith {Household Arts) New York City 

Wahlquist, Hjalmar {Fine Arts) Philadelphia, Pa. 

"Wales, Nelle E. {Household Arts) Toledo, Ohio 

Warner, Susan Edessa {Household Arts) Farmington, Mich. 

Wells, Bertha Vogt {Elementary Education) Holly Hill, S. C. 

Wells, Mae Lavinia {Household Arts) Ashburnham, Mass. 

Wellwood, Beatrice {Household Arts) New York City 

Wendover, Charlotte Marion {Household Arts) Tenafly, N. J. 

Whitcomb, Edith {Primary Supervision) Grand Rapids, Mich. 

White, Gladys MacCleerie {Household Arts) South Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Whitfield, George McCabe {School Administration) Seattle, Wash. 

Whiteford, Margaret (Mrs.) {Household Arts) New York City 

Whyte, Ada Mabel {Household Arts) Oneonta, N. Y. 

Willey, Emily {Industrial Arts) Cincinnati, Ohio 

Winn, Bertha {Elementary Supervision) Kalamazoo, Mich. 

WoOLEY, Roberta Marie {Kindergarten Supervision) Philadelphia, Pa. 

Young, Mary McKeen {Household Arts) Easton, Pa. 

ZOFFMAN, Christine {Household Arts) San Jos6, Calif. 

UNCLASSIFIED UNDERGRADUATES 

Andrews, Wallace John Summit, N. J. 

Beard, Frederica Oak Park, 111. 

Bilderback, Willis E Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

Bradley, Minnie Emily Seattle, Wash. 

Burghardt, Henry Dwight Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Cavanaugh, Therese New Haven, Conn. 

Chatfield, Stella New York City 

Coen, Violet Stanley New York City 

COLLINGWOOD, Emilie Holyoke, Mass. 

Daubon, Angeles Santurce, P. R. 

Davis, Lida Leota Bluefield, W. Va. 

DeZeller, Mabel Corinne New York City 

Diller, Helen Elizabeth Montclair, N. J. 

Dodge, Florence B Englewood, N. J. 

Drayton, Anna H. (Mrs.) New York City 

Dreyfus, Jeanne New York City 

DuNKiN, Dorothea New York City 

DuRYEA, Madeline S Farmingdale, N. Y. 

Farrell, Helen W New York City 

Feleky, Antoinette New York City 

FuLLGRAFF, May Alden New York City 

Gold, Bella Hawthorne, N. Y. 

Goldmann, Julia New York City 

Greenbaum, Mamie Rosalind Bridgeport, Conn. 

Gross, Abraham Nathan New York City 

Hamilton, Ella Jean Philadelphia, Pa. 

Herckner, Charlotte Hackensack, N.J. 

HiGGiNS, Louise Alberta Hoboken, N. J. 

Hunt, Russell New York City 



386 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



Hunter, Clifforde E Decatur, Ga. 

Irwin, Mary Grace Arlington, N. J. 

Jamison, Lillie Hope Greensboro, N. C. 

Jessup, Mary Reynale New Dorp, N. Y. 

Kaplan, Frances New York City 

Kellsey, Helen Churchill Englewood, N. J. 

Kidder, Zinie Hodgdon Berkeley, Calif. 

Koenig, S. H. (Mrs.) New York City 

Kohn, Abraham New York City 

Kolb, Mary Ensley, Ala. 

Koontz, James Byron Rahway, N. J. 

Lambert, Irene Juliet New York City 

Levy, Adele Helens Scranton, Pa. 

Little, Carrie Paterson, N. J. 

Logan, Anna Elizabeth Oxford, Ohio 

Loughran, Katharine Ann New York City 

Mackay, Irene Addison, N. Y. 

Masters, Kathrine Wollaston Wilmington, Del. 

Maynard, Fanny Alma '. : New York City 

Mellen, Emily Kimball Port Chester, N. Y. 

Mercado, Lucila Juana Diaz, P. R. 

Miller, Eleanor Sarah Saranac Lake, N. Y. 

Miller, Elizabeth Margaretville, N. Y. 

Morris, Harriet Alice Bayonne, N. J. 

MuNRO, Sibyl Helen New York City 

Noonan, Margaret Eleanor St. Louis, Mo. 

OsBORN, Hilda Summit, N. J. 

Osterhout, Junia Belton, Texas 

Packard, Asa Judson Norwood, N. J. 

Palmer, Leonard L New York City 

Peck, Clara Louise Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Phillips, C. Dorothea .• High Bridge, N. J. 

PiERSON, MiNETTE Vestal Centre, N. Y. 

Radcliffe, Paul R Flemington, N. J. 

Reidy, Katharine L New York City 

Rhodes, Helen Neilson Kendall, Mont. 

Richmond, Lilian Glen Charlotte, N. C. 

Sax, Carol Mayer Ottumwa, Iowa 

ScHALL, May Taylorsville, Pa. 

Seidman, Mary A. (Mrs.) New York City 

Sharp, Lillian A Tomkinsville, N. Y. 

Sleffel, Katherine Francis New York City 

Sloan, M. Josephine Worthington, Ind. 

Smith, Isabel Mt. Carmel, Pa. 

Spiegel, Dora Rosenberg New York City 

Stahl, George Frederick New York City 

Stewart, Myra Giffin New York City 

Tisdale, Clara L LaCrosse, "Wis. 

Torres, Arturo San Jos6, Costa Rica 

Upton, Ethel wyn Bertha New York City 

Watkins, Helen Richards (Mrs.) New York City 

Whallay, Jessie M New York City 

Wright, Vera Adele New Haven, Conn. 



SUMMARY 387 

SUMMARY 

I. Graduate Students: 

Candidates for Doctor's Degree and Diploma 75 

" " Master's Degree and Diploma 177 

Unclassified 40 

292 

II. Professional Students: 

Candidates for Bachelor's Degree and Diploma, and for special 
Diplomas : 

For Teaching: Biology 14, Educational Psychology 4, English 58, Fine Arts 79, 
French 6, Geography 11, German 26, in Grammar Grades 6, History 42, Household 
Arts 3S7i Industrial Arts 49, in Kindergarten 25, Latin 12, Mathematics 31, Music 30, 
Physical Education sr, Physical Science 9, in Primary Grades 17, Supervising in 
Elementary Schools 83, Supervising in Kindergarten 26, Supervising in Primary 
Grades 20, School Administration 2, Candidates for the Bachelor of Science Degree 
only 17 97S 

III. Unclassified Students 86 

Less duplicate counts, students candidates for more than one 

diploma 10 

Total resident registration 1343 

IV. Additional matriculated students,^Summer Session, 191 1 420 

Net",total matriculated students 1 763 

V. Students[from other parts of the University 359 

Total matriculated students 2122 

VI. Non-matriculated (special classes) registered at Teachers College 11 26 

" " (evening technical classes) 333 

" " (candidates for special certificates) 148 

Total attendance 3729 

In addition to the above there are this year 1061 pupils in the Horace 
Mann School and 201 in the Speyer School; total 1262. 
Total attendance at the college and its schools, 4991. 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES 

Nicholas Murray Butler President 

EwEN McIntyre Honorary President 

Charles F. Chandler Vice-President 

Thomas P. Cook Vice-President 

William Jay Schieffelin Vice-President 

GusTAVUS Ramsperger Honorary Vice-President 

Term expires igi2 Term expires igi3 

Arthur H. Elliott Otto P. Amend 

Hieronimus a. Herold Adolph Henning 

Albert Plaut Caswell A. Mayo 

David Costelo Reuben R. Smith 

Henry C. Lovis 

Term expires igi4 
William C. Alpers Charles S. Erb 

Max J. Breitenbach Leo W. Geisler, Jr. 

Herbert D, Robbins 

Clarence O. Bigelow Treasurer 

Thomas F. Main Secretary 

Edward W. Runyon Assistant Secretary 

W. B. Simpson Clerk of the College 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

The Faculty 

The President of the University- 
Dean RUSBY 

Professors Arney, Bastedo, Chandler, Curtis, Diekman, Duff, 
Elliott, Gies, Jessup, Mansfield, Oehler, Vorisek, Wimmer 

Officers of the Faculty 

Professor Rusby . . Dean and ex-officio Member of the University Council 

Professor Diekman Secretary 

388 



GENERAL STATEMENT 389 

Other Instructors 

Frederick A. Leslie, Phar.D., Instructor in Analytical Chemistry; 
Charles W. Ballard, Phar.D., Instructor in Materia Medica; Jean- 
NOT HosTMANN, Ph.G., Assistant in Chemistry; George HoHMANN,Ph.G., 
Assistant in Pharmacy. 

OTHER OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

(See page 5) 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College of Pharmacy of the City of New York, founded in 1829, 
chartered in 1831, and recognized in 1879 by the Regents as part of the 
University of the State of New York, became a member of the educa- 
tional system of Columbia University on July i, 1904. The President 
of the University is ex-officio President of the College of Pharmacy, and 
the CoUege is represented in the University Council by its Dean, who 
is appointed by the Trustees of the College of Pharmacy on the nomination 
of the President. The College, however, maintains its separate corporate 
organization, and its Trustees continue to provide for its financial support. 

The College is situated at 115 West 68th Street, near Columbus Avenue, 
in an especially well-equipped building erected in 1894. 

The College of Pharmacy is thus the professional school of Columbia 
University for pharmacists, pharmaceutical chemists, and Doctors of 
Pharmacy and, as well, a valuable addition to the University's resources 
for teaching and research in botany, chemistry, and materia medica. 

ADMISSION 

(See page 176) 

Students who are to be examined for admission will be examined either 
at the Regents' examination, or at the January and September entrance 
examinations of Columbia University, or of the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board, which are held in June of each year. (See page 176.) 

College Course 

This course is open, according to statute, only to persons holding the 
Qualifying Certificate for a Pharmacy Student, granted by the State 
Education Department for 15 Regents' counts or their equivalent. (Lead- 
ing to the degree of Ph.G.) 



390 COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

University Course 

This course is open only to persons holding the Academic Equivalent 
Certificate of the Regents of the State of New York, or the correspond- 
ing credentials of Columbia University or of the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. (Leading to the degree of Ph.C.) 

Graduate Course 

This course is open to pharmaceutical chemists of this or other schools 
of equal grade or those holding equivalent degrees. (Leading to the degree 
of Phar.D.) 

Food and Drug Course 

This course is open to all graduates of this College, and to others whose 
training has qualified them to perform the necessary work. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

1. A College course, consisting of a junior and senior year, leading 
to the degree of Graduate in Pharmacy, conferred by the College inde- 
pendently of the University, and qualifying the graduate to meet any 
examination for the position of licensed pharmacist. 

The work undertaken is as follows: Junior year — physics, general 
and pharmaceutical chemistry, analytical chemistry, mathematics of 
pharmacy, practical pharmacy, dispensing pharmacy, botany, phar- 
macognosy, physiology, and toxicology. Senior year — organic chemistry, 
inorganic and organic pharmaceutical chemistry and urinalysis, analytical 
chemistry, practical pharmacy, dispensing pharmacy, materia medica, 
toxicology, commercial pharmacognosy, histological pharmacognosy. 

2. A University course of two years leading to the degree of Pharmaceuti- 
cal Chemist, conferred by the University. The work undertaken in this 
course differs from that of the College course in being of a somewhat 
more advanced character, and in being pursued through the full academic 
year. It includes instruction in general biology and a laboratory course 
in physics, in addition to the studies of the College course. Part of this 
work is performed by the medical department of the University. 

3. A third or graduate course of one year, leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Pharmacy. This course is designed to fit graduates for positions 
as analysts and microscopists, and for making urinary analyses, bacterio- 
logical examinations, and performing other work of the kind. It consists 
of practical work in plant analysis, technical microscopy and bacteriology, 
quantitative and organic analysis, and lecture courses in the theory and 
practice of inorganic quantitative analysis, commercial organic analysis 
and toxicology, and physiological chemistry. Students so desiring may 



COURSE OF STUDY 39I 

add a second year to this course, making their entire course the equiva- 
lent of that leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

4. A course of one year in the microscopical and chemical analysis of 
foods and drugs. A Summer Preparatory Course of twelve weeks is 
provided for those who, for any reason, require training in special subjects 
as a preparation for the Food and Drug Course. 

5. A number of special courses of instruction have also been estab- 
lished, partly for the benefit of those regular students who desire, for 
any reason, to specialize in certain lines of work, and partly to provide 
instruction in individual departments for those who do not desire to 
take the full course. Certificates, but not diplomas, are awarded to 
such students. These special courses of instruction are in pharmacog- 
nosy, chemical analysis, advanced inorganic and organic chemistry, and 
practical pharmacy. 

Method of Instruction 

During the junior and senior years the instruction occupies three days 
of the week, the alternate days being free for that practical experience 
in the pharmacy which is required by Boards of Pharmacy. This ar- 
rangement enables students to meet the Board requirements, and it also 
provides a means of paying the expenses of a majority of students. 

Many students, under the advice of the Faculty, prefer to devote the 
entire time of the second year to college work. For those so desiring, 
additional instruction is provided. 

In addition to lectures and laboratory work a series of recitations or 
quizzes, by a corps of quaUfied instructors, is given to the classes, in small 
sections. 

Prizes 

(See page 443) 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

SENIOR COLLEGE CLASS 

Abell, Harry Gouvemeur, N. Y. 

Alterman, Samuel Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Andes, Anthony John Utica, N. Y. 

Andrews, Arthur H Mineola, N. Y. 

Aronowitch, Boris New York City 

Barbieri, Bernard Joseph New York City 

Barone, Vincent New York City 

Becker, David Yonkers, N. Y. 

Bialo, Emanuel Joseph New York City 

Bloom, Fay (Miss) Toronto, Can. 

Bockshitzky, Joshua New York City 

Boehme, Fred New York City 

Bonanotte, Alfred Frank New York City 

Brandt, Otto, Jr Newark, N. J. 

Braswell, Idelle S. (Mrs.) Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Breslaw, Harry New York City 

Carroll, Arthur J Towanda, Pa. 

Chrisman, RussellIK Syracuse, N. Y. 

Davidson, Morris New York City 

Davis, Jacob New York City 

De Biaso, Frank Joseph New York City 

De Lucia, F. Louis New York City 

De Pasquale, Michael New York City 

Donovan, George James Terryville, Conn. 

Drury, Edsell M Middletown, N. Y. 

Druss, Louis A New York City 

Elkins, Harold C Mexico, N. Y. 

Falke, Leopold L Brooklyn, N. Y, 

Feinberg, Samuel New York City 

Finkelstein, Alexander S New York City 

Freeman, Maxwell R New York City 

Gerstner, Robert R New York City 

GiNZBURG, Sidney New York City 

Godduhn, Prances (Miss) Jamaica, L. I. 

GoiDO, Robert W New York City 

GoRODESs, Israel New York City 

Gorton, Graham Summit, N. J. 

Greenstein, Henry Bernhard New York City 

Henriquez, George Madrid, Spain 

Herschkowitz, Henry New York City 

Hlavac, Frank Stanley New York City 

Iannotti, Osvaldo New York City 

Jacobs, Samuel New York^City 



SENIOR CLASS 393 

KAinfMAN, Harry S Newark, N. J. 

Kessler, Joseph Stamford, Conn. 

Klein, Julius New York City 

LaGambina, Caesar New York City 

Lapetina, Antonio New York City 

Leonhardt, Louis Henry Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Levitch, Samuel Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Lieberfeld, Charles Jersey City, N. J. 

Lo Vece, Joseph New York City 

McDaniel, Hughett K Dover, Del. 

MacMillan, Malcolm Dunmore, Pa. 

MacNamara, John New City, N. Y. 

Maid, Charles John Tupper Lake, N. Y. 

Manashow, Isadore New York City 

Mattia, Antonio O New York City 

Mayerowitz, Peter New York City 

Miller, Wm. Frederick New York City 

Milnes, Wm. E Fulton, N. Y. 

MiRANDO, John Wm Southington, Conn. 

Mistretta, Alessio Astoria, N. Y. 

Moellering, Christian Jersey City, N. J. 

Mussen, Wright S Newburgh, N. Y. 

OsTROW, Michael New York City 

Pellettieri, Elias B Utica, N. Y. 

Pendola, Peter Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Persky, Wm Loch Sheldrake, N. Y. 

Piping, Antonio A New York City 

PoRTOGHESE, Gaetano New York City 

Postrelka, Israel New York City 

Prinzivalli, Salvatore New York City 

Realbuto, Louis New York City 

Rossi, Eugene New York City 

Roth, Isadore Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Savarese, Louis New York City 

ScHAUER, Carl E. F Bayonne, N. J. 

Schoen, Samuel Corona, L. I. 

Seligsohn, Max New York City 

Selkin, Carl J New York City 

Shaftan, Julius New York City 

Shutts, Christopher F Harrison, N. Y. 

SicuLAR, Myron New York City 

Silverman, Theodore New York City 

Sipple, Charles Edward Hancock, N. Y. 

Smallman, James, Jr Highland Falls, N. Y. 

Solomon, Sigmund New York City 

Spiegel, Herman New York City 

St. Clair, Rob Roy Tazewell, Va. 

Steitz, Maude E. (Miss) Albany, N. Y. 

Taylor, Bertram Hasbrouck Newburgh, N. Y. 

Thode, Wm New York City 

Travers, Thomas John New York City 

Ventura, Antonio F New York City 

Wasserman, Jacob New York City 

Watman, Elizabeth I. (Miss) Bayonne, N. J. 

Weinar, Frank Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

198J 



394 COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

SENIOR UNIVERSITY CLASS 

Ansheles, Joseph Port Richmond, S. I. 

Buck, Ainslie Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Calvelli, Eugene New York City 

Calvelli, George New York City 

Crockett, Wm. Goggin Tazewell, Va. 

Deffaa, George Bergen Fields, N.J. 

Guerrieri, Pasquale Newark, N. J. 

Muench, Albert August Syracuse, N. Y. 

Nemser, Maximilian New York City 

Oehlers, Herbert Christian Chestnut Hill, Conn. 

PiCKHARDT, Elsa (Miss) New York City 

Robertiello, Attilio New York City 

Robinson, Pauline Maxine (Miss) New York City 

Schaefer, Hugo Herman Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Schleussner, Robt New York City 

Simon, Gustav New York City 

White, Chas. W Dover, N. J. 

[I7J 

JUNIOR COLLEGE CLASS 

Ales, Francesco New York City 

Allen, Wm. Cooper Rye, N. Y. 

Alt, Fred New York City 

Andavall, Aris Jordan New York City 

Anze, Simon New York City 

Applegate, Frank S Phillipsburg, N. J. 

Aschenbrand, Harry K Islip, L. I. 

Avstreih, Sol New York City 

Ball, Roy W Monroe, N. Y. 

Barta, Joseph J Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Bellis, Saul E New York City 

Benton, Harold S Middletown, N. Y. 

Bockmann, Frederick Augustus Utica, N. Y. 

Brennan, John Joseph Naugatuck, Conn. 

Burmeister, Henry A., Jr New York City 

Cangialosi, Giro New York City 

Cannistra, Joseph New York City 

Cappetta, Joseph New York City 

Carroll, Wm. T Brewster. N. Y. 

Casilli, Alfred New York City 

Caso, Frank P New York City 

Chanowitch, Simon New York City 

Clancy, Thomas A Bridgeport, Conn. 

Cohen, Louis New York City 

CoLLEY, Arthur Roy Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Davis, Malvina (Miss) New York City 

Degele, Carl Sievers Columbia Park, L. I. 

Dubinbaum, Asher New York City 

Dunn, Morris V New York City 

Eden, Wm. H Brooklyn, N. Y. 

E^PSTEIN, IsADOR New York City 

Ettinger, Jerome Edward New York City 

Fasano, Sylvio Albert New York City 

Fein, Louis New York City 



JUNIOR CLASS 395 

Ferber, Samuel New York City 

Flaxman, Harry New York City 

FOrer, Chas. W Sheepshead Bay, N. Y. 

Gaetano, Peter New York City 

Ganow, Stacey Barnum Ithaca, N. Y. 

Gansu, Herman Leopold Arverne, L. I. 

Glassberg, Jos. J New York City 

GoLDiN, Wm New York City 

Greco, Joseph P New York City 

Grosso, Anna (Miss) New York City 

Hadinger, August Joseph New York City 

Hamlin, Lynn Chase Deansboro, N. Y. 

Hartig, Leo Joseph Livingston Manor, N. Y. 

Hartstien, Morris Peekskill, N. Y. 

Hayes, Benjamin A Dobbs Ferry, N. Y. 

Hayes, Frank S Utica, N. Y. 

Heine, Chas New York City 

Hermelin, Harry M Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Hoffman, Clarence George Utica, N. Y. 

Humphreys, Fred. Parker Morristown, N. J. 

Jaffe, Raymond Newark, N. J. 

Johnson, David Larchmont Manor, N. Y. 

Kaschuck, Emanuel Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Katz, Samuel Livingston Manor, N. Y. 

Keller, Robert Philip Liberty, N. Y. 

Kenney, Edward P ■ Long Eddy, N. Y. 

Kodet, Edward J New York City 

Kramer, Abraham H Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Kramer, Louise (Miss) New York City 

Krueger, Werner New York City 

Lamantia, Salvador New York City 

Lazarus, Abraham I New York City 

Lechner, Benjamin New York City 

Leff, Max New York City 

Leonhardt, John Chas., Jr Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Levin, Philip New York City 

Levine, Hyman New York City 

Levine, Morris Paterson, N. J. 

Levinson, Sam Jersey City, N. J. 

Litsky, Abraham D Waterbury, Conn. 

Loori, Daniel Jersey City, N. J. 

MacDonald, Elmer Huyler Hackensack, N.J. 

Mader, Frank J Elizabeth, N. J. 

Mahoney. Edward Westerly, R. I. 

Marrazzo, Dominick New York City 

Martinek, Anton John New York City 

Mashin, William Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Maslon, Benjamin New York City 

Matusow, Esther (Miss) New York City 

Maugiere, Jos. M 

MiCHELS, Jacob A New York City 

Milano, Fortunato F 

Miller, Abraham New York City 

Miraglia, John Anthony Hoboken, N. J. 

Monroe, Harry Wilcox Herkimer, N. Y. 

MosKOWiTZ, Jacob New York City 



396 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 



MuNN, Samuel Augustus Yonkers, N. Y. 

Murphy, John Joseph Utica, N. Y. 

Muscat, Benjamin Rochester, N. Y. 

Paganelli, Benjamin 

Peet, Florence Irene (Miss) Yorktown Heights, N. Y. 

Picozzi, Salvatore Brooklyn, N. Y. 

PoRRECA, Louis Hackensack, N. J. 

Prince, Harlan George New York City 

PuRicK, George Butler Smithtown Branch, L. I. 

Rebace, Joseph New Haven, Conn. 

Reis, Chas. Percy Syracuse, N. Y. 

Retzlaff, Walter Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RiCHMAN, Benjamin Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Riemer, Meyer New York City 

RivEiN, Samuel M Brooklyn, N. Y. 

RoDGERS, Fred T Monroe, N. Y . 

RosENFELD, Harry New York City 

Ross, Horace Raymond Petersburgh, Pa. 

RucH, Fred Utica, N. Y. 

Sace, Francis M New Brighton, S. I. 

Sanchez, Miguel S Niquero, Cuba 

Schamach, Chas Paterson, N. J. 

Scheuerman, Henry W -. Elizabeth, N. J. 

Shapiro, Michael M Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Short, Louis Dennis Calais, Maine 

Simpson, Walter B East Orange, N. J. 

Tagliareni, Michael New York City 

Trager, Joseph Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Venetucci, Justin New York City 

Wagner, Abraham Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Wagner, George Louis Milford, Pa. 

Watters, Chas. John South Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Weinstein, Solomon New York City 

Weiss, Louis New York City 

Windt, Ernest New York City 

Wright, Samuel B Salisbury Mills, N. Y. 

Wu, Stzejan Canton, China 

Young, H. Willard Port Jervis, N. Y. 

Ziegler, Harry Cleveland New York City 

Zuceerman, Hyalan New York City 

Zuparn, Maurice New York City 

[128J 

JUNIOR UNIVERSITY CLASS 

Aceerman, Edwin B Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Augsbury, Theodore Byron Hempstead, N. Y. 

Bender, Morris Samuel New York City 

BiGELOW, Orrin Richfield Springs, N. Y. 

Bluestone, Isaac New York City 

BoTKiN, Reuben J Bayonne, N. J. 

Cabrera, Rafael, Jr Nicaragua, S. A. 

Calvelli, Alfred T New York City 

Caplan, Lewis L New York City 

Chafey, James Holmes Point Pleasant, N. J. 

Cottrell, Osceoloa P Keyport, N. J. 



SUMMARY 397 



Crane, Emory M New York City 

Daub, Arthur Belmont New York City 

Davis, Dalton Scranton, Pa. 

DE LiGUORi, Alphonse J Waterbury, Conn. 

De Martini, W Jersey City, N. J. 

DiMicELi, Morris New York City 

Flett, Raymond F Atlantic Highlands, N. J. 

GiNSBURG, Benjamin Van Nest, N. Y. 

Goodman, Samuel Hunter, N. Y. 

Gregory, M. Glover New Canaan, Conn. 

Halper, Arthur V New York City 

Hammond, Fred. G Montgomery, Ala. 

HoDES, Harry Herman Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Irvin, Karl Frederick Altoona, Pa. 

Jacobson, Nicholas M Yonkers, N. Y. 

Kloomok, Isaac New York City 

Legoll, Joseph Chas New York City 

Planten, John Rutgers, Jr Brooklyn, N. Y, 

Savarese, John Gaetano New York City 

Scherer, Max New York City 

Schoelles, Wm., Jr Sea Cliff, L. I. 

Shapiro, Henry New York City 

Solomons, Isaiah A., Jr Savannah, Ga. 

Steinman, Isadore New York City 

Taylor, Wm New York City 

Traub, Adam J Elizabeth, N. J. 

Vogel, Hyman New York City 

Weinstein, Herman New York City 

Wiener, Jacob Henry Rockaway Park, Y. 

Wright, Edna Wallace (Miss) Bridgeport, Conn. 

Zimmerman, Thomas Weehawken Heights, N. J. 

[42I 

FOOD AND DRUG COURSE 

Berning, Bernhard Herrman Kingsbridge, N. Y. 

Fried, Leo H New York City 

Greenbaum, Samuel New York City 

Ringler, Isador Frederick New York City 

Schwartz, Israel New York City 

Steinach, Edwin C New York City 

[6] 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Hunt, Frank]L Smithtown Branch, L. I. 

Mazzoni, Philip Union Hill, N. J. 

[2] 

SUMMARY 

Senior Classes 115 

Junior Classes 173 

Food and Drug Course 6 

Graduate Course 2 

296 



SUMMER SESSION AND EXTENSION TEACHING 

Administrative Board 

Professor Egbert, Director 

Professors Hervey, Monroe, Woodbridge, Dean Keppel, and-Secretary 
Fackenthal 

Recorder 

Miss Wadelton 

SUMMER SESSION OF 191 1 

Officers of Instruction 

Luther Herbert Alexander, Ph.D., Romance Languages; George 
Marcus Allen, B.S., Architecture; Carrie Van R. Ashcroft, B.S., 
Physical Education; Harry Morgan Ayres, Ph.D., English; Gertrude 
M. Bacon, Cooking and Sewing; Franlkin Thomas Baker, A.M., English; 
Laura I. Baldt, B.S., Household Arts; John Spencer Bassett, Ph.D., 
History; HalTrueman Beans, Ph.D., Chemistry; Jesse E. Beans, Archi- 
tecture; Katherine Berkemeyer, Costume Design; Frederick G. Beyer- 
man, Physical Education; Frederick Reginald Beygrau, Stenography 
and Typewriting; Maurice Alpheus Bigelow, Ph.D., Biology; Walter 
Van Dyke Bingham, Ph.D., Educational Psychology; Frederick Gordon 
BoNSER, M.S., Industrial Education; William Frederick Book, Ph.D., 
Psychology; George Willis Botsford, Ph.D., History; Wilbur Pardon 
Bowen, M.S., Physical Edtication; Ethelwyn C. Bradish, Industrial 
Arts; Wilhelm Alfred Braun, Ph.D., German; W. E. Breckenridge, 
Mathematics; Harold Chapman Brown, Ph.D., Philosophy; John Wil- 
fred BuRLEY, Industrial Arts; Charles Howard Burnside, M.A., 
Mechanics; P^.ussell Burton-Opitz, Ph.D., Physiology; William B. 
Cairns, Ph.D., English; R. D. Calkins, M.S., Geography; H. A. Caparn, 
Landscape and Design; William Chad wick, Fine Arts; Antonio Cirino, 
Industrial Arts; Rossetter Gleason Cole, Ph.B., Music; Grace L. 
Cook, A.M., English; Anna M. Cooley, B.S., Household Arts; William 
Forbes Cooley, Ph.D., Philosophy; Caroline Crawford, Physical 
Education; Carlton Clarence Curtis, Ph.D., Botany; William Hawley 

398 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 399 

Davis, A.M., Public Speaking; Helen M. Day, B.S., Household Arts; 
Joseph Villiers Denney, M.A., English; John Dewey, Ph.D., Philo- 
sophy of Education; Ella V. Dobbs, Industrial Arts; Raymond Dodge, 
Ph.D., Psychology; Helen Donovan, B.S., Household Arts; Goldthwaite 
H. Dorr, LL.B., Law; Lillian Curtis Drew, Physical Edtication; Lida 
Belle Earhart, Ph.D., Elementary Education; Andrew Wheatley 
Edson, A.m., Educational Administration; Charles Hubert Farns- 
worth. Music; Frederic Ernest Farrington, Ph.D., Educational 
Administration; Herman Waldo Farwell, A.M., Physics; William 
Benjamin Fite, Ph.D., Mathematics; John Driscoll Fitz-Gerald, II., 
Ph.D., Romance Languages; A. E. Flanagan, Architecture; Edward 
Joseph Fortier, A.B., Romance Languages; Nellis B. Foster, M.D., 
Biological Chemistry; James Everett Frame, A.M., New Testament 
Literature; Lucile Grace French, Household Arts; Grace Fulmer, 
Kindergarten Education; Charlotte Garrison, Kindergarten; Franklin 
Henry Giddings, Ph.D., Sociology; William John Gies, Ph.D., Biologi- 
cal and Physiological Chemistry; Ralph W. Gifford, LL.B., Law; Willy- 
stine Goodsell, Ph.D., History of Education; Amadeus William Grabau, 
S.D., Geology; Robert P. Gray, Household Arts and Fine Arts; Charles 
Clayton Grove, Ph.D., Mathematics; Charles Grove Haines, Ph.D., 
Politics; Everett J. Hall, Chemistry; William Hallock, Ph.D., Physics; 
Charles A. Harriman, Architecture; Henry Rand Hatfield, Ph.D., 
Economics; Florence Mary Healy, Physical Education; Ernest Norton 
Henderson, Ph.D., Philosophy of Education; William Addison Hervey, 
A.M., German; Frederick William Justus Heuser, A.M., German; 
Patty Smith Hill, Kifidergarten Education; Milo B. Hillegas, Educa- 
tion; Jane Hoagland, Industrial Arts; Percy Hodge, Ph.D., Mechanics; 
George Thomas Holm, Swimming; Henry F. Hornbostel, B.S., Archi- 
tecture; Archer B. Hulbert, History; Gordon Ferrie Hull, Ph.D., 
Physics; Otto Victor Humann, Fine Arts; Charles Bishop Johnson, 
Public Speaking; Henry Johnson, A.M., History; Arthur Julius Jones, 
Ph.D., Education; Daniel Jordan, B.Pd., Romance Languages; Cavalier 
Hargrave Jouet, Ph.D., Chemistry; Edward Kasner, Ph.D., Mathe- 
matics; Helen Rex Keller, B.L., Library Economy; Sara Lawrence 
Kellogg, B.A., Library Economy; William Heard Kilpatrick, A.M., 
History of Education; George Washington Kirchwey, LL.D., Law; 
Charles Knapp, Ph.D., Greek, Latin; Helen Kneip, Kindergarten; 
Edward Benjamin Krehbiel, Ph.D., History; Alfred Louis Kroeber, 
Ph.D., Anthropology; Louis Auguste Loiseaux, B. es S., Romance Lan- 
guages; James Lee Love, A.M., Assistant to the Director; William H. 
McCastline, M.D., Physical Education; Nelson Glenn McCrea, Ph.D., 
Latin; James Howard McGregor, Ph.D., Zoology; Matilda McKeown, 
B.S., Household Arts; Frank Morton McMurry, Ph.D., Elementary 
Education; Grace Harriet Macurdy, Ph.D., Greek; Melinda I. Man- 
chester, Household Arts; Maud March, Physical Education; A. Mari- 



400 SUMMER SESSION 

NONi, A.M., Romance Languages; Charles J. Martin, Woodworking; 
Ralph Edward Mayer, C.E., Mechanical Drawing; Abby Shaw Mayhew, 
Physical Education; William Edward Mead, Ph.D., English; Royal 
Meeker, Ph.D., Economics; James Alexander Miller, M.D., Medical 
Diagnosis; Paul Monroe, Ph.D., History of Education; William Pepper- 
rell Montague, Ph.D., Philosophy; Annie E. Moore, B.S., Elementary 
Education; Frank Gardner Moore, Ph.D., Latin; William Underhill 
Moore, LL.B., Law; J. Livingston R. Morgan, Ph.D., Chemistry; O. S. 
Morgan, Ph.D., Agriculture; Leighton B. Morse, Ph.D.; Physics; 
Alfred J. Moses, Ph.D., Mineralogy; Isadore G. Mudge, Library Eco- 
nomy; Henri Francois Muller, B. es L., Romance Languages; Henry 
Raymond Mussey, Ph.D., Economics; John M. Nelson, Ph.D., Chemistry; 
William Noyes, A.M., Industrial Arts; Harry Ohlson, Physical Educa- 
tion; William Orr, A.M., Secondary Education; Mary H. Peacock, A.B., 
Household Arts; Henry C. Pearson, Elementary Education; Walter 
Bowers Pillsbury, Ph.D., Psychology; Allen Wilson Porterfield, 
Ph.D., German; Thomas Reed Powell, LL.B., Public Law; Harry Wil- 
fred Reddick, Ph.D., Mathematics; John Franklin Reigart, A.B., Ele- 
mentary Education; Arthur Frank Joseph Remy, Ph.D., German; Rachel 
T. Richardson, Industrial Arts; Henry Alford Ruger, Ph.D., Educa- 
tional Psychology; Henry H. L. Schulze, A.M., German; Robert Living- 
ston Schuyler, Ph.D., History; Emily C. Seaman, A.M., Household 
Arts; Henry Clapp Sherman, Ph.D., Chemistry; Lewis Parker Sice- 
loff, A.B., Mathematics; Charles Conrad Sleffel, Industrial Arts; 
Walter Irvine Slighter, Electrical Engineering; Edward R. Smith, 
A.B., Fine Arts; Stevenson Smith, Ph.D., Educational Psychology; Caro- 
line E. Stackpole, M.A., Biology; Isabel M. Stephens, B.S., Physical 
Education; Seth Thayer Stewart, LL.B., Physical Education; George 
Drayton Strayer, Ph.D., Educational Administration; James Sullivan, 
Ph.D., History; Henry Suzzallo, Ph.D., Philosophy of Education; Mary 
D. SwARTZ-RosE, Ph.D., Household Arts; Sallie B. Tannahill, Fine 
Arts; Ashley H. Thorndike, Ph.D., English; Frederick Thorne, B.S., 
Industrial Arts; Evelyn Smith Tobey, B.S., Household Arts; Clifford 
Brewster Upton, M.A., Mathematics; May B. Van Arsdale, B.S., 
Household Arts; Karl Max Vogel, M.D., Clinical Pathology; Leon 
VoLKMAR, Industrial Arts; Camillo von Klenze, Ph.D., German; Her- 
man T. Vult6, Ph.D., Household Chemistry; Augustus Baldwin Wads- 
worth, M.D., Bacteriology; Charlotte A. Waite, B.S., Household Arts; 
Lester Frank Ward, LL.D., Sociology, LaMont A. Warner, Household 
Arts and Fine Arts; Charles P. Warren, A.M., Architecture; Raymond 
Weeks, Ph.D., Romance Languages; Charles William Weick, B.S., In- 
dustrial Arts; Guy Montrose Whipple, Ph.D., Educational Psychology; 
Clarence Hudson White, Photography; Henry Seely White, Ph.D., 
Mathematics; Walter George Whitman, A.B., Chemistry; J. Paul J. 
Williams, C.E., Civil Engineering; Roland Hugh Williams, A.M., 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 4OI 

Chemistry; Frederick A. Woll, Physical Education; Francis Carter 
Wood, M.D., Clinical Pathology; Irving Francis Wood, Ph.D., Philoso- 
phy and History of Religion; Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, LL.D., 
Philosophy; Robert Sessions Woodworth, Ph.D., Psychology; Ernest 
Hunter Wright, Ph.D., English; Theodora Ethel Wye, B.S., Classical 
Philology. 

Lecturers 

Ethel Helena Budington, Library Economy; Christina Ericson, 
Textiles and Clothing; J. J. Findlay, Education; Frederick Charles 
Hicks, Library Economy; Frederick W. Jenkins, Library Economy; 
Andrew Keogh, Library Economy; Montrose J. Moses, Library Economy; 
Harriet B. Prescott, Library Economy; DeLoss Smith, Music; Thomas 
Tapper, Music; Gilbert O. Ward, Library Economy. 

Assistants 

Ellen A, Beers, Household Arts; Bertha M. Bentley, Elementary 
Education; Grace V. Bliss, Fine Arts; Dorothy Bocker, Physical Edu- 
cation; Minnie L. Bollert, English; Milledge L. Bonham, Jr., History; 
Grace Lillian Brown, Kindergarten; Louis A. Brown, Physical Educa- 
tion; Victor Lovitt Oakes Ckittick, English; Elsie R.Ci.aff, Education; 
Ethel M. Cornell, Household Arts; Fred Dannelfelser, Industrial 
Arts; Rollin Colegrove Dean, Zoology; Bernard Ogilvie Dodge, 
Botany; Josephine Duke, Music; O. R. Foster, Physics, Bertha M. 
Gath, Elementary Education; Lillian B. Gunn, Household Arts; William 
Haller, English; William E. Harned, Stenography; M. Heidelberger, 
Chemistry; Thomas A. Hogan, Industrial Arts; Merle M. Hoover, 
English; Margaret C. Hull, Household Arts; Francis Jenkins, Elemen- 
tary Education; Elizabeth Kurtz, Geology; Lulu R. Lancaster, House- 
hold Arts; L. G. McClelland, Biology; M. T. McClure, Philosophy; 
Robert Franklin McCracken, Chemistry; Henry Howard Marvin, 
Physics; Frank George Meredith, Excursions; William S. Nelms, 
Physics; L. J. Nuttall, Educational Psychology; Charles Packard, 
Zoology; Alice M. Paine, Elementary Education; B. F. Philipson, Chemis- 
try; Grace R. Potter, Elementary Education; John Ross, Industrial Arts; 
Emma Schraner, Physical Education; L. Schroeder, History of Education; 
Jesse B. Sears, Education; Willard Leslie Severinghaus, Physics; 
Raymond W. Sies, Education; Caroline V. Sinnamon, Elementary Edu- 
cation; RoxANA A. Steele, Elementary Education; C. H. Stone, Chemistry; 
Cornelia H. Stone, Household Arts; Gardo Thompson, Household Arts; 
Anna C. Thornton, Physical Education; John Welhoff Todd, Psycho- 
logy; Charlotte Walls, Physical Education; Charles Digby Wardlaw, 
Education; Florence V. Watkins, Elementary Education; Florence 
Wilson, Library Economy; Elizabeth D. Young, Kindergarten. 



402 SUMMER SESSION 

In Charge of Excursions, Leonidas Wakefield Crawford, A.M. 

Lecturer and Chorus Leader, Walter Henry Hall. 

Organist, William J. Kraft. 

Social Secretary, Teachers College, Mrs. William H. Kilpatrick. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The twelfth Summer Session of the University opened July 5, 191 1, 
and closed August 16. The registration days for the Summer Session 
were June 30, July i and 3. Examinations for certificates were held on 
August 16. 

Courses were ofifered to men and women on equal terms, in accounting, 
anthropology, architecture, assaying, biblical literature, biology, botany, 
chemistry, commercial geography, corporation finance, domestic art, 
domestic science, economics, education, engineering, English, fine arts, 
freehand drawing, French, geography, geology, German, Greek, his- 
tory, history of religion, household arts, industrial arts, Italian, kinder- 
garten, Latin, law, hbrary economy, manual training, mathematics, 
mechanical drawing, mechanics, medicine, mineralogy, music, philosophy, 
photography, physical education, physics, physiology, poUtics, psychology, 
public speaking and oral reading, Romance languages, sociology, Spanish, 
stenography and typewriting, and zoology. 

Each course consisted of thirty-one lectures or other exercises, or their 
equivalent in laboratory or field work. Credit for such courses in the 
Summer Session as are accepted by the several Faculties of the Uni- 
versity in partial fulfilment of the requirements for degrees, or for diplomas 
in teaching is given upon the satisfactory completion of the course, in- 
cluding the final examination. 

Fees 
(See page 43) 

The tuition fee for the Summer Session is I30, which covers courses 
of instruction aggregating six points credit, the normal limit allowed by 
the regulations. 

For the Announcement of the Sxmimer Session of 19 12, which will open 
July 8 and offer a wide range of courses, or for information regarding 
dormitory accommodations, or board and lodging, address the Secretary 
of Columbia University, New York. 

Registration, Session of 1911 

Copies of the separately printed Directory of the Summer Session, igii, 
may be had upon application to the Secretary of the University. In this 
catalogue, at the close of the Register of Students imder each Faculty, 
will be found a list of the Summer Session students of 19 il who matricu- 
lated under that Faculty, but who did not return to register in September. 



SUMMARY 403 

SUMMARY 

I. Non-matriculated 1731 

II. Matriculated: 

1. Columbia CoUege 150 

2. Barnard CoUege 48 

3. Mines, Engineering and 

Chemistry 147 

4. Law 25 

5. Medicine 8 

6. Fine Arts 7 

7. Political Science 43. 

8. Philosophy* 366 

9. Pure Science .68 

10. Teachers CoUege 377 

1239 



2970 



* Including 185 students with education as a major subject and registered 
under the Faculty of Philosophy through Teachers College. 

EXTENSION TEACHING, 1911-12 

OflSlcers of Instruction 

Instructors — B. M. Anderson, Jr., E. E. Agger, M. G. Bach, R. F. 
Bach, J. E. Beans, H. T. Beans, F. R. Beygrau, W. A. Braun, G. M. 
Brett, H. C. Brown, F. M. Burdick, C. H. Burnside, Miss G. L. Cook, 
W. F. CooLEY, A. J. Cross, C. C. Curtis, F. B. Dow, D. B. Duncan, 
W. O. Farnsworth, H. W. Farwell, F. C. Fette, J. K. Finch, C. Fon- 
taine, G. B. Ford, R. K. Forsyth, E. J. Fortier, C. R. Gaston, A. W. 
Grabau, N. E. Griffin, C. C. Grove, W. T. Hale, W. H. Hall, W. P. 
Hall, W. Hallock, C. M. Hamilton, C. A. Harriman, T. H. Harring- 
ton, C. H. Hayes, W. A. Hervey, F. W. J. Heuser, M. B. Hillegas, 
G. Hindermyer, R. M. Hodge, H. L. Hollingworth, L. Imbert, J. W. 
Ingle, Jr., E. T. Kennedy, S. B. Koopman, O. Kress, F. Lamond, A. A. 
Livingston, L. A. Loiseaux, E. N. Milliken, W. Milwitzky, T. C. 
MiTCHiLL, R. H. Montgomery, W. C. Moore, O. S. Morgan, H. F. 
MuLLER, A. C. Neish, J. M. Nelson, J. W. Nichols, F. S. Nowlan, 
C. A. PiFER, W. B. Pitkin, A. W. Porterfield, H. W. Reddick, J. H. 
Robinson, A. F. Ross, E. M. Sait, H. H. L. Schulze, R. L. Schuyler, 
J. T. Shotwell, L. p. Siceloff, C. G. Simpson, E. R. Smith, Miss A. Sny- 
der, H. R. Steeves, W. W. Stifler, E. K. Strong, Jr., E. H. Sturtevant, 
A. Tassin, R. Taylor, S. M. Tucker, J. L. Tynan, C. Van Doren, L. T. 
Wilson, G. Weeman, L. Welzmiller, F. P. Whitaker, Miss A. T. Whyte, 
S. L. Wolff, F. A. Woll, Miss T. E. Wye. 



404 EXTENSION TEACHING 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The statutes of the University (Section 230) define Extension Teaching 
as "instruction given by University officers and under the administrative 
supervision and control of the University, either away from the University 
buildings, or at the University, for the benefit of students unable to attend 
the regular courses of instruction." 

Students 

Courses in Extension Teaching are planned for two classes of students, — 
first, men and women who can give only a portion of their time to study 
and who desire to pursue subjects included in a liberal education of the 
character and grade of a college or professional school, but without any 
reference to an academic degree, — second, those who look forward to 
qualifying themselves to obtain in the future academic recognition, involv- 
ing acceptance of the work which they may satisfactorily complete in 
Extension Teaching. 

Courses 

In the academic year 1911-12 regular courses of instruction are in many 
instances co-ordinated so as to form at least the first year of collegiate 
and professional work, thus providing in the evening at Morningside 
Heights, and elsewhere, courses in subjects which are offered in the Fresh- 
man and Sophomore years of Columbia College and Barnard College, so 
that students may make progress toward the degrees of A.B. and B.S. 

There are also offered at Morningside Heights in the evening subjects 
which are given in the Schools of Mines, Engineering and Chemistry, so 
that a student may pursue some special line of scientific study or prepare 
himself for the second or third year in these schools. 

Evening courses are offered in Architecture which correspond to the 
courses of the Columbia University School of Architecture. 

Evening courses in Commerce and Finance, forming the first year 
of a three-year course leading to a certificate in commerce, are given at 
Morningside Heights. 

A series of courses has been arranged which will equip students for the 
position of secretary. These require three years for high school graduates 
and one year for college graduates. 

Many courses are offered which aid a student to prepare for the Schools 
of Law and Medicine or to complete his preparation for Columbia College 
or for the scientific schools. 

A large number of other courses in varied subjects are given late in 
the afternoon and on Saturday which repeat those in liberal studies offered 
in the Colleges of the University. These are given in the same manner 
and often by the same instructors as the regular courses. In many in- 
stances university credit will be granted. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 405 

Numerous courses are given at various centres. These are either 
regular courses of collegiate grade or those preliminary thereto. Lecture 
courses arranged in groups of six lectures will also be given in different 
centres. 

Lecture-study courses in certain subjects forming thirty lectures alter- 
nating with quiz or conference hours will be given at Morningside Heights 
and at centres when requested. 

Fees for Extension Courses 

1. AU students, matriculated or non-matriculated, admitted to Exten- 
sion courses, must pay at the time of registration the fees determined 
by the Administrative Board. The fees for Extension courses are deter- 
mined as a rule at the rate of $5 per point, i.e., for one hour per week of 
class-room work, or two hours of laboratory or drawing-room work through 
a half-year. All students must pay a registration fee of $5.00, which 
is payable but once in the University. Students taking six points each 
half-year have the privileges of the library, dormitories, and gymnasium. 

Unless otherwise directed, students must pay all fees at the office of the 
Bursar. 

2. Students in courses in local centres will pay either the fee arranged 
by the local centre or the usual fee described above. Detailed information 
in regard to the payment of the fee is given with the statement of the 
course. 

Admission to Extension Courses 

No examination is required for admission to courses offered in Exten- 
sion Teaching but students must satisfy the Administrative Board that 
they can pursue the courses with advantage. It is expected that the 
prospective student in all collegiate and professional courses shall have 
had a full secondary school education. The courses are open, unless it 
is otherwise stated, both to men and women. The Administrative Board 
reserves to itself the right to refuse admission to a course or to withdraw 
the privilege of attendance upon a course which the student is unfitted to 
pursue with advantage. 

Students who are duly admitted to Extension courses but are not can- 
didates for a degree or diploma are termed non-matriculated students. 
Students who have completed the requirements for admission, and have 
been formally admitted by or in behalf of the Faculty concerned as can- 
didates for a diploma or degree, are termed matriculated students. 

Courses in Extension Teaching, approved by the Committee on Instruc- 
tion, are credited for matriculated students toward the degrees of A.B. and 
B.S. in Columbia College and Barnard College, and toward the degree 
of B.S. and the diplomas in Teachers College, in accordance with the regu- 
lations established by the various faculties. 



406 ■ EXTENSION TEACHING 

Courses in Extension Teaching, approved by the Executive Committee 
of the Council, will count toward the degree of A.M., in accordance with 
the regulations of the University Council. 

For detailed information as to the places and hours for these courses, 
both at the University and at the several local centres, the qualifications 
for admission, the regulations for registration, candidacy for degrees, 
diplomas, attendance, and examinations, the fees prescribed, and for a 
statement of each course offered, see the Announcement of Extension Teach- 
ing, igii-i2, which may be obtained without charge upon application to 
the Secretary of the University. 

SUMMARY OF STUDENTS, 1910-1911 

Morningside 922 

Newark 56 

Brooklyn 55 



DEGREES CONFERRED DURING 1910-11 

Degrees are conferred at the October and February meetings of the 

University Council and on Commencement Day. 

See the Academic Calendar 

Columbia College 

Bachelor of Arts 



Alexander Isidore Abrahams 

Edgar Altenburg (February 8) 

Laurence Henry Axman 

Herbert Peter Baumer 

Paitl Morris Beck 

Wiley Alexander Bell, Jr. 

Sidney Bender 

Augustus Henry Bergman 

Henry Berkowitz (February 8) 

Shelton Hale Bishop 

Joseph Thomas Blaber 

Percy Emanuel Boas 

Carmine William Caruso 

Albert M. Cohn-McMaster (Octobers) 

William Caspar Dorr 

George Pennington Egbert 

Meyer Eichmann 

Carl Bernard Eimer 

Seba Eldridge (February 8) 

Albert Epstein (October 3) 

Robert Le Fevre Fairbairn 

Frank Julius Felbel 

Aaron Boylan Fitz-Gerald 

Dixon Ryan Fox (February 8) 

Max Frank 

Ernest Vivian Frerichs (October 3) 

Israel Friedman (February 8) 

Henry Curt Furstenwalde 

Kiliaen van Rensselaer Gibson 

Arthur Nicholas Giegerich 

(February 8) 
Nelson Burroughs Gildersleeve 
Edwin Lawrence Gluck 
Herbert Samuel Goldstein! 

(February 8) 
Jones Greene Griffith 
Abraham Maurice Grill 
IsADOR Haber 



Ernest William Hartung (October 3) 

William Henry Hastings 

Harold Gould Henderson, Jr. 

(October 3) 

Wayne Darlington Heydecker 

John Warren Hill 

Lester Sanders Hill 

Joseph Charlap Hyman (February 8) 

Roland Stuart Ketchum (October 3) 

Joseph Klingenstein 

Richard Charles Klugescheid 

Leo Koenig 

Samuel Seymour Korn 

Samuel Oppenheim Kuhn 

Allen Lefferts 

Maurice Levine 

Samuel Joshua Levinson 

Louis Martin Levy 

Harold Baxter Liebler 

Angelo Lipari 

With high honors in Romance Lan- 
guages and Latin 

Llewellyn Lloyd (February 8) 

Armin Kohl Lobeck (February 8) 

William MacRossie 

Robert Vincent Mahon (October 3) 

Bernard Kent Marcus 

George Milroy Marshall 

Alexander Becht Morris 

(October 3) 

John Joseph Murphy 

Melville Nauheim (October 3) 

Robert Clinton Norton 

Berthold Hintz Nye (October 3) 

Earl William Osborne (February 8) 

Frank Pascarella 

Thomas Bugard Paton, Jr. 

ARTHxnt Leo Price 



407 



408 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



William Remsen 
William Walter Renwick 
Ernest Spencer Roche 
John Pierre Roche (February 8) 
Nathaniel Otis Rockwood 
Milton Benjamin RosENBLt)TH 
William Neely Ross (February 8) 
Gabriel Rubino 
Arnold Moses Schmidt 
Frederick William Scholz 
John Andrew Siceloff 
Frederick Burr Spencer 
194J 



James Alexander Steel 

Ralph Randles Stewart (February 8) 

John Andrew Storey, Jr. 

Samuel Myer STRASBimcER 

Ernest Harvey Van Fossan 

Harold Van Tine 

George Henry Warren, Jr. 

William Thomas Webber 

Webb William Weeks (October 3) 

Walter Moses Weis 

WiNFRED Hamlin Ziegler 

Carl Daniel Zigrosser 



Bachelor of Science 



Sidney Adlman (February 8) 
Henry Daniel Baker 
James Alpheus Baker, Jr. 

(February 8) 
Gurnee Hinman Barrett 
Paul David Bieber (October 3) 
Harry Bloch 

IsiDOR Bernard Blumborg (October 3) 
Alexandre Bruno 
Sterry Hunt Childs 
Leonard Covello (February 8) 
Martin Louis Degavre (February 8) 
Geoffrey James Dwyer 
Louis M. Epstein 
Joseph Constantine Ferrara 
Alfred Russell Flower 
Bonner Frizzell 

Michael Der Garabedian (October 3) 
Samuel Ralph Gerstein 
IsMAR Ginsberg 
Harold Melville Greenebaum 
Milton Greenebaum 
Alfred John Grimm 
Chen Sheng Huang 
William Cullen Bryant Kemp 
George Thurman Keyes 
[48] 



David Edward Kronman (October 3) 

Monroe Bradford Zunstler 

William Murray Lee 

Myron Lawrence Lesser (February 8) 

Alexander Leon Louria (October 3) 

Alexander Lowy 

Edward HSmond Mackenzie 

Cedric Ferris Maguire 

Harry Widdicombe Marsh 

Alden Karl Martin 

Hua-Chuen Mei 

Adolph Henry Meyer 

Joseph Stewart Michtom 

John Augustine| Mullen 

David Gerson Schechter 

Gabriel Schlesinger 

Frank Gillman Schrenkeisen 

(February 8) 
George William Artway Scott 

(February 8) 
Milton Pinchus Springer 
Ricmond Stephens 
Edwin Wadsworth Stone 
Irwin Wheeler 
William Osterhout Whipps 

(February 8) 



Barnard College 
Bachelor of Arts 



Helen Lovene Amy 

Lillian Sophia Anderson (February 7) 

Alice Laura Bennett 

Fanny Aurill Bishop 

Stella Bloch 

Ida Bokshitzky 

Josephine AdSle Bosch 

Helen Brown 



JuANiTA Brown 

Emilie Elizabeth Margaret Bruning 

Agnes Madeleine Burke 

Eleanor Burne 

Edith Crowell Burns 

Ruth Augusta Burns ~ 

Emily Thorp Burr (February 7) 

Anna May Callan 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



409 



Therese Cassel 

Amelia Aurelie ClSment 

Helen Copeland Coombs 

Helen Hopkins Crandell 

Harriet Joy Currier 

Agnes May Deniee 

Evelyn Dewey 

Adele Duncan 

Levanchia Vibbard Eaton 

Elizabeth English 

Vera Ajlanda Fueslein 

Katharine Gay 

Rose Gerstein 

Grace Gilleaudeau 

Elsie Gleason 

Elizabeth Naomi Gray 

Louise de Forest Greenawalt 

Lottie June Greiff 

Charlotte Haithwaite (October i) 

Ruth Johnston Hakes 

Harriet Florence Hale 

Margaret Tower Hart 

Irma Fanny Heiden 

Julia Ryon Henning (October i) 

Anna Francis Herreshoff 

AuGUSTiNA Hess (February 7) 

Alice Taylor Hill 

Madeleine Hirsh 

Margaret Rosalind Hogan 

Olga Kathryn Ihlseng 

Eugenia Ingerman 

Rhoda Muriel Ivimey 

Louie Estelle Johnson 

Anna Augusta Kugler 

Ethel Sylvia Leveridge 

Grace Greene Lovell 

Augusta Lustgarten 

Grace Irene McKee 

Edna Josphine McKeever 

(February 7) 
Ellen Naar Maison (October i) 
Anna Leila Martin 
Eleanor Marion Martin (June i, 1910) 
Marie Ruth Maschmedt 
Theresa Mayer (February 7) 
[105] 



Eva Cecile Mordecai 

Edith Matilda Morris 

Ruth Lillian Moss 

Agnes Nobis 

Marian Oberndorfer 

Louise Elizabeth Ockers 

Alice Margaret O' Gorman 

Mary Bartow Polhemus 

Helen Maud Porter 

Marion Pratt 

Ottilie Prochazka 

Frances Maude Fitz Randolph 

Mabel Jean Reid 

Beatrice Alma Rich (June i, 1910) 

Elizabeth Riordon 

Mamie Erna Rivkin 

Helen De Mott Runyon 

Rose Salmowitz (October i) 

Dorothy Sal wen 

Mildred Louise Sanborn 

Georgiana Sandford 

Gertrude Elizabeth Louise Saul 

Helen Elizabeth Savitz (October i) 

Ethel Schlesinger 

Lillian Schoedler 

Caroline Eustis Seely 

Angelina Maria Seveso 

Myrtle Shwitzer 

Ruth Hillard Sidell 

LuisE Maria Sillcox 

Gladys Hollingsworth Smith 

Ruth Madeline Stagen 

Jeannette Amelia Steinecke 

Natalie Stewart 

Maude Beulah Stimson (February 7) 

Stella Straus 

Gladys Griffith Tallman 

Elisabeth Thomson 

Kate Huntington Tiemann 

Annie Schmelzel Van Buskirk 

Charlotte Verlage 

Linda Caroline Weymann 

Helen Elizabeth Wilkes 

Geraldine Willets 

Hazel Blackmore Wright 



Bachelor of Laws 



Saul Bernard Ackerman, B.S. 
James Arthur Allen, A.B. 
Frederick Dyer Anderson, A.B. 
Alexander Appel, B.S. 
Stephen Myles Bell, C.E. 
Frederic Otto Berge, B.S. 
L, Horatio Biglow, Jr., A.B. 



Harry Bijur, A.B. 

Clifford Hershey Bissell, A.B. 

Oscar Samuel Blinn, A.B. 

Otho Samuel Bowling, A.B., A.M. 

Emil Breitenfeld, A.B. 

John Brizzolara, A.B. 

John Kenneth Byard, A.B. 



410 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



William Edward Byers, A.B. 
Orville Gibert Calhoun, A.B. 
Michael Nelson Chanalis, A.B. 
Louis Albert Chase, Ph.B. 
Irving W. Church, A.B. 
Miles Chester Comstock, B.S. 
Harold Augustus Content, A.B. 
Ralph Copeland, A.B. 
Frederic Joseph Corbett, B.S. 
Victor Willard Cutting, A.B. 
Francis Dean, A.B. 
Russell Goodier Dunmore, A.B. 
WiLLL-iii Eastman, A.B. 
Lewis Epstein, A.B. 
SroNET Webster Fish. A.B. 
Pascal Joseph Fortinash, B.S. 
Osmond Kessler Fraenkel, A.B., A.M. 

AbRXEAM FREEDiL^N, Ph.B. 

Richard Gar\-ey, Jr. 
WiLLLUi Louis Glenn, A.B. 
Walter M.'^.yer GoLD3^^TH, A.B. 
Percy Frank Griffin, A.B. 
P.-VLT. Hayes Gutlfoil, A.B., A.M. 
Siegfried Frisch Hartman, B.S. 
Herjlan Willi.^oj Heidgerd, A.B. 
Carl Frederick Helm 
Lewis Henry, A.B. 
Charles Hershenstein, A.B., A.M. 
S.-vmuel Hershenstein 
Harold Henry Herts, A.B., A.M. 
Mortimer Hen-ry Hess, A.B., A.M. 
Fremont Amasa Higgins, A.B., A.M. 
Leslie Stephen High, A.B., A.M. 
George Edgar Hite, II., A.B. 
Lintdsay' Ditncan Holmes, A.B. 
Alexander Holtzoff, A.B., A.M. 
James E. Houghton, A.B. 
Richard Charles Hunter, A.B. 
WiLLLOi Alfred Jacobs, A.B. 
Hallett Johnson, A.B. 
[94l 

Doctor 

Stephen Hulbert Ackerman, Jr., A.B. 
Hugo Alexander, B.S. 
Frederic Augustus Alling, B.S. 
W.'i.LTER Palmer Anderton, A.B. 
John Ratney Ashe, B.S. 
WiLLL\M Howard Barber, A.B. 
ABRAHAii Bessie, A.B. 
Louis Edward Bisch, A.B. 
R. Mark Brown, A.B. 
Ralph Monroe Bruckheimer 
Arthl'r Samuel C.\lman 
Clarence Orion Cheney, A.B. 
Stephen A. Chilian 



Harding Johnson 

Asa Bigelow Eellogg, A.B. 

Eugenie Edml-nd Kelly, A.B. 

Clh-e Wetherill^Eernan, A.B. 

Karl Wendell Eirchwey, A.B. 

Gregory Eistler, B.S. 

Geoffrey Eonta, A.B. 

Edward E. Leissnt;r 

Oscar Levinf:, B.S. 

Lester Miles Livengood, B.L. 

George S. Love, A.B. 

John Clifford McChristie, A.B. 

Frederic Hewlett McCoun, Jr., A.B. 

WiLLLCJ G. McLoughlen, A.B. 

Ch,a.rles Lionel Marcus, B.S., A.M. 

George Megrew 

Walter Bernard Milkman, A.B. 

George Willi.vj Morris, A.B. 

Carl Metz Myers, B.S. 

Amos Jenkins Peaslee, A.B. 

W. H. Dann.A-T Pell, A.B. 

Arthur Wy-m.a^' Proctor, LL.B. 

Robert Hughes Rice, A.B. 

Leopold Opper Rothschild, A.B. 

Xath-^^n S.^lsbury, A.B. 

Harold Seely Schultz, A.B. 

Louis Frederick Schwartz, Jr., A.B. 

Francis E. Scott, A.B. 

Frank L. Sherrer, A.B. 

John Stewart Sickels, B.S. 

Walter Bernard Solinger 

Joseph Stein-er, A.B., A.M. 

Philip J. TER^nNi, A.B. 

Robert Boyd Walkinshaw, Ph.B. 

Guy Oliver Walser, A.B., A.M. 

Carl Jacob Wangerien, A.B. 

Dawtd Weinstein, A.B. 

WiLLL^j Stix Weiss, A.B. 

Stant-ey Lewis Wolff, A.B. 

S. Dl-ncajn Wylie, A.B. 

of Medicine 

James Livingston Cobb, A.B. 

Walter Fran'k Cobb, B.P.E. 

Ira Cohen, B.S. 

Abbott Carson Combes, Jr. 

Am£d£e Joseph Debon 

Alfred Bernard Camille De Passe 

Henry Sage Du"nning, D.D.S. 

Edgar Gerald Dustin 

Henry Douglas Eaton 

Samuel Eisler 

Edward Cranch Ernst 

MaLTUCE GOLDiLVN, M.D. 

George Mxinro Goodwin, A.B. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



411 



Roderick Vincent Grace, A.B. 
John- Y7. Gray 
F.AJRFAX Hall, Ph.B. 
Harbeck Halsted 
Mel\'in Gustav Herzfeld 
Nathaniel Barni,vell Heyward, A.B. 
James Fitts Hill 
Austin Latting Hobbs, A.B. 
J.^iES Frederick Horn, A.M., B.D. 
Robert Phin-eas Knapp 
Howard Tracy Langworthy 
LoLis Oscar Levin- 
Fred Ray".ion-d Lewis, Ph.B. 
Ke\-in Da\td Lynch, A.B. 
Paltl Ely McChesn-ey, A.B. 
Charles Miles McKin-lay, A.B. 
Constantin-e Joseph MacGuire, Jr.. 

A.B. 
Hymen Rl"dolph Miller, B.S. 
Gl-y Mol-nt, A.B. 
Vance Bishop Mupoiay 
Joseph Augustin-e O' Conor 

17 oj 

Engineer 

Fran-k Ashton Ay'er 

Thomas Mellor Bains, Jr. 

Herbert Van Vlierden Baldwin, B.S. 

(October 3) 
Harold Purdy B.axks, A.B. 
Hom:er Lyman C.a.rr, A.B. (Februarj' 8) 
Richard Cobden, Jr. 
How.ARD Pinckn-ey Corsa 
Charles Eustace Dwyer, A.B. 
Arthuh Ransford Fletcher, A.B. 
Joseph Ramon Guiteras 
Albert Edward Hall 
H-IlROLd Howe Hodgkinson (October 3) 
J.AMES Milton HoFp•^LA.^■ 
Percy Regin.ald Isem.\n 
Gust.^ve a. J.ahn, Jr. 
Albert Allyn Leach, Jr. 
Mon-trose L. Lee (February 8) 
Edg.ar Owen McC.an-n. A.B., A.M. 
Eugene P. McCrorken (October 3) 
Rudolph A. McGo^-ern (October 3) 
Sajtoel Melitzer, B.S. 
Albert Men-delsohn 
Clare Goodell Mitchell, A.B. 



[46] 



Harold Blackman Osborn, B.S.,M.D. 

Howard THOM.is P.\ffard, A.B. 

Leo Smith Petersen 

Howard Morton Phipps, A.B. 

Edward Leander Pratt, A.B. 

D.aniel Rutgers Robert, Litt.B. 

Lewis Byrn^ Robinson, A.B. 

MAR.CUS Adolphus Rothschild, A.B. 

CL.A.YTON Elbert Royce, A.B. 

Louis Cl..vusen Schroeder 

Frederick Wilson Scott, A.B. 

Louis Shein-jla.n 

Homer Waldo Spiers, A.B. 

RuTus EDV.-IN Stetson, A.B. 

BxYTD Dl-dley Stowell, A.B. 

Nicholas Alfred Sl-llo 

Cyril Sl-mner, A.B. 

Bl-rton DuTtRELL Thorpe, A.B. 

John Adolf Vietor, A.B. 

P.OSCOE W.AiKER, B.S. 

Mark Hopkins Ward, A.B. 
Pearl Caleb West, A.B., M.D. 
John Willl^m Wurthmann, Phax.D. 

of Mines 

Perry North Moore, A.B. (October 3) 
THOILA.S Charles Morc^vn, A.B. 
Vincent I. Mlxholl.ant>, A.B. (October 

3) 
Edmunt) Newton 
Hen-ry William NIE^LA.N, A.B. 
M.alcolm Lin-dsay O'Neale (October 3) 
Lewis A. P.arsons, Ph.B. (October 3) 
George Lau-rence Peters 
Gilbert Sslall Peyton, Jr. 
James DeLong Phllson 
Curtis Pigott, Ph.B. (October 3) 
George Hilli.a.rd Ross, A.B. (October 

3) 
David Burnet Scott, A.B. 
EDW.A.RD Eggleston Seely-e, C.E. 
Roger Lolis Strobel 
CoRN-ELius George Slxlivan 
John Drury T.^lant (October 3) 
William Leon.ard Thosla.s, A.B. 
Lester Seymolts. Thompson 
Hen-ry Joseph Volker 
Cutler Bon-estell Whitwell 
Philip D-antorth Wilson, B.S 
SiDN-EY Leo Wise 



Metallurgical Engineer 



Hen-ry Butler Allen- 
Flint CuiiMiNGS Elder (February S) 
Kenneth Spro.a.t Gutterman 



Leslie M.fKozinNSKY, E.M. (February 8) 
Clarence Dantel Mapes 
Gran-^tlle Mercer Williams 



412 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Civil Engineer 



Robert Wesley Briggs 
William Ernst Buchtenkirch 
Howard Thomas Cole 
Norman Arthur Deiser 
Robert Dreyfuss (October 3) 
Martin Finkelstein 
Morris Friedman 
Ernest Henry Harder 
Albert Henry Herter 
William Benedict Jones 
Arthur Francis de Jongh (October 3) 
Charles Kandel 
George Peter Kuzmier 
Ferdinand Leiser, Jr. 
Grover Cleveland Loening, B.S., A.M. 
[28] 



Louis Margolis, A.B. 

Myron Gilbert Marum 

Emil Gustave Meyer 

Frederick W. Ockert 

Archie Hartley Paterson 

Harold Perrine, A.B., A.M. (Octo- 
ber 3) 

Felix Riesenberg 

Morris S. Schapiro, B.S. 

Thomas Edward Snook, Jr. (Octo- 
ber 3) 

Charles Burr Spencer, A.B. (October 3) 

Sandor Schwartz Szanto, B.S. 

Wilbur Drake Tupper 

Charles Wolff 



Electrical Engineer 



Edward Thomas Caswell 
Paul Richard^.Deschere 
John Clarence Hale] 
Howard Sinton Hertzog 
Charles Marcel Hirsch 
[lol: 



Arthur John Holman 
Frederick Rowe Keller 
Richard Ellard Kinsman 
Benjamin Liebowitz] 
Joseph Norris Murray 



Mechanical Engineer 



Albert Louis Baum 
Ralph Blumenfeld 
Clinton Brettell 
Sidney Milton Clark 
Frederick Stevens Frambach 
Walter Frederichs 
William Aloysius Gately 
[is] 



Alfred Leopold Jaros, Jr. 
Edgar''Jesse KXtz 
Matthias Kirschberg 
Frederick Thurlow Lacy 
Otis Chamberlain Morrill, A.B. 
Arthur Rowley Parker 
Welles Hamilton Sellew, A.B. 
Lillian Lee Vaughan, B.S. 



Chemist 



Luis Cacicedo, A.E., B.S. 
[2] 



Benjamin Horowitz 
Chemical Engineer 



Henry Michael Bach 
Carl Haner, Jr., A.B. 
Nathan Robert Levy 
[6] 



Donald Vaughn Lowe 
Louis Schlichting, Jr. 
Edward Albert Tschxtoy 



Bachelor of Architecture 



John Parks Almand 
Samuel Brenner 
Ellery Lothrup Davis 
Victor Emmanuel Eberhard 

bets) 

[7l 



(Octo- 



Erich Gugler 

Robert Jahelka 

Edward Cray Taylor (October 3) 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



413 



Bachelor of Science in Architecture 

George Hickenlooper (October 3^ 

Certificate of Proficiency 



Russell George Swartwoutj 

[2] 



Adolph Kugel 



Walteh Van Dreser 

Bachelor of Music 

Norris Lindsay Norden, B.S. 

Bachelor of Science in Education 



Grace Allingham 

Mary Frances Anderson 

Mary Annie Archer 

Alice Penfield Atwood (October 21) 

Isabel V. Bac6 

Rose AdSle Baird 

Lydia Ray Balderston 

Jessie Marie Barber 

Manuel Barranco 

William T. Bawden (October 21) 

Minna Dorothea Behr 

Nellie Warren Birdsong 

Edith Blackman 

Isidor Bernard Blumberg 

Cora Louise Boehringer 

Edward W. Boshart 

Olive Bostock 

Ida Estelle Boyd 

Grace E. Bruner 

Charlotte Adam Buemming 

Leila R. Godfrey Burfitt 

Mabel T. Burnham (October 21) 

Mary Florence Cahill 

Samuel Nathaniel Caplow 

Sarah Tucker Carrington 

M. Katherine Christian 

Marion Hoyt Chute 

Antonio Cirino 

Rose M. Clark (October 21) 

Anna Lois Coffey 

Ada Buell Colburn 

Katherine Rosamond Coleman (Feb- 

ruary 24) 
William Benjamin Cook 
Clarence Garfield Cooper 
Agnes Houston Craig (October 21) 
Hettie Weakley Craighead 
Hazel Alice Crumb 
Phosbe Jane Davidson 
Minnie Lee Davis 
Grace Alice Day 



Villa Auger Deevey (October 21) 

Jeannette Clyde Dingman 

E. Claire Dinwiddie 

Amalia Adalia Disch 

Helen Donovan 

Laura Franc Eaton 

Gratia Winthrop Eldridge 

Mary Jay Eldridge 

Estelle James Ellisson 

Georgia Belle Elwell 

Leila Enders 

Rachel Erwin 

LuRA Mary Eyestone 

Jennie Rebecca Faddis (April 21) 

Clara May Feeney 

Anna Fuller Fisher (April 21) 

Margaret O'Connor Fitzhugh 

Elizabeth Fletcher Fonda (October 

21) 
Alva Elvira Forssell 
Mary Elizabeth Frayser 
Louise Freer 
Anna Jeannette Gannett 
Mary Louise Gardner 
Eleanor Gay 
Mary Jane Genin 
Minnie Myrtle Gessford 
Caroline Maud Gilbert 
Terrence Ward Gilbert 
Gertrude Gladding 
Eugene Michael Gollup (April 21) 
Franklin Pierce Hamm (October 21) 
Katherine Vaughn Harding 
Agnes Ellen Harris 
Florence Ethel Harvey 
Carolyn Bell Hawk 
Florence Mary Healy 
Balbina Marcella Hess 
Bessie May Hicks 
Augusto Hidalgo (January 20) 
Helen Rebecca Hildreth (October 21) 



414 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Harriette Eliza Hinman 

Charles J. Hoffmann 

Elizabeth Gleason Holmes 

Irene Emma Hoyt 

Betty JoffS (February 24) 

Elizabeth Johnson 

Leila Glover Johnson 

Louise Elizabeth Jones 

Margaret Mordecai Jones 

Mary Philippa Jones (February 24) 

Elizabeth Beatrice Kelley 

Augusta Hall Kemper 

Margaret Agnes Kieran 

Annie Blanche Kirk 

Stella David Kisch 

Merle Irene Koch 

Walter Krumbeck 

Margaret Ideson Ladd 

Irene Mary Lanning 

Anna Leland 

Ray Lauder Leland 

Mignon Levin 

Gertrude May Lobdell 

Amy Louise Logan 

Anna Berta Longenecker 

Elizabeth Cordelia Macpherson 

Everett O. Maple 

Helen Marks 

Josephine Atlee Marshall 

Florence Jane Martin 

Carlota Matienzo 

Emma Bunn Matteson 

Emma Leonisa Maynard 

WiLFRiDA Jane Messenger (October 21) 

Elizabeth Meyjes 

Klara Marie Michaelson (October 

21) 
Joseph Stewart Michtom 
Isidore Miller 
Mary Elizabeth Minahan 
Kate Stackhouse Montgomery 
Alleen Moon (October 21) 
Carolyn Elizabeth Morrison 
Mary Brunette Foster Nassau 
Leonard John Nuttall, Jr. - 
Nell O'Brien (February 24) 
Vera Paye Ogden 
Blanche Marie Olin 
Julia Louise Owens 
Clara Pancake 
Martha Patterson 
Wilhelmina Pegram 
Eo Pendleton 
Mary Elizabeth Pennell 
Sarah Elizabeth Pettit 
Walter William Pettit 



Julia Phillips 
Florence Mary Pierpont 
Ina Klosking Pitner 
Nancy Huff Powell 
Mary Brigham Pratt 
America Puig 

Anita Winifred F. Randolph 
Gail Hamilton F. Randolph 
Mary Maud Reed (February 24) 
William Henry Reuther 
Gertrude Rhoads 
Clarinda Chapman Richards 
Rachel Tasker Richardson 
Harold Lopides Ritt 
Mabel Vera Rivers 
Elizabeth Meikle Roach 
Ethel Minerva Roach 
Lulie Niles Robbins (February 24) 
Annie L. Robinson (October 21) 
Bertha May Rogers 
Helena Mabel Ryland 
Blanche Sameth 
Elsie Sameth 

JuLiANE Marie Auguste Sarauw (Octo- 
ber 21) 
Emilie Schneider 
Edward Edwin Schwartz 
Isadore Krell Schwartz (October 21) 
Louise Humphrey Seely 
Caroline Lizetta Shaffner 
Margaret Moe Simmons (April 21) 
Katherine Aby Simpson 
Alice Madeleine Smart (February 24) 
Frank Drake Smith 
Helen Smith 
Mary^Goodwin Smith 
Nellie Carson Smithey 
Esther King Snoddy (October 21) 
Anna Eleanor Snyder 
Muriel Isobel Speller 
Harriet Monfort Spining 
Ellen Steele 
Eleanor Grace Stewart 
Hugh Henry Stewart 
Isabel Maitland Stewart 
Jean Josephine Stewart 
Minnie Margaret Stiles (February 24) 
Sara Porter Strong 
Alice Stephanie Sullivan 
Beatrice Sumner 
Ida Marie Swanson 
Alice Lillian Thomas 
Frieda Morse Thomas 
Marion Kendall Thompson 
Edna Parrish Tiffany 
Helen Faville Topping 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



415 



Helena^'Fredericka Trieschmann 
Faung-Yuin Tsao 
William Douglass Van Auken 
Bernard Joseph Van Ingen 
Marvin James Van Wagenen 
Charlotte Augusta Waite 
Alice Rebecca Wallin 
Grace Louise Wayman 
Julius Jay Weil 
Blanche Wylie Welzmiller 
Mabel Hubbard Wheeler (January 20) 
Belle Wiley 
[214] 



Elise Sweet Wiley 

Annie Jones Williams 

Anna Teer Wilson (April 21) 

Mary Margaret Wilson 

Almira Munn Winchester 

Joseph Scott Wiseman (February 24) 

Rosa K. Witter 

Caroline Conklin Wood 

Elizabeth Ash Woodward 

Ina Yoakley (February 24) 

Mary Amelia Yoran 

Emma Zenneck 



Doctor's Diploma in Education 



Carter Alexander (October 21) 
Louis Benjamin Blan 
Frederick Gordon Bonser (October 21) 
Samuel V/indsor Brown 
Bailey Barton Burritt 
Lotus Delta Coffman 
Edward Augustus Fitzpatrick 
[15] 



Alexander James Inglis 

Walter Albert Jessup 

Charles Henry Keyes 

Cecil Fairfield Lavell 

Abby Porter Leland 

William Louis Rabenort (April 21) 

Clarence Hall Robison 

Joseph King Van Denburg 



Anna Emma Everson 



Master's Diploma in Education 

Biology 

Clara Louise Williams 

Educational Administration 



William Asher 

Harold Barnes 

D'Arcy Cornwell Barnett 

Charles Winne Blessing 

Samuel Joseph Branch 

Frederic Hugo Doeden 

Spright Dowell 

Eugene Bernard Gartlan 

Watson Gienger 

Mason Albert Hawkins (October 21) 



George Hetzel 
Franklin Keller (October 21) 
Meredith Darlington Morris 
Frank James Platt 
Allen Mead Ruggles 
Heber Hynds Ryan 
Frank Marion Shelton 
Lionel Julius Simmonds 
George Everett Walk 
James Madison Wood 



Educational Philosophy 



May Louise Alder 

Orville Gilbert Brim 

Lucy May Ellis (February 24) 



Walter John Gifford 
Edward Cornell Zabriskie 



Hu Ting Chien 

EuPHAN Washington Macrae 



Educational Sociology 

Everett Belknap Tewksbury 



Elementary Education 



Elizabeth Starbuck Adams 

Bessie Lee Gambrill 

James Collins Miller (October 21) 



Nicholas Orem (October 21) 
George Lucas Roberts (October 21) 



4i6 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Elementary Supervision 



Florence Isabella Blades 
Lilian Louise Crafts 
Katherine Mary Hedges Hall 
Seiichiro Nishimura 
James Michael O'Gorman 



Harriet Louisa Barber 
Josephine Osborne Bostwick 



Anna Elsie Berneopf (October 21) 



Gilbert DeMorest Deere 



Peter Olai Osterhus 
Alma Mary Patterson 
John L. G. Pottorf 
George D. Sutton 



English 

Helen Winifred Bryant 
William Eugene Vaughan 

German 

History 

Reuel Raymond Neil Gould 



Rouper Stepan Racoubian 
Mary Kezia Hartzell 
Juliet Oakes Rogers 

Clara Rachel Bennett 

Mary Louise Alder 
Ruth Parker 



History of Education 

Household Administration 

Household Arts 

Industrial Education 

George Edward Webster 

Kindergarten Supervision 

Latin 



Mathematics 



Elizabeth Mitchell Back 
Helen Alice Dulin 
Clara Cecilia Eaton 
Florence James Flynn 



Anna Euretta Richardson 



Evelyn May Goldsmith 
D. Grace Greenwood 



Frederick Foreman Good 



Antoinette Dyett Hill 
Gertrude Elaine Preston 
Henrietta V. Race 



Nutrition 

Loretta Mae Wallace 



Physical Education 



Charles Finney Tambling 
Frederic Albert Woll 



Physical Science 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



417 



Secondary Education 



Claude Towne Benjamin 
George Washington Camp (October 21) 
Elizabeth Carse 

John Scholl Hosterman (October 21) 
Lazarus E. Marks 
1821 



Minna McEuen Meyer 

Robert Henry Rippere (October 21) 

Rebecca Jane Slaymaker (October 21) 

Elise Timberlake 

LuTiE Louise Wheeler 



Bachelor's Diploma in Education 



Biology 



Lura Mary Mack 
Louise Humphrey Seely 
Eleanor Grace Stewart 
Faung-Yuin Tsao 



Rose Ad6le Baird 

Georgia Belle Elwell 

Annie Fuller Fisher (April 20) 

Harrietts Eliza Hinman 

Anna Leland 

Josephine Atlee Marshall 



Grace Louise Wayman 
Helen Wilkes 
Elizabeth Ash Woodward 



Domestic Art 



Martha Patterson 

Ina Klosking Pitner 

Annie L. Robinson (October 21) 

Prieda Morse Thomas 

Caroline Conklin Wood 

Mary Amelia Yoran 



Domestic Science 



Grace Allingham 
Lydia Ray Balderston 
Jessie Marie Barber 
M. Katherine Christian 
Ada Buell Colburn 
Hettie Weakley Craigheae 
Jeanette Clyde Dingman 
Laura Franc Eaton 
Clara May Feeney 
Eleanor Gay 
Agnes Ellen Harris 
Augusta Hall Kemper 
Josephine Atlee Marshall 
Emma Bunn Mattesoj>' 
Blanche Olin 
Clara Pancake 



Sarah Elizabeth Pettit 

Julia Phillips 

AmSrica Puig 

Anita Winifred F. Randolph 

Gail Hamilton F. Randolph 

Ethel Minerva Roach 

Helena Mabel Ryland 

Blanche Sameth 

Helen Smith 

Jean Josephine Stewart 

Minnie Margaret Stiles (February 24) 

Sara Porter Strong 

Ida Marie Swanson 

Alice Lillian Thomas 

Alice Rebecca Wallin 



Eugene Michael Gollop (April 21) 
Mignon Levin 



Educational Psychology 

Gertrude May Lobdell 



Elementary Supervision 



Mary Frances Anderson 
Manuel Barranco 
Nellie Warren Birdsong 
IsiDOR Bernard Blumborg 



Cora Louise Boehringer 
Olive Bostock 
Clarence Garfield Cooper 
Minnie Lee Davis 



4i8 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Grace Alice Day 

Margaret O'Connor Fitzhugh 

Mary Elizabeth Frayser 

Mary Louise Gardner 

Franklin Pierce Hamm (October 21) 

Bessie May Hicks 

Elizabeth Johnson 

Everett O. Maple 

Klara Marie Michaelson (October 21) 

Carolyn Elizabeth Morrison 



Leonard John Nuttall 
Nell O'Brien (February 24) 
Walter William Pettit 
Mary Maxto Reed (February 24) 
Bertha May Rogers 
William Douglass Van Auken 
Julius Jay Weil 
Annie Jones Williams 
Belle Wiley 
Rosa K. Witter 



English 



Helen Lorene Amy 

Mabel Towne Burnham (October 21) 

Samuel Nathaniel Caplow 

Rose M. Clark (October 21) 

Phcebe Jane Davidson 

Estelle James Ellisson 

Minnie Myrtle Gessford 

Charles J. Hoffman 

Annie Blanche Kirk 

Merle Irene Kock 

Isidore Miller 

Kate Stackhouse Montgomery 



Alleen Moon (October 21) 

Agnes Nobis 

Florence Mary Pierpont 

Gertrude Rhoades 

Harold Lopides Ritt 

Mabel Vera Rivers 

Mary Goodwin Smith 

Anna Eleanor Snyder 

Helena Fredericka Trieschmann 

Marvin James Van Wagenen 

Blanche Wylie Welzmiller 

Emma Zennbck 



Fine Arts 



Minna Dorothea Behr 
Ida Estelle Boyd 
Marion Hoyt Chute 
Antonio Cirinio 
Florence E. Clark 
Caroline Maxjo Gilbert 



Edith Crowell Burns 
Amelia AurSlie Cl&mbnt 
Elizabeth Meyjes 



Elizabeth Johnson^ 



Louise Elizabeth Jones 
Clarinda Richards 
Rachel Richardson 
Elizabeth Meikle Roach 
Mary Margaret Wilson 



French 



Emilie Schneider 
Angelina Seveso 



Geography 
German 



Emilie Elizabeth Margaret Bruning 

Therese Cassel 

Katherine Vaughan Harding 

Alice Taylor Hill 

Betty JoFFfi (February 24) 

Elizabeth Meyjes 



JuLiANE Auguste Marie Saramo (Octo- 
ber 21) 
Emilie Schneider 
Edward Edwin Schwartz 
Isidore Krell Schwartz (October 21 



Grammar Grade Teaching 
Harriet Monfort Spining Caroline Lizetta^Shaffner 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



419 



History 



Mary Annie Archer 
Edith Crowell Burns 
■Amalia Adalia Disch 
Ray Lauder Leland 
Anna Bertha Longenecker 



Julia Louise Owens 
Wilhelmina Pegram 
Mabel Jean Reid 
Caroline Lizetta Shaffner 
Marion Kendall Thompson 



Industrial A rts 



Edward William Boshart 
Antonio Cirino 
Anna Lois Coffey 
Terrence Ward Gilbert 
Prxjdentia Browne Gowell 



Augusto Hidalgo (January 20) 
Leila Glover Johnson 
Walter Krumbeck 
William Henry Reuther 
Hugh Henry Stewart 



Kindergarten Supervision 



Sara Bostwick 

Villa Augur Deevey (October 21) 

Irene May Lanning 



Mary Elizabeth Pennell 
Mary Brigham Pratt 
Almira Munn Winchester 



Kindergarten Teaching 



Mary Jay Eldridge 
Leila Enders 
Rachel Erwin 
Gertrude Gladding 
Irene Hoyt 
Helen Marks 



Florence Jane Martin 
Vera Faye Ogden 
Beatrice Sumner 
Edna Parrish Tiffany 
Helen Faville Topping 



Latin 



Margaret Albright 

Henry Berkowitz (February 24) 

Sarah Tucker Carrington 

Therese Cassel 

William Casper Dorr 

Grace Green Lovell 



Emma Leonisa Maynard 

Wilfrida Jane Messenger (October 21) 

Nancy Huff Powell 

Esther King Snoddy (October 21) 

Bernard James Van Ingen 



Mathematics 



Isabel V. Baco 
Josephine Ad£le Bosch 
Eleanor Burne 
Amelia Aur£lie Cl£ment 
William Benjamin Cook 
Alva Elvira Forssell 
Lottie June Greiff 
Margaret Mordecai Jones 
Anna Augusta Kugler 



Joseph Stewart Michtom 
Helen Maud Porter 
Anna Lucile Reed 
Angelina Seveso 
Katherine Simpson 
Nellie Carson Smithey 
Ellen Steele 
Elise Sweet Wiley 



Music 



Elizabeth Naomi Gray 



420 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Eo Pendleton 



Primary Grade Teaching 
Physical Education 



Grace E. Bruner 
E. Claire Dinwiddie 
Gratia Winthrop Eldridge 
Louise Freer 
P. Ethel Harvey 
Florence Mary Healey 



Hazel Alice Crumb 
Lottie June Greiff 



Olive Bostock " ' 
Anna Jeannette Gannett 
I220J 



Stella David Kisch 
" Margaret Ideson Ladd 
Elizabeth Cordelia Macpherson 
Elsie Sameth 

Alice Madeleine Smart (February 24) 
Frank Drake Smith 

Physical Science 

Ina Yoakley (February 24) 

Primary Supervision 

Alice Stephanie Sullivan 
Anna Teer Wilson (April 21) 



Pharmaceutical Chemist 



Marion Astarita, Ph.G. 
Frank J. Brannigan, Ph.G. 
Harry L. Hermes, Ph.G. 
Frank L. Hunt, Ph.G. 
John J. Loughlin, Jr., Ph.G. 
[II] 



Arthur Machol, Ph.G. 
Leon M. Monell, Ph.G. 
Solomon Morris, Ph.G. 
Victor A. Robinson, Ph.G. 
Theodore Weicker, Ph.G. 
Samuel Wilkinson, Ph.G. 



Doctor of Pharmacy 



Robert F. Blume, Ph.G., Ph.C. 
[31 



RoDDiE Minor (Miss). Ph.G., Ph.C. 
Walter REGNAtn.T, Ph.G., Ph.C. 



Master of Arts 



Saul Bernard Ackerman 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1908. 
Elizabeth Starbuck Adams 

A.B. Wellesley 1896. 
Florence L. Adams 

B.L. Mt. Holyoke 1893. 
Orrin Wilson Albert 
A.B. Otterbein 1909. 
Margaret Albright 

A.B. Coe Coll, 1909. 
Mary Louise Alder 

A.B. Kansas State 1904. 
Carlo C. Altarelli 

B.D. Union Theol. Sem. 1910. 

JOSEPHUS COURTENAY ANDERSON 

A.B. Wofford Coll. 1906, A.M. 1907. 
Mary Anderson 
, A.B. Lake Forest 190S. 



Mary Perle Anderson 

B.S. Mt. Holyoke 1890. 
Elizabeth Williams Anthony 

A.B. Bates 1908. 
Alexander Appel 

B.S. 1909. 
William Asher 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1901, LL.B. N. Y 

Law Sch. 1906. 
Matthew Gruenberg Bach 

A.B. Trinity (Conn.) 1910. 
Elizabeth Mitchell Back 

A.B. 190S. 
Connie Gazette Barbee 

A.B. North Carolina 1910. 
Frank Weston Barber 

B.S. 1910. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



421 



Harold Barnes 

A.B. Kansas State 1892. 
D'Arcy Cornwell Barnett 

A.B, Maryland Agr'l Coll. 1898, 

A.M. I907. 
Charles Hobby Bassford 

B.S. Trinity Coll. (Conn.) 1910. 
George Jeremiah Becker 

A.B. Syracuse 1906. 
Claude Towne Benjamin 

A.B. Cornell 1897. 
Clara Rachel Bennett 

B.S. 1908. 
Anna Elise Bernkopf 

B.S. 1909. 

(October 18) 
Margarete Anna Marie Bernkopf 

Konigliches Lehrerinnenseminar 

Dresden 1888. 
Alice Townsend Bidwell 

A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1899. 
Paul Billingsley 

A.B. 1908. 
Florence Isabella Blades 
r A.B, Elmira 1905. 
Charles Winne Blessing 

A.B. Union 1888, S.T.B. Boston 

Univ. 1893 
Helene Marie Boas 

A.B. 1909. 

(February 21) 
George Addison Bole 

B.S. Geneva Coll. 1906. 
Josephine Osborne Bostwick 

A.B. Acadia Coll. 1901. 
Herbert Alexander Boyd 

A.B. Toronto 1909. 
Samuel Joseph Branch 

A.B. Lincoln Univ. 1902, A.M. 1905; 

B.D. Union Theol. Sem. 1907. 
Carl Brands 

A.B. 1906. 
Orville Gilbert Brim 

B.S. Valparaiso 1907. ' 
Ethel Elizabeth Brown 

A.B. Toronto 1904. 
Orville M. Brunson 

B.S. Earlham 1906. 
Helen Winifred Bryant 

A.B. Smith 1902. 
Jonas Franklin Bucher ~^ 

A.B. Franklin and Marshall 1903, 
Marjorie Burr 

A.B. Vassar 1899. 
Eunice Burton 

A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1908. 



George Washington Camp 

A.B. Emory Coll. 1896. 

(October 18) 
Edward Francis Carey 

A.B. Michigan 1898; S.T.B. Andover 

1901. 
Charles Antoninus Carroll 

A.B. Cornell 1910. 
Elizabeth Carse 

A.B. N. Y. Normal Coll. 1893, Ph.B. 

Cornell 189S. 
Mary Louise Chase 

A.B. Smith 1908. 
Shao-Kwan Chen 

A.M. Imperial Univ. of Pekin 1908. 
Hu Ting Chien 

A.B. Harvard 1910. 
Andrew Middleton Child, Jr. 

A.B. 1909. 
Chao-Hsin Chu 

A.M. Imperial Univ. of Pekin 

1907. 
Ella Hazel Clark 

A.B. Illinois 1905. 
LoRA Minnie Clark 

B.S. 1909. 
Rose May Clark 

B.S. 1910. 
Oral Sumner Coad 

A.B. Knox 1909. 
Florence Colby 

A.B. Denver Univ. 1909. 

(February 21) 
Paul Coleman 

A.B. Pittsburg 1905. 
William Carithers Coleman 

A.B. Pittsburg 1909. 
Elizabeth Brownell Collier 

A.B. Vassar 1906. 
Robert Comin 

A.B. Princeton 1897. 
John Earl Conn 

A.B. Findlay Coll. 1910. 
George Benson Cox 

A.B. Western Univ. London (Can- 
ada) 1906, B.D. Trinity Univ. 

Toronto 1910. 
Lilian Louise Crafts 

A.B. Rochester 1906. 
Earl W. Crecroft 

Ph.B.SFranklin 1907. 
Otelia Cromwell 

A.B. Smith 1900. 

(October 18) 
Anna Mills CtrooEBACK 

A.B. Vassar 1902. 



422 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Leonard Harold Davidow 

B.S.Sipio. 
Harry Thaddeus Davimos 

A.B. 1910. 
Amy Eliza Davis 

Ph.B. Wesleyan 1904. 
Gilbert DeMorest Deere 

Ph.B. Franklin Coll. 1903. 
MaryJCelia Demarest 

A.B. 1909. 
Arthur Dickson 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1909. 
William Warren Dimmick 

LL.B. N. Y. Univ. 1906. 
FredericIHugo Doeden 

A.B. Illinois 1904. 
Spright Dowell 

A.B. Wake Forest Coll. 1896. 
f" (October 18) 
Noel Thomas Dowling 

A.B. Vanderbilt 1909. 
OtisIHerbert Draper \ 

A.B. Johns Hopkins 1910. 
HelenJAlice Dulin 

A.B.;Randolph-Macon Woman's'Coll. 

1903. 
Samuel Glover Dunseath 

A.B. Ursinus 1910. 
Frederic Crook Eastman 

A.B. Williams 1896, M.D. Long 

Island Coll. 1899. 
Clara Cecilia Eaton 

A.B. 1908. 
Moses Eckstein 
Rose Frances Egan 

A.B. Syracuse 1900. 
Lucy May Ellis 

A.B. Goucher Coll. (Baltimore) 1908. 

(February 21) 
Lewis Epstein 

A.B. 1909. 
Percy Elwood Erickson 

A.B. Dartmouth 1906. 
Thuisco Arthur Erpf-Lefkovics 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1910. 

(February 21) 
Anna Emma Everson 

B.S. 1908. 
Anna Eves 

A.B. Earlham 1907. 
George Marcus Falion 

A.B. 190S. 

(October 18) 
Charles Reinhard Fettke 

B.S. Washington 1910.I 



James Kip Finch 

C.E. 1906. 
Ruth Stella Finch 

A.B. Smith 1906. 
Bess Lute Fishback 

A.B., B.S. Washington State Coll. 

1910. 
Florence James Flynn 

A.B. Ohio State 1896. 
Daniel Foley 

A.B. Boston Coll. 1901. 

(February 21) 
Harriet Ruth Fox 

A.B. 1910. 
Maude Morrison Frank 

A.B. N. Y. N«rmal Coll. 1907. 
Marie Harriet Frary 
Bessie Lee Gambrill 

A.B. Western Maryland Coll. 1902. 
Manuel Gamio 

Equiv. A.B. Escuela Preparatoria, 

Mexico City, 1906. 
Eugene Bernard Gartlan 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1898. LL.B. N. Y. 

Univ. 1900. 
Richard Garvey, Jr. 

B.S. St. Vincent's Coll. 1905. 
Marian Lathrop Gibson 

A.B. 1910. 
Watson Gienger 

A.B. Dickinson 1907. 
Walter John Gifford 

A.B. Oberlin 1907. 
Logan S. Gillentine 

B.S. Burritt Coll. 1898. A.B. Nash- 
ville Bible Coll. 1900. 
James Packard Gillespie 

A.B. 19OS. B.D. Union Theol. Sem. 

1907. 
Evelyn May Goldsmith 

B.S. 1910. 
Fred Foreman Good 

A.B. Juniata 1909. 
Mary Gould 

A.B. Minnesota 1907. 
Reuel Raymond Neil Gould 

A.B. Michigan 1901. 
James Eakins Gray 

A.B. 1909. 
Alexander Green 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1910. 
Grace Greenwood 

B.S. 1908. 
Edith Griffin 
A.B. Kansas 1907. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



423 



Ned Gray Griffin 

B.S. Dartmouth 1910. 
Jennie Kelso Guthrie 

A.B. Mt. Holyoke 1899. 
Gamble Hall 

B.S. N. Y. Univ. 1908. 
Katharine Mary Hedges Hall 

A.B. Stanford 1909. 
Margaret Woodburn Hall 

A.B. Vassar 1903. 

(February 21) 
Sherwood Estabrook Hall 
William Haller 

A.B. Amherst 1908. 
Ruth Gillette Hardy 

A.B. 1909. 
Frank Hector Harrin 

A.B. Kansas State Normal 1910. 
Ernst William Hartung 

A.B. 1910. 
Mary Kezia Hartzell 

B.S. Minnesota 1909, 
Henry Quinby Hawes 

A.B. Bowdoin 1910. 
Mabel Gary Hawes 

A.B. Wellesley 1 891. 

(February 21) 
Mason Albert Hawkins 

A.B. Harvard 1901. 

(October 18) 
Grace Althea Hayward 

A.B. Kansas 1905. A.M. 1907. 
Gertrude Mary Heaphy 

B.S. 1908. 
Julia Ryon Henning 

A.B. 1910. 
George Hetzel 

A.B. Kansas Normal Coll. 1910. 
Clara Kennedy Hicks 

B.S. Mt. Holyoke 1892. 
Antoinette Dyett Hill 

A.B. 1910. 
Mary Edith Holmes 

A.B. Michigan 1903. 
Merle Montgomery Hoover 

A.B. Lebanon Valley Coll. 1906. 

(February 21) 
Elizabeth Fuller Hopson 

A.B. Vassar 1905. 
Lydiard Horton 

A.B. Williams 1901. 
John School Hosterman 

A.B. Franklin and Marshall 1904. 

(October 18) 
Marion Houghton 

A.B. Bryn Mawr 1906. 



Lyman J. Howes 

A.B. Leland Stanford 1906. 
Eleanor Gary Hunsdon 

A.B. 1908. 
Gertrude Laura Hunter 

A.B. 1910. 
Falba Love Johnson 

A.B. Columbia Coll. for Women, 

S. C, 190S. 
Hannah May Johnson 

A.B. George Washington Univ. 1906. 
Robert Zachariah Johnstone 

A.B. Virginia Union 1908. 
John Clark Jordan 

A.B. Knox Coll. 1908. 

(February 21) 
Myrtle Jeannette Joseph 

A.B. California 1900. 
POA-VUNG Jui 

Ph.B. Yale 1909. 
Max Kahn 

M.D. Cornell 1910. 
Elias Raas Kaufman 

A.B. Vanderbilt 1909. 
Albert Samuel Keister 

A.B. Otterbein igio.aB.Mus. 1910. 
Franklin Jefferson Keller 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1906. 

(October 18) 
Benjamin Burks Kendrick 

B.S. Mercer Univ. 1905. 

(February 21) 
Roland Stuart Ketchum 

A.B. 1910. 
Howard Carson Kidd 

A.B. Geneva 1908. 
Thomas Bruce Kirkpatrick 

B.S. 1910. 
Yoshiwo Kitahara 

Equiv. LL.B. Waseda, Tokyo, 1905. 
John Anton Klein 

Ph.B. Central Wesleyan Coll. 1906. 
Anna Elizabeth Kurtz 

Ph.B. Ohio 1901. 
Harry Kurz 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909. 
Victor de La Flor 

(February 21) 
Emma May Laney 

A.B. Mississippi State Coll. for 

Women 1906. 
Willard Samuel Langton 

B.S. Agr. Coll. of Utah 1896. 
Louise Doddridge Larimore 

A.B. Wellesley 1910. 



424 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Frank Charles Laubach 

A.B. Princeton 1909. 
Leonard Axel Lawson 

A.B. Upsala Coll. 1909. 
HiLMA Leers 

A.B. 1904. 

(October 18) 
Michael Levine 

B.S. C, C. N. Y. 1906. 

(October 18) 
Victor Emmanuel Levine 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1909. 
Charles Lee Lewis 

B.S. Burritt Coll. 1903, A.B. Tennes- 
see 1906. 
Leicester Crosby Lewis 

A.B. 1910. 
Lester Miles Livengood 

B.L. Whitman 1908., 
Doris Long 

A.B. 1910. 
Louis Henry Lubarsky 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1904. 

(February 21) 
Lorenzo Grenville Lyon 

A.B. Princeton 1892, A.M. 1895. 

(October 18) 
John Daly McCarthy 

B.S. Dartmouth 1908. 
Clara Frances McIntyre 

A.B. RadcliflEe 1900. 
Minnie Elizabeth McKenzie 

Ph.B. Chicago 190S. 
John Miller McLaughlin 

B.S. Mt. Union 1900. 
William Gerald McLoughlin 

A.B. St. Francis Xavier 1907. 
Amelia McMinn 

B.S. Wisconsin 1895. 
Yin Ch'u Ma 

A.B. Yale 1910. 
Lura Mary Mack 

A.B. Vassar 1905. 
EuPHAN Washington Macrae 

Ph.B. Chicago 1901. 
William Mansfield 

Ph.G. 1903. Phar.D. 1904. 
Lazarus Emmanuel Marks 

B.S. 1910. 
Leola Ethel Marrs 

A.B., B.S. West Virginia 190S. 
Marvin Garfield Mason 

A.B. Dickinson 1906. 
Esther Matson 

A.B. Woman's Coll. of Baltimore 1897. 

(February 21) S 



Alexander MacPherson Meikle 

A.B. Wabash 1908, B.D. Union 

Theol. Sem, 1911. 
Nor hert John Melville 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1904. 
WiLFRiDA Jane Messenger 

B.S. 1910. 
Louise Gertrude Wagmann Metzger 

B.S. 1907. 
Minna McEuen Meyer (Mrs.) 

B.S. 1908. 
James Collins Miller 

B.S. Throop Polytechnic Inst. 1907. 

(October 18) 
Victor Garfield Mills 

Ph.B. Western Reserve 1904. 
Charlotte Moore 

Ph.B. Cornell 1899. 

(February 21) 
Winifred Tooley Moore 

(February 21) 
Meredith Darlington Morris 

A.B. Mt. Union 1895, A.M. 1901; 

A.B. Harvard 1896. 
Edgar Keer Morrow 

A.B. Ohio Wesleyan 190S. B.D. 

Union Theol. Sem. 1911. 
Hermann Joseph Muller 

A.B. 1910. 
Henri Charles Neel 

Equiv. A.B. Sorbonne 1909. 
Helen Newbold 

A.B. 1909. 
Seiichiro Nishimura 
NoRRis Lindsay Norden 

B.S. 1909. 
Edward Joseph O'Connell 

A.B. 1906. 
Elizabeth Barrett O'Farrell 

A.B. Coll. of St. Angela 1908. 

(October 18) 
James Michael O' Gorman 

B.S. 1909. 
Laura Virginia O'Hanlon 

A.B. N. Y. Normal Coll. 1910. 
Lucy Evelyn Ongley 

A.B. Smith 1908. 
Nicholas Orem 

A.B. St. John's Coll. Annapolis 

189s, A.M. 1910. 

(October 18) 
Peter Olai Osterhus 

B.S. Valparaiso 1906. 
SosuKE Otsuke 

Equiv. A.B. Tokyo 1909. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



425 



Elizabeth Anne Page 

A.B. Syracuse 1907. 
Ruth Parker 

A.B. Smith 1908. 
Miriam Greene Paslay 

A.B. Mississippi State Coll. for 

Women 1889. 
Alma Mary Patterson 

A.B. Stanford 1900. 
William DeForest Pearson 

A.B. 1910. 
George Adam Pfeiffer 

M.E. Stevens 1910. 
Maurice Picard 

A.B. 1910. 
Frank James Platt 

A.B. Beloit 1908. 
John L. G. Pottorf 

A.B. Mt. Union Coll. 1903- 
Alma Webster Powell 

LL.B. N.Y. Univ. 1900, B.Mus. 1910. 
Chilton Latham Powell 

A.B. Amherst 1907. A.M. 1908. 
Gertrude Elaine Preston 

Ph.B. Iowa State 1898. 
Julius Joseph Price 

A.B. Pennsylvania, 1908. 
Michael Puorro 

B.S. 1909. 
Mignon Quaw 

B.S. Montana State 1902. 
Henrietta Viola Race 

Ph.B. Lawrence Coll. 1900. 

A.M. Baker Univ. 1909. 
RoupEN Stefan Racoubian 

B.S. 1910. 
Anna Lucile Reed 

A.B. Pomona 1910. 
Cass Arthur Reed 

B.S. Pomona 1906, B.D. Union Theol. 

Sem. 1911. 
Helen Lees Reets 

A.B. Wilson 1910. 
Nannie Herndon Rice 

A. B. Mississippi State Coll. for 

Women 1905. 
Anna Euretta Richardson 

B.S. Nashville 1903. 
Morgan Thomas Riley 

A.B. Yale 1907. 
Robert Henry Rippere 

A.B. Wesleyan 190S. 

(October 18) 
George Lucas Roberts 

A.B. Indiana 1894. 

(October 18) 



James Howard Robinson 

A.B. Hamline 1908, B.D. Union 

TheoL Sem. 1911. 
Juliet Oakes Rogers 

B.S. 1909. 
Lillian Rosanoff 

A.B. 1908. 
George Jacob Rosenthal 

A.B. 1910. 
Henry Hosie Rowland 

A.B. Harvard 1906, B.D. Union 

Theol. Sem. 191X. 
Allen. Mead Ruggles 

A.B. Wisconsin 1906. 
Elmer Beecher Russell 

Ph.B. Vermont 1906. 
Heber Hinds Ryan 

B.S. Whitman Coll. 1906. 
Luis Emlynn Salas 

B.S. London Univ. 1904. 
JuLiANE Marie Auguste Sarauw 

B.S. 1910. 
Edna Rebecca Scales 

A.B. 1909. 
William Store Schlauch 

B.S. Pennsylvania 1903- 

(October 18) 
Arthur Meier Schlesinger 

A.B. Ohio State 1910. 
Mildred Deshon Schlesinger 

A.B. 1910. 
Julia Schoenfeld 

A.B. Allegheny Coll. 1897- 
Carl Alois Schwarze 

B.S. Mississippi 1909. 
Nellie Barney Sergent 

A.B. Smith 1906. 
Frank M. Shelton 

B.S. Mt. Union Coll. 1899. 
BiRL Earl Shultz 

A.B. DePauw 1909. 
Cecilia Minna Sillcox 

A.B. 1908. 
Lionel Julius Simmonds 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1903. 
Rebecca J. Slaymaker 

B.S. 1909. 

(October 18) 
Nellie May Smith 

A.B. Vassar 1898. 
Noble Hiram Smith 

Ph.B. Drake 1910. 
Nadine Hope Stein 

A.B. N. Y. Normal Coll. 1910. 
Walter Mitchell Stephen 

B.S. Washington State Coll. 190/. 



426 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Cecil Gardner Stevens 

A.B. Bishop's Univ. (Canada) 1908. 
William Bertrand Stevens 

B.D. Cambridge Epis. Theol. School 

1910. 
George Douglas Sutton 

B.S. Alma Coll. 1908. 
Charles Finney Tambling 

A.B. Oberlin 1895. 
Joseph Byron Tarney 

A.B. Indiana 1902. 
Everett Belknap Tewksbury 

A.B. Harvard 1899. 
John Furman Thomason 

B.L, Furman Univ. 1900, A.B. 

1903. 

(February 21) 
Alice Ranney Thompson 

B.S. California 1906. 
Edward Ole Thorpe 

A.B. Williams 1903. 
Elise Timberlake 

B.S. 1910. 
Ravaud Hawley Truax 

A.B. Hamilton 1909. 
Sarah Boyd Tucker 

A.B, Winthrop Coll. 1903. 

(October 18) 
Levering Tyson 

A.B. Pennsylvania Coll. 1910. 
Elsa Ueland 

A.B. Minnesota 1909. 
Hester Anne Van Arsdale 

A.B. Vassar 1910. 
Edgar Flandreau Van Buskirk 

A.B. Rochester 1907. 

(February 21) 
William Eugene Vaughan 

A.B. Peabody Coll. 1900. 
Alexander Vazakes 
Adelaide Brainerd Ventres 

A.B. Smith 1888. 
Joseph Vital 
Caroline Eliza Vose 

A.B. Wellesley 1910. 
Edwin Charles Wade 

A.B. Hampden-Sidney Coll. 1907. 

(February 21) 
George Everett Walk 

A.B. Ohio Wesleyan 1899. 
Robert Boyd Walkinshaw 

Ph.B. Wooster 1905. 
13 IS] 



LoRETTA Mae Wallace 

B.S. Purdue 1910. 
Frederica Warner 

Ph.B. Rochester 1909. 
Jay Odell Warner 

Ph.B. Wooster 1906. 
Ulysses Grant Warren 

Ph.B. Syracuse 1896. 
George Edward Webster 

B.S. BucknelI*i9o8, M.S. 1910. 
Edith Welle 

A.B. 1905. 

(October 18) 
Clara Wells 

A.B. N. Y. Normal Coll. 1909- 
LuTiE Louise Wheeler 

A.B. N. Y. State Normal Coll. 

1910. 
George Frisbie Whicher 

A.B. Amherst 1910. 
Karl Erroll Whitaker 

B.S. Vanderbilt 1909. 
Alvin Lincoln White 

B.S. Bethany Coll. 1886, A.M. 

1889. 
Goodrich Cook White 

A.B. Emory 1908. 
Francis Wien 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1900. 
Helen Chapman Wilcox 

A.B. Vassar 1908. 
Mary Adeline Willard 

A.B. Knox 1904. 
Clara Louise Williams 

A.B. McGill 1907. 
Winworth Williams 

A.B. Drake 1904. 
RoLLO Linsmore de Wilton 

A.B. 1910. 

(February 21) 
Adah Binford Winslow 

A.B. Virginia Coll. 1891, A.M. Vir- 
ginia Wesleyan 1893. 
Frederic Albert Woll 

B.S. 1910. 
James Madison Wood 

A.B., B.S. Missouri 1907. 
In Young 

Ph.B. Yale 1908, E.M. Lehigh 1910. 
Edward Cornell Zabriskie 

B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1893. 
Olga Olive von Zellen 

A.B. Michigan 190s. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



427 



Doctor of PhUosophy 



Le Roy Abrams 

A.B.Leland Stanford 1899, A.M. 1902. 
Dissertation: A phyto-geographical 
and taxonomic study of the Southern 
California trees and shrubs. 
(October 18) 

Carter Alexander 

B.S. (Educ.) Missouri 190S. A.B. 
1906, A.M. 1908. 

Dissertation: Some aspects of the 
work of teachers' voluntary associa- 
tions in the United States to-day. 
(.October 18) 

Luther Herbert Alexander 

A.B. Toronto 1883, A.M. 1883. 
Dissertation; -Ata participial sub- 
stantives in Romance; with special 
reference to French. 

Morris LeRoy Arnold 

A.B, Minnesota 1904, A.M. Harvard 
190S. 
- Dissertation: A study of Shake- 
speare's soliloquies. 

Robert Bagnell 
A.M. 1909. 

Dissertation: Economic and moral 
aspects of the liquor business. 

George Denton Beal 

A.B. 1910, Ph.B. Scio 1908. 
Dissertation: Stilbazoles and SchiS 
bases in the 4-quinazolone group. 

Ralph Curtiss Benedict 
Ph.B. Syracuse 1906. 
Dissertation: The genera of the fern 
tribe Vittariese. 

Louis Benjamin Blan 

A.M. 1908, B.S. C. C. N. Y. 1901. 
Dissertation: A special study of the 
incidence of retardation. 

Frederick Gordon Bonser 

B.S. Illinois 1901, M.S. 1902. 
Dissertation: The reasoning ability 
of ehUdren of the fourth, fifth, and 
sixth school grades. 
(October 18) 

Earl Lockridge Bradsher 

A.M. 1904, A.B. Missouri 1903. 
Dissertation: Mathew Carey: editor, 
author, and publisher: A study in 
American literary development. 

Joseph Valentine Breitwieser , 
A.B. Indiana 1907, A.M. 1908. 
Dissertation: Attention and move- 
ment in reaction time. 



Sidney David Brummer 

A.M. 1901, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1899. 
Dissertation: Political history of New 
York State during the period of the 
Civil War. 

Jessie Yereance Cann 

A.M. 1910, A.B. Woman's Coll. 
Bait. 1904. 

Dissertation: The relationship exist- 
ing between the weight of a falling 
drop and the diameter of the tip from 
which it falls. 

Francis Stuart Chapin 
B.S. 1909, A.M. 1910. 
Dissertation: Education and the 
mores. 

Huan-Chang Chen 

Equiv. A.B. Chaok'ing 1892, A.M. 
Canton 1903. Ph.D. Pekin 1904. 
Dissertation: Economic principles of 
the Confucian school. 

Edward Conner Chickering 

A.B. Yale 1896, A.M. Harvard 1897. 
Dissertation: An introduction to 
Octavia Praatexta. 
(February 21) 

John Maurice Clark 

A.M. 1906, A.B. Amherst 1905- 
Dissertation: Standards of reason- 
ableness in local freight discrimina- 
tions. — 
(October 18) 

Olynthus B. Clark 

B.S. Eureka 1896, A.M. 1900. 
Dissertation: The Politics of Iowa 
during the Civil War and Recon- 
struction Period. 

Lotus Delta Coffman 

A.B. Indiana 1906, A.M. 1910. 
Dissertation: The social composition 
of the teaching population. 

Garabed Krikor Daghlian 

A.M. 1910, A.B. Central Turkey 
Coll. 1902. 

Dissertation: The drop weights of 
twenty non-associated liquids and 
the molecular weights calculated for 
them. 
DuRANT Drake 

A.B. Harvard 1900, A.M. 1904. 
Dissertation: The problem of things 
in themselves. 
Clarence Norman Fenner 
E.M. 1892, A.M. 1909. 



428 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Dissertation: The Watchung basalt 

and the paragenesis of the zeolites 

and other secondary minerals. 

(October 1 8) 
Edgar Jacob Fisher 

A.B. Rochester 1906, A.M. 1907. 

Dissertation: The Province of New 

Jersey, 1738-1778. 
Edward Augustus Fitzpatrick 

B.S. 1906, A.M. 1907. 

Dissertation: The educational views 

and influence of DeWitt Clinton. 
William Trufant Foster 

A.B. Harvard 1901, A.M. 1904. 

Dissertation: Administration of the 

college curriculum. 
George Augustus Geiger 

A.M. 1910, A.B. Harvard 1908. 

Dissertation: Researches in the 

quinazoline g[roup. 
Clarence Everett Gordon 

A.M. 190S, B.S. Mass. Agl. Coll. 

1901, B.S. Boston Univ. 1903. 

Dissertation: The geology of the 

Poughkeepsie quadrangle. 

ISIDOR GrEENWALD 

A.B. Michigan 1909. 
Dissertation: The effect of para- 
thyroidectomy upon metabolism. 

Edmund Newton Harvey 
B.S. Pennsylvania 1909. 
Dissertation: Studies on the permea- 
bility of cells. 

Michael Heidelberger 
B.S. 1908, A.M. 1909. 
Dissertation: Phthalones in the 
quinazolone series and their deriv- 
atives. 

Jessie Wallace Hughan 
A.B. 1898, A.M. 1899. 
Dissertation: The present status of 
socialism in the United States. 

Alexander James Inglis 

A.B. Wesleyan 1902, A.M. 1909. 
Dissertation: The rise of the high 
school in Massachusetts. 

Herman Gerlach James 1 

A.B. Illinois 1906, A.M. 1910; J.D. 
Chicago 1909. 

Dissertation: The introductory arti- 
cles in the Constitution of Illinois. 

Walter Albert Jessup 
A.B. Earlham 1903. '' 
Dissertation: Social factors affecting 
special supervision in schools. 



AusnN Baxter Keep 

A.B. Amherst 1897. A.M. 1901. 
Dissertation: The library in colonial 
New York. 

Frank Dunn Kern 

B.S. Iowa 1904, M.S. Purdue 1907. 
Dissertation: A biologic and taxo- 
nomic study of the genus Gymno- 
sporangium. 

Charles Henry Keyes 

A.B. St. John's Coll. 1879. 
Dissertation: Progress through the 
grades of city schools: a study of 
acceleration and arrest. 

Edwin Kirk 
A.B. 1907. 

Dissertation: The structure and rela- 
tionships of certain eleutherozoic 
Pelmatazoa. 

Gordon Saul Philip Kleeberg 

a.b. 190s, a.m. 1906, ll.b. 1907. 
LL.M. 1908. 

Dissertation: The formation of the 
Republican party as a national po- 
litical organization. 

William Edwin Knickerbocker 
A.B. C. C..N. Y. 1904. 
Dissertation: Ellipsis in old French. 
(February 21). 

Cecil Fairfield Lavell 

A.M. Queen's Univ. (Canada) 1894. 
Dissertation: The evolution of Greek 
moral education. 

Abby Porter Leland 

A.B. 190S. A.M. 1906. 
Dissertation: The educational theory 
and practice of T. H. Green. 

Edward H. Lewinski-Corwin 

(Equivalent A.B.) Warsaw College. 
Dissertation: Workingmen's insur- 
ance in Belgium. 

Francis Church Lincoln 

A.M. 1907, B.S. Mass. Inst, of Tech. 
1900, E.M. New Mexico Sch. of 
Mines 1904. 

Dissertation: Certain natural asso- 
ciations of gold. 

Albert Arthur Livingston 
A.B. Amherst 1904. 
Dissertation: I sonetti morali e amo- 
rosi di Gian Francesco Busenello, 
cittadino Veneziano. Testo critico. 
(October 18) 

Almer McDuffie McAfee 
A.B. Texas 1908. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



429 



Dissertation: The drop weight of the 
associated liquids — water, ethyl alco- 
hol, methyl alcohol and acetic acid. 

Charles Virgin Morrill 

A.M. 1906, A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1903. 
Dissertation: The chromosomes in the 
oogenesis, fertilization, and cleavage 
of coreid hemiptera. 
(October 18) 

Joseph Albert Mosher 

A.M. 1907, Ph.B. Syracuse 1905. 
Ph.M. 1906. 

Dissertation: The exemplum in the 
early religious and didactic litera- 
ture of England. 

Frank Allen Patterson 

A.M. 1907. A.B. Syracuse 1904. 
Dissertation: The Middle English 
penitential lyric. 

Harry Gilbert Paul 

A.B. Michigan 1897, A.M. Chicago 

1901. 

Dissertation: John Dennis: his life 

and critical writings. 

(October 18) 

George Henry Porter 
Ph.B. Ohio 1901. 

Dissertation: Ohio politics during 
the Civil War period. 

Allen Wilson Porterfield 

A.B. West Virginia 1900, A.M. 1901. 
Dissertation: Karl Lebrecht Immer- 
mann: A study in German Roman- 
ticism. 
(February 21) '■ 

Edward Ewing Pratt 

A.B Oberlin CoU. 1906, A.M. 

Tulane Univ. 1907.) 

Dissertation: Industrial causes of 

congestion of population in New York 

City. 

William Raleigh Price ^ 

A.B. Cornell 1898. 
Dissertation: The symbolism of 
Voltaire's novels, with special refer- 
ence to Zadig. 

William Louis Rabenort 
B.S. 1906, A.M. 1907. 
Dissertation: Spinoza as educator^ 
(February 21) 

Paul Radin 

A.B. C. C. N. Y. 1902. 
Dissertation: The ritual and signi- 
ficance of the Winnebago medicine- 
lodge. 



Harry Wilfred Reddick 

A.B. Indiana 1904, A.M. Illinois 1906. 

Dissertation: Systems of tauto- 

chrones in a general field of force. 

(October 18) 
Alfred Zontzinger Reed 

A.B. Harvard 1897, A.M. 1898. 

Dissertation: The territorial basis of 

government under the state constitu- 
tions. 
Clarence Hall Robison 

A.B. Northwestern 1895, A.M. 1897. 

Dissertation : Agricultural instruc- 
tion in the public high schools of 

the United States. 

(February 21) 
Gaillard Sherburne Rogers 

A.B. 1908, A.M. 1909. 

Dissertation: Geology of the Cort- 

landt series and its emery deposits. 
Edward McChesney Sait 

A.B. Toronto 1902, A.M. 1903. 

Dissertation: Recent tendencies^^in 

primary legislation. 
Frederick William Schwartz 

B.S. Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. 

1905. 

Dissertation: The weight of a falling 

drop and the laws of Tate. The drop 

weights and molecular weights of 

some of the lower esters. 
Aaron Franklin Shull 

A.B. Michigan 1908. 

Dissertation: Studies in the life cycle 

of Hydatina Senta. 
Frederick Judson Soule 

A.M. 1909, A.B. Alma 1906. 

Dissertation: An American village 

community. 

(February 21) 
David Bernard Steinman 

C?E. A.M. 1909. B.S. C. C. N. Y. 

1906. 

Dissertation: The determination of 

maximum and economic spans for 

suspension bridges and cantilevers. 
Edward Kellogg Strong, Jr. 

B.S. California 1906, M.S. 1909. 

Dissertation: The relative merit of 

advertisements: a psychological and 

statistical study. 
Rupert Taylor 

A.B. Arkansas 1903, A.M. 1906. 

Dissertation: The political prophecy 
in England. 



430 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Edgar George Thomssen Mary Theodora Whitley 

B.S. 1907, A.M. 1908. B.S. 190S, A.M. 1906. 

Dissertation: The weight of a falling Dissertation: An empirical study of 

drop and the laws of Tate. The certain tests for individual differ- 

determinations of the molecular ences. 

weights and critical temperatures of Louis Elsberg Wise 

liquids by aid'ofdrop^ weights with an A.B. 1907. 

improved apparatus. Dissertation: Para-aminobenzonitrile 

(February 21) and its derivatives.! 

Joseph K. VanDenburg Samuel Lee Wolff 3 

A.B. Wesleyan 189S, A.M. 1898. A.M. 189S. LL.B. 1897; A.B. Har- 

; Dissertation: Causes of the elimina- vard 1892. 

tion of students in the public sec- Dissertation:'The' Greek romances in 

ondary schools of New York City. Elizabethan fiction. 

Carl Van Doren Leon Elmer Woodman 

A.B. Illinois 1907. A.B. Dartmouth 1899. A.M. 1902. 

Dissertation: The life of Thomas Dissertation: A study of the multiple 

Love Peacock. reflections of short electric waves 

Chin Yu Wen between two or more reflecting sur- 

B.S. Mass. Inst. Tech. 1908, M.S. faces. 

1909. (October 18) 

Dissertation: The effect of organic Hawkling Lugine Yen 

and inorganic "addition agents" A.M. 1909. A.B. St. John's Univ. 

upon the electro-deposition of copper 1907- 

from electrolytes containing arsenic. Dissertation: A survey ofj^constitu- 

[76] tional development in China. 

HONORARY DEGREES 

Master of Science 

Daniel Edward Moran 
of the Class of 18S4, School of Mines 
Samuel William Fairchild 
of New York 

Master of Arts 

Hugo Reisinger 
of New York , 

Doctor of Science 

'• Charles Francis Stokes 
of the Class of i884,iCollege of Physicians and Surgeons 
Surgeon General of the United States Navy 

Doctor of Letters 

Edward Robinson 
Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Doctor of Sacred Theology 

The Right Reverend Charles Sumner Burch 
Bishop Suffragan of the Diocese of New York 
The Right Reverend William Lawrence 
Bishop of Massachusetts 



DEGREES CONFERRED 431 

Doctor of Laws 

Alonzo Barton Hepburn 

President of the Chamber of Commerce of the Stale of New York 

Simeon Eben Baldwin 

Governor of Connecticut 

Baron d'Estournelles de Constant 

Senator of France 

Charles Frederick Chandler 

Mitchill Professor of Chemistry in Columbia University 



{Conferred January 9, 1911) 
Ernst Daenell, Litt.D. — 
Professor of Modern History in the University of Kiel 
Kaiser Wilhelm Professor igio-ii 

Commencement Calendar, 191 1 

May 29-31 — Teachers College Exhibition. 

June 2 — Barnard College Senior Dance; Teachers College River Day. 

June 4 — Baccalaureate Service, Rt. Rev. Charles Stunner Burch, 
D.D., Bishop Suffragan of the Diocese of New York, 
Preacher. 

June 5 — Columbia College Class Day; Senior Dance; Teachers College 
Dance. 

June 5-10 — Architectural Exhibition. 

June 6 — Barnard College Ivy Day; Phi Beta Kappa Oration, Hon. 
Theodore E. Burton, United States Senator from Ohio. 

June 7 — Commencement; Conferring of Degrees and Award of 
Honors; Laying of Corner Stone of the Avery Library 
Building; Presentation of Exedra by Class of '86, College 
and Science; Presentation of Gemot in Hamilton Hall by 
Class of '81, College and Science; Alumni Luncheons; 
Costume Parade; Baseball Game, Lafayette vs. Columbia; 
Alumnse Reception; Pushball Contest, '86 vs. 1901; Beef- 
steak Dinner; Senior and Alumni Singing and Band 
Concert. 

June 8 — Barnard College Class Day. 



FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND OTHER PROVISION FOR 
THE ASSISTANCE AND REWARD OF STUDENTS 

NOTE. Unless otherwise provided, all stipends of Fellows and Scholars shall be paid 
in equal semi-annual ^instalments on the second Wednesday of each half-year. Be- 
fore being entitled to receive either instalment of his stipend, each Fellow and Scholar 
is required to report himself in writing to the Registrar as in residence, on or before 
the opening day of each half-year. Failure so to report may operate to vacate the 
Fellowship or Scholarship. 

All Fellows ,and Scholars^ are' required [to pay all fees for matriculation, tuition, 
graduation, and for the use of the Gymnasiimi. The provisions regarding the mazimtmi 
fee for the higher degrees and the statute concerning the sons of professors do not 
apply to them. 

General Regulations 

The following regulations apply, unless the contrary is specifically 
stated, to the award of all fellowships and scholarships: 

In each case application in writing, on a blank prepared for the purpose 
must be filed with the Secretary of the University; for fellowships it 
should be filed on or before March i ; for University scholarships on or 
before April i , and for other scholarships on or before May i . Applications 
and documents received in support thereof later than these dates, or not 
distinctly indicating the name of the candidate and the fellowship or 
scholarship for which he applies, may fail of consideration. As an evidence 
of graduation, a printed certificate is preferable to the formal diploma 
itself, as there is risk that the latter may be lost or injured in transit. 

The appointment is in each case for one year dating from July i. Can- 
didates will be notified as promptly as possible as to the success of their 
applications. Documents and letters submitted by the candidates are 
returned, but not letters written direct to the University. If the applicant 
wishes the documents which he has submitted returned to him by mail 
he should enclose postage for the purpose, otherwise they will be held 
tmtil called for. Documents will not be preserved for more than one 
year from the date of application. 

All Fellows and Scholars, as hereinafter provided, shall reside in New 
York City or its vicinity during the academic year, unless permission be 
granted by the Council to study elsewhere. No Fellow or Scholar may 
pursue a professional or technical course of study during his term. 

The conditions under which the appointment may be granted are 
indicated in the following paragraphs: 

432 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 433 

UNIVERSITY FELLOWSHIPS 

(For awards, see p. 454) 

Twelve fellowships, of the value of $650 each, known as "Univer- 
sity Fellowships, " are awarded annually by the University Council at 
its stated meeting in April, to those graduates of colleges and scientific 
schools, not over thirty years of age, who show themselves especially 
fitted to pursue courses of higher study and original investigation. 
The candidate must give evidence: 

(o) of a liberal education, such as a diploma from a college or sci- 
entific school of good repute ; 

(6) of decided fitness for a special line of study, such as an example 
of some scientific or literary work already performed; 

(c) of upright character, such as a testimonial from some instructor. 

A Fellow may be reappointed for reasons of weight, but not for more 
than two terms of one year each. 

As these fellowships are awarded as honors, those who are disposed, 
for the benefit of others, to waive the pecuniary emolument, may do so, 
and still have their names retained on the list of Fellows. In such cases 
additional University Fellows may be appointed. 

Vacancies will be filled in the same manner in which original ap- 
pointments are made. 

Each Fellow is expected to perform such duties as are allotted to 
him in connection with a course of study leading to the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. He is expected to devote his time to the pro- 
secution of special studies under the direction of the head of the de- 
partment in which his major subject lies, and before the close of the 
academic year to give evidence of progress by the preparation of a 
thesis, the completion of a research, the delivery of a lecture, or by 
some other method. 

No Fellow shall be allowed to accept remunerative employment 
or to give instruction or assistance in any department of the University 
except by permission of the President, and the acceptance of any such 
employment, without such permission, shall operate to vacate the 
fellowship. 

SPECIAL FELLOWSHIPS 

Unless otherwise specified, the regulations as to the mode of applica- 
tion for the following fellowships, and the conditions governing their 
award and tenure, are the same as those for University fellowships 
(see ante). Candidates should indicate clearly upon their application- 
blanks the fellowship for which they are applicants. For awards, see 
page 455. 

Tyndall and Barnard Fellowships 

The Tyndall Fellowship for the Encouragement of Research in 
Physics, endowed by Professor John Tyndall, annual value $648, 



434 FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

and the Barnard Fellowship for Encouraging Scientific Research, 
endowed by the bequest of the Icte President Barnard, annual value 
$400, are awarded annually under the following conditions: The 
Tyndall Fellowship is available for one or more American pupils who 
may have shown- decided talent in physics, preferably such as shall 
express the determination to devote their lives to the advancement of 
theoretic science and original investigations in that department of 
learning, and is awarded either to a graduate of the University or to a 
student in it (not necessarily a candidate for a degree) upon the recom.- 
mendation of the head of the Department of Physics. The Barnard 
Fellowship is awarded upon the joint recommendation of the Faculties 
of Columbia College, Applied Science, and Pure Science to a graduate 
of any one of them who, having shown decided aptness for physical 
investigation, is disposed to devote himself thereto for some years 
continuously. The recommendation must in each case be made to the 
President on or before April i. The appointm.ent is for the term of one 
year, but the incumbent shall be eligible to reappointment. 

It is the duty of a Tyndall or Barnard Fellow to devote himself 
faithfully to the investigation of some subject in physical science at 
this, or some other University, under the supervision of some known 
physicist approved by the President, and the head of the Department 
of Physics. He shall make a quarterly report, certified to by the 
physicist superintending and directing him, to the President, giving 
an account of the v/ork in which he has been engaged during the aca- 
demic or calendar quarter preceding. For awards, see page 455. 

Adams Research Fellowship 

The Ernest Kempton Adams Research Fellowship, founded by 
Mr. Edward Dean Adams, in memory of his son, Ernest Kempton 
Adams, E. E. '97, A.M. '98, is of an annual value of $1250. The 
appointment may be made from among the teaching staff, alumni, 
or students of Columbia University. The incumbent of the fel- 
lowship shall prosecute researches either in Columbia University or 
elsewhere, in the physical sciences, in psychology, or in their prac- 
tical applications. The results of the investigations of the incumbent 
of the fellowship are published and distributed by the University 
under the title of "Researches of the Ernest Kempton Adams Re- 
search Fellows of Columbia University. " For awards, see page 455. 

Class of '70 Fellowship 

There is a fellowship known as the "Class of '70 Fellowship, " of the 
annual value of $500, which, after the expiration of the term of the 
present incumbent, shall be filled by the University Council, subject to 
such regulations as may be prescribed. For award, see page 455. 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 435 

George William Curtis Fellowship 

The George William Curtis Fellowship is awarded for a term of two 
years upon the recommendation of the Faculty of Political Science in 
every third year, the next award being July i, 19 12. The Curtis 
Fellow shall be entitled to receive during his incumbency the net in- 
come of the endowment of $10,000 (in 1908-09, $600 annually), ac- 
cruing during a period of three years, and proportionately for any 
part of the term. 

Candidates shall submit an essay or address on the "Immediate 
Duty of the American Citizen, " in addition to complying with the 
requirements of candidates for University Fellowships. 

The Fellow shall devote himself to the study of the science of gov- 
ernment, with a special view to its application to the then existing 
condition of the United States or to the State or City of New York; 
and at or before the conclusion of his second year he shall publish (a) a 
monograph satisfactory to the Faculty of Political Science on some 
subject relating thereto, and (6) a brief sketch of George William 
Curtis as a citizen and orator, showing that he has familiarized himself 
with the life and character of the man whose memory is to be per- 
petuated by the fellowship which he has enjoyed. For awards, see 
page 456. 

Drisler Fellowship 

The Henry Drisler Fellowship in Classical Philology, established in 
1894 in commemoration of the semi-centennial in the service of the 
University of Professor Henry Drisler, A.B. 1839, is of the annual 
value of $650, and is open to Bachelors of Arts of this University, or 
some other institution of equivalent standing, who have studied Greek 
and Latin throughout their undergraduate course, and who have an 
adequate knowledge of French and German. They must present tes- 
timonials from their instructors in Greek and Latin as to the quality 
of their work, and give evidence of fitness for advanced study and 
research, either by a special examination, or by an essay embodying 
the results of research in some department of classical study. 

The appointment is made by the University Council on the recom- 
mendation of the Department of Classical Philology. Recommendations 
should reach the President on or before April i, and reappointments 
may be made for not more than two terms of one year each. 

The Fellow must study at this University under the direction of the 
professors of Greek and Latin, unless permitted by the Council to 
spend a year in some foreign university, or in the American School of 
Classical Studies at Athens, or in the American School of Classical 
Studies at Rome. For awards, see page 456. 



436 FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

Garth Fellowship 

The Granville W. Garth Fellowship in Political Economy is awarded 
each year. The successful applicant for the fellowship shall be en- 
titled to receive the net annual income of the capital sum of the 
Granville W. Garth Memorial Fund of $16,250. See page 485. For 
awards, see page 456. 

Gottsberger Fellowship 

The Gottsberger Fellowship, awarded every second year, is open 
only to candidates who, having first taken a degree in Columbia 
College, have been for not less than two years resident graduate 
students of Columbia University, taking also the degree of Master 
of Arts. The holder may with the consent of the professor in charge 
of his major subject of study, and with the approval of the President, 
pursue his studies abroad. The Fellow so appointed receives the net 
income for two years of the capital sum of $9500 constituting the 
Cornelius Heeney Gottsberger Scholarship Fund. For awards, see 
page 456. 

Mosenthal Fellowship 

The Mosenthal Fellowship, established in memory of the late Joseph 
Mosenthal, is designed to aid talented students of musical composi- 
tion, either men or women, in the study of their art. The stipend is 
the net income for two years of the capital sum of $7500. It is awarded 
every second year by the Council upon the recommendation of the 
Professor of Music, and is tenable for one year. 

Applicants are required to show a thorough knowledge of harmony 
and of counterpoint and some ability to compose, by submitting a 
number of original compositions in support of their applications. 

The holder must devote himself to the study of musical composition 
at Columbia University, or, with the approval of the President and the 
Professor of Music, abroad. In the former case, he shall be required, 
in addition to his studies in Music, to pursue such other studies in at 
least two departments of the University as the Professor of Music 
may direct. In either case, the Fellow shall submit, at such times 
as the Professor of Music may designate, the results of his work in 
musical composition. For awards, see page 456. 

Proudfit Fellowship in Letters 

The Alexander Moncrief Proudfit Fellowship in Letters for the 
encouragement of the study of English Literature, founded by the 
bequest of Alexander Moncrief Proudfit, is open to any son of native- 
born American parents who shall have taken the degree of Bachelor 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 437 

of Arts after three years' residence in Columbia College, and who shall, 
while enjoying such fellowship, remain unmarried. The appointment 
is made by the Council upon the joint recommendation of the professors 
in the Department of English. The Fellow shall be entitled to receive 
during his incumbency the net income of the sum of $13,875. He shall 
carry on his studies and research at Columbia University, or elsewhere, 
under the direction of the professors in the department named. For 
awards, see page 456. 

Schiff Fellowship 

The SchiflE Fellowship in Political Science, the gift of Mr. Jacob H. 
SchiS, is of an annual value of $600. The appointment is made each 
year by the Council upon the recommendation of the Faculty of Po- 
litical Science, which recommendation is based upon the nomination 
following: On or before April i of each academic year the Faculty of 
Political Science shall propose to Mr. Jacob H. Schiff while living the 
name of a suitable person for nomination by him. The conditions to 
govern the nomination after Mr. SchifE's death will be found in the 
University Statutes. For awards, see page 457. 

Carl Schurz Fellowship 

The Carl Schurz Fellowship for the Study of the German Language 
and Literature is awarded, in every even-numbered year, by the 
Council, upon the recommendation of the professors of the Department 
of Germanic Languages and Literatures. The Fellow shall be en- 
titled to receive the net income for two years of the capital sum of 
$10,000, constituting the endowment contributed by citizens of New 
York, in commemoration of the seventieth birthday of Carl Schurz. 
The appointment may be renewed for reasons of weight for a further 
term of one year, but without additional stipend. 

Candidates must present testimonials as to their zeal and success 
in the study of German, and must by an essay or published treatise 
give evidence of their fitness for a wider and more profound study of 
the languages and literatures and for independent research. They 
must also have a sufficient knowledge of Latin and French to use 
these languages readily in the prosecution of their studies. The 
holder must study at Columbia University under the direction of the 
Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, unless permitted 
by the Council to stud)' at some German university. For awards, see 
page 457. 

William Mitchell Fellowship 

The William Mitchell Fellowship shall be awarded annually by the 
Trustees, on the nomination of the Faculty of Columbia College, to 



438 FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

a graduate of the College who purposes entering upon a course of ad- 
vanced study in letters or science, and who is adjudged by the Faculty 
capable of attaining distinction in such courses of study. In deter- 
mining the appointment, preference shall be given to members of the 
graduating class and to graduates of not more than three years' standing. 
The Fellow so appointed shall be entitled to receive the net income of 
the fund of $10,000, bequeathed by Benjamin D. Silliman, and he is 
permitted to study at Columbia University or elsewhere. For awards, 
see page 457. 

Samuel Anthony Goldschmidt Fellowship 

The Samuel Anthony Goldschmidt Fellowship in Chemistry is 
awarded each year by the University Council in the same manner as 
University Fellowships are awarded and subject to the same regula- 
tions. The Fellow shall be entitled to receive the net annual income 
of $16,250, the gift of George B. Goldschmidt in memory of Samuel 
Anthony Goldschmidt of the class of 1871, For awards, see page 457. 

Richard Watson Gilder Fellowship 

Two or more Gilder Fellowships shall be awarded annually by the Uni- 
versity Council upon the recommendation of the Faculty of Political 
Science to graduates of any college or university, or to students having 
exceptional qualifications. The holders of the fellowships shall devote 
themselves to the investigation of political and social conditions in this 
country or abroad; to the examination and analysis of the practical working 
of legislation enacted for the purpose of improving civic conditions or to 
practical civic work, in accordance with plans approved by the Professor 
of Politics and the Professor of Sociology. It shall be the duty of each 
Gilder Fellow to make a written report at least semi-annually to such 
proiossors, giving an account of the work on which he has been engaged. 
Each of such Fellows shall receive such portion of the income of the Richard 
Watson Gilder Fund for the Promotion of Good Citizenship as the Trus- 
tees may from time to time determine, provided that a portion of the income 
of the fund may in the discretion of the Trustees be set aside to meet the 
cost of publishing the results of the investigations and studies of such 
Fellows, and such publications shall bear the title of the fund. A Fellow 
appointed under this section may be reappointed for two additional years, 
and no more. For award, see page 457. 

Annual Fellowships 

The Treasurer may receive gifts of money for fellowships for one 
year or more provided that no fellowship shall be created for less than 
$500 per annum. Such fellowship shall be filled by the University 
Council, subject to such regulations as may be prescribed. 



FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 439 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS 

Twenty University Scholarships, of an annual value of $150, are 
awarded by the University Council at the regular meeting in May to 
students under the Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, and 
Pure Science, who are not over thirty years of age, under the following 
regulations : 

1. They are open to all graduates of colleges and scientific schools 
whose course of study has been such as to entitle them to be enrolled 
at Columbia as candidates for one of the higher degrees. 

2. They are tenable for one academic year, with a possibility of 
renewal for one year longer. 

3. Applications should be filed in writing, not later than May i. 

4. In the awards preference will be given to those candidates for 
University Fellowships who have failed of appointment after having 
been recommended therefor by any faculty or department. 

5. University Scholars will be required to enrol themselves as can- 
didates for a higher degree and to pursue a regular course of study 
leading thereto. 

6. Additional Scholars may be appointed by the Committee to fill any 
vacancies occurring otherwise than by the graduation of an incumbent. 

7. A University Scholar may relinquish the income thereof without 
waiving his right to be designated as a University Scholar. 

For awards, see page 457. 

President's University Scholarships 

Eight additional scholarships, known as the President's University 
Scholarships, are awarded by the University Council, governed by the 
regulations attached to the University Scholarships, and by such 
further regulations as may from time to time be adopted. 

University Scholarships for Women 

Four University Scholarships, known as the Curtis University 
Scholarships, will be awarded annually to women students under the 
Faculties of Political Science, Philosophy, and Pure Science. These 
scholarships are awarded under the same regulations as those govern- 
ing the University Scholarships. For awards, see page 458. 

Richard Butler Scholarship 

The Richard Butler Scholarship, tenable for one academic year, 
with the possibility of renewal for each of two years more, for the 
benefit of male students bom in the State of Ohio, is open for com- 
petition to qualified candidates who propose to enter any college or 
school of the University (except Teachers College or the College of 
Pharmacy). The annual value (to be applied to tuition charges) 



440 FELLOWSHIPS AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

is the income of a fund of $5000, given for the estabHshment of the 
scholarship. 

Applications should be made under the same regulations as those 
for University Scholarships. For awards, see page 458. 

Pulitzer Scholarships 

Through the generosity of the late Mr. Joseph Pulitzer, male graduates 
of the public high-schools of the city of New York, not to exceed forty 
at any time, are awarded scholarships upon competitive examination. 
Each scholarship so awarded may be held for a period of four years 
in the College or in any department of the University except the 
Medical School, Teachers College, and the College of Pharmacy. The 
scholarship will be withdrawn if at any time the holder fails to main- 
tain a satisfactory standard in his academic work. During his term the 
scholar receives from Mr. Pulitzer the sum of $250 a year over and 
above the cost of his tuition. Full information regarding the con- 
ditions under which these scholarships are awarded will be furnished, 
upon application, by the Secretary of the University. 

John D. Jones Scholarship 

The Wawepex Society makes annual provision for a scholarship 
amounting to $200 and including the use of a table at the biological 
laboratory at Cold Spring Harbor, L. I. The award is made by the 
Council upon the recommendation of the Department of Zo5logy. For 
awards, see page 458. 

Annual Scholarships 

The Treasurer may receive gifts of money for scholarships for one 
or more years, provided that no such stipend shall be less than the 
annual tuition fee of the college or of the school in which it is provided. 

Benefactors Scholarships 

Sixty-three scholarships of tuition value were established by the 
Trustees in 1899 in recognition of the liberal gifts for the purchase of 
the site on Morningside Heights received from J. Pierpont Morgan, 
Cornelius Vanderbilt, A. A. Low, R, Fulton Cutting, Alfred Corning 
Clark, Samuel Sloan, Henry Parish, Jacob H. Schiff, and others. 
These scholarships have been assigned to different faculties as follows : 
Columbia College 20 ; Applied Science 27 ; Law 16. 

Medals and Prizes 

Essays submitted in competition for any of the following should, 
unless otherwise indicated, be submitted to the Secretary of the Uni- 



MEDALS AND PRIZES 44I 

versity not later than May i, in the year of award. The essays should 
be signed fictitiously and should be accompanied by a sealed envelope 
containing the author's name and address. The awards are announced 
at Commencement and, unless otherwise indicated, are annual. 

National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution Medal. 

For information as to the award of the medals offered by this Society, 
apply to the Secretary of the University. 

Barnard Medal 

A gold medal of the value of $200 established by the provisions 
of the will of President Barnard and endowed by him, known as the 
"Barnard Medal for Meritorious Service to Science," is awarded 
quinquennially (next award 1915) to such person, if any, whether a 
citizen of the United States or any other country, as shall within the 
five years next preceding have made such discovery in physical or 
astronomical science, or such novel application of science to purposes 
beneficial to the human race, as in the judgment of the National 
Academy of Sciences of the United States shall be esteemed most 
worthy of such honor. For awards, see page 459. 

Bunner Medal 

The H. C. Bunner Gold Medal, established by the friends of the late 
Henry Cuyler Bunner, is awarded to the candidate for a Columbia 
degree who shall present the best essay on an assigned subject in 
American literature. The award will be made by a committee to be 
appointed by the President. The subject for the essays to be handed 
in on May i, 1912, is "Mark Twain as a Novelist." For award, see 
page 459. 

Bennett Prize 

A prize established through a gift of $iooo from Mr. James Gor- 
don Bennett may be awarded by the Faculty of Political Science for 
the best essay upon some subject of contemporaneous interest in the 
domestic or foreign policy of the United States. The competition is 
open to students not holding a baccalaureate degree who pursue courses 
amounting to six hours a week in the School of Political Science. The 
subject for 1912 is "Primary Legislation in New York." For award, see 
page 459. 

Loubat Prizes 

Mr. Joseph F. Loubat has endowed two prizes of $1000 and $400,. 
respectively, for the best works published in the English language 
upon the history, geography, archaeology, ethnology, philology, or 



442 MEDALS AND PRIZES 

numismatics of North America. The next award will be made in 19 13. 
Competition is open, under the deed of gift, to all persons, whether 
connected with Columbia University or not, and whether citizens of 
the United States or of any other country. No treatise shall be 
eligible for the purposes of the competition except such as relate to the 
topics involving antiquarian research, or that refer to events prior to 
1776. In order to insure consideration of their works, authors are 
invited to send copies to the President of Columbia University not 
later than April i of the year in which the prize is to be awarded; but 
the competition will not be restricted to works thus submitted. For 
names of the Committee of Award for 19 13, and for further details, 
address the Secretary of the University. For awards, see page 460, 

Grant Squires Prize 

The Grant Squires Prize, the income for five years of a fund of 
$1000, established by Grant Squires, A.B. '85, LL.B. '87, is awarded 
at the close of every quinquennial period, to such graduate conducting 
an original investigation of a sociological character as shall be adjudged 
most worthy by a Committee of Award, consisting of the President, 
the Professor of Sociology, and one of the Professors of Political 
Economy appointed by the Faculty of Political Science. The next 
award will be in 1915. Such award shall be deemed to be a recognition 
of scientific ability and achievement, as well as an encouragement of 
research. For awards, see page 460. 

Toppan Prize 

A prize known as the Robert Noxon Toppan Prize, the income of an 
endowment of $4000, in memory of Robert Noxon Toppan, LL.B. '61, 
is awarded annually to the member of the School of Law or of Political 
Science who shall pass the best written examination upon a paper 
prepared by the Professor of Constitutional Law. For awards, see 
page 460. 

Prize of the Dante Society 

The Dante Society of Cambridge, Mass., ofEers an annual prize of 
$100 for an essay on a subject drawn from the life or works of Dante. 
This prize is open to competition by students of Columbia University 
and by graduates of not more than three years' standing. For par- 
ticulars, see the Announcement of the Division of Modern Languages and 
Literatures. 

Earle Prize in Classics 

A prize of $50 established in memory of Mortimer Lamson Earle, 
Instructor in Greek in Barnard College from 1889 to 1895 and from 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 443 

1898 to 1900, and Professor of Classical Philology from 1900 to 1905, 
is open for annual competition to all candidates for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. It will be awarded partly on the basis of the 
regular work of the year in Greek and in Latin, partly on the basis 
of a special examination held in May or June. The special examina- 
tion will cover specified portions of Greek and Latin literature, sight- 
reading in Greek and in Latin, and prose composition in Greek and 
in Latin. For 19 12 the special subjects will be .^Eschylus; Prometheus; 
Sophocles; Philotetes; Letters of Cicero, first 50 (pp. i to 57 in the edition 
by Dr. Ernst Reiss, published by the MacMillan Co., 1910). For awards, 
see page 460. 

Prizes of the New Jersey Alumni Association 

Two prizes of $50 each are awarded annually by the New Jersey 
Alumni Association to the New Jersey students who pass the best 
entrance examinations to Columbia College and the Schools of Mines, 
Engineering, and Chemistry, respectively; with the proviso that before 
the award these students shall complete satisfactorily one half-year 
of academic work. For awards, see page 460. 

Loan Funds 

There are three funds available for short-term loans to needy students, 
which may be drawn upon by permission of the President. 

Scholarships and Prizes in Columbia College 

Seventy -two scholarships, of the annual value of $150 each, are 
open for competition in Columbia College. All scholarships are in- 
tended to be academic honors. Award is made, with the exception of 
the scholarships depending upon entrance examinations, by the Com- 
mittee on Scholarships. Unless otherwise indicated, application for 
award for each year of incumbency must be made on or before May 
I, on blanks furnished by the Secretary of the University. Awards 
will be announced not later than July i. 

No student who has incurred serious academic censure, or who 
obtains leave of absence for the year of appointment, will be consid- 
ered for reappointment. Failure to maintain a grade of at least C in 
all courses taken may, and in the case of competitive scholars will, 
vacate the scholarships. Vacancies may be filled at the discretion 
of the Committee. Payment of one or both instalments of the stipend 
may be withheld if the student proves undeserving. 

The stipend of the scholarship is sufficient to pay the tuition fees 
of a student electing not more than 17 points in Columbia College. 
Students permitted by the Dean to take more than 17 points or to 



444 SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

elect professional courses must pay the difference between the amount 
of the scholarship and the charge fixed by the statutes for the courses 
elected. 

Section I — Competitive Scholarships awarded, not later than July 15 
in the order given, by the Committee on Admissions to those quali- 
fied Freshmen who pass in June the best entrance examinations in 
subjects aggregating the fifteen units requisite for admission. The 
examination may be taken at any point where examinations are held 
by the College Entrance Examination Board. No applications are 
required from candidates for first appointment. Reappointments are 
made under the general regulations of the Committee on Scholarships. 

Alumni Competitive Scholarships 4 

Founded by the Trustees in 1890, one awarded annually. 
(For awards, see page 460) 

Hewitt and Harper Scholarships (2 each) 4 

Endowed by the gift of Abram S. Hewitt, LL.D., of the 
Class of 1842, and by the bequest of Joseph W. Harper, 
A.M., of the Class of 1848. One open annually for com- 
petition to graduates of New York City high-schools. 
(For awards, see page 461) 

Brooklyn Scholarships 12 — 20 

Founded by the Trustees in 1895, ii^ recognition of ex- 
President Low's gift of a memorial building for the Univer- 
sity Library. Three are open for competition annually to 
residents of Brooklyn trained either in the public or the 
private schools of that borough. 

(For awards, see page 461) 

Louis K. McClymonds Scholarships 

The Louis K. McClymonds Scholarships (2) of the annual 
value of $650, maintained by Mrs. Annie K. McClymonds in 
memory of her late husband, are open to those candidates for 
the degree of A.B. or B.S. who shall have satisfactorily com- 
pleted the requirements for admission, and who in the judg- 
ment of the Faculty of Columbia College shall be deemed most 
deserving of appointment. Other things being equal, preference 
shall be given to sons of American-born parents who have no 
other means of providing for their tuition and living expenses 
during the academic year. For awards, see page 461. 

Section II — General Scholarships awarded to applicants 
whose record for ability and scholarship obtained either before 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 445 

or after matriculation gives evidence of special fitness^for the 
course of study which they wish to pursue. Candidates in their 
first year of residence at Columbia University must be strongly 
recommended by the college or school from which they have 
come, and have shown marked proficiency or promise in college 
work. Students not in need of financial aid cannot be consid- 
ered as applicants, nor can those who, through physical, mental, 
or moral weakness, give little promise of future usefulness. 

A. Open to members of any class: 

Faculty Scholarships established by the Trustees 6 

Beck Scholarship i 

Established in recognition of the liberality of Charles Bath- 
gate Beck, A.B. 1877, LL.B. 1879. 

Campbell Scholarships (see page 483) 2 

Class of 1848 Scholarships (see page 484; 2 

Scholarships of the Society for Promoting Religion and 

Learning 8 — 19 

Founded and awarded by this Society. 

B. Open only to Freshmen. The requirements for admission 
must be completed before matriculation. For award after en- 
trance, applications should be filed not later than October i, 
1 9 10, or February 16, 19 11. In general,' awards will not be 
made later than December i or March i, respectively. 

Schermerhorn Scholarships 5 

Endowed by John Jones Schermerhorn, A.B. 1825. 

MoSat Scholarships 2 

Endowed by William B. Moffat, A.B. 1838; M.D. 1842. 

Stuart Scholarships (see page 481) 2 

Alumni Association Scholarships 4—13 

Established by the Trustees in recognition of the interest 
that the Alumni Association has always shown in the affairs 

of the College. 

Benefactors Scholarships (see p. 440) Morgan (5), Vanderbilt (5), 
A. A. Low (3), Cutting (2), Clark (2), Sloan (i), Parish (i), 
SchifE (i) 20 — 72 

Prize of the Alumni Association 

A prize of fifty dollars in money or its equivalent "to the most 
faithful and deserving student of the graduating class" was estab- 
lished in 1858 by the Association of the Alumni of Columbia College. 
The graduating class selects the incumbent from three names 
submitted to it by the Faculty; or if, ten days prior to Commence- 



446 SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

ment, the class should notify the President of the University of its 
failure to make a selection, the award may be made by the Faculty. 
For awards, see page 461. 

Chanler Historical Prize 

By the bequest of J. Winthrop Chanler, A.B. '47, the income of 
$1000 is awarded annually, on Commencement Day, to the member 
of the graduating class of Columbia College who, in the judgment 01 
the Faculty, shall be the author of the best original manuscript essay 
on the history of civil government in America, or some other his- 
torical subject, the subject for 191 1 being "The Political Principles 
of JeflEerson and Jackson." For awards, see page 461. 

Curtis Medals 

An endowment fund of $1000 established by the late Samuel Putnam 
Avery, an associate of George William Curtis in the work of Civil Ser- 
vice Reform, provides for the award of two medals of gold and silver to 
students in Columbia College for excellence in public delivery of Eng- 
lish orations. Competitors must be either third- or fourth-year stu- 
dents in regular standing, or in exceptional cases, and with permission 
of the Dean, special students taking corresponding courses amounting 
to not less than 1 2 hours a week. The Department of English publishes 
about November i a list of subjects for the competition. Subjects not 
on the list may be chosen with the consent of the department provided 
that application be made not later than December i . The contestants 
will be selected by the department at a preliminary competition which 
will not be open to the public. The final public competition will be 
held not less than two weeks later. The award will be made by 
judges appointed by the President. For awards, see page 461. 

General Theological Seminary Prizes 

Regulations as to the Seminary prizes adopted by the Protestant 
Episcopal Society for Promoting Religion and Learning in the State 
of New York, at a stated meeting held on April 25, 1900: 

Notice shall be given every year of the conditions of the prizes 
under the old regulations (see Announcement of the College for igoo- 
01, page 72), and applications invited. Wherever the conditions of 
the preceding competition show that one or both of the prizes have 
not been taken for lack of applicants, notice shall at the same time be 
given of the competition for the prize or prizes thus open under the 
new regulations set forth each year in the Announcement of Columbia 
College. 

The Society's Greek Seminary Prize amounts to $30 and the So- 
ciety's English Prize to $20. For awards, see page 461. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 447 

John Dash Van Buren, Jr., Prize in Mathematics 

A prize known as the John Dash Van Buren, Jr., Prize in Mathematics 
was established by Mrs. Louis T. Hoyt in memory of her nephew, 
John Dash Van Buren, Jr., a member of the Class of 1905. The annual 
income of $5000 is awarded to the candidate for an academic degree 
who passes the best examination in analytical geometry, differential 
and integral calculus, and in such additional subjects as the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics may prescribe. For awards, see page 461. 

Charles M. Rolker, Jr., Prize 

A prize to be known as the Charles M. Rolker, Jr., Prize, to be publicly 
awarded on Class Day is provided for by a fund of the same name, the 
gift of Mrs. C. M. Rolker in memoiy of her son, Charles M. Rolker, Jr., 
of the Class of 1907. The income of the fund is to be awarded to the 
member of the graduating class of Columbia College deemed by his class- 
mates the most worthy of special distinction as an tindergraduate student, 
because of scholarship, participation in student activities, pre-eminence in 
athletic sports, or in any combination of these. For awards, see page 461. 

Undergraduate Prizes in Belles-Lettres 

Three prizes, aggregating $150, were offered in 1910-11 for encouraging 
the study of belles-lettres among the students of Columbia College. A 
prize of |6o was offered for the best poem, $50 for the best critical essay on 
a work or works of the imagination, and $40 for the best short story. For 
awards, see page 462. 

Award of Honors, Columbia College, 191 1 

(For awards, see page 460) 

Scholarships and Prizes in the School of Law 

Twenty-one scholarships of the annual value of $150 each are 
available annually for award to candidates for the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws standing in need of pecuniary aid and whose record for ability 
and scholarship gives evidence of special fitness for the work of the 
school. 

The scholarships will be awarded by the Faculty at its meeting in 
June, immediately preceding Commencement. Scholarships not al- 
lotted at the June meeting, or becoming vacant, may be filled by the 
Faculty at its discretion. 

Benefactors Scholarships. — Eight Morgan and eight Vanderbilt 
Scholarships, known as Benefactors Scholarships (see p. 440), may be 
awarded to students who have been in the school for at least one year. 



448 SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

Faculty Scholarships. — Four Faculty Scholarships may be awarded to 
members of any class. 

Beck Prize Scholarship. — The Charles Bathgate Beck Prize Scholar- 
sViip is awarded to the first-year candidates who shall pass the best 
examination in the subjects relating to Real-Estate Law, The 
holder shall, provided he remains a member of the school, receive one 
year's income of the prize fund established by the will of Charles Bath- 
gate Beck in equal semi-annual instalments, during the two years fol- 
lowing the award. If two or more students pass examinations of 
equal merit, the income of the fund may be divided. For awards, see 
page 462. 

Convers Prize 

A prize, known as the E. B. Convers Prize (the annual income of 
the sum of $1000), has been established in the School of Law in 
memory of E. B. Convers, of the Class of 1866. This prize will be 
awarded annually to such member of the graduating class in the Law 
School as may write the best original essay on some legal subject to 
be chosen from a list of ten subjects prepared each year by the Faculty 
of Law or on any other legal subject approved by the Faculty. For 
award, see page 463. 

Ordronaux Prize 

A prize to be known as the Ordronaux Prize in Law shall by vote of the 
Faculty be awarded annually to the candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws of at least one year's standing on the basis of general proficiency 
in legal study. For award, see page 463. 



Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons 

Alumni Association Fellowships 

Provision is made annually by the Alumni Association of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons for three fellowships, tenable for one year 
and of an annual value of $500, open to graduates who have shown 
special aptitude for scientific research in the Departments of Anatomy, 
Physiology, and Pathology. Appointments are made by the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Alumni Association from candidates presented 
by the Professors of Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology. 

Incumbents are expected to devote themselves to scientific research 
in the department which they may elect, either at Columbia Univer- 
sity, where they enjoy free tuition and the privileges of the laboratories, 
or in other institutions either here or abroad, at their own expense, and 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 



449 



at the end ti the year's work to present to the Association a thesis 
containing evidence of independent or original work in their special 
department. For awards, see page 463. 

Proudfit Fellowship in Medicine 

The Maria McLean Proudfit Fellowship, endowed by the late 
Alexander Moncrief Proudfit, A.B. '92, for the encouragement of ad- 
vanced studies in medicine, is open to any son of native-born American 
parents, a graduate in medicine, who shall pursue advanced studies in 
internal medicine under the direction of the Medical Faculty of the 
University, and who shall, while enjoying such fellowship, remain un- 
married, and shall be appointed by the University Council upon the 
recommendation of the FacvJty of Medicine. Appointment shall be 
made every four years, upon terms to be designated by the Faculty. 
The Fellow shall carry on his studies under the direction of the 
Faculty of Medicine. For awards, see page 463. 

Alonzo Clark Scholarship 

By the will of the late Alonzo Clark, M.D., LL.D., for many years 
President of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Professor of 
Pathology and Practical Medicine, it has been placed in the power of 
the Faculty to bestow a scholarship, with an income of about $700 a 
year, for the purpose of promoting the discovery of new facts in medical 
science. For award, see page 463. 

Abram Dubois Fellowship 

The Abram Dubois Fellowship, established in 1910, is open to a grad- 
uate of the School of Medicine who shall have satisfactorily completed a 
term of service of one year or more, the whole or greater part of which 
shall have been devoted to the study of diseases of the eye as interne in 
a hospital in New York, or elsewhere, approved by the Committee on 
Award. The award is made annually, but the holder may be continued 
in the fellowship, if no equally worthy candidate presents himself. The 
incumbent is restricted to clinical and laboratory study of the subject of 
diseases of the eye in foreign or American universities. 

George Blumenthal, Jr., Scholarship 

There shall be a scholarship or scholarships open to qualified candidates 
maintained in the College of Physicians and Surgeons by the income of 
the George Blumenthal, Jr., Scholarship Fund. An annual award or awards 
shall be made to a student or students to cover the cost of tuition or for 
other purposes, in amounts not less than $250 nor more than $500 to any 
one student in any one academic year. 



450 SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

Prizes 

The (following prizes are awarded for the best medical essay sub- 
mitted under the conditions named in the statement of each prize, and, 
in addition, under the following general regulations: 

Each essay must be marked with a device or^motto, and accompanied 
by a sealed envelope similarly marked and containing the name and 
address of the author, and a written statement that the essay contains 
the result of original investigation made by him, that it is not the work 
of more than one author, and that it has not at the same time been sub- 
mitted for any other prize. If in any case no essay is received that is 
deemed suflSciently meritorious, the prize will not be awarded. 

Altunni Association Prize 

The Alumni Association Prize of $500 is awarded biennially (next 
award, 1914) to an alumnus of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
for the best medical essay submitted upon any subject that the writer 
may select. Essays should be sent to the Secretary of the Alumni 
Association of the College of Physicians and Surgeons on or before 
April I of the year of award. For award, see page 463. 

Cartwright Prize of the Alumni Association 

The Cartwright Prize of $500 was endowed by a bequest of $10,000 
left by Benjamin Cartwright, and is offered for competition in alter- 
nate years with the Alumni Association Prize. 

It is awarded on the same terms as the latter, except that it is open 

to universal competition. For award, see page 463. 

Joseph Mather Smith Prize 

The fund for this prize was given by the relatives, friends, and 
pupils of the late Dr. Smith, as a memorial of his services as Professor 
in the College of Physicians and Surgeons from 1826 to 1866, Under 
the provisions of the trust an annual prize of $100 is awarded for the 
best essay on the subject of the year, presented by an alumnus of 
the College. The competing essays should be sent to the Dean of the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons on or before March 10. For award, 
see page 463. 

Stevens Triennial Prize 

The Stevens Triennial Prize, value $200, established by the late 
Alexander Hodgdon Stevens, M.D., formerly President of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons, is open for universal competition. (Next 
award 19 12.) 

The Dean of the Medical Faculty, the President of the Alvunni Asso- 
ciation of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, and the Professor 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 451 

of Physiology are, ex-officio, the administrators of the prize. Essays 
must be in the hands of the first-named on or before January i of the 
year of award. 

Scholarships 

Thirteen scholarships of the annual value of $250, and tenable for 
one year are open to candidates for the degree of Doctor of Medicine. 
The award of these scholarships is made only to students whose record 
for ability and scholarship gives evidence of special fitness and who 
need pecuniary aid to obtain an education. 

Harsen Scholarships — The income of a fund established by the late 
Jacob Harsen, M.D., in 1859, for the purpose of "promoting the study 
of Medical and Surgical Practice, " has, under an order of the Supreme 
Court, been made available for the award of five scholarships to stu- 
dents in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, in lieu of the Harsen 
prizes heretofore awarded. Of these scholarships, which are known as 
the " Harsen Scholarships, " two may be awarded to students taking 
the second year in the medical course; two to students in their third 
year, and one to a student in his fourth year, provided that the aggre- 
gate of the stipends of such scholarships shall not exceed the income 
earned by the fund during the preceding year. 

Faculty Scholarships — These are four in number and may be awarded 
to members of any class. 

Vanderbilt Scholarships — In recognition of the liberal gifts of William 
H. Vanderbilt to the College of Physicians and Surgeons, four scholar- 
ships, to be known as the "William H. Vanderbilt Scholarships," 
have been established. These are open to students of any class. 

Scholarships and Prizes in the Schools of Mines, Engineer- 
ing, and Chemistry 

Thirty -five scholarships of the annual value of $250 each are avail- 
able annually for award to meritorious candidates for professional 
degrees in Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry, who are in good aca- 
demic standing, and in need of pecuniary aid. 

The awards will be made not later than July i by the Committee 
on Scholarships. Scholarships not allotted at this time, or becoming 
vacant, shall be filled by the Committee at its discretion. 

Twenty-seven Benefactors Scholarships (see p. 440) are open to stu- 
dents in the Schools under the Faculty of Applied Science, as follows: 
Morgan (7), Vanderbilt (7), James (10), Jesup (i), Babcock (i), and 
Ottendorfer (i). These scholarships may be awarded to students who 
have been in the University for at least one year. 

In addition to the above, eight Faculty scholarships may be awarded 
to members of any class. 



452 SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

Marcus Daly Scholarship ia Mining Engineering 

The Marcus Daly Scholarship of the annual value of $1000, main- 
tained by Mrs. James W. Gerard in memory of her father, is open to 
that worker or descendant of a worker in the Montana mines who 
passes the best competitive entrance examinations to the course in 
Mining Engineering. The winner of the scholarship shall hold the 
same throughout his course in mining engineering, subject to the same 
conditions of reappointment as those imposed upon the holders of 
competitive scholarships in Columbia College. As soon as the term 
of one holder of the scholarship is about to expire, another competi- 
tive examination is held. For awards, see page 463. 

niig Medals 

A bequest of $2000 left by William C. lUig, E.M. '82, provides for 
the annual award of medals at Commencement to the student or 
students in the graduating class of the Schools of Mines, Engineering, 
and Chemistry, who shall, in the judgment of the Faculty, have 
merited the same by commendable proficiency in their regular studies. 
For awards, see page 463. 

Darling Prize 

The Edward A. Darling Prize in Mechanical Engineering, the income 
of $1000, bequeathed by Edward A. Darling, formerly Superintendent 
of Buildings and Grounds, shall be awarded annually to the most 
faithful and deserving student of the graduating class in Mechanical 
Engineering, the recipient of the prize to be chosen by ballot by mem- 
bers of the graduating class in the course in Mechanical Engineering 
from among three names to be chosen by the Faculty of Applied 
Science. For awards, see page 464. 

Scholarships and Fellowships in the School of Architecture 

Columbia Fellowship 

The Columbia Fellowship in Architecture, the net income of $13,000 
established in recognition of the gifts of F. Augustus Schermerhom, 
E.M. '68, to the School of Architecture, is open each year to 
graduates of the three preceding years, and is awarded in June as the 
result of a competition in design. The winner is required to spend a 
year in the School as a graduate student in Design. The value of this 
Fellowship in 1910 was $535. For awards, see page 464. 

McKim Fellowship 

The McKim Fellowship in Architecture, endowed by gift of Charles 
F. McKim of $20,000, is open to graduates who have received their 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 453 

degrees within six years preceding its bestowal, and is awarded in 
May of each year as the result of a competition in design. The holder 
is required to spend a year in foreign travel and study. Any incxxm- 
bent who has displayed marked proficiency and promise is eligible to 
reappointment for one year, but no more. The value of this Fellow- 
ship is $820. For awards, see page 464. 

Perkins Fellowship 

A travelling Fellowship, the net income from a fund of $5700, from 
the bequest of the late Willard P. Perkins, is awarded every fourth 
year, the last award being in 19 10. The conditions of award and 
the purposes of the Fellowship are the same as for the McKim 
Fellowships. For awards, see page 464. 

Scholarships 

Four scholarships of the value of $200 are awarded in the School of 
Fine Arts, under the same general conditions as those in the Schools of 
Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry (see page 463). For awards, see 
page 464. 

Medal of the Society of Columbia University Architects 

The Society of Columbia University Architects offers an annual medal 
for proficiency in advanced design. For award, see page 464. 



Barnard College 

Honors 

Honors are of two kinds, departmental and general honors. The 
regulations governing their award are the same as those for the corre- 
sponding "Honors in Columbia College" (see page 194). For awards, see 
page 465. 

Scholarships 

There are altogether forty-one scholarships and three special funds for 
the aid of needy and deserving students. 

For a detailed statement of the values of the various scholarships, 
the conditions under which they are awarded, the regulations regarding 
applications, and the like, the Announcement of Barnard College 
should be consulted. This may be obtained without charge upon 
application to the Secretary of Barnard College. 

The following is a summary of the scholarships: 



454 FELLOWS AND SCHOLARS 

Competitive 
(Awarded for excellence in entrance examinations) 

1. Open to all Students: Trustees' Competitive Scholarship (i); 
Jessie Kaufmann Scholarship (i) 

2. Open to Particular Students'.: Brooklyn Scholarships (12). Lucille 
Pulitzer Scholarships, Series of 1908-12 (3) 

Non-competitive 

(Awarded on the nomination of the Committee on Scholarships 
of the Faculty to worthy students who have passed at least one year 
in College.) 

1. Open to all Students: 12 Student Scholarships, the Ella Weed 
Scholarship, the Veltin School Scholarship, the Jennie B. Clarkson 
Scholarship, the Emily James Smith Scholarship, the Anna E. 
Barnard Scholarship, the Brearley School Scholarship, the Eliza 
Taylor Chisholm Memorial Scholarship, the Graham School Scholar- 
ship, the Keller School Scholarship, the Tillitson Scholarship, Kinnicutt 
Scholarship. 

2. Open to Particular Students: the Mrs. Donald McLean Scholar- 
ship, the Emma Hertzog Scholarship, the Mrs. Henry Clarke Coe 
Scholarship. 

3. Special Funds for the Aid of Needy and Deserving Students: the 
Arthur Brooks Fund, income of $5000, the Fiske Scholarship Fund, 
income of $5000, the George W. Smith Scholarship Fund, income of 
$5000. 

Prizes 

Detailed statements about the conditions governing the award of 
prizes will be found in the current edition of the Barnard College 
Announcement, which can be obtained without charge of the Secretary 
of Barnard College. 

FELLOWS AND SCHOLARS 

University Fellows igii-12 

Walter Parks Bliss Bacteriology 

Niels Christian Christensen, Jr Geology 

William Edward Dunn American History 

Frank Nicholas Egerton, Jr Physics 

Marston Lovell Hamlin Organic Chemistry 

Harry Cleveland Harris Semitic Languages 

Samuel Simon Laucks Constitutional Law 



FELLOWS AND SCHOLARS 455 

Darwin Oliver Lyon Psychology 

Matthew Thompson McClure, Jr Philosophy 

Arthur M. Schlesinger American History 

Herbert N. Shenton Sociology 

Robert Metcalf Smith English 

Honorary Fellow 1911-12 
Frank Hatch Streightoff Economics 

Special Fellows igii-12 

Alice Dorothy Brewster English 

A. E. Guenther Physiology 

Edward Kellogg Strong, Jr Psychology 

Tyndall Fellows 

1891-92 William H. Freedman 1903-04 Frank Leo Tufts 

1892-93 Charles R. Mann 1904-07 Frederic Columbus 

1894-95 Charles R. Mann Blake 

1895-97 Walter Wheeler Cook 1907-08 George B. Pegram 

1897-98 No incumbent 1908-09 Harold Worthington 

1898-1901 Robert Bowie Owens Webb 

1901-03 Bergen Davis 1909-11 Henry Howard Marvin 
1911-12 Andrew Warren Jackson 

Barnard Fellows 

1894-96 William Lispenard Robb 1905-07 Clarence Whitney 
1896-97 No incumbent Kanolt 

1897-1900 Heinrich Ries 1907-08 Harold Worthington 

1900-03 John Alexander Mathews Webb 

1903-05 William Campbell 1908-11 Clement S. Brainin 

1911-12 George Addison Bole 

Ernest Kempton Adams Research Fellows 

1905-07 Ernest Fox Nichols 1909-11 Clark Wells Chamberlain 
1907-09 Bergen Davis 1911-12 Robert W. Wood 

Class of 'to Fellow 
1896 — Lewis Buffet Garll 



456 FELLOWS AND SCHOLARS 

George William Curtis Fellows 

1901-03 James Wilford Garnbr 1907-08 Edward McChesney Sait 

1902-04 Charles Austin Beard 1908-og Blaine Free Moore 

1904-06 Charles Grove Haines 1910-11 Sydney D. Moore Hudson 

1906-07 No inciimbent 1911-12 Samuel Mack Eastman 

Drisler Fellows 

1894-96 John Kasson Lathrop 1902-03 Harwood Hoadley 
1896-97 George N. Olcott 1903-04 Walter Whipple Ar- 

1897-98 William T. F. Tamelyn nold 

1898-99 Corliss Fitz Randolph 1904-05 No incumbent 
1899-1900 Edward Charles 1905-06 Macon Anderson Leiper 

Harwood 1906-08 Charles Jones Ogden 

1900-01 Bert Hodge Hill 1908-10 Hubert McNeill Poteat 

1901-02 No incumbent 1910-11 Irving Comes Demarest 

1911-12 Rhys Carpenter 

Garth Fellows 

1905-06 Meyer Jacobstein 1909-10 Edward Henry Le- 

1906-07 James Henry Gilbert winski 

1907-08 Louis Dwight Har- 1910-11 Benjamin McAlester 

well Weld Anderson 

1908-09 Solomon Vinbberg Frank Hatch Streight- 

OFF 

1911-12 Robert Murray Haig 

Gottsherger Fellows 

1905-06 George Christian Otto 1909-10 Ralph Watson Dox 

Haas 1910-11 William Stuart Messer 

1907-08 Meyer Jacobstein 1911-12 Fremont Amasa Higgins 

Mosentkal Fellows 

1899-1901 Mary Angela Diller 1906-07 William Jacob Kraft 
1902-04 Frank Edwin Ward 1908-09 Franz Bellinger 

1904-05 Benjamin Lambord 1910-n Edward Betts Manning 

Prottdfii Fellows in Letters 

1900-03 John Erskine 1907-10 Ernest Hunter Wright 

1903-05 Stanley Kidder Wilson 1910-11 Geddes Smith 
1905-06 No incumbent 1911-12 Nelson Burroughs Gil- 

1906-07 Charles Francis Law- dersleeve 

SON 



FELLOWS AND SCHOLARS 457 

Schiff Fellows 

1898-1900 William Henry Fry 1906-07 Samuel G. Nissenson 

1900-01 Walter Percy Bordwell 1907-08 Carl F. L. Huth 

1901-02 Ulrich BoNNELL Phillips 1908-09 Leonard Stott 

1902-03 George Charles Selden Blakey 

1903-04 Preserved Smith 1909-10 Charles Elmer 

1904-05 NoRRis Arthur Brisco Gehlke 

1905-06 Charles Ramsdell 1910-11 Benjamin Burks Ken- 

LlNGLEY DRICK 

1911-12 Henry Elmer Hoagland 

Carl Schurz Fellows 

1902-03 John Louis Kind 1908-09 Percy Gaines Craig 

1904-05 Allen Wilson Porterfield 1909-10 Henry John Skipp 
1906-07 Henry Hermann Louis 1910-11 Will Carson Ryan, Jr. 

SCHULZE 

William Mitchell Fellows 

1908-10 Irving Comes Demarest 1910-11 Maurice Picard 

1911-12 Lester Sanders Hill 

Goldschmidt Fellows 

1909-10 Edward Calvin Kendall 1910-11 Almer McDuffie Mc- 
Afee 
1911-12 Harold Edward Woodward 

Gilder Fellow 

1911-12 William Shepherdson 

University Scholars, 1911-12 

James S. L. Brunton Geology 

Chester Charles Clark Geology 

Earl Willis Crecraft Constitutional Law 

Daniel Moore Fisk Zoology 

Robert Stanley Forsythe English 

Dixon Ryan Fox American History 

Enoch Burton Gowin Sociology 

Alexander Green Germanic Languages 

Ned Gray Griffin Organic Chemistry 

Max Kahn Organic Chemistry 



458 FELLOWS AND SCHOLARS 

Lyman Morse Kells Mathematics 

Garry Cleveland Myers Psychology 

Howard Webster Nudd Social Economy 

Carl William Parker Economics 

Claude Albert Pifer English 

Arthur Henry Richardson Sociology 

Elmer B. Russell American History 

YiNCHANG T. Wang Chemistry 

George Frisbie Whicher English 

Robert Lemuel Wiggins, Jr English 

President's University Scholars, igii-12 

Percy Addison Chapman Romance Languages 

Ralph Kendall Forsyth Economics 

Hubert Baker Goodrich Zoology 

Robert Melyne Isham Chemistry 

Angelo Lipari Romance Languages 

James Ross McCain American History 

Chilton Latham Powell English 

BiRL Earl Shultz Constitutional Law 

Curtis University Scholars, IQII-12 

Lucy Ada Case History 

Agnes Williams Clancy English 

Mildred Albro Hoge Zoology 

Sarah Morris Greek 

Richard Butler Scholars 

1904-07 Otho Lee Monroe 1909-10 Howard Dwight Smith 

1907-09 John Sherman Robinson 1910-11 George Denton Beal 

1911-12 George Given Hollingshead 

John D. Jones Scholars 

1898-99 Francis Bertody Sumner 1905-06 John Howard Mc- 

1899-1900 John Cutler Torrey Gregor 

1900-01 Frederick Clark Pual- 1906-07 David Day Whitney 

MiER 1907-08 Charles V. Morrill 

1901-02 William E. Kellicott 1908-09 David Day Whitney 

1902-03 Charles Zeleny 1909-11 Aaron Franklin 

1903-04 Louis I. Dublin Shull, Jr. 

1904-05 Charles Rupert Stockard 1911-12 Alfred Henry Sturte- 

vant 



FELLOWS AND SCHOLARS 459 

Annual Scholars 

Arthur Barto Adams Economics 

Walter Gerard Martin Buckisch English 

Donald Lemen Clark English 

Walter James Graham English 

George Ernest Hesse English 

Howard C. Kidd Economics 

Algernon Ashburner Osborne Economics 

Walter C. Phillips English 

Louis Wann English 

Special Altimni Association Scholarships 

Columbia College 

CoBURN Gilman Colorado 

Leo M. Baxter New Jersey 

Milton M. Alison Pittsburgh 

J. A. Murphy Western New York 

Morris Wolf Philadelphia 

Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry 

Selin E. Woodworth California 

Harold E. Allen Dist. of Columbia 

Hugo H. Moss Mexico 

A. P. Meyer St. Louis 

Frank H. Simonds Yonkers 

Law 

Walter David Kansas City 

H. T. Davenport Washington 

Architecture 

Urban F. Peacock Wisconsin 

Political Science 

William N. Ross Northern New York 

C. B. Coleman Indiana 

Barnard Medal 

Awards 
1895 Lord Rayleigh and Professor William Ramsay 
1900 Professor Wilhelm Conrad von Rontgen 
1905 Professor Henri Becquerel 
19 10 Professor Ernest Rutherford 

Bunner Medal 
No award in igii 

Bennett Prize 
No award in igii 



460 SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 

Loubat Prizes 

Award of 1803: First Prize, "History of the United States of America 
during the Administrations of Jefferson and Madison, " by Henry 
Adams. 

Second Prize, " Report of Investigations among the Indians of 
the Southwestern States," by A. F. Bandelier. 

Award of i8g8: First Prize, "Stone Implements of the Potomac- 
Chesapeake Tidewater Province, " by William Henry Holmes. 
Second Prize, "The Social Organization and the Secret Societies 
of the Kwakiutl Indians, " by Franz Boaz, Ph.D. 

No award in 1903 

Award of 1908: First Prize, "The American Colonies in the Seventeenth 
Century," by Herbert Levi Osgood, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Second Prize, "The History of the Society of Jesus in North 
America," by Rev. Thomas Aloysius Hughes, S. J. 

Grant Squires Prize 

Award of iqio 

Howard Washington Odum 

Toppan Prize 

Award of igii 

Louis Mayers, A.B. 

BiRL Earl Shultz, A.B. 

Earle Prize in Classics 

Award of 1911 
Clarence Augustus Manning 

New Jersey Alumni Association 

Awards of 1911 

Columbia College — Frederick Charles Nyland 

Schools of Mines, Engineering, and Chemistry — Oscar Byron 

Columbia College 

Alumni Competitive Scholarships 

For 1911-12 

Class of 1913 — S. Hartig Class of 1914 — A. Weinstein 

Class of 19 15 — D. C. Crampton 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND PRIZES 461 

Hewitt and Harper Scholarships 
For igii-i2 

Harper, Class of 1912 — E. Colby Harper, Class of 1914 — J. Lintz 

Hewitt, Class of 1913 — H. H. Nordlinger 

Brooklyn Scholarships 

For igii-i2 
Class of 1912 — A. B. Brenner Class of 1914 — J. Lipschultz 

W. E. Shrewsbury S. Camen 

Class of 1913 — Nathan Shanks B. Grossbaum 

M. Gottesman Class of 1915 — D. Rothenberg 

C. Perlowitz 

Louis K. McClymonds Scholarships 

For IQI1-12 
Class of 1913 — R. S. Harris Class of 1915 — W. D. Clark 

Prize of the Alumni Association 

Names submitted in igii 

Arnold Lipari Ernest Spencer Roche 

Ralph Randles Stewart (selected) 

Chanler Historical Prize 

Award, of igii 
Dixon Ryan Fox 

Curtis Medals 

Award of igii 
Gold Medal — George W. A. Scott 
Silver Medal —